Errors in an Article on the UC Davis Sociology Department Lead to Questions about the Davis Enterprise

On July 20, 2007 the Davis Enterprise ran an article, “Sociology courses canceled – UC Davis instructor complains after his workload is decreased” by Davis Enterprise Intern Talia Kennedy, a recent graduate from UC Davis.

The crux of the article is that the Sociology Department due to budgetary problems had to cancel a number of courses for the upcoming year.

Responding to fiscal shortcomings, the UC Davis department of sociology has canceled several courses for the 2007-08 academic year. Though department officials spared many classes led by tenured faculty, they slashed 16 undergraduate courses, many of which were taught by lecturers and acting instructors — a move that has disheartened at least one lecturer.

The article cites a sociology lecturer, David Gharagozlou who believes that his race and ethnicity are the reason that his courses were canceled.

“I (am) disappointed,” said David Gharagozlou, who was hired as a sociology lecturer two years ago. Three of the courses he taught during the 2006-07 school year were canceled, and the department chairwoman, Vicki Smith, assigned him to teach only one course in the fall.

Smith, who just completed her first year as leader of the department, cited budget cuts as the reason behind the changes both in a letter to Gharagozlou and in an interview with The Enterprise. However, Gharagozlou said he believes her decisions were based on personal attitudes about his background: Gharagozlou is a native of Iran, where he once taught at the University of Tehran. His research and instruction largely focuses on political and religious fundamentalism.

“My class evaluations were good and if the personal antipathy (is) the reason for that, maybe she doesn’t like my origin,” Gharagozlou said in an e-mail from Sweden. “I am sorry for her because this is unprofessional and if she favor(s) others then it is a sign of favoritism, which is (a) very weak attitude and it doesn’t belong to (the) quality of leadership.”

The article generated a strong reaction from many others in the sociology department. In a letter to the editor, Ara Francis, a graduate student, and 23 other signators, writes:

As a doctoral candidate in the sociology department, I was alarmed to read Talia Kennedy’s article about recent course cancellations. In this piece, Ms. Kennedy draws from an interview with lecturer David Gharagozlou who suggested that the department chair, Professor Vicki Smith, canceled his classes because of favoritism, the religious and political content of his courses and his Iranian heritage. These were very serious statements, none of which were corroborated, and it is unsettling that this piece was published without further investigation.

The letter goes on to criticize the writer, Talia Kennedy for failing to interview other teachers (Ms. Kennedy only interviewed Gharagozlou)–10 lecturers and instructors in the Sociology Department–about their reactions to course cancellations. Furthermore, Ms. Kennedy did not point out that the budget problems are universitywide and not specific to the Sociology department.

Finally and this is perhaps the key, lecturers are the last hired and first “fired” when budget shortfalls arise. Lecturers serve as temporary and adjunct professors and they do not receive the priority that full-time university tenured or tenure-track professors receive. So it is natural that a lecturer would have their classes cut first rather than a university professor.

Says Ara Francis, et al in the letter to the editor:

It is my impression that temporary instructors like Dr. Gharagozlou and myself constitute a “flexible labor force.” This means that we are given jobs when money is available, and we are the first to lose our jobs when budgets are cut. Indeed, this is an unhappy state of affairs. However, the current status of university lecturers is a structural problem that has little to do with the hiring decisions of individual department chairs.

This is however, the beginning and not the end of the story. Though the letter to the editor was signed by Ara Francis and 23 others, when it appeared in the Davis Enterprise only Ara Francis was noted as the sole signer of the letter.

According to Ms. Francis,

When Talia Kennedy’s article was published on July 20th, it generated a lot of discussion on our electronic listserv, and someone suggested that we put together a letter articulating our concerns. I drafted the letter and received endorsements from three lecturers and twenty-one graduate students (most of whom also work for the sociology department as instructors or teaching assistants).

Furthermore, the title of the published letter reads, “More Investigation Warranted.” Ms. Francis believes that would lead readers to assume that the letter called for further investigation into the allegations made by Dr. Gharagozlou’s when in fact, that is “quite contrary to the spirit of the letter.”

The biggest complaint was that the letter only contained Ms. Francis’ name.

The most problematic aspect of the published letter was that [Davis Enterprise Editor and Assistant Publisher] Debbie Davis neither included nor referred to the twenty-four endorsements, despite the fact that the original letter – signatures included – met the 350-word requirement. Those signatures were central to the letter because they presented a direct challenge to Dr. Gharagozlou’s claims. Indeed, most of the endorsers were temporary instructors also affected by recent course cancellations.

Ms. Francis would speak to Debbie Davis by telephone regarding the decision to exclude the other signatures. According to Davis Enterprise Editor and Assistant Publisher Debbie Davis who graciously responded to my inquiries via email,

“It is our policy to make a follow-up phone call to confirm letters to the editor that we receive via e-mail. As I told Ara Francis, the letter writer to whom you refer, since we could not confirm the additional signers of the letter, I did not list them.”

Ara Francis disputes this claim by Ms. Davis:

“I easily could have provided verification because all but one of the signatories had requested via email that their names be added to the letter.”

Debbie Davis acknowledged it would have been better to have at least noted that there were additional signers.

“In retrospect, I wish I had added the line “and 24 other signers” beneath her name when her letter was published. At her request, we did just that in a separate squib published on Aug. 1.”

The handling of the matter drew further scrutiny and criticism from Ara Francis. While Davis was willing to publish a small blurb in the paper noting that the letter had received twenty-four signatures rather than one signature, she was inclined to let the matter drop and not devote any further space to this incident.

According to Francis,

She went on to tell me that she preferred to not publish anything further regarding this story – including a third letter to the editor that she had received from another graduate student – because Talia Kennedy is a summer intern who feels “devastated” about the fallout from her story. She stated that she didn’t want to push this young woman “over the edge.”

In fact, the situation leads to questions about how the newspaper screens and eventually “hires”and supervises interns. The interns are selected and supervised by Linda DuBois, an associate editor who is on vacation and unavailable for comment. Interns receive no pay, only experience.

According to Debbie Davis:

“[I] feel it is a newspaper’s responsibility to help train journalists of the future. This is a profession where much can be learned by doing. Each story gives a young reporter more experience, more confidence and more tools for the next story. We learn best by doing.”

Ms. Davis went on to describe the process by which they receive and accept applications from prospective interns during the spring. Associate Editor Linda DuBois then interviews the candidates “whom she believes will suit our needs.” One key consideration in that process is whether the intern has the ability to live in the area, since they are not paid for their work.

“Since we do not pay wages, that is of some concern to us. For example, we’d be unlikely to hire an intern from New York state who would have to incur a large debt to complete the summer internship”

Somewhere along the way however, this process must have broken down, as a reasonable review of Talia Kennedy and her past record would have revealed some startling revelations.

An incident occurred in mid-May of this year in which thirty-one members of the California Aggie staff, where Talia Kennedy served as campus editor last year, called for the resignation of Ms. Kennedy and Peter Hamilton, the editor in chief of the student run news paper.

In a pointed letter signed by 31 staff members, they complained that they had “no confidence” in the Aggie’s leadership namely Peter Hamilton and Talia Kennedy, the ambitions of Talia Kennedy to ascend to the position of editor in chief for the following school year, and a huge amount of unnecessary expenses incurred while attending an awards banquet.

Problems had been brewing all year long. As early as December of 2006, I had spoken with a number of individuals at the California Aggie who complained about the methods of Ms. Kennedy and her relationship with the editor, Peter Hamilton. This was in response to a number of stories we did last fall complaining not only of poor coverage in the Aggie, but the lack of responsiveness of the editors to these complaints.

The Davis Wiki reported on May 24, 2007:

“The Media Board put both Peter Hamilton and Talia Kennedy on administrative leave for the remainder of their terms. In response, Hamilton locked the Aggie staff out of the website (he was drawing pay for both Online Editor and Editor in Chief). Additionally, there are reports that Hamilton changed the lock on his office, preventing access from the rest of the Aggie staff.”

Was the Davis Enterprise aware of these problems just two months prior to the article on the Sociology Department? According to Debbie Davis, they were not.

“I was not aware of any internal problems at the California Aggie involving Talia Kennedy. I don’t believe Linda was either.”

However, a quick search on Google of “Talia Kennedy” and “California Aggie” would have revealed this incident and might have called into question the hiring of this intern.

According to Ara Francis, problems with the story on the sociology department may lead to changes with how the paper mentors their student interns.

“[Debbie Davis] said that this situation has caused the paper to reconsider how they mentor their interns, and she agreed that the story had needed further work before going to print.”

However,

At the same time, she said that this issue wasn’t important enough to pursue publicly. When I said it sounded like a “big mess,” she replied that it was not, and that in fact, this situation it was “not even a bump in the road.”

In the meantime, Talia Kennedy continues to intern at the Davis Enterprise until later this month when she will attended the UC Berkeley graduate school in their Journalism program.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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209 thoughts on “Errors in an Article on the UC Davis Sociology Department Lead to Questions about the Davis Enterprise”

  1. Anonymous

    Errors in an Article on the UC Davis Sociology Department Lead to Questions about the Davis Enterprise

    DPD was today a slow news day. There have always been questions about the Davis Enterprise. Journalistic integrity does not exist in a lot of places anymore. The Job of the Enterprise is to sell newspapers, and with this story they will sell a lot more today, making Debbie Davis look good with her management. To effect change we need to stop reading, writing, talking about, and buying the Davis Enterprise. When circulation falls to low levels, change will occur naturally. Hopefully it will change for the better.

  2. Anonymous

    Errors in an Article on the UC Davis Sociology Department Lead to Questions about the Davis Enterprise

    DPD was today a slow news day. There have always been questions about the Davis Enterprise. Journalistic integrity does not exist in a lot of places anymore. The Job of the Enterprise is to sell newspapers, and with this story they will sell a lot more today, making Debbie Davis look good with her management. To effect change we need to stop reading, writing, talking about, and buying the Davis Enterprise. When circulation falls to low levels, change will occur naturally. Hopefully it will change for the better.

  3. Anonymous

    Errors in an Article on the UC Davis Sociology Department Lead to Questions about the Davis Enterprise

    DPD was today a slow news day. There have always been questions about the Davis Enterprise. Journalistic integrity does not exist in a lot of places anymore. The Job of the Enterprise is to sell newspapers, and with this story they will sell a lot more today, making Debbie Davis look good with her management. To effect change we need to stop reading, writing, talking about, and buying the Davis Enterprise. When circulation falls to low levels, change will occur naturally. Hopefully it will change for the better.

  4. Anonymous

    Errors in an Article on the UC Davis Sociology Department Lead to Questions about the Davis Enterprise

    DPD was today a slow news day. There have always been questions about the Davis Enterprise. Journalistic integrity does not exist in a lot of places anymore. The Job of the Enterprise is to sell newspapers, and with this story they will sell a lot more today, making Debbie Davis look good with her management. To effect change we need to stop reading, writing, talking about, and buying the Davis Enterprise. When circulation falls to low levels, change will occur naturally. Hopefully it will change for the better.

  5. sah

    I have not read the story. However, if the writer wrote a story that falsely implied someone was racially bias then she deserves to be “pushed over the edge”. Ms. Davis should consider how Ms. Smith feels about the false accusations?

    Also, this episode has very little to do with intern mentoring – it is really about editorial control. Where was the editorial review? Perhaps stories written by interns should be reviewed before they are published, that seems fundamental.
    Stories that falsely accuse others of bias should be considered important stories requiring extra attention. They are more than “bumps in the road”.

  6. sah

    I have not read the story. However, if the writer wrote a story that falsely implied someone was racially bias then she deserves to be “pushed over the edge”. Ms. Davis should consider how Ms. Smith feels about the false accusations?

    Also, this episode has very little to do with intern mentoring – it is really about editorial control. Where was the editorial review? Perhaps stories written by interns should be reviewed before they are published, that seems fundamental.
    Stories that falsely accuse others of bias should be considered important stories requiring extra attention. They are more than “bumps in the road”.

  7. sah

    I have not read the story. However, if the writer wrote a story that falsely implied someone was racially bias then she deserves to be “pushed over the edge”. Ms. Davis should consider how Ms. Smith feels about the false accusations?

    Also, this episode has very little to do with intern mentoring – it is really about editorial control. Where was the editorial review? Perhaps stories written by interns should be reviewed before they are published, that seems fundamental.
    Stories that falsely accuse others of bias should be considered important stories requiring extra attention. They are more than “bumps in the road”.

  8. sah

    I have not read the story. However, if the writer wrote a story that falsely implied someone was racially bias then she deserves to be “pushed over the edge”. Ms. Davis should consider how Ms. Smith feels about the false accusations?

    Also, this episode has very little to do with intern mentoring – it is really about editorial control. Where was the editorial review? Perhaps stories written by interns should be reviewed before they are published, that seems fundamental.
    Stories that falsely accuse others of bias should be considered important stories requiring extra attention. They are more than “bumps in the road”.

  9. davisite

    DPD has done an excellent job of “connecting the dots” between the Enterprise’s editor’s handling of this minor news piece ,the letter to the editor and the reporter interne with her connection to the Aggie and its recent problems with competence and bias. The interview-arguments of the fired lecturer are open to serious question by all discerning Enterprise readers(are there any left?). The Enterprise story narrative panders to the die-hard, “I told you so”, ,xenophobic Enterprise readership(another whinner with an unpronouncable name,crying discrimination) .. yet another sad day for our home-town newspaper.

  10. davisite

    DPD has done an excellent job of “connecting the dots” between the Enterprise’s editor’s handling of this minor news piece ,the letter to the editor and the reporter interne with her connection to the Aggie and its recent problems with competence and bias. The interview-arguments of the fired lecturer are open to serious question by all discerning Enterprise readers(are there any left?). The Enterprise story narrative panders to the die-hard, “I told you so”, ,xenophobic Enterprise readership(another whinner with an unpronouncable name,crying discrimination) .. yet another sad day for our home-town newspaper.

  11. davisite

    DPD has done an excellent job of “connecting the dots” between the Enterprise’s editor’s handling of this minor news piece ,the letter to the editor and the reporter interne with her connection to the Aggie and its recent problems with competence and bias. The interview-arguments of the fired lecturer are open to serious question by all discerning Enterprise readers(are there any left?). The Enterprise story narrative panders to the die-hard, “I told you so”, ,xenophobic Enterprise readership(another whinner with an unpronouncable name,crying discrimination) .. yet another sad day for our home-town newspaper.

  12. davisite

    DPD has done an excellent job of “connecting the dots” between the Enterprise’s editor’s handling of this minor news piece ,the letter to the editor and the reporter interne with her connection to the Aggie and its recent problems with competence and bias. The interview-arguments of the fired lecturer are open to serious question by all discerning Enterprise readers(are there any left?). The Enterprise story narrative panders to the die-hard, “I told you so”, ,xenophobic Enterprise readership(another whinner with an unpronouncable name,crying discrimination) .. yet another sad day for our home-town newspaper.

  13. Doug Paul Davis

    “DPD was today a slow news day. “

    I’m actually offended by this comment. I spent a lot of time working on this story and putting it together. I did so because I thought there were several aspects of this story that were important for the community to know. It is one thing to disagree with me on my opinion on something–I expect that, that is the nature of a blog and the give and take is healthy.

    How is this story going to help the Enterprise sell papers?

  14. Doug Paul Davis

    “DPD was today a slow news day. “

    I’m actually offended by this comment. I spent a lot of time working on this story and putting it together. I did so because I thought there were several aspects of this story that were important for the community to know. It is one thing to disagree with me on my opinion on something–I expect that, that is the nature of a blog and the give and take is healthy.

    How is this story going to help the Enterprise sell papers?

  15. Doug Paul Davis

    “DPD was today a slow news day. “

    I’m actually offended by this comment. I spent a lot of time working on this story and putting it together. I did so because I thought there were several aspects of this story that were important for the community to know. It is one thing to disagree with me on my opinion on something–I expect that, that is the nature of a blog and the give and take is healthy.

    How is this story going to help the Enterprise sell papers?

  16. Doug Paul Davis

    “DPD was today a slow news day. “

    I’m actually offended by this comment. I spent a lot of time working on this story and putting it together. I did so because I thought there were several aspects of this story that were important for the community to know. It is one thing to disagree with me on my opinion on something–I expect that, that is the nature of a blog and the give and take is healthy.

    How is this story going to help the Enterprise sell papers?

  17. Anonymous

    Doug Paul Davis said…
    “DPD was today a slow news day. “

    I’m actually offended by this comment. I spent a lot of time working on this story and putting it together.

    Did you work hard on this story? Yes. Was it a well written story? Yes. Is everyone who reads this blog going to blindly accept the opinions of your story without at least looking at it for themselves? I hope not. Will the Davis Enterprise sell more papers today? Probably yes. Will Debbie Davis look better or worse to the owner/publisher of the Enterprise today? Better, she made more money for the company toady.

    A sad day in a long line of sad days.

  18. Anonymous

    Doug Paul Davis said…
    “DPD was today a slow news day. “

    I’m actually offended by this comment. I spent a lot of time working on this story and putting it together.

    Did you work hard on this story? Yes. Was it a well written story? Yes. Is everyone who reads this blog going to blindly accept the opinions of your story without at least looking at it for themselves? I hope not. Will the Davis Enterprise sell more papers today? Probably yes. Will Debbie Davis look better or worse to the owner/publisher of the Enterprise today? Better, she made more money for the company toady.

    A sad day in a long line of sad days.

  19. Anonymous

    Doug Paul Davis said…
    “DPD was today a slow news day. “

    I’m actually offended by this comment. I spent a lot of time working on this story and putting it together.

    Did you work hard on this story? Yes. Was it a well written story? Yes. Is everyone who reads this blog going to blindly accept the opinions of your story without at least looking at it for themselves? I hope not. Will the Davis Enterprise sell more papers today? Probably yes. Will Debbie Davis look better or worse to the owner/publisher of the Enterprise today? Better, she made more money for the company toady.

    A sad day in a long line of sad days.

  20. Anonymous

    Doug Paul Davis said…
    “DPD was today a slow news day. “

    I’m actually offended by this comment. I spent a lot of time working on this story and putting it together.

    Did you work hard on this story? Yes. Was it a well written story? Yes. Is everyone who reads this blog going to blindly accept the opinions of your story without at least looking at it for themselves? I hope not. Will the Davis Enterprise sell more papers today? Probably yes. Will Debbie Davis look better or worse to the owner/publisher of the Enterprise today? Better, she made more money for the company toady.

    A sad day in a long line of sad days.

  21. Anonymous

    It seems to me that the issue is what the Enterprise did on a slow news day.

    To fill their news hole, they callously invented a controversy based on a single e-mail to them so that they could print sensational, unsubstantiated allegations.

    When challenged, they circled the wagons and suppressed responses. Apparently their own reputation was far more important to them than those of their victims.

    The Enterprise’s trampling on innocent reputations may seem trivial to some, but thanks to DPD for taking it seriously.

  22. Anonymous

    It seems to me that the issue is what the Enterprise did on a slow news day.

    To fill their news hole, they callously invented a controversy based on a single e-mail to them so that they could print sensational, unsubstantiated allegations.

    When challenged, they circled the wagons and suppressed responses. Apparently their own reputation was far more important to them than those of their victims.

    The Enterprise’s trampling on innocent reputations may seem trivial to some, but thanks to DPD for taking it seriously.

  23. Anonymous

    It seems to me that the issue is what the Enterprise did on a slow news day.

    To fill their news hole, they callously invented a controversy based on a single e-mail to them so that they could print sensational, unsubstantiated allegations.

    When challenged, they circled the wagons and suppressed responses. Apparently their own reputation was far more important to them than those of their victims.

    The Enterprise’s trampling on innocent reputations may seem trivial to some, but thanks to DPD for taking it seriously.

  24. Anonymous

    It seems to me that the issue is what the Enterprise did on a slow news day.

    To fill their news hole, they callously invented a controversy based on a single e-mail to them so that they could print sensational, unsubstantiated allegations.

    When challenged, they circled the wagons and suppressed responses. Apparently their own reputation was far more important to them than those of their victims.

    The Enterprise’s trampling on innocent reputations may seem trivial to some, but thanks to DPD for taking it seriously.

  25. Rich Rifkin

    David,

    I’m confused by the headline to your story, “Errors in an Article on the UC Davis Sociology Department Lead to Questions about the Davis Enterprise.”

    While it is now clear that the original story by Talia Kennedy was terribly incomplete, and the allegations by Mr. Gharagozlou are probably unfounded, what errors were there in her story?

    “The article cites a sociology lecturer, David Gharagozlou who believes that his race and ethnicity are the reason that his courses were canceled.”

    This is untrue. Gharagozlou never mentions race. He does mention his Iranian heritage.

    But he is quoted in the piece as saying, “I feel bad because I do not know exactly which real reasons (are) behind this decision.”

    “The letter goes on to criticize the writer, Talia Kennedy for failing to interview other teachers (Ms. Kennedy only interviewed Gharagozlou)–10 lecturers and instructors in the Sociology Department–about their reactions to course cancellations.”

    I don’t think Ms. Francis is wrong in her criticism of Ms. Kennedy. Gharazoglou was the only instructor interviewed, other than Smith. However, it should be pointed out that Kennedy’s article gave a full accounting of Smith’s reasons for cutting those classes. It was not the case that she simply quoted Gharazoglou and not the department chair: “Gharagozlou is not the only instructor to be affected, Smith said. Five lecturers will either not teach any classes next year, will teach fewer courses than originally planned or will teach different courses than they have in the past. Additionally, six acting instructors — graduate students who are sometimes offered part-time teaching positions — will not teach at all during the 2007-08 academic year, she said.”

    “An incident occurred in mid-May of this year in which thirty-one members of the California Aggie staff, where Talia Kennedy served as campus editor last year, called for the resignation of Ms. Kennedy and Peter Hamilton, the editor in chief of the student run news paper.”

    Are you suggesting that because of the troubles last year at The Aggie, no one should hire Talia Kennedy for a job in journalism? Should she be barred from the profession?

    Or are you just being snide because you knew about these problems and Miss DuBois did not when she chose Kennedy as an unpaid intern?

    I would hope that you have the decency to allow a girl to make a mistake in college (assuming she was in the wrong with the situation at The Aggie) and not have that held against her after she graduates and simply wants to gain some experience in the real world. If you do have such a harsh attitude, I feel sorry for you.

    “In a pointed letter signed by 31 staff members, they complained that they had “no confidence” in the Aggie’s leadership namely Peter Hamilton and Talia Kennedy, the ambitions of Talia Kennedy to ascend to the position of editor in chief for the following school year, and a huge amount of unnecessary expenses incurred while attending an awards banquet.”

    David, for god’s sake, the young lady was/is an unpaid intern just out of college. Don’t make a mountain out of a molehill.

    “Problems had been brewing all year long. As early as December of 2006, I had spoken with a number of individuals at the California Aggie who complained about the methods of Ms. Kennedy and her relationship with the editor, Peter Hamilton. This was in response to a number of stories we did last fall complaining not only of poor coverage in the Aggie, but the lack of responsiveness of the editors to these complaints.”

    It’s starting to sound like you have a personal vendetta against Miss Kennedy.

    “Was the Davis Enterprise aware of these problems just two months prior to the article on the Sociology Department? According to Debbie Davis, they were not.”

    She was picked to be an unpaid intern. She’s not the new editor-in-chief, Mr. Torquemada.

    When I said it sounded like a “big mess,” she replied that it was not, and that in fact, this situation it was “not even a bump in the road.”

    I really think you are making far too much out of this situation. It’s just not that big of a deal. I agree that it was a mistake to not include the fact that there were 24 signatories to Ms. Francis’s letter to the editor. But otherwise, I’m offended by your being so offended by an intern doing a less than perfect piece of journalism.

  26. Rich Rifkin

    David,

    I’m confused by the headline to your story, “Errors in an Article on the UC Davis Sociology Department Lead to Questions about the Davis Enterprise.”

    While it is now clear that the original story by Talia Kennedy was terribly incomplete, and the allegations by Mr. Gharagozlou are probably unfounded, what errors were there in her story?

    “The article cites a sociology lecturer, David Gharagozlou who believes that his race and ethnicity are the reason that his courses were canceled.”

    This is untrue. Gharagozlou never mentions race. He does mention his Iranian heritage.

    But he is quoted in the piece as saying, “I feel bad because I do not know exactly which real reasons (are) behind this decision.”

    “The letter goes on to criticize the writer, Talia Kennedy for failing to interview other teachers (Ms. Kennedy only interviewed Gharagozlou)–10 lecturers and instructors in the Sociology Department–about their reactions to course cancellations.”

    I don’t think Ms. Francis is wrong in her criticism of Ms. Kennedy. Gharazoglou was the only instructor interviewed, other than Smith. However, it should be pointed out that Kennedy’s article gave a full accounting of Smith’s reasons for cutting those classes. It was not the case that she simply quoted Gharazoglou and not the department chair: “Gharagozlou is not the only instructor to be affected, Smith said. Five lecturers will either not teach any classes next year, will teach fewer courses than originally planned or will teach different courses than they have in the past. Additionally, six acting instructors — graduate students who are sometimes offered part-time teaching positions — will not teach at all during the 2007-08 academic year, she said.”

    “An incident occurred in mid-May of this year in which thirty-one members of the California Aggie staff, where Talia Kennedy served as campus editor last year, called for the resignation of Ms. Kennedy and Peter Hamilton, the editor in chief of the student run news paper.”

    Are you suggesting that because of the troubles last year at The Aggie, no one should hire Talia Kennedy for a job in journalism? Should she be barred from the profession?

    Or are you just being snide because you knew about these problems and Miss DuBois did not when she chose Kennedy as an unpaid intern?

    I would hope that you have the decency to allow a girl to make a mistake in college (assuming she was in the wrong with the situation at The Aggie) and not have that held against her after she graduates and simply wants to gain some experience in the real world. If you do have such a harsh attitude, I feel sorry for you.

    “In a pointed letter signed by 31 staff members, they complained that they had “no confidence” in the Aggie’s leadership namely Peter Hamilton and Talia Kennedy, the ambitions of Talia Kennedy to ascend to the position of editor in chief for the following school year, and a huge amount of unnecessary expenses incurred while attending an awards banquet.”

    David, for god’s sake, the young lady was/is an unpaid intern just out of college. Don’t make a mountain out of a molehill.

    “Problems had been brewing all year long. As early as December of 2006, I had spoken with a number of individuals at the California Aggie who complained about the methods of Ms. Kennedy and her relationship with the editor, Peter Hamilton. This was in response to a number of stories we did last fall complaining not only of poor coverage in the Aggie, but the lack of responsiveness of the editors to these complaints.”

    It’s starting to sound like you have a personal vendetta against Miss Kennedy.

    “Was the Davis Enterprise aware of these problems just two months prior to the article on the Sociology Department? According to Debbie Davis, they were not.”

    She was picked to be an unpaid intern. She’s not the new editor-in-chief, Mr. Torquemada.

    When I said it sounded like a “big mess,” she replied that it was not, and that in fact, this situation it was “not even a bump in the road.”

    I really think you are making far too much out of this situation. It’s just not that big of a deal. I agree that it was a mistake to not include the fact that there were 24 signatories to Ms. Francis’s letter to the editor. But otherwise, I’m offended by your being so offended by an intern doing a less than perfect piece of journalism.

  27. Rich Rifkin

    David,

    I’m confused by the headline to your story, “Errors in an Article on the UC Davis Sociology Department Lead to Questions about the Davis Enterprise.”

    While it is now clear that the original story by Talia Kennedy was terribly incomplete, and the allegations by Mr. Gharagozlou are probably unfounded, what errors were there in her story?

    “The article cites a sociology lecturer, David Gharagozlou who believes that his race and ethnicity are the reason that his courses were canceled.”

    This is untrue. Gharagozlou never mentions race. He does mention his Iranian heritage.

    But he is quoted in the piece as saying, “I feel bad because I do not know exactly which real reasons (are) behind this decision.”

    “The letter goes on to criticize the writer, Talia Kennedy for failing to interview other teachers (Ms. Kennedy only interviewed Gharagozlou)–10 lecturers and instructors in the Sociology Department–about their reactions to course cancellations.”

    I don’t think Ms. Francis is wrong in her criticism of Ms. Kennedy. Gharazoglou was the only instructor interviewed, other than Smith. However, it should be pointed out that Kennedy’s article gave a full accounting of Smith’s reasons for cutting those classes. It was not the case that she simply quoted Gharazoglou and not the department chair: “Gharagozlou is not the only instructor to be affected, Smith said. Five lecturers will either not teach any classes next year, will teach fewer courses than originally planned or will teach different courses than they have in the past. Additionally, six acting instructors — graduate students who are sometimes offered part-time teaching positions — will not teach at all during the 2007-08 academic year, she said.”

    “An incident occurred in mid-May of this year in which thirty-one members of the California Aggie staff, where Talia Kennedy served as campus editor last year, called for the resignation of Ms. Kennedy and Peter Hamilton, the editor in chief of the student run news paper.”

    Are you suggesting that because of the troubles last year at The Aggie, no one should hire Talia Kennedy for a job in journalism? Should she be barred from the profession?

    Or are you just being snide because you knew about these problems and Miss DuBois did not when she chose Kennedy as an unpaid intern?

    I would hope that you have the decency to allow a girl to make a mistake in college (assuming she was in the wrong with the situation at The Aggie) and not have that held against her after she graduates and simply wants to gain some experience in the real world. If you do have such a harsh attitude, I feel sorry for you.

    “In a pointed letter signed by 31 staff members, they complained that they had “no confidence” in the Aggie’s leadership namely Peter Hamilton and Talia Kennedy, the ambitions of Talia Kennedy to ascend to the position of editor in chief for the following school year, and a huge amount of unnecessary expenses incurred while attending an awards banquet.”

    David, for god’s sake, the young lady was/is an unpaid intern just out of college. Don’t make a mountain out of a molehill.

    “Problems had been brewing all year long. As early as December of 2006, I had spoken with a number of individuals at the California Aggie who complained about the methods of Ms. Kennedy and her relationship with the editor, Peter Hamilton. This was in response to a number of stories we did last fall complaining not only of poor coverage in the Aggie, but the lack of responsiveness of the editors to these complaints.”

    It’s starting to sound like you have a personal vendetta against Miss Kennedy.

    “Was the Davis Enterprise aware of these problems just two months prior to the article on the Sociology Department? According to Debbie Davis, they were not.”

    She was picked to be an unpaid intern. She’s not the new editor-in-chief, Mr. Torquemada.

    When I said it sounded like a “big mess,” she replied that it was not, and that in fact, this situation it was “not even a bump in the road.”

    I really think you are making far too much out of this situation. It’s just not that big of a deal. I agree that it was a mistake to not include the fact that there were 24 signatories to Ms. Francis’s letter to the editor. But otherwise, I’m offended by your being so offended by an intern doing a less than perfect piece of journalism.

  28. Rich Rifkin

    David,

    I’m confused by the headline to your story, “Errors in an Article on the UC Davis Sociology Department Lead to Questions about the Davis Enterprise.”

    While it is now clear that the original story by Talia Kennedy was terribly incomplete, and the allegations by Mr. Gharagozlou are probably unfounded, what errors were there in her story?

    “The article cites a sociology lecturer, David Gharagozlou who believes that his race and ethnicity are the reason that his courses were canceled.”

    This is untrue. Gharagozlou never mentions race. He does mention his Iranian heritage.

    But he is quoted in the piece as saying, “I feel bad because I do not know exactly which real reasons (are) behind this decision.”

    “The letter goes on to criticize the writer, Talia Kennedy for failing to interview other teachers (Ms. Kennedy only interviewed Gharagozlou)–10 lecturers and instructors in the Sociology Department–about their reactions to course cancellations.”

    I don’t think Ms. Francis is wrong in her criticism of Ms. Kennedy. Gharazoglou was the only instructor interviewed, other than Smith. However, it should be pointed out that Kennedy’s article gave a full accounting of Smith’s reasons for cutting those classes. It was not the case that she simply quoted Gharazoglou and not the department chair: “Gharagozlou is not the only instructor to be affected, Smith said. Five lecturers will either not teach any classes next year, will teach fewer courses than originally planned or will teach different courses than they have in the past. Additionally, six acting instructors — graduate students who are sometimes offered part-time teaching positions — will not teach at all during the 2007-08 academic year, she said.”

    “An incident occurred in mid-May of this year in which thirty-one members of the California Aggie staff, where Talia Kennedy served as campus editor last year, called for the resignation of Ms. Kennedy and Peter Hamilton, the editor in chief of the student run news paper.”

    Are you suggesting that because of the troubles last year at The Aggie, no one should hire Talia Kennedy for a job in journalism? Should she be barred from the profession?

    Or are you just being snide because you knew about these problems and Miss DuBois did not when she chose Kennedy as an unpaid intern?

    I would hope that you have the decency to allow a girl to make a mistake in college (assuming she was in the wrong with the situation at The Aggie) and not have that held against her after she graduates and simply wants to gain some experience in the real world. If you do have such a harsh attitude, I feel sorry for you.

    “In a pointed letter signed by 31 staff members, they complained that they had “no confidence” in the Aggie’s leadership namely Peter Hamilton and Talia Kennedy, the ambitions of Talia Kennedy to ascend to the position of editor in chief for the following school year, and a huge amount of unnecessary expenses incurred while attending an awards banquet.”

    David, for god’s sake, the young lady was/is an unpaid intern just out of college. Don’t make a mountain out of a molehill.

    “Problems had been brewing all year long. As early as December of 2006, I had spoken with a number of individuals at the California Aggie who complained about the methods of Ms. Kennedy and her relationship with the editor, Peter Hamilton. This was in response to a number of stories we did last fall complaining not only of poor coverage in the Aggie, but the lack of responsiveness of the editors to these complaints.”

    It’s starting to sound like you have a personal vendetta against Miss Kennedy.

    “Was the Davis Enterprise aware of these problems just two months prior to the article on the Sociology Department? According to Debbie Davis, they were not.”

    She was picked to be an unpaid intern. She’s not the new editor-in-chief, Mr. Torquemada.

    When I said it sounded like a “big mess,” she replied that it was not, and that in fact, this situation it was “not even a bump in the road.”

    I really think you are making far too much out of this situation. It’s just not that big of a deal. I agree that it was a mistake to not include the fact that there were 24 signatories to Ms. Francis’s letter to the editor. But otherwise, I’m offended by your being so offended by an intern doing a less than perfect piece of journalism.

  29. Rich Rifkin

    However, if the writer wrote a story that falsely implied someone was racially bias then she deserves to be “pushed over the edge”.

    Race was actually never mentioned in the story at all. Also, the intern did not imply that there was racial or ethnic bias. She quoted a person who lost most of his job as suspecting that there was a bias against his Iranian heritage at play. And that was disputed in the article itself by the chairwoman of the department who stated that the course cancellations were entirely due to budgetary reasons.

  30. Rich Rifkin

    However, if the writer wrote a story that falsely implied someone was racially bias then she deserves to be “pushed over the edge”.

    Race was actually never mentioned in the story at all. Also, the intern did not imply that there was racial or ethnic bias. She quoted a person who lost most of his job as suspecting that there was a bias against his Iranian heritage at play. And that was disputed in the article itself by the chairwoman of the department who stated that the course cancellations were entirely due to budgetary reasons.

  31. Rich Rifkin

    However, if the writer wrote a story that falsely implied someone was racially bias then she deserves to be “pushed over the edge”.

    Race was actually never mentioned in the story at all. Also, the intern did not imply that there was racial or ethnic bias. She quoted a person who lost most of his job as suspecting that there was a bias against his Iranian heritage at play. And that was disputed in the article itself by the chairwoman of the department who stated that the course cancellations were entirely due to budgetary reasons.

  32. Rich Rifkin

    However, if the writer wrote a story that falsely implied someone was racially bias then she deserves to be “pushed over the edge”.

    Race was actually never mentioned in the story at all. Also, the intern did not imply that there was racial or ethnic bias. She quoted a person who lost most of his job as suspecting that there was a bias against his Iranian heritage at play. And that was disputed in the article itself by the chairwoman of the department who stated that the course cancellations were entirely due to budgetary reasons.

  33. Sociology Graduate of UCD

    Doug Paul Davis –

    Please don’t be offended.

    You obviously did your research and worked hard on this article.

    What your article shows, is what we know and have known, and that is this: The Enterprise does not provide the readers responsible reporting thoroughly showing both sides of a story. This happens over and over.

    Does Talia need more training in journalism? Absolutely, otherwise she will be the kind of reporter readers complain about.

    Should the Enterprise have hired her? It’s up to them, but they should have done their research and known about her background, AND provided her more mentoring and training. THIS, THEY FAILED TO DO. This, shows and leads us as readers to QUESTION the Enterprise and the method by which they monitor their stories that are written and submitted.

    If they had more reporters that did their thorough investigations like you Doug, we would all be well served.

    Thank you for another interesting story on the Vanguard.

  34. Sociology Graduate of UCD

    Doug Paul Davis –

    Please don’t be offended.

    You obviously did your research and worked hard on this article.

    What your article shows, is what we know and have known, and that is this: The Enterprise does not provide the readers responsible reporting thoroughly showing both sides of a story. This happens over and over.

    Does Talia need more training in journalism? Absolutely, otherwise she will be the kind of reporter readers complain about.

    Should the Enterprise have hired her? It’s up to them, but they should have done their research and known about her background, AND provided her more mentoring and training. THIS, THEY FAILED TO DO. This, shows and leads us as readers to QUESTION the Enterprise and the method by which they monitor their stories that are written and submitted.

    If they had more reporters that did their thorough investigations like you Doug, we would all be well served.

    Thank you for another interesting story on the Vanguard.

  35. Sociology Graduate of UCD

    Doug Paul Davis –

    Please don’t be offended.

    You obviously did your research and worked hard on this article.

    What your article shows, is what we know and have known, and that is this: The Enterprise does not provide the readers responsible reporting thoroughly showing both sides of a story. This happens over and over.

    Does Talia need more training in journalism? Absolutely, otherwise she will be the kind of reporter readers complain about.

    Should the Enterprise have hired her? It’s up to them, but they should have done their research and known about her background, AND provided her more mentoring and training. THIS, THEY FAILED TO DO. This, shows and leads us as readers to QUESTION the Enterprise and the method by which they monitor their stories that are written and submitted.

    If they had more reporters that did their thorough investigations like you Doug, we would all be well served.

    Thank you for another interesting story on the Vanguard.

  36. Sociology Graduate of UCD

    Doug Paul Davis –

    Please don’t be offended.

    You obviously did your research and worked hard on this article.

    What your article shows, is what we know and have known, and that is this: The Enterprise does not provide the readers responsible reporting thoroughly showing both sides of a story. This happens over and over.

    Does Talia need more training in journalism? Absolutely, otherwise she will be the kind of reporter readers complain about.

    Should the Enterprise have hired her? It’s up to them, but they should have done their research and known about her background, AND provided her more mentoring and training. THIS, THEY FAILED TO DO. This, shows and leads us as readers to QUESTION the Enterprise and the method by which they monitor their stories that are written and submitted.

    If they had more reporters that did their thorough investigations like you Doug, we would all be well served.

    Thank you for another interesting story on the Vanguard.

  37. had to deal with her fallout

    Talia Kennedy was a horrible reporter at the Aggie, in that she focused on accusations and sensationalism and failed to check sources who could respond to allegations with facts. She’d frequently leave messages at 4:30pm, requesting quotes for a story that would run the next day, and would run the story without getting comment from the person who she left the messages with. She’d run accusations as a lead story, but when they proved to be false, would run the follow-up story below the fold or on the second page.
    Not a good journalist, frustrating to deal with, and responsible for much turmoil. Now the Enterprise has her. Great. Glad my subscription ran out. Haven’t missed it.

  38. had to deal with her fallout

    Talia Kennedy was a horrible reporter at the Aggie, in that she focused on accusations and sensationalism and failed to check sources who could respond to allegations with facts. She’d frequently leave messages at 4:30pm, requesting quotes for a story that would run the next day, and would run the story without getting comment from the person who she left the messages with. She’d run accusations as a lead story, but when they proved to be false, would run the follow-up story below the fold or on the second page.
    Not a good journalist, frustrating to deal with, and responsible for much turmoil. Now the Enterprise has her. Great. Glad my subscription ran out. Haven’t missed it.

  39. had to deal with her fallout

    Talia Kennedy was a horrible reporter at the Aggie, in that she focused on accusations and sensationalism and failed to check sources who could respond to allegations with facts. She’d frequently leave messages at 4:30pm, requesting quotes for a story that would run the next day, and would run the story without getting comment from the person who she left the messages with. She’d run accusations as a lead story, but when they proved to be false, would run the follow-up story below the fold or on the second page.
    Not a good journalist, frustrating to deal with, and responsible for much turmoil. Now the Enterprise has her. Great. Glad my subscription ran out. Haven’t missed it.

  40. had to deal with her fallout

    Talia Kennedy was a horrible reporter at the Aggie, in that she focused on accusations and sensationalism and failed to check sources who could respond to allegations with facts. She’d frequently leave messages at 4:30pm, requesting quotes for a story that would run the next day, and would run the story without getting comment from the person who she left the messages with. She’d run accusations as a lead story, but when they proved to be false, would run the follow-up story below the fold or on the second page.
    Not a good journalist, frustrating to deal with, and responsible for much turmoil. Now the Enterprise has her. Great. Glad my subscription ran out. Haven’t missed it.

  41. Christine Cipperly

    David,

    Thank you for your work and for bringing this to our attention. Personal accusations always to be carefully evaluated. A person’s reputation is one of their most precious possessions.

    The Enterprise needs to be responsible for what is published in the paper. They also need to support their interns. In exposing this incompletely investigated article, you did a service to Debbie Davis and to Talia Kennedy. I am sure that this is not a mistake either will make again. It would have been interesting to get Talia Kennedy’s version of what happened at the Cal Aggie last May.
    You would have been modeling how she should have covered her story in the first place.

    Multiple signatures to a letter representing the views of a department should ALL be published with the letter. The Enterprise frequently includes long lists of signers to a letter.

    But these are usually not letters criticizing the Enterprise.

    This town needs more than one paper.Your blog and The Flatlander are the closest thing we have to it.

    May your tribe increase.

  42. Christine Cipperly

    David,

    Thank you for your work and for bringing this to our attention. Personal accusations always to be carefully evaluated. A person’s reputation is one of their most precious possessions.

    The Enterprise needs to be responsible for what is published in the paper. They also need to support their interns. In exposing this incompletely investigated article, you did a service to Debbie Davis and to Talia Kennedy. I am sure that this is not a mistake either will make again. It would have been interesting to get Talia Kennedy’s version of what happened at the Cal Aggie last May.
    You would have been modeling how she should have covered her story in the first place.

    Multiple signatures to a letter representing the views of a department should ALL be published with the letter. The Enterprise frequently includes long lists of signers to a letter.

    But these are usually not letters criticizing the Enterprise.

    This town needs more than one paper.Your blog and The Flatlander are the closest thing we have to it.

    May your tribe increase.

  43. Christine Cipperly

    David,

    Thank you for your work and for bringing this to our attention. Personal accusations always to be carefully evaluated. A person’s reputation is one of their most precious possessions.

    The Enterprise needs to be responsible for what is published in the paper. They also need to support their interns. In exposing this incompletely investigated article, you did a service to Debbie Davis and to Talia Kennedy. I am sure that this is not a mistake either will make again. It would have been interesting to get Talia Kennedy’s version of what happened at the Cal Aggie last May.
    You would have been modeling how she should have covered her story in the first place.

    Multiple signatures to a letter representing the views of a department should ALL be published with the letter. The Enterprise frequently includes long lists of signers to a letter.

    But these are usually not letters criticizing the Enterprise.

    This town needs more than one paper.Your blog and The Flatlander are the closest thing we have to it.

    May your tribe increase.

  44. Christine Cipperly

    David,

    Thank you for your work and for bringing this to our attention. Personal accusations always to be carefully evaluated. A person’s reputation is one of their most precious possessions.

    The Enterprise needs to be responsible for what is published in the paper. They also need to support their interns. In exposing this incompletely investigated article, you did a service to Debbie Davis and to Talia Kennedy. I am sure that this is not a mistake either will make again. It would have been interesting to get Talia Kennedy’s version of what happened at the Cal Aggie last May.
    You would have been modeling how she should have covered her story in the first place.

    Multiple signatures to a letter representing the views of a department should ALL be published with the letter. The Enterprise frequently includes long lists of signers to a letter.

    But these are usually not letters criticizing the Enterprise.

    This town needs more than one paper.Your blog and The Flatlander are the closest thing we have to it.

    May your tribe increase.

  45. Anonymous

    The Davis Enterprise’s publication of one person’s perception of departmental policies and actions without seeking corroboration was foolish and unfortunate.

    It is good that the Vanguard has investigated, analyzed and publicized this issue. It is good that Debbie Davis has acknowledged that the article needed further review before publication. It is good that Debbie Davis agrees that she should have acknowledged the additional signatures to Ara Francis’ letter.

    When people make many important decisions every day, sometimes they make mistakes.

    Presently, there is often a “gotcha” attitude in our society. Recent California governors have been reluctant to grant pardons. I think they fear that if ninety nine pardons turned out well, and one pardoned criminal committed a heinous crime the press would talk only about the one error and not about the ninety nine successes.

    We should avoid contributing to this trend. Now that the Enterprise’s mistakes have been pointed out and acknowledged, we should let the issue rest unless and until the problem reoccurs.

    Carl Jorgensen
    (I am a retired faculty of the sociology department.)

  46. Anonymous

    The Davis Enterprise’s publication of one person’s perception of departmental policies and actions without seeking corroboration was foolish and unfortunate.

    It is good that the Vanguard has investigated, analyzed and publicized this issue. It is good that Debbie Davis has acknowledged that the article needed further review before publication. It is good that Debbie Davis agrees that she should have acknowledged the additional signatures to Ara Francis’ letter.

    When people make many important decisions every day, sometimes they make mistakes.

    Presently, there is often a “gotcha” attitude in our society. Recent California governors have been reluctant to grant pardons. I think they fear that if ninety nine pardons turned out well, and one pardoned criminal committed a heinous crime the press would talk only about the one error and not about the ninety nine successes.

    We should avoid contributing to this trend. Now that the Enterprise’s mistakes have been pointed out and acknowledged, we should let the issue rest unless and until the problem reoccurs.

    Carl Jorgensen
    (I am a retired faculty of the sociology department.)

  47. Anonymous

    The Davis Enterprise’s publication of one person’s perception of departmental policies and actions without seeking corroboration was foolish and unfortunate.

    It is good that the Vanguard has investigated, analyzed and publicized this issue. It is good that Debbie Davis has acknowledged that the article needed further review before publication. It is good that Debbie Davis agrees that she should have acknowledged the additional signatures to Ara Francis’ letter.

    When people make many important decisions every day, sometimes they make mistakes.

    Presently, there is often a “gotcha” attitude in our society. Recent California governors have been reluctant to grant pardons. I think they fear that if ninety nine pardons turned out well, and one pardoned criminal committed a heinous crime the press would talk only about the one error and not about the ninety nine successes.

    We should avoid contributing to this trend. Now that the Enterprise’s mistakes have been pointed out and acknowledged, we should let the issue rest unless and until the problem reoccurs.

    Carl Jorgensen
    (I am a retired faculty of the sociology department.)

  48. Anonymous

    The Davis Enterprise’s publication of one person’s perception of departmental policies and actions without seeking corroboration was foolish and unfortunate.

    It is good that the Vanguard has investigated, analyzed and publicized this issue. It is good that Debbie Davis has acknowledged that the article needed further review before publication. It is good that Debbie Davis agrees that she should have acknowledged the additional signatures to Ara Francis’ letter.

    When people make many important decisions every day, sometimes they make mistakes.

    Presently, there is often a “gotcha” attitude in our society. Recent California governors have been reluctant to grant pardons. I think they fear that if ninety nine pardons turned out well, and one pardoned criminal committed a heinous crime the press would talk only about the one error and not about the ninety nine successes.

    We should avoid contributing to this trend. Now that the Enterprise’s mistakes have been pointed out and acknowledged, we should let the issue rest unless and until the problem reoccurs.

    Carl Jorgensen
    (I am a retired faculty of the sociology department.)

  49. Anonymous

    Historical note: Xenophobia is not foreign(pun intended) to our Northern California region. Within the past 40 years,the area around Tracy was known to be second only to Western North Carolina as a center of White Supremacy beliefs in the USA.

  50. Anonymous

    Historical note: Xenophobia is not foreign(pun intended) to our Northern California region. Within the past 40 years,the area around Tracy was known to be second only to Western North Carolina as a center of White Supremacy beliefs in the USA.

  51. Anonymous

    Historical note: Xenophobia is not foreign(pun intended) to our Northern California region. Within the past 40 years,the area around Tracy was known to be second only to Western North Carolina as a center of White Supremacy beliefs in the USA.

  52. Anonymous

    Historical note: Xenophobia is not foreign(pun intended) to our Northern California region. Within the past 40 years,the area around Tracy was known to be second only to Western North Carolina as a center of White Supremacy beliefs in the USA.

  53. Anonymous

    Anonymous said…
    Historical note: Xenophobia is not foreign(pun intended) to our Northern California region. Within the past 40 years,the area around Tracy was known to be second only to Western North Carolina as a center of White Supremacy beliefs in the USA.
    8/9/07 11:21 AM

    What does this have to do with the topic at hand. Did I miss something here?

  54. Anonymous

    Anonymous said…
    Historical note: Xenophobia is not foreign(pun intended) to our Northern California region. Within the past 40 years,the area around Tracy was known to be second only to Western North Carolina as a center of White Supremacy beliefs in the USA.
    8/9/07 11:21 AM

    What does this have to do with the topic at hand. Did I miss something here?

  55. Anonymous

    Anonymous said…
    Historical note: Xenophobia is not foreign(pun intended) to our Northern California region. Within the past 40 years,the area around Tracy was known to be second only to Western North Carolina as a center of White Supremacy beliefs in the USA.
    8/9/07 11:21 AM

    What does this have to do with the topic at hand. Did I miss something here?

  56. Anonymous

    Anonymous said…
    Historical note: Xenophobia is not foreign(pun intended) to our Northern California region. Within the past 40 years,the area around Tracy was known to be second only to Western North Carolina as a center of White Supremacy beliefs in the USA.
    8/9/07 11:21 AM

    What does this have to do with the topic at hand. Did I miss something here?

  57. Anonymous

    Having worked with Miss Kennedy I have to say that I’m not surprised that this has happened. Hearing the multiple complaints from working with her last year (using facebook profiles as sources, possibly having relationships with people she’s reporting on) I seriously doubt she has much “journalist ethics”. I only hope that for her sake she takes these experiences and learns from them.

    But again, I wouldn’t be surprised if she didn’t.

  58. Anonymous

    Having worked with Miss Kennedy I have to say that I’m not surprised that this has happened. Hearing the multiple complaints from working with her last year (using facebook profiles as sources, possibly having relationships with people she’s reporting on) I seriously doubt she has much “journalist ethics”. I only hope that for her sake she takes these experiences and learns from them.

    But again, I wouldn’t be surprised if she didn’t.

  59. Anonymous

    Having worked with Miss Kennedy I have to say that I’m not surprised that this has happened. Hearing the multiple complaints from working with her last year (using facebook profiles as sources, possibly having relationships with people she’s reporting on) I seriously doubt she has much “journalist ethics”. I only hope that for her sake she takes these experiences and learns from them.

    But again, I wouldn’t be surprised if she didn’t.

  60. Anonymous

    Having worked with Miss Kennedy I have to say that I’m not surprised that this has happened. Hearing the multiple complaints from working with her last year (using facebook profiles as sources, possibly having relationships with people she’s reporting on) I seriously doubt she has much “journalist ethics”. I only hope that for her sake she takes these experiences and learns from them.

    But again, I wouldn’t be surprised if she didn’t.

  61. Anonymous

    “The Enterprise needs to be responsible for what is published in the paper. They also need to support their interns. In exposing this incompletely investigated article, you did a service to Debbie Davis and to Talia Kennedy.”

    One obvious way in which the Enterprise might “support their interns” would be to pay them. If Ms. Kennedy had been a paid intern, she might have been more motivated to do the work necessary to produce an accurate article for the Enterprise…
    The flip side of that, of course, is the Enterprise might, having made an investment, order its editors to take a more active role in shepherding interns’ rough drafts through a rational editorial process, whereby interns might learn a thing or two, resulting as well in a printed product that would not waste so much energy, what with members of the community having to take the time to write letters-to-the-editor or call the editor up repeatedly in the interests of accuracy.

  62. Anonymous

    “The Enterprise needs to be responsible for what is published in the paper. They also need to support their interns. In exposing this incompletely investigated article, you did a service to Debbie Davis and to Talia Kennedy.”

    One obvious way in which the Enterprise might “support their interns” would be to pay them. If Ms. Kennedy had been a paid intern, she might have been more motivated to do the work necessary to produce an accurate article for the Enterprise…
    The flip side of that, of course, is the Enterprise might, having made an investment, order its editors to take a more active role in shepherding interns’ rough drafts through a rational editorial process, whereby interns might learn a thing or two, resulting as well in a printed product that would not waste so much energy, what with members of the community having to take the time to write letters-to-the-editor or call the editor up repeatedly in the interests of accuracy.

  63. Anonymous

    “The Enterprise needs to be responsible for what is published in the paper. They also need to support their interns. In exposing this incompletely investigated article, you did a service to Debbie Davis and to Talia Kennedy.”

    One obvious way in which the Enterprise might “support their interns” would be to pay them. If Ms. Kennedy had been a paid intern, she might have been more motivated to do the work necessary to produce an accurate article for the Enterprise…
    The flip side of that, of course, is the Enterprise might, having made an investment, order its editors to take a more active role in shepherding interns’ rough drafts through a rational editorial process, whereby interns might learn a thing or two, resulting as well in a printed product that would not waste so much energy, what with members of the community having to take the time to write letters-to-the-editor or call the editor up repeatedly in the interests of accuracy.

  64. Anonymous

    “The Enterprise needs to be responsible for what is published in the paper. They also need to support their interns. In exposing this incompletely investigated article, you did a service to Debbie Davis and to Talia Kennedy.”

    One obvious way in which the Enterprise might “support their interns” would be to pay them. If Ms. Kennedy had been a paid intern, she might have been more motivated to do the work necessary to produce an accurate article for the Enterprise…
    The flip side of that, of course, is the Enterprise might, having made an investment, order its editors to take a more active role in shepherding interns’ rough drafts through a rational editorial process, whereby interns might learn a thing or two, resulting as well in a printed product that would not waste so much energy, what with members of the community having to take the time to write letters-to-the-editor or call the editor up repeatedly in the interests of accuracy.

  65. Anonymous

    Anonymous 12:25 said”
    “What does this have to do with the topic at hand. Did I miss something here?”

    The Enterprise’s editorial position on Reisig for DA with his department’s aggressive prosecution of local “foreigners”(e.g. the Bazayans, the goat-herder in Clarksville),the Enterprise’s attacks on the work of our previous Human Relations Commission ,the Enterprise’s uncritical support of past DPD excesses and this Enterprise article in question whose narrative appears to highlight Mr.Gharagozlou ruminating about discrimination without a factual basis. All of the above have a common thread..
    antipathy towards minorities in general and Middle Eastern minorities in particular.

  66. Anonymous

    Anonymous 12:25 said”
    “What does this have to do with the topic at hand. Did I miss something here?”

    The Enterprise’s editorial position on Reisig for DA with his department’s aggressive prosecution of local “foreigners”(e.g. the Bazayans, the goat-herder in Clarksville),the Enterprise’s attacks on the work of our previous Human Relations Commission ,the Enterprise’s uncritical support of past DPD excesses and this Enterprise article in question whose narrative appears to highlight Mr.Gharagozlou ruminating about discrimination without a factual basis. All of the above have a common thread..
    antipathy towards minorities in general and Middle Eastern minorities in particular.

  67. Anonymous

    Anonymous 12:25 said”
    “What does this have to do with the topic at hand. Did I miss something here?”

    The Enterprise’s editorial position on Reisig for DA with his department’s aggressive prosecution of local “foreigners”(e.g. the Bazayans, the goat-herder in Clarksville),the Enterprise’s attacks on the work of our previous Human Relations Commission ,the Enterprise’s uncritical support of past DPD excesses and this Enterprise article in question whose narrative appears to highlight Mr.Gharagozlou ruminating about discrimination without a factual basis. All of the above have a common thread..
    antipathy towards minorities in general and Middle Eastern minorities in particular.

  68. Anonymous

    Anonymous 12:25 said”
    “What does this have to do with the topic at hand. Did I miss something here?”

    The Enterprise’s editorial position on Reisig for DA with his department’s aggressive prosecution of local “foreigners”(e.g. the Bazayans, the goat-herder in Clarksville),the Enterprise’s attacks on the work of our previous Human Relations Commission ,the Enterprise’s uncritical support of past DPD excesses and this Enterprise article in question whose narrative appears to highlight Mr.Gharagozlou ruminating about discrimination without a factual basis. All of the above have a common thread..
    antipathy towards minorities in general and Middle Eastern minorities in particular.

  69. ACLU Supporter

    “Why would the Davis community be interested in the course scheduling and personnel decisions being made in the UC Davis Sociology department for the academic year 2007-2008?”

    I think that is where the racial question comes in and sorry to say Mr. Rifkin, but it is a racial question.

  70. ACLU Supporter

    “Why would the Davis community be interested in the course scheduling and personnel decisions being made in the UC Davis Sociology department for the academic year 2007-2008?”

    I think that is where the racial question comes in and sorry to say Mr. Rifkin, but it is a racial question.

  71. ACLU Supporter

    “Why would the Davis community be interested in the course scheduling and personnel decisions being made in the UC Davis Sociology department for the academic year 2007-2008?”

    I think that is where the racial question comes in and sorry to say Mr. Rifkin, but it is a racial question.

  72. ACLU Supporter

    “Why would the Davis community be interested in the course scheduling and personnel decisions being made in the UC Davis Sociology department for the academic year 2007-2008?”

    I think that is where the racial question comes in and sorry to say Mr. Rifkin, but it is a racial question.

  73. Anonymous

    Anonymous said…

    Historical note.

    According to whom?

    This is “fact” that I gleaned from speaking to those who were around at that time. I cannot refer you to written references. I would love to hear from the keepers of this region’s (social) history… Lofland?

  74. Anonymous

    Anonymous said…

    Historical note.

    According to whom?

    This is “fact” that I gleaned from speaking to those who were around at that time. I cannot refer you to written references. I would love to hear from the keepers of this region’s (social) history… Lofland?

  75. Anonymous

    Anonymous said…

    Historical note.

    According to whom?

    This is “fact” that I gleaned from speaking to those who were around at that time. I cannot refer you to written references. I would love to hear from the keepers of this region’s (social) history… Lofland?

  76. Anonymous

    Anonymous said…

    Historical note.

    According to whom?

    This is “fact” that I gleaned from speaking to those who were around at that time. I cannot refer you to written references. I would love to hear from the keepers of this region’s (social) history… Lofland?

  77. Rich Rifkin

    ACLU asserts: “I think that is where the racial question comes in and sorry to say Mr. Rifkin, but it is a racial question.”

    I didn’t say it was not a racial question. I didn’t express an opinion on that one way or the other. I simply said that the gentleman in question never mentioned race: “Gharagozlou never mentions race. He does mention his Iranian heritage.”

    You say it is a racial question. That raises the question: which race?

  78. Rich Rifkin

    ACLU asserts: “I think that is where the racial question comes in and sorry to say Mr. Rifkin, but it is a racial question.”

    I didn’t say it was not a racial question. I didn’t express an opinion on that one way or the other. I simply said that the gentleman in question never mentioned race: “Gharagozlou never mentions race. He does mention his Iranian heritage.”

    You say it is a racial question. That raises the question: which race?

  79. Rich Rifkin

    ACLU asserts: “I think that is where the racial question comes in and sorry to say Mr. Rifkin, but it is a racial question.”

    I didn’t say it was not a racial question. I didn’t express an opinion on that one way or the other. I simply said that the gentleman in question never mentioned race: “Gharagozlou never mentions race. He does mention his Iranian heritage.”

    You say it is a racial question. That raises the question: which race?

  80. Rich Rifkin

    ACLU asserts: “I think that is where the racial question comes in and sorry to say Mr. Rifkin, but it is a racial question.”

    I didn’t say it was not a racial question. I didn’t express an opinion on that one way or the other. I simply said that the gentleman in question never mentioned race: “Gharagozlou never mentions race. He does mention his Iranian heritage.”

    You say it is a racial question. That raises the question: which race?

  81. Anonymous

    This girl just doesn’t learn her lesson. She needs to get off that high horse of hers. She needs to learn the value of integrity.

    After her fallout with The Aggie, I had hoped that she would learn a lesson in integrity. I knew if she didn’t learn from that experience, she would end up screwing herself over. Unfortunately for her, that happened sooner than later.

    I hope The Davis Enterprise and the UC Berkeley School of Journalism really do reconsider their respective application and admission processes.

    Ms. Kennedy needs to learn that success as a journalist is the continuous desire to tell a story — the whole story. Also, she needs to realize the value of aiding the journalism process as a whole instead of trying to bring others down due to her own selfish endeavors. If she continues to do so, Ms. Kennedy will end up in this never-ending cycle. Let’s hope she actually learns something this time.

  82. Anonymous

    This girl just doesn’t learn her lesson. She needs to get off that high horse of hers. She needs to learn the value of integrity.

    After her fallout with The Aggie, I had hoped that she would learn a lesson in integrity. I knew if she didn’t learn from that experience, she would end up screwing herself over. Unfortunately for her, that happened sooner than later.

    I hope The Davis Enterprise and the UC Berkeley School of Journalism really do reconsider their respective application and admission processes.

    Ms. Kennedy needs to learn that success as a journalist is the continuous desire to tell a story — the whole story. Also, she needs to realize the value of aiding the journalism process as a whole instead of trying to bring others down due to her own selfish endeavors. If she continues to do so, Ms. Kennedy will end up in this never-ending cycle. Let’s hope she actually learns something this time.

  83. Anonymous

    This girl just doesn’t learn her lesson. She needs to get off that high horse of hers. She needs to learn the value of integrity.

    After her fallout with The Aggie, I had hoped that she would learn a lesson in integrity. I knew if she didn’t learn from that experience, she would end up screwing herself over. Unfortunately for her, that happened sooner than later.

    I hope The Davis Enterprise and the UC Berkeley School of Journalism really do reconsider their respective application and admission processes.

    Ms. Kennedy needs to learn that success as a journalist is the continuous desire to tell a story — the whole story. Also, she needs to realize the value of aiding the journalism process as a whole instead of trying to bring others down due to her own selfish endeavors. If she continues to do so, Ms. Kennedy will end up in this never-ending cycle. Let’s hope she actually learns something this time.

  84. Anonymous

    This girl just doesn’t learn her lesson. She needs to get off that high horse of hers. She needs to learn the value of integrity.

    After her fallout with The Aggie, I had hoped that she would learn a lesson in integrity. I knew if she didn’t learn from that experience, she would end up screwing herself over. Unfortunately for her, that happened sooner than later.

    I hope The Davis Enterprise and the UC Berkeley School of Journalism really do reconsider their respective application and admission processes.

    Ms. Kennedy needs to learn that success as a journalist is the continuous desire to tell a story — the whole story. Also, she needs to realize the value of aiding the journalism process as a whole instead of trying to bring others down due to her own selfish endeavors. If she continues to do so, Ms. Kennedy will end up in this never-ending cycle. Let’s hope she actually learns something this time.

  85. joan morgan

    “She needs to learn the value of integrity. She needs to realize the value of aiding the journalism process as a whole instead of trying to bring others down due to her own selfish endeavors.”

    This has become a mean attack on Ms. Kennedy by anonymous posters. This site disgusts me sometimes. I can’t believe how ugly some people here can get.

  86. joan morgan

    “She needs to learn the value of integrity. She needs to realize the value of aiding the journalism process as a whole instead of trying to bring others down due to her own selfish endeavors.”

    This has become a mean attack on Ms. Kennedy by anonymous posters. This site disgusts me sometimes. I can’t believe how ugly some people here can get.

  87. joan morgan

    “She needs to learn the value of integrity. She needs to realize the value of aiding the journalism process as a whole instead of trying to bring others down due to her own selfish endeavors.”

    This has become a mean attack on Ms. Kennedy by anonymous posters. This site disgusts me sometimes. I can’t believe how ugly some people here can get.

  88. joan morgan

    “She needs to learn the value of integrity. She needs to realize the value of aiding the journalism process as a whole instead of trying to bring others down due to her own selfish endeavors.”

    This has become a mean attack on Ms. Kennedy by anonymous posters. This site disgusts me sometimes. I can’t believe how ugly some people here can get.

  89. Robin

    I very much appreciate The Vanguard, and this was an excellent analysis of issues that are worth airing.

    I had read The Enterprise article when it first appeared and thought it was quite bizarre. I could not understand how the newspaper could run a story that seemed to be working so hard to show bias in the Sociology Department when the facts stated in the article itself did not support that implication.

    I did not notice at the time that the story was written by an intern. Shame on The Enterprise! What a disservice they did for this intern by not requiring her to do more research before even considering whether to publish this article. Now, in addition to its long-standing shoddy journalism, The Enterprise can add shoddy reference checking and shoddy mentoring.

    As for how the letter submitted by Ara Francis was treated by The Enterprise — I’m sorry you had this experience, Ara, but welcome to the club. You are far from the first person whose letter to The Enterprise has been butchered in some manner that dramatically alters the meaning of the letter or undermines the goal in submitting it. And it doesn’t end with letters. I often wonder how the decent reporters on staff (there are a few) can work with editors who regularly craft sensational headlines that misstate the content of their articles.

    No letters or complaints seem to affect the editorial approach at The Enterprise. I’ve long since given up, and I take everything in the paper with a large grain of salt.

  90. Robin

    I very much appreciate The Vanguard, and this was an excellent analysis of issues that are worth airing.

    I had read The Enterprise article when it first appeared and thought it was quite bizarre. I could not understand how the newspaper could run a story that seemed to be working so hard to show bias in the Sociology Department when the facts stated in the article itself did not support that implication.

    I did not notice at the time that the story was written by an intern. Shame on The Enterprise! What a disservice they did for this intern by not requiring her to do more research before even considering whether to publish this article. Now, in addition to its long-standing shoddy journalism, The Enterprise can add shoddy reference checking and shoddy mentoring.

    As for how the letter submitted by Ara Francis was treated by The Enterprise — I’m sorry you had this experience, Ara, but welcome to the club. You are far from the first person whose letter to The Enterprise has been butchered in some manner that dramatically alters the meaning of the letter or undermines the goal in submitting it. And it doesn’t end with letters. I often wonder how the decent reporters on staff (there are a few) can work with editors who regularly craft sensational headlines that misstate the content of their articles.

    No letters or complaints seem to affect the editorial approach at The Enterprise. I’ve long since given up, and I take everything in the paper with a large grain of salt.

  91. Robin

    I very much appreciate The Vanguard, and this was an excellent analysis of issues that are worth airing.

    I had read The Enterprise article when it first appeared and thought it was quite bizarre. I could not understand how the newspaper could run a story that seemed to be working so hard to show bias in the Sociology Department when the facts stated in the article itself did not support that implication.

    I did not notice at the time that the story was written by an intern. Shame on The Enterprise! What a disservice they did for this intern by not requiring her to do more research before even considering whether to publish this article. Now, in addition to its long-standing shoddy journalism, The Enterprise can add shoddy reference checking and shoddy mentoring.

    As for how the letter submitted by Ara Francis was treated by The Enterprise — I’m sorry you had this experience, Ara, but welcome to the club. You are far from the first person whose letter to The Enterprise has been butchered in some manner that dramatically alters the meaning of the letter or undermines the goal in submitting it. And it doesn’t end with letters. I often wonder how the decent reporters on staff (there are a few) can work with editors who regularly craft sensational headlines that misstate the content of their articles.

    No letters or complaints seem to affect the editorial approach at The Enterprise. I’ve long since given up, and I take everything in the paper with a large grain of salt.

  92. Robin

    I very much appreciate The Vanguard, and this was an excellent analysis of issues that are worth airing.

    I had read The Enterprise article when it first appeared and thought it was quite bizarre. I could not understand how the newspaper could run a story that seemed to be working so hard to show bias in the Sociology Department when the facts stated in the article itself did not support that implication.

    I did not notice at the time that the story was written by an intern. Shame on The Enterprise! What a disservice they did for this intern by not requiring her to do more research before even considering whether to publish this article. Now, in addition to its long-standing shoddy journalism, The Enterprise can add shoddy reference checking and shoddy mentoring.

    As for how the letter submitted by Ara Francis was treated by The Enterprise — I’m sorry you had this experience, Ara, but welcome to the club. You are far from the first person whose letter to The Enterprise has been butchered in some manner that dramatically alters the meaning of the letter or undermines the goal in submitting it. And it doesn’t end with letters. I often wonder how the decent reporters on staff (there are a few) can work with editors who regularly craft sensational headlines that misstate the content of their articles.

    No letters or complaints seem to affect the editorial approach at The Enterprise. I’ve long since given up, and I take everything in the paper with a large grain of salt.

  93. Afraid of the press

    It looks like there are at least three victims.

    First, Ms. Smith and the Sociology Department. Their reputations clearly just weren’t a factor when the Enterprise decided to run this awful article. Mr. Rifkin’s notion that an article that was “terribly incomplete” and “probably unfounded” had no errors is right out of the Fox News school of thinking. Apparently, underlying facts don’t matter, as long as the ugly, unfounded accusations published are attributed to someone else.

    Second, Mr. Gharagozlou. He was undoubtedly angry when he fired a shotgun blast of accusations off to the Enterprise. He probably expected the Enterprise to check it out, not to vomit it up complete with grammatical errors onto thousands of broadsheet pages. While the Sociology Department has an obligation not to hold this moment of anger against him professionally, he’ll no doubt pay a very heavy social cost. The Enterprise used him without any regard for that cost.

    Finally, Ms. Kennedy. It’s the job of an editor to protect a reporter by making the final decision as to the newsworthiness of an article. Ms. Kennedy had a right to assume that her unpaid internship would include that some care be taken to protect her from her inexperience. She probably thought she would be getting a chance to see how a real newspaper works. Instead, the Enterprise evidently viewed her internship as a chance to bring more tabloid-style journalism to their pages.

    Villains? Obviously the unnamed editor who who chose 30 sensational column inches over their responsibility to the community and the reputations of the victims. But, let’s also add Ms. Davis to the villain list. If Francis is correct, Ms. Davis justified her attempts to protect the Enterprise and the unnamed editor by hiding behind claims of concern for their unpaid intern. A far better response would have been to admit error (in print), run the critical responses accurately, caution the editor, and vow to do better in the future.

  94. Afraid of the press

    It looks like there are at least three victims.

    First, Ms. Smith and the Sociology Department. Their reputations clearly just weren’t a factor when the Enterprise decided to run this awful article. Mr. Rifkin’s notion that an article that was “terribly incomplete” and “probably unfounded” had no errors is right out of the Fox News school of thinking. Apparently, underlying facts don’t matter, as long as the ugly, unfounded accusations published are attributed to someone else.

    Second, Mr. Gharagozlou. He was undoubtedly angry when he fired a shotgun blast of accusations off to the Enterprise. He probably expected the Enterprise to check it out, not to vomit it up complete with grammatical errors onto thousands of broadsheet pages. While the Sociology Department has an obligation not to hold this moment of anger against him professionally, he’ll no doubt pay a very heavy social cost. The Enterprise used him without any regard for that cost.

    Finally, Ms. Kennedy. It’s the job of an editor to protect a reporter by making the final decision as to the newsworthiness of an article. Ms. Kennedy had a right to assume that her unpaid internship would include that some care be taken to protect her from her inexperience. She probably thought she would be getting a chance to see how a real newspaper works. Instead, the Enterprise evidently viewed her internship as a chance to bring more tabloid-style journalism to their pages.

    Villains? Obviously the unnamed editor who who chose 30 sensational column inches over their responsibility to the community and the reputations of the victims. But, let’s also add Ms. Davis to the villain list. If Francis is correct, Ms. Davis justified her attempts to protect the Enterprise and the unnamed editor by hiding behind claims of concern for their unpaid intern. A far better response would have been to admit error (in print), run the critical responses accurately, caution the editor, and vow to do better in the future.

  95. Afraid of the press

    It looks like there are at least three victims.

    First, Ms. Smith and the Sociology Department. Their reputations clearly just weren’t a factor when the Enterprise decided to run this awful article. Mr. Rifkin’s notion that an article that was “terribly incomplete” and “probably unfounded” had no errors is right out of the Fox News school of thinking. Apparently, underlying facts don’t matter, as long as the ugly, unfounded accusations published are attributed to someone else.

    Second, Mr. Gharagozlou. He was undoubtedly angry when he fired a shotgun blast of accusations off to the Enterprise. He probably expected the Enterprise to check it out, not to vomit it up complete with grammatical errors onto thousands of broadsheet pages. While the Sociology Department has an obligation not to hold this moment of anger against him professionally, he’ll no doubt pay a very heavy social cost. The Enterprise used him without any regard for that cost.

    Finally, Ms. Kennedy. It’s the job of an editor to protect a reporter by making the final decision as to the newsworthiness of an article. Ms. Kennedy had a right to assume that her unpaid internship would include that some care be taken to protect her from her inexperience. She probably thought she would be getting a chance to see how a real newspaper works. Instead, the Enterprise evidently viewed her internship as a chance to bring more tabloid-style journalism to their pages.

    Villains? Obviously the unnamed editor who who chose 30 sensational column inches over their responsibility to the community and the reputations of the victims. But, let’s also add Ms. Davis to the villain list. If Francis is correct, Ms. Davis justified her attempts to protect the Enterprise and the unnamed editor by hiding behind claims of concern for their unpaid intern. A far better response would have been to admit error (in print), run the critical responses accurately, caution the editor, and vow to do better in the future.

  96. Afraid of the press

    It looks like there are at least three victims.

    First, Ms. Smith and the Sociology Department. Their reputations clearly just weren’t a factor when the Enterprise decided to run this awful article. Mr. Rifkin’s notion that an article that was “terribly incomplete” and “probably unfounded” had no errors is right out of the Fox News school of thinking. Apparently, underlying facts don’t matter, as long as the ugly, unfounded accusations published are attributed to someone else.

    Second, Mr. Gharagozlou. He was undoubtedly angry when he fired a shotgun blast of accusations off to the Enterprise. He probably expected the Enterprise to check it out, not to vomit it up complete with grammatical errors onto thousands of broadsheet pages. While the Sociology Department has an obligation not to hold this moment of anger against him professionally, he’ll no doubt pay a very heavy social cost. The Enterprise used him without any regard for that cost.

    Finally, Ms. Kennedy. It’s the job of an editor to protect a reporter by making the final decision as to the newsworthiness of an article. Ms. Kennedy had a right to assume that her unpaid internship would include that some care be taken to protect her from her inexperience. She probably thought she would be getting a chance to see how a real newspaper works. Instead, the Enterprise evidently viewed her internship as a chance to bring more tabloid-style journalism to their pages.

    Villains? Obviously the unnamed editor who who chose 30 sensational column inches over their responsibility to the community and the reputations of the victims. But, let’s also add Ms. Davis to the villain list. If Francis is correct, Ms. Davis justified her attempts to protect the Enterprise and the unnamed editor by hiding behind claims of concern for their unpaid intern. A far better response would have been to admit error (in print), run the critical responses accurately, caution the editor, and vow to do better in the future.

  97. Anonymous

    “She needs to learn the value of integrity. She needs to realize the value of aiding the journalism process as a whole instead of trying to bring others down due to her own selfish endeavors.”

    Joan Morgan quoted the above and then said…
    “This has become a mean attack on Ms. Kennedy by anonymous posters. This site disgusts me sometimes. I can’t believe how ugly some people here can get.”

    I don’t get Ms. Morgan’s observation as to “ugliness,” It reads to me like “integrity” means simply, in terms of Ms. Kennedy’s published article, a lack of execution on Ms. Kennedy’s part in terms of producing accurate journalism. Ms. Kennedy wasn’t being “attacked,” per se, it’s just that it is being pointed out, about her writing, that she didn’t follow-through and interview enough sources to place in context assertions she made in the article, objectively speaking.
    Her editors should have caught her mistake before it saw print.
    In the interest of accurate journalism, it is valid to point out her shortcomings as a journalist–which, once she gets more experience in the craft, will surely be self-edited as she becomes aware of them.

  98. Anonymous

    “She needs to learn the value of integrity. She needs to realize the value of aiding the journalism process as a whole instead of trying to bring others down due to her own selfish endeavors.”

    Joan Morgan quoted the above and then said…
    “This has become a mean attack on Ms. Kennedy by anonymous posters. This site disgusts me sometimes. I can’t believe how ugly some people here can get.”

    I don’t get Ms. Morgan’s observation as to “ugliness,” It reads to me like “integrity” means simply, in terms of Ms. Kennedy’s published article, a lack of execution on Ms. Kennedy’s part in terms of producing accurate journalism. Ms. Kennedy wasn’t being “attacked,” per se, it’s just that it is being pointed out, about her writing, that she didn’t follow-through and interview enough sources to place in context assertions she made in the article, objectively speaking.
    Her editors should have caught her mistake before it saw print.
    In the interest of accurate journalism, it is valid to point out her shortcomings as a journalist–which, once she gets more experience in the craft, will surely be self-edited as she becomes aware of them.

  99. Anonymous

    “She needs to learn the value of integrity. She needs to realize the value of aiding the journalism process as a whole instead of trying to bring others down due to her own selfish endeavors.”

    Joan Morgan quoted the above and then said…
    “This has become a mean attack on Ms. Kennedy by anonymous posters. This site disgusts me sometimes. I can’t believe how ugly some people here can get.”

    I don’t get Ms. Morgan’s observation as to “ugliness,” It reads to me like “integrity” means simply, in terms of Ms. Kennedy’s published article, a lack of execution on Ms. Kennedy’s part in terms of producing accurate journalism. Ms. Kennedy wasn’t being “attacked,” per se, it’s just that it is being pointed out, about her writing, that she didn’t follow-through and interview enough sources to place in context assertions she made in the article, objectively speaking.
    Her editors should have caught her mistake before it saw print.
    In the interest of accurate journalism, it is valid to point out her shortcomings as a journalist–which, once she gets more experience in the craft, will surely be self-edited as she becomes aware of them.

  100. Anonymous

    “She needs to learn the value of integrity. She needs to realize the value of aiding the journalism process as a whole instead of trying to bring others down due to her own selfish endeavors.”

    Joan Morgan quoted the above and then said…
    “This has become a mean attack on Ms. Kennedy by anonymous posters. This site disgusts me sometimes. I can’t believe how ugly some people here can get.”

    I don’t get Ms. Morgan’s observation as to “ugliness,” It reads to me like “integrity” means simply, in terms of Ms. Kennedy’s published article, a lack of execution on Ms. Kennedy’s part in terms of producing accurate journalism. Ms. Kennedy wasn’t being “attacked,” per se, it’s just that it is being pointed out, about her writing, that she didn’t follow-through and interview enough sources to place in context assertions she made in the article, objectively speaking.
    Her editors should have caught her mistake before it saw print.
    In the interest of accurate journalism, it is valid to point out her shortcomings as a journalist–which, once she gets more experience in the craft, will surely be self-edited as she becomes aware of them.

  101. Brent Laabs

    This sort of behavior is what I would expect from Talia Kennedy. After being Campus Editor and City Editor of the Aggie, drawing salaries for both positions (because she was dating the Editor in Chief, most likely), we should expect a decent level of professionalism from her.

    And yet, I see her making the same mistake as a person she was partially responsible for firing from the Aggie, Eddie Lee (who is currently Editor in Chief). Her story went to press with only one source, just like his did. The only difference is that while Eddie Lee essentially plagarized large parts of the press release, Kennedy took the time to sensationalize her one source. You tell me which is more responsible.

    If you had wanted to hear her side of the story, you should have come the Media Board meeting where she defended herself. Her defense? We’re the editors, we know best. In response to a request for her resignation, she said to at least half of the Aggie staff that she wanted them to resign. Not only did it violate federal whistleblower laws, it could have threatened to dismantle the Aggie as an institution.

    I don’t believe that she should be a student at UCB, when she has shown little respect for journalistic ethics and the journalistic profession time and time again. And honestly, shame on the Enterprise for hiring her, but I don’t really expect much from them anyway.

    (By the way, I covered this story for the Davis Wiki)

  102. Brent Laabs

    This sort of behavior is what I would expect from Talia Kennedy. After being Campus Editor and City Editor of the Aggie, drawing salaries for both positions (because she was dating the Editor in Chief, most likely), we should expect a decent level of professionalism from her.

    And yet, I see her making the same mistake as a person she was partially responsible for firing from the Aggie, Eddie Lee (who is currently Editor in Chief). Her story went to press with only one source, just like his did. The only difference is that while Eddie Lee essentially plagarized large parts of the press release, Kennedy took the time to sensationalize her one source. You tell me which is more responsible.

    If you had wanted to hear her side of the story, you should have come the Media Board meeting where she defended herself. Her defense? We’re the editors, we know best. In response to a request for her resignation, she said to at least half of the Aggie staff that she wanted them to resign. Not only did it violate federal whistleblower laws, it could have threatened to dismantle the Aggie as an institution.

    I don’t believe that she should be a student at UCB, when she has shown little respect for journalistic ethics and the journalistic profession time and time again. And honestly, shame on the Enterprise for hiring her, but I don’t really expect much from them anyway.

    (By the way, I covered this story for the Davis Wiki)

  103. Brent Laabs

    This sort of behavior is what I would expect from Talia Kennedy. After being Campus Editor and City Editor of the Aggie, drawing salaries for both positions (because she was dating the Editor in Chief, most likely), we should expect a decent level of professionalism from her.

    And yet, I see her making the same mistake as a person she was partially responsible for firing from the Aggie, Eddie Lee (who is currently Editor in Chief). Her story went to press with only one source, just like his did. The only difference is that while Eddie Lee essentially plagarized large parts of the press release, Kennedy took the time to sensationalize her one source. You tell me which is more responsible.

    If you had wanted to hear her side of the story, you should have come the Media Board meeting where she defended herself. Her defense? We’re the editors, we know best. In response to a request for her resignation, she said to at least half of the Aggie staff that she wanted them to resign. Not only did it violate federal whistleblower laws, it could have threatened to dismantle the Aggie as an institution.

    I don’t believe that she should be a student at UCB, when she has shown little respect for journalistic ethics and the journalistic profession time and time again. And honestly, shame on the Enterprise for hiring her, but I don’t really expect much from them anyway.

    (By the way, I covered this story for the Davis Wiki)

  104. Brent Laabs

    This sort of behavior is what I would expect from Talia Kennedy. After being Campus Editor and City Editor of the Aggie, drawing salaries for both positions (because she was dating the Editor in Chief, most likely), we should expect a decent level of professionalism from her.

    And yet, I see her making the same mistake as a person she was partially responsible for firing from the Aggie, Eddie Lee (who is currently Editor in Chief). Her story went to press with only one source, just like his did. The only difference is that while Eddie Lee essentially plagarized large parts of the press release, Kennedy took the time to sensationalize her one source. You tell me which is more responsible.

    If you had wanted to hear her side of the story, you should have come the Media Board meeting where she defended herself. Her defense? We’re the editors, we know best. In response to a request for her resignation, she said to at least half of the Aggie staff that she wanted them to resign. Not only did it violate federal whistleblower laws, it could have threatened to dismantle the Aggie as an institution.

    I don’t believe that she should be a student at UCB, when she has shown little respect for journalistic ethics and the journalistic profession time and time again. And honestly, shame on the Enterprise for hiring her, but I don’t really expect much from them anyway.

    (By the way, I covered this story for the Davis Wiki)

  105. Anonymous

    Ms. Kennedy targeted me and everyone she supervised at The Aggie. Her behavior is disgusting. She embezzled money in cahoots with Peter Hamilton (then subsequently lied about it); framed Eddie Lee (circumstances prove that he did not plagiarize for several reasons*), framed E. Kane, features editor from fall quarter (whose name the Media Board cleared on all accusations i.e. not guilty as charged); framed writer Eric Baliantz; conducted herself unprofessionally around the office and treated her fellow staff members with utter disrespect and maliciousness, instilling them with fear of her and her wrath.

    Someone or a body of people ought to inform Berkeley that this girl has acted unethically on multiple counts (let’s not forget 31 people asking for her resignation) and does not belong at the Berkeley School of Journalism. This girl has shown no remorse for her actions, only continuing to abuse her position as a writer, destroying innocent individuals’ credibility and reputations as she breezes by. All in all, let’s stand up for what’s right and inform those who should know about Kennedy’s unacceptable actions.

  106. Anonymous

    Ms. Kennedy targeted me and everyone she supervised at The Aggie. Her behavior is disgusting. She embezzled money in cahoots with Peter Hamilton (then subsequently lied about it); framed Eddie Lee (circumstances prove that he did not plagiarize for several reasons*), framed E. Kane, features editor from fall quarter (whose name the Media Board cleared on all accusations i.e. not guilty as charged); framed writer Eric Baliantz; conducted herself unprofessionally around the office and treated her fellow staff members with utter disrespect and maliciousness, instilling them with fear of her and her wrath.

    Someone or a body of people ought to inform Berkeley that this girl has acted unethically on multiple counts (let’s not forget 31 people asking for her resignation) and does not belong at the Berkeley School of Journalism. This girl has shown no remorse for her actions, only continuing to abuse her position as a writer, destroying innocent individuals’ credibility and reputations as she breezes by. All in all, let’s stand up for what’s right and inform those who should know about Kennedy’s unacceptable actions.

  107. Anonymous

    Ms. Kennedy targeted me and everyone she supervised at The Aggie. Her behavior is disgusting. She embezzled money in cahoots with Peter Hamilton (then subsequently lied about it); framed Eddie Lee (circumstances prove that he did not plagiarize for several reasons*), framed E. Kane, features editor from fall quarter (whose name the Media Board cleared on all accusations i.e. not guilty as charged); framed writer Eric Baliantz; conducted herself unprofessionally around the office and treated her fellow staff members with utter disrespect and maliciousness, instilling them with fear of her and her wrath.

    Someone or a body of people ought to inform Berkeley that this girl has acted unethically on multiple counts (let’s not forget 31 people asking for her resignation) and does not belong at the Berkeley School of Journalism. This girl has shown no remorse for her actions, only continuing to abuse her position as a writer, destroying innocent individuals’ credibility and reputations as she breezes by. All in all, let’s stand up for what’s right and inform those who should know about Kennedy’s unacceptable actions.

  108. Anonymous

    Ms. Kennedy targeted me and everyone she supervised at The Aggie. Her behavior is disgusting. She embezzled money in cahoots with Peter Hamilton (then subsequently lied about it); framed Eddie Lee (circumstances prove that he did not plagiarize for several reasons*), framed E. Kane, features editor from fall quarter (whose name the Media Board cleared on all accusations i.e. not guilty as charged); framed writer Eric Baliantz; conducted herself unprofessionally around the office and treated her fellow staff members with utter disrespect and maliciousness, instilling them with fear of her and her wrath.

    Someone or a body of people ought to inform Berkeley that this girl has acted unethically on multiple counts (let’s not forget 31 people asking for her resignation) and does not belong at the Berkeley School of Journalism. This girl has shown no remorse for her actions, only continuing to abuse her position as a writer, destroying innocent individuals’ credibility and reputations as she breezes by. All in all, let’s stand up for what’s right and inform those who should know about Kennedy’s unacceptable actions.

  109. Anonymous

    I second Rich Rifkin. Talia Kennedy is a crappy reporter, but y’all are making a mountain range out of a pimple.

    As for the Flatlander…9/11 Conspiracy theories?! Nuff said.

  110. Anonymous

    I second Rich Rifkin. Talia Kennedy is a crappy reporter, but y’all are making a mountain range out of a pimple.

    As for the Flatlander…9/11 Conspiracy theories?! Nuff said.

  111. Anonymous

    I second Rich Rifkin. Talia Kennedy is a crappy reporter, but y’all are making a mountain range out of a pimple.

    As for the Flatlander…9/11 Conspiracy theories?! Nuff said.

  112. Anonymous

    I second Rich Rifkin. Talia Kennedy is a crappy reporter, but y’all are making a mountain range out of a pimple.

    As for the Flatlander…9/11 Conspiracy theories?! Nuff said.

  113. Jonas

    I don’t think the full details of The Aggies’ internal problems with Ms. Kennedy should be discussed publicly. Yes, she made another mistake, but rehashing certain details of what happened in mid-May is not necessary.

    She obviously made a huge mistake, and I think those who are outraged do have a point. It is never a good thing to only have one source with no one else corroborating that source. Even those sappy human interest stories at least have comment from the other side.

    As a former member of The California Aggie staff (I worked all 4 of my years at UC Davis there),I have seen enough scandals, disagreements and internal problems in my time, and this last incident didn’t really take me by surprise. Even though I was present during the mid-May fiasco, I harbor no harsh feelings against Talia. My hope for any staff member at The Aggie who has moved on (fired or not fired) is to use what they have learned from their Aggie experience once they have to face the real world. My goal for my staff members when I was an editor/manager was for them to not only learn about the journalism process but learn about how to deal with people and listen to both sides in order to aid the community, not be a burden to it.

    I can only hope journalists who are in a situation like that of Ms. Kennedy’s will take it as a learning experience. There are those journalists out there whose hearts are so calloused and whose egos are so bloated that they don’t have a clue in the world about the gravity of their actions. Hopefully, this is not the case for Talia.

    I agree with the posting above: the “value of integrity” is very important — journalist or not.

  114. Jonas

    I don’t think the full details of The Aggies’ internal problems with Ms. Kennedy should be discussed publicly. Yes, she made another mistake, but rehashing certain details of what happened in mid-May is not necessary.

    She obviously made a huge mistake, and I think those who are outraged do have a point. It is never a good thing to only have one source with no one else corroborating that source. Even those sappy human interest stories at least have comment from the other side.

    As a former member of The California Aggie staff (I worked all 4 of my years at UC Davis there),I have seen enough scandals, disagreements and internal problems in my time, and this last incident didn’t really take me by surprise. Even though I was present during the mid-May fiasco, I harbor no harsh feelings against Talia. My hope for any staff member at The Aggie who has moved on (fired or not fired) is to use what they have learned from their Aggie experience once they have to face the real world. My goal for my staff members when I was an editor/manager was for them to not only learn about the journalism process but learn about how to deal with people and listen to both sides in order to aid the community, not be a burden to it.

    I can only hope journalists who are in a situation like that of Ms. Kennedy’s will take it as a learning experience. There are those journalists out there whose hearts are so calloused and whose egos are so bloated that they don’t have a clue in the world about the gravity of their actions. Hopefully, this is not the case for Talia.

    I agree with the posting above: the “value of integrity” is very important — journalist or not.

  115. Jonas

    I don’t think the full details of The Aggies’ internal problems with Ms. Kennedy should be discussed publicly. Yes, she made another mistake, but rehashing certain details of what happened in mid-May is not necessary.

    She obviously made a huge mistake, and I think those who are outraged do have a point. It is never a good thing to only have one source with no one else corroborating that source. Even those sappy human interest stories at least have comment from the other side.

    As a former member of The California Aggie staff (I worked all 4 of my years at UC Davis there),I have seen enough scandals, disagreements and internal problems in my time, and this last incident didn’t really take me by surprise. Even though I was present during the mid-May fiasco, I harbor no harsh feelings against Talia. My hope for any staff member at The Aggie who has moved on (fired or not fired) is to use what they have learned from their Aggie experience once they have to face the real world. My goal for my staff members when I was an editor/manager was for them to not only learn about the journalism process but learn about how to deal with people and listen to both sides in order to aid the community, not be a burden to it.

    I can only hope journalists who are in a situation like that of Ms. Kennedy’s will take it as a learning experience. There are those journalists out there whose hearts are so calloused and whose egos are so bloated that they don’t have a clue in the world about the gravity of their actions. Hopefully, this is not the case for Talia.

    I agree with the posting above: the “value of integrity” is very important — journalist or not.

  116. Jonas

    I don’t think the full details of The Aggies’ internal problems with Ms. Kennedy should be discussed publicly. Yes, she made another mistake, but rehashing certain details of what happened in mid-May is not necessary.

    She obviously made a huge mistake, and I think those who are outraged do have a point. It is never a good thing to only have one source with no one else corroborating that source. Even those sappy human interest stories at least have comment from the other side.

    As a former member of The California Aggie staff (I worked all 4 of my years at UC Davis there),I have seen enough scandals, disagreements and internal problems in my time, and this last incident didn’t really take me by surprise. Even though I was present during the mid-May fiasco, I harbor no harsh feelings against Talia. My hope for any staff member at The Aggie who has moved on (fired or not fired) is to use what they have learned from their Aggie experience once they have to face the real world. My goal for my staff members when I was an editor/manager was for them to not only learn about the journalism process but learn about how to deal with people and listen to both sides in order to aid the community, not be a burden to it.

    I can only hope journalists who are in a situation like that of Ms. Kennedy’s will take it as a learning experience. There are those journalists out there whose hearts are so calloused and whose egos are so bloated that they don’t have a clue in the world about the gravity of their actions. Hopefully, this is not the case for Talia.

    I agree with the posting above: the “value of integrity” is very important — journalist or not.

  117. Anonymous

    “I second Rich Rifkin. Talia Kennedy is a crappy reporter, but y’all are making a mountain range out of a pimple.”

    The principle is that objectivity in the craft of journalism needs to be instilled, even in terms of such a “minor” subject as the firings in the UCD Sosh Dept.,
    however successfully or not. Talia Kennedy is going to go on to write stories about more important subjects; hopefully she will read the postings here and then take the principle of objectivity–in honor of which journalists in the past have died or ended their careers–to heart and use this tool more judiciously when she does.

  118. Anonymous

    “I second Rich Rifkin. Talia Kennedy is a crappy reporter, but y’all are making a mountain range out of a pimple.”

    The principle is that objectivity in the craft of journalism needs to be instilled, even in terms of such a “minor” subject as the firings in the UCD Sosh Dept.,
    however successfully or not. Talia Kennedy is going to go on to write stories about more important subjects; hopefully she will read the postings here and then take the principle of objectivity–in honor of which journalists in the past have died or ended their careers–to heart and use this tool more judiciously when she does.

  119. Anonymous

    “I second Rich Rifkin. Talia Kennedy is a crappy reporter, but y’all are making a mountain range out of a pimple.”

    The principle is that objectivity in the craft of journalism needs to be instilled, even in terms of such a “minor” subject as the firings in the UCD Sosh Dept.,
    however successfully or not. Talia Kennedy is going to go on to write stories about more important subjects; hopefully she will read the postings here and then take the principle of objectivity–in honor of which journalists in the past have died or ended their careers–to heart and use this tool more judiciously when she does.

  120. Anonymous

    “I second Rich Rifkin. Talia Kennedy is a crappy reporter, but y’all are making a mountain range out of a pimple.”

    The principle is that objectivity in the craft of journalism needs to be instilled, even in terms of such a “minor” subject as the firings in the UCD Sosh Dept.,
    however successfully or not. Talia Kennedy is going to go on to write stories about more important subjects; hopefully she will read the postings here and then take the principle of objectivity–in honor of which journalists in the past have died or ended their careers–to heart and use this tool more judiciously when she does.

  121. Doug Paul Davis

    There are two key points I’d like to make at the end of the day today.

    First, those who think that this is a whole lot to do about nothing, have not talked with some of the people involved in this story. If they had, I think they would see things differently.

    Second, some have taken exception to the tone expressed by some about Ms. Kennedy. While I really tried to the focus the story today about the Davis Enterprise and their decisions, there is no doubt in my mind that there is a lot of frustration pent up from an incident that btw occurred less that three months ago. And furthermore, many of the people involved never got a public vetting of the issue, it was not covered in the Aggie or the Enterprise, so I think that a little understanding there might be helpful.

    Finally, it is my hope that people can learn from their mistakes, but people never learn from their mistakes if those mistakes are covered up and people do not own up to them. The idea that everyone has somehow learned a lesson here, strikes me as odd since the reaction from the paper was that there would be no public disclosure of the errors because the intern was too devastated.

    I’m sorry, but I felt this was an important story and I also believe that Debbie Davis, who indeed has a responsibility to her intern who is under her guidance, also has a responsibility to the community and to the individual who was on the receiving end of this article. And I think Vickie Smith is owed a deep apology from Debbie Davis over the way this was handled and the way the article was reported.

    Just my thoughts…

  122. Doug Paul Davis

    There are two key points I’d like to make at the end of the day today.

    First, those who think that this is a whole lot to do about nothing, have not talked with some of the people involved in this story. If they had, I think they would see things differently.

    Second, some have taken exception to the tone expressed by some about Ms. Kennedy. While I really tried to the focus the story today about the Davis Enterprise and their decisions, there is no doubt in my mind that there is a lot of frustration pent up from an incident that btw occurred less that three months ago. And furthermore, many of the people involved never got a public vetting of the issue, it was not covered in the Aggie or the Enterprise, so I think that a little understanding there might be helpful.

    Finally, it is my hope that people can learn from their mistakes, but people never learn from their mistakes if those mistakes are covered up and people do not own up to them. The idea that everyone has somehow learned a lesson here, strikes me as odd since the reaction from the paper was that there would be no public disclosure of the errors because the intern was too devastated.

    I’m sorry, but I felt this was an important story and I also believe that Debbie Davis, who indeed has a responsibility to her intern who is under her guidance, also has a responsibility to the community and to the individual who was on the receiving end of this article. And I think Vickie Smith is owed a deep apology from Debbie Davis over the way this was handled and the way the article was reported.

    Just my thoughts…

  123. Doug Paul Davis

    There are two key points I’d like to make at the end of the day today.

    First, those who think that this is a whole lot to do about nothing, have not talked with some of the people involved in this story. If they had, I think they would see things differently.

    Second, some have taken exception to the tone expressed by some about Ms. Kennedy. While I really tried to the focus the story today about the Davis Enterprise and their decisions, there is no doubt in my mind that there is a lot of frustration pent up from an incident that btw occurred less that three months ago. And furthermore, many of the people involved never got a public vetting of the issue, it was not covered in the Aggie or the Enterprise, so I think that a little understanding there might be helpful.

    Finally, it is my hope that people can learn from their mistakes, but people never learn from their mistakes if those mistakes are covered up and people do not own up to them. The idea that everyone has somehow learned a lesson here, strikes me as odd since the reaction from the paper was that there would be no public disclosure of the errors because the intern was too devastated.

    I’m sorry, but I felt this was an important story and I also believe that Debbie Davis, who indeed has a responsibility to her intern who is under her guidance, also has a responsibility to the community and to the individual who was on the receiving end of this article. And I think Vickie Smith is owed a deep apology from Debbie Davis over the way this was handled and the way the article was reported.

    Just my thoughts…

  124. Doug Paul Davis

    There are two key points I’d like to make at the end of the day today.

    First, those who think that this is a whole lot to do about nothing, have not talked with some of the people involved in this story. If they had, I think they would see things differently.

    Second, some have taken exception to the tone expressed by some about Ms. Kennedy. While I really tried to the focus the story today about the Davis Enterprise and their decisions, there is no doubt in my mind that there is a lot of frustration pent up from an incident that btw occurred less that three months ago. And furthermore, many of the people involved never got a public vetting of the issue, it was not covered in the Aggie or the Enterprise, so I think that a little understanding there might be helpful.

    Finally, it is my hope that people can learn from their mistakes, but people never learn from their mistakes if those mistakes are covered up and people do not own up to them. The idea that everyone has somehow learned a lesson here, strikes me as odd since the reaction from the paper was that there would be no public disclosure of the errors because the intern was too devastated.

    I’m sorry, but I felt this was an important story and I also believe that Debbie Davis, who indeed has a responsibility to her intern who is under her guidance, also has a responsibility to the community and to the individual who was on the receiving end of this article. And I think Vickie Smith is owed a deep apology from Debbie Davis over the way this was handled and the way the article was reported.

    Just my thoughts…

  125. Brent Laabs

    Hey Jonas, good to see you posting. There’s a lot of people who are still upset about the Aggie shakedown in May, but I’m sad to see that most of you are anonymous. I’m an elected official, so there could be real consequences for what they say. But I still believe in putting my name behind it as a matter of integrity. You all should too, if you’re in the newspaper business.

    Jonas: I feel like the Aggie values its secrecy and its subculture too much, and it’s people not talking that causes all of the big scandals. People are still upset over Eric Balliantz, and I hardly know anything about it. Openness encourages accountability, in governments as in newspapers.

    DPD: It’s incredibly hard for me to believe that Kennedy was devastated by her error — she was in charge of enforcing those standards with other people as an editor, so she should understand her mistake and ‘fess up.

    I don’t know why everyone discounts the California Aggie so much. It seems like they make the same editorial mistakes as the Davis Enterprise; the Aggie also has a larger circulation. Talia should be judged by much the same standards as we judge the Enterprise editors, as the Aggie has about as much effect on its community (UCD) as the Enterprise does on theirs (Davis).

    I’ll disclose my bias here, too: She mishandled some information that I leaked to her, in such a way that it didn’t protect my confidentiality, as she had promised. It was at least partially responsible for getting me impeached as UCSA Board of Directors Chair. But honestly, what I feel is super minor compared to what I have heard from Aggie reporters and staffers who had to work with her all year.

    Sorry to ramble, but DPD brought up a lot of issues that we in the campus community still haven’t resolved.

  126. Brent Laabs

    Hey Jonas, good to see you posting. There’s a lot of people who are still upset about the Aggie shakedown in May, but I’m sad to see that most of you are anonymous. I’m an elected official, so there could be real consequences for what they say. But I still believe in putting my name behind it as a matter of integrity. You all should too, if you’re in the newspaper business.

    Jonas: I feel like the Aggie values its secrecy and its subculture too much, and it’s people not talking that causes all of the big scandals. People are still upset over Eric Balliantz, and I hardly know anything about it. Openness encourages accountability, in governments as in newspapers.

    DPD: It’s incredibly hard for me to believe that Kennedy was devastated by her error — she was in charge of enforcing those standards with other people as an editor, so she should understand her mistake and ‘fess up.

    I don’t know why everyone discounts the California Aggie so much. It seems like they make the same editorial mistakes as the Davis Enterprise; the Aggie also has a larger circulation. Talia should be judged by much the same standards as we judge the Enterprise editors, as the Aggie has about as much effect on its community (UCD) as the Enterprise does on theirs (Davis).

    I’ll disclose my bias here, too: She mishandled some information that I leaked to her, in such a way that it didn’t protect my confidentiality, as she had promised. It was at least partially responsible for getting me impeached as UCSA Board of Directors Chair. But honestly, what I feel is super minor compared to what I have heard from Aggie reporters and staffers who had to work with her all year.

    Sorry to ramble, but DPD brought up a lot of issues that we in the campus community still haven’t resolved.

  127. Brent Laabs

    Hey Jonas, good to see you posting. There’s a lot of people who are still upset about the Aggie shakedown in May, but I’m sad to see that most of you are anonymous. I’m an elected official, so there could be real consequences for what they say. But I still believe in putting my name behind it as a matter of integrity. You all should too, if you’re in the newspaper business.

    Jonas: I feel like the Aggie values its secrecy and its subculture too much, and it’s people not talking that causes all of the big scandals. People are still upset over Eric Balliantz, and I hardly know anything about it. Openness encourages accountability, in governments as in newspapers.

    DPD: It’s incredibly hard for me to believe that Kennedy was devastated by her error — she was in charge of enforcing those standards with other people as an editor, so she should understand her mistake and ‘fess up.

    I don’t know why everyone discounts the California Aggie so much. It seems like they make the same editorial mistakes as the Davis Enterprise; the Aggie also has a larger circulation. Talia should be judged by much the same standards as we judge the Enterprise editors, as the Aggie has about as much effect on its community (UCD) as the Enterprise does on theirs (Davis).

    I’ll disclose my bias here, too: She mishandled some information that I leaked to her, in such a way that it didn’t protect my confidentiality, as she had promised. It was at least partially responsible for getting me impeached as UCSA Board of Directors Chair. But honestly, what I feel is super minor compared to what I have heard from Aggie reporters and staffers who had to work with her all year.

    Sorry to ramble, but DPD brought up a lot of issues that we in the campus community still haven’t resolved.

  128. Brent Laabs

    Hey Jonas, good to see you posting. There’s a lot of people who are still upset about the Aggie shakedown in May, but I’m sad to see that most of you are anonymous. I’m an elected official, so there could be real consequences for what they say. But I still believe in putting my name behind it as a matter of integrity. You all should too, if you’re in the newspaper business.

    Jonas: I feel like the Aggie values its secrecy and its subculture too much, and it’s people not talking that causes all of the big scandals. People are still upset over Eric Balliantz, and I hardly know anything about it. Openness encourages accountability, in governments as in newspapers.

    DPD: It’s incredibly hard for me to believe that Kennedy was devastated by her error — she was in charge of enforcing those standards with other people as an editor, so she should understand her mistake and ‘fess up.

    I don’t know why everyone discounts the California Aggie so much. It seems like they make the same editorial mistakes as the Davis Enterprise; the Aggie also has a larger circulation. Talia should be judged by much the same standards as we judge the Enterprise editors, as the Aggie has about as much effect on its community (UCD) as the Enterprise does on theirs (Davis).

    I’ll disclose my bias here, too: She mishandled some information that I leaked to her, in such a way that it didn’t protect my confidentiality, as she had promised. It was at least partially responsible for getting me impeached as UCSA Board of Directors Chair. But honestly, what I feel is super minor compared to what I have heard from Aggie reporters and staffers who had to work with her all year.

    Sorry to ramble, but DPD brought up a lot of issues that we in the campus community still haven’t resolved.

  129. Anonymous

    DPD:
    “…The idea that everyone has somehow learned a lesson here, strikes me as odd…”

    The issue, in particular, is the objective accuracy of Ms. Kennedy’s future articles
    (as a goal for her to shoot for anyways–she’s obviously well-connected: there will be more articles…); it’s time to hope, just before we all move on, that a tiny shaft of objective enlightenment has penetrated the narcissism clouding her judgement…even through hearsay.

  130. Anonymous

    DPD:
    “…The idea that everyone has somehow learned a lesson here, strikes me as odd…”

    The issue, in particular, is the objective accuracy of Ms. Kennedy’s future articles
    (as a goal for her to shoot for anyways–she’s obviously well-connected: there will be more articles…); it’s time to hope, just before we all move on, that a tiny shaft of objective enlightenment has penetrated the narcissism clouding her judgement…even through hearsay.

  131. Anonymous

    DPD:
    “…The idea that everyone has somehow learned a lesson here, strikes me as odd…”

    The issue, in particular, is the objective accuracy of Ms. Kennedy’s future articles
    (as a goal for her to shoot for anyways–she’s obviously well-connected: there will be more articles…); it’s time to hope, just before we all move on, that a tiny shaft of objective enlightenment has penetrated the narcissism clouding her judgement…even through hearsay.

  132. Anonymous

    DPD:
    “…The idea that everyone has somehow learned a lesson here, strikes me as odd…”

    The issue, in particular, is the objective accuracy of Ms. Kennedy’s future articles
    (as a goal for her to shoot for anyways–she’s obviously well-connected: there will be more articles…); it’s time to hope, just before we all move on, that a tiny shaft of objective enlightenment has penetrated the narcissism clouding her judgement…even through hearsay.

  133. PeaceBwithyou

    I am of the mind that people can perpetuate talk, they can speculate, they can waste time reading internet blogs, but if their obsession with talk and back-and-forth accusations yield no action, then discussing issues over and over is pointless, a mere exercise in futility. I personally would not waste my time with such things unless I planned to do something about what made me empassioned.

    Summary: I feel that unless all this talk leads to major group action toward the removal of Kennedy from The Enterprise or Berkeley, it all seems like fodder that people who don’t know all the details are casually tossing around for the fix off controversy.

  134. PeaceBwithyou

    I am of the mind that people can perpetuate talk, they can speculate, they can waste time reading internet blogs, but if their obsession with talk and back-and-forth accusations yield no action, then discussing issues over and over is pointless, a mere exercise in futility. I personally would not waste my time with such things unless I planned to do something about what made me empassioned.

    Summary: I feel that unless all this talk leads to major group action toward the removal of Kennedy from The Enterprise or Berkeley, it all seems like fodder that people who don’t know all the details are casually tossing around for the fix off controversy.

  135. PeaceBwithyou

    I am of the mind that people can perpetuate talk, they can speculate, they can waste time reading internet blogs, but if their obsession with talk and back-and-forth accusations yield no action, then discussing issues over and over is pointless, a mere exercise in futility. I personally would not waste my time with such things unless I planned to do something about what made me empassioned.

    Summary: I feel that unless all this talk leads to major group action toward the removal of Kennedy from The Enterprise or Berkeley, it all seems like fodder that people who don’t know all the details are casually tossing around for the fix off controversy.

  136. PeaceBwithyou

    I am of the mind that people can perpetuate talk, they can speculate, they can waste time reading internet blogs, but if their obsession with talk and back-and-forth accusations yield no action, then discussing issues over and over is pointless, a mere exercise in futility. I personally would not waste my time with such things unless I planned to do something about what made me empassioned.

    Summary: I feel that unless all this talk leads to major group action toward the removal of Kennedy from The Enterprise or Berkeley, it all seems like fodder that people who don’t know all the details are casually tossing around for the fix off controversy.

  137. don shor

    “Sorry to ramble, but DPD brought up a lot of issues that we in the campus community still haven’t resolved.”
    Evidently not. But I have been hearing about these sorts of internecine battles at the Aggie since I was a student there in the 1970’s. Disputes and controversies going back to 1999 are covered at Davis Wiki. I remember similar fights long before that. Like the ASUCD Senate, it seems that great upheaval has been the norm.

    The subtext of all this is that somehow the Enterprise should have known all about the current dispute and therefore declined Talia Kennedy’s application for an internship.

    “…a quick search on Google of “Talia Kennedy” and “California Aggie” would have revealed this incident and might have called into question the hiring of this intern.”

    Are employers supposed to Google applicants now? Follow local blogs to vet their candidates? Check the Wiki to see how the competing egos are playing out there? I can’t imagine how the Enterprise management could have sorted out who was right and who was wrong in the latest Aggie squabble.

    UCD lecturers have complained about their status, one way or another, for as long as I can remember — because they are overworked, underpaid, and unrepresented (still? I think so). They went on strike a few years ago. This was an unbalanced story about one lecturer who thought that he was being treated unusually due to his ethnicity.

    When I read the article I thought that Mr. Gharagozlou probably had no merit to his complaint. The story didn’t validate his complaint, it reported it. When I read the letter from Ms. Francis I felt that it confirmed my initial impression and provided some balance. IMO letters to the editor sometimes actually get more attention than the original article. The editor acknowledged the error, corrected it to a degree, and has explained her actions. I don’t know what more you can reasonably expect at this point.

  138. don shor

    “Sorry to ramble, but DPD brought up a lot of issues that we in the campus community still haven’t resolved.”
    Evidently not. But I have been hearing about these sorts of internecine battles at the Aggie since I was a student there in the 1970’s. Disputes and controversies going back to 1999 are covered at Davis Wiki. I remember similar fights long before that. Like the ASUCD Senate, it seems that great upheaval has been the norm.

    The subtext of all this is that somehow the Enterprise should have known all about the current dispute and therefore declined Talia Kennedy’s application for an internship.

    “…a quick search on Google of “Talia Kennedy” and “California Aggie” would have revealed this incident and might have called into question the hiring of this intern.”

    Are employers supposed to Google applicants now? Follow local blogs to vet their candidates? Check the Wiki to see how the competing egos are playing out there? I can’t imagine how the Enterprise management could have sorted out who was right and who was wrong in the latest Aggie squabble.

    UCD lecturers have complained about their status, one way or another, for as long as I can remember — because they are overworked, underpaid, and unrepresented (still? I think so). They went on strike a few years ago. This was an unbalanced story about one lecturer who thought that he was being treated unusually due to his ethnicity.

    When I read the article I thought that Mr. Gharagozlou probably had no merit to his complaint. The story didn’t validate his complaint, it reported it. When I read the letter from Ms. Francis I felt that it confirmed my initial impression and provided some balance. IMO letters to the editor sometimes actually get more attention than the original article. The editor acknowledged the error, corrected it to a degree, and has explained her actions. I don’t know what more you can reasonably expect at this point.

  139. don shor

    “Sorry to ramble, but DPD brought up a lot of issues that we in the campus community still haven’t resolved.”
    Evidently not. But I have been hearing about these sorts of internecine battles at the Aggie since I was a student there in the 1970’s. Disputes and controversies going back to 1999 are covered at Davis Wiki. I remember similar fights long before that. Like the ASUCD Senate, it seems that great upheaval has been the norm.

    The subtext of all this is that somehow the Enterprise should have known all about the current dispute and therefore declined Talia Kennedy’s application for an internship.

    “…a quick search on Google of “Talia Kennedy” and “California Aggie” would have revealed this incident and might have called into question the hiring of this intern.”

    Are employers supposed to Google applicants now? Follow local blogs to vet their candidates? Check the Wiki to see how the competing egos are playing out there? I can’t imagine how the Enterprise management could have sorted out who was right and who was wrong in the latest Aggie squabble.

    UCD lecturers have complained about their status, one way or another, for as long as I can remember — because they are overworked, underpaid, and unrepresented (still? I think so). They went on strike a few years ago. This was an unbalanced story about one lecturer who thought that he was being treated unusually due to his ethnicity.

    When I read the article I thought that Mr. Gharagozlou probably had no merit to his complaint. The story didn’t validate his complaint, it reported it. When I read the letter from Ms. Francis I felt that it confirmed my initial impression and provided some balance. IMO letters to the editor sometimes actually get more attention than the original article. The editor acknowledged the error, corrected it to a degree, and has explained her actions. I don’t know what more you can reasonably expect at this point.

  140. don shor

    “Sorry to ramble, but DPD brought up a lot of issues that we in the campus community still haven’t resolved.”
    Evidently not. But I have been hearing about these sorts of internecine battles at the Aggie since I was a student there in the 1970’s. Disputes and controversies going back to 1999 are covered at Davis Wiki. I remember similar fights long before that. Like the ASUCD Senate, it seems that great upheaval has been the norm.

    The subtext of all this is that somehow the Enterprise should have known all about the current dispute and therefore declined Talia Kennedy’s application for an internship.

    “…a quick search on Google of “Talia Kennedy” and “California Aggie” would have revealed this incident and might have called into question the hiring of this intern.”

    Are employers supposed to Google applicants now? Follow local blogs to vet their candidates? Check the Wiki to see how the competing egos are playing out there? I can’t imagine how the Enterprise management could have sorted out who was right and who was wrong in the latest Aggie squabble.

    UCD lecturers have complained about their status, one way or another, for as long as I can remember — because they are overworked, underpaid, and unrepresented (still? I think so). They went on strike a few years ago. This was an unbalanced story about one lecturer who thought that he was being treated unusually due to his ethnicity.

    When I read the article I thought that Mr. Gharagozlou probably had no merit to his complaint. The story didn’t validate his complaint, it reported it. When I read the letter from Ms. Francis I felt that it confirmed my initial impression and provided some balance. IMO letters to the editor sometimes actually get more attention than the original article. The editor acknowledged the error, corrected it to a degree, and has explained her actions. I don’t know what more you can reasonably expect at this point.

  141. down with the Enterprise

    I’ve been thinking for a while that the only thing the Enterprise contributes to the community are the letters to the editor and community announcements.
    If there was a website for community announcements (maybe a section of the Davis Wiki, or a Google community calendar), as well as a ‘local letters to the editor’ forum, there would be no need for the Enterprise.

    Yes, my intent would be to get rid of the Enterprise. It would need to be a campaign, wherein we found a way to get the advertizers to switch to a web-based community forum and flee the Enterprise. In my opinion, the Enterprise has outlived its usefulness, and does more harm than good. It’s time to end it, not just set up ‘alternatives’,

  142. down with the Enterprise

    I’ve been thinking for a while that the only thing the Enterprise contributes to the community are the letters to the editor and community announcements.
    If there was a website for community announcements (maybe a section of the Davis Wiki, or a Google community calendar), as well as a ‘local letters to the editor’ forum, there would be no need for the Enterprise.

    Yes, my intent would be to get rid of the Enterprise. It would need to be a campaign, wherein we found a way to get the advertizers to switch to a web-based community forum and flee the Enterprise. In my opinion, the Enterprise has outlived its usefulness, and does more harm than good. It’s time to end it, not just set up ‘alternatives’,

  143. down with the Enterprise

    I’ve been thinking for a while that the only thing the Enterprise contributes to the community are the letters to the editor and community announcements.
    If there was a website for community announcements (maybe a section of the Davis Wiki, or a Google community calendar), as well as a ‘local letters to the editor’ forum, there would be no need for the Enterprise.

    Yes, my intent would be to get rid of the Enterprise. It would need to be a campaign, wherein we found a way to get the advertizers to switch to a web-based community forum and flee the Enterprise. In my opinion, the Enterprise has outlived its usefulness, and does more harm than good. It’s time to end it, not just set up ‘alternatives’,

  144. down with the Enterprise

    I’ve been thinking for a while that the only thing the Enterprise contributes to the community are the letters to the editor and community announcements.
    If there was a website for community announcements (maybe a section of the Davis Wiki, or a Google community calendar), as well as a ‘local letters to the editor’ forum, there would be no need for the Enterprise.

    Yes, my intent would be to get rid of the Enterprise. It would need to be a campaign, wherein we found a way to get the advertizers to switch to a web-based community forum and flee the Enterprise. In my opinion, the Enterprise has outlived its usefulness, and does more harm than good. It’s time to end it, not just set up ‘alternatives’,

  145. Anonymous

    Don – How about an apology to the Chair of the Department for the incorrect and unfair article by the Enterprise and the reporter, rather than just a correction regarding the names attached to the letter?

    I think that would go a long way toward repairing the damage to the department’s reputation.

  146. Anonymous

    Don – How about an apology to the Chair of the Department for the incorrect and unfair article by the Enterprise and the reporter, rather than just a correction regarding the names attached to the letter?

    I think that would go a long way toward repairing the damage to the department’s reputation.

  147. Anonymous

    Don – How about an apology to the Chair of the Department for the incorrect and unfair article by the Enterprise and the reporter, rather than just a correction regarding the names attached to the letter?

    I think that would go a long way toward repairing the damage to the department’s reputation.

  148. Anonymous

    Don – How about an apology to the Chair of the Department for the incorrect and unfair article by the Enterprise and the reporter, rather than just a correction regarding the names attached to the letter?

    I think that would go a long way toward repairing the damage to the department’s reputation.

  149. Anonymous

    Down With The Enterprise wrote:
    “the Enterprise has outlived its usefulness, and does more harm than good. It’s time to end it, not just set up ‘alternatives”

    –Don’t fool yourself, Down, the Enterprise knows its loyal readership very, very well. A readership which Debbie Davis identifies in the current issue of DavisLife Magazine (which has a link on People’s Vanguard’s home page).
    One thing I was glad to learn from reading the DavisLife article: “…the [Enterprise]newsroom keeps a close eye on the news.”
    Anyway, also in the article entitled, “Behind The Scenes Of The Davis Enterprise”
    Debbie Davis is quoted, ““We are always a local paper, number one…but we have this kind of balancing act that we do.”
    Davis went on to say that there are two distinct types of readers for The Davis Enterprise. One relies on the DE for local only, getting their national and international news elsewhere. And then there are a sizable number of people that take only the DE.
    It’s that second “sizable” group of people who will always support the Davis Enterprise, which caters to them in many ways…
    And who probably don’t send or read many postings to the People’s Vanguard of Davis.

  150. Anonymous

    Down With The Enterprise wrote:
    “the Enterprise has outlived its usefulness, and does more harm than good. It’s time to end it, not just set up ‘alternatives”

    –Don’t fool yourself, Down, the Enterprise knows its loyal readership very, very well. A readership which Debbie Davis identifies in the current issue of DavisLife Magazine (which has a link on People’s Vanguard’s home page).
    One thing I was glad to learn from reading the DavisLife article: “…the [Enterprise]newsroom keeps a close eye on the news.”
    Anyway, also in the article entitled, “Behind The Scenes Of The Davis Enterprise”
    Debbie Davis is quoted, ““We are always a local paper, number one…but we have this kind of balancing act that we do.”
    Davis went on to say that there are two distinct types of readers for The Davis Enterprise. One relies on the DE for local only, getting their national and international news elsewhere. And then there are a sizable number of people that take only the DE.
    It’s that second “sizable” group of people who will always support the Davis Enterprise, which caters to them in many ways…
    And who probably don’t send or read many postings to the People’s Vanguard of Davis.

  151. Anonymous

    Down With The Enterprise wrote:
    “the Enterprise has outlived its usefulness, and does more harm than good. It’s time to end it, not just set up ‘alternatives”

    –Don’t fool yourself, Down, the Enterprise knows its loyal readership very, very well. A readership which Debbie Davis identifies in the current issue of DavisLife Magazine (which has a link on People’s Vanguard’s home page).
    One thing I was glad to learn from reading the DavisLife article: “…the [Enterprise]newsroom keeps a close eye on the news.”
    Anyway, also in the article entitled, “Behind The Scenes Of The Davis Enterprise”
    Debbie Davis is quoted, ““We are always a local paper, number one…but we have this kind of balancing act that we do.”
    Davis went on to say that there are two distinct types of readers for The Davis Enterprise. One relies on the DE for local only, getting their national and international news elsewhere. And then there are a sizable number of people that take only the DE.
    It’s that second “sizable” group of people who will always support the Davis Enterprise, which caters to them in many ways…
    And who probably don’t send or read many postings to the People’s Vanguard of Davis.

  152. Anonymous

    Down With The Enterprise wrote:
    “the Enterprise has outlived its usefulness, and does more harm than good. It’s time to end it, not just set up ‘alternatives”

    –Don’t fool yourself, Down, the Enterprise knows its loyal readership very, very well. A readership which Debbie Davis identifies in the current issue of DavisLife Magazine (which has a link on People’s Vanguard’s home page).
    One thing I was glad to learn from reading the DavisLife article: “…the [Enterprise]newsroom keeps a close eye on the news.”
    Anyway, also in the article entitled, “Behind The Scenes Of The Davis Enterprise”
    Debbie Davis is quoted, ““We are always a local paper, number one…but we have this kind of balancing act that we do.”
    Davis went on to say that there are two distinct types of readers for The Davis Enterprise. One relies on the DE for local only, getting their national and international news elsewhere. And then there are a sizable number of people that take only the DE.
    It’s that second “sizable” group of people who will always support the Davis Enterprise, which caters to them in many ways…
    And who probably don’t send or read many postings to the People’s Vanguard of Davis.

  153. Anonymous

    Anonymous, 8/11/07 4:52 AM, quoted…
    Anonymous, 8/11/07 1:16 AM:
    “Local paper. Young reporter. You get what you pay for. Don’t buy the paper if you don’t like it.”

    Then stated:
    Are you kidding me???

    The ones who buy it, have been buying it, in more ways than one, for years and years and years…
    Several years ago an upscale publication called “Downtown Davis” challenged the Enterprise, which demonstrated the solidity of its lock on local advertisers: “Downtown Davis,” which contained some great writing, lasted exactly one month.

  154. Anonymous

    Anonymous, 8/11/07 4:52 AM, quoted…
    Anonymous, 8/11/07 1:16 AM:
    “Local paper. Young reporter. You get what you pay for. Don’t buy the paper if you don’t like it.”

    Then stated:
    Are you kidding me???

    The ones who buy it, have been buying it, in more ways than one, for years and years and years…
    Several years ago an upscale publication called “Downtown Davis” challenged the Enterprise, which demonstrated the solidity of its lock on local advertisers: “Downtown Davis,” which contained some great writing, lasted exactly one month.

  155. Anonymous

    Anonymous, 8/11/07 4:52 AM, quoted…
    Anonymous, 8/11/07 1:16 AM:
    “Local paper. Young reporter. You get what you pay for. Don’t buy the paper if you don’t like it.”

    Then stated:
    Are you kidding me???

    The ones who buy it, have been buying it, in more ways than one, for years and years and years…
    Several years ago an upscale publication called “Downtown Davis” challenged the Enterprise, which demonstrated the solidity of its lock on local advertisers: “Downtown Davis,” which contained some great writing, lasted exactly one month.

  156. Anonymous

    Anonymous, 8/11/07 4:52 AM, quoted…
    Anonymous, 8/11/07 1:16 AM:
    “Local paper. Young reporter. You get what you pay for. Don’t buy the paper if you don’t like it.”

    Then stated:
    Are you kidding me???

    The ones who buy it, have been buying it, in more ways than one, for years and years and years…
    Several years ago an upscale publication called “Downtown Davis” challenged the Enterprise, which demonstrated the solidity of its lock on local advertisers: “Downtown Davis,” which contained some great writing, lasted exactly one month.

  157. Former Enterprise Reader

    Ithink it’s obvious that Ms Kennedy has a fine career in journalism to look forward to. Fox News is always looking for reporters ready to sensationalize and distort. She’ll fit right in.

  158. Former Enterprise Reader

    Ithink it’s obvious that Ms Kennedy has a fine career in journalism to look forward to. Fox News is always looking for reporters ready to sensationalize and distort. She’ll fit right in.

  159. Former Enterprise Reader

    Ithink it’s obvious that Ms Kennedy has a fine career in journalism to look forward to. Fox News is always looking for reporters ready to sensationalize and distort. She’ll fit right in.

  160. Former Enterprise Reader

    Ithink it’s obvious that Ms Kennedy has a fine career in journalism to look forward to. Fox News is always looking for reporters ready to sensationalize and distort. She’ll fit right in.

  161. Anonymous

    Former Enterprise Reader said…
    Ithink it’s obvious that Ms Kennedy has a fine career in journalism to look forward to. Fox News is always looking for reporters ready to sensationalize and distort. She’ll fit right in.

    8/11/07 11:55 AM

    Surprising how cynical some of the comments on this thread got…Fox News? Ganging up on an unpaid intern? A cheap shot.
    As if her story is over now after one article published in a provincial paper and before her career could even really be said to have begun…

  162. Anonymous

    Former Enterprise Reader said…
    Ithink it’s obvious that Ms Kennedy has a fine career in journalism to look forward to. Fox News is always looking for reporters ready to sensationalize and distort. She’ll fit right in.

    8/11/07 11:55 AM

    Surprising how cynical some of the comments on this thread got…Fox News? Ganging up on an unpaid intern? A cheap shot.
    As if her story is over now after one article published in a provincial paper and before her career could even really be said to have begun…

  163. Anonymous

    Former Enterprise Reader said…
    Ithink it’s obvious that Ms Kennedy has a fine career in journalism to look forward to. Fox News is always looking for reporters ready to sensationalize and distort. She’ll fit right in.

    8/11/07 11:55 AM

    Surprising how cynical some of the comments on this thread got…Fox News? Ganging up on an unpaid intern? A cheap shot.
    As if her story is over now after one article published in a provincial paper and before her career could even really be said to have begun…

  164. Anonymous

    Former Enterprise Reader said…
    Ithink it’s obvious that Ms Kennedy has a fine career in journalism to look forward to. Fox News is always looking for reporters ready to sensationalize and distort. She’ll fit right in.

    8/11/07 11:55 AM

    Surprising how cynical some of the comments on this thread got…Fox News? Ganging up on an unpaid intern? A cheap shot.
    As if her story is over now after one article published in a provincial paper and before her career could even really be said to have begun…

  165. Anonymous

    Who is “we” and why are “we” worried? Journalists worried about one of our colleagues getting “typecast” before she gets a chance to prove she can grow?
    Change is good.

  166. Anonymous

    Who is “we” and why are “we” worried? Journalists worried about one of our colleagues getting “typecast” before she gets a chance to prove she can grow?
    Change is good.

  167. Anonymous

    Who is “we” and why are “we” worried? Journalists worried about one of our colleagues getting “typecast” before she gets a chance to prove she can grow?
    Change is good.

  168. Anonymous

    Who is “we” and why are “we” worried? Journalists worried about one of our colleagues getting “typecast” before she gets a chance to prove she can grow?
    Change is good.

  169. Anonymous

    Those from The California Aggie still posting about their former colleague are pathetic. Seriously, you need some professional help — your comments are obsessive. Leave her alone — she’s probably long forgotten about you. And comments likened to attempting to stalwart her education or career? You better be careful because legal action could be taken against you.

    Also, the Vanguard doesn’t even appear to have attempted to contact Kennedy for this story. I hope she’s aware of all this stalker-like behavior following her around.

    The bottom line is, get over it and move on.

  170. Anonymous

    Those from The California Aggie still posting about their former colleague are pathetic. Seriously, you need some professional help — your comments are obsessive. Leave her alone — she’s probably long forgotten about you. And comments likened to attempting to stalwart her education or career? You better be careful because legal action could be taken against you.

    Also, the Vanguard doesn’t even appear to have attempted to contact Kennedy for this story. I hope she’s aware of all this stalker-like behavior following her around.

    The bottom line is, get over it and move on.

  171. Anonymous

    Those from The California Aggie still posting about their former colleague are pathetic. Seriously, you need some professional help — your comments are obsessive. Leave her alone — she’s probably long forgotten about you. And comments likened to attempting to stalwart her education or career? You better be careful because legal action could be taken against you.

    Also, the Vanguard doesn’t even appear to have attempted to contact Kennedy for this story. I hope she’s aware of all this stalker-like behavior following her around.

    The bottom line is, get over it and move on.

  172. Anonymous

    Those from The California Aggie still posting about their former colleague are pathetic. Seriously, you need some professional help — your comments are obsessive. Leave her alone — she’s probably long forgotten about you. And comments likened to attempting to stalwart her education or career? You better be careful because legal action could be taken against you.

    Also, the Vanguard doesn’t even appear to have attempted to contact Kennedy for this story. I hope she’s aware of all this stalker-like behavior following her around.

    The bottom line is, get over it and move on.

  173. Anonymous

    Anonymous said…
    Those from The California Aggie still posting about their former colleague are pathetic. Seriously, you need some professional help — your comments are obsessive. Leave her alone — she’s probably long forgotten about you. And comments likened to attempting to stalwart her education or career? You better be careful because legal action could be taken against you.

    Also, the Vanguard doesn’t even appear to have attempted to contact Kennedy for this story. I hope she’s aware of all this stalker-like behavior following her around.

    The bottom line is, get over it and move on.
    ————————-
    “Pathetic…you need some professional help…”
    Here again the People’s Vanguard opinion-spinners fail to make the proper distinction between a person and her work.

    “And comments likened to attempting to stalwart her education or career?”
    “…stalwart her career?”
    What does that even mean? Obviously, you are no professional journalist, merely another opinion-spinner, who’s put not much thought into this comment…get a dictionary, go back and take Remedial (Bonehead) English and then write us what you really mean.
    The point about Ms. Kennedy is she’s just learning her language skills, unlike you. As well the Aggie writers.
    So, until you learn how to write English and deal objectively with their concerns, give them a break.

  174. Anonymous

    Anonymous said…
    Those from The California Aggie still posting about their former colleague are pathetic. Seriously, you need some professional help — your comments are obsessive. Leave her alone — she’s probably long forgotten about you. And comments likened to attempting to stalwart her education or career? You better be careful because legal action could be taken against you.

    Also, the Vanguard doesn’t even appear to have attempted to contact Kennedy for this story. I hope she’s aware of all this stalker-like behavior following her around.

    The bottom line is, get over it and move on.
    ————————-
    “Pathetic…you need some professional help…”
    Here again the People’s Vanguard opinion-spinners fail to make the proper distinction between a person and her work.

    “And comments likened to attempting to stalwart her education or career?”
    “…stalwart her career?”
    What does that even mean? Obviously, you are no professional journalist, merely another opinion-spinner, who’s put not much thought into this comment…get a dictionary, go back and take Remedial (Bonehead) English and then write us what you really mean.
    The point about Ms. Kennedy is she’s just learning her language skills, unlike you. As well the Aggie writers.
    So, until you learn how to write English and deal objectively with their concerns, give them a break.

  175. Anonymous

    Anonymous said…
    Those from The California Aggie still posting about their former colleague are pathetic. Seriously, you need some professional help — your comments are obsessive. Leave her alone — she’s probably long forgotten about you. And comments likened to attempting to stalwart her education or career? You better be careful because legal action could be taken against you.

    Also, the Vanguard doesn’t even appear to have attempted to contact Kennedy for this story. I hope she’s aware of all this stalker-like behavior following her around.

    The bottom line is, get over it and move on.
    ————————-
    “Pathetic…you need some professional help…”
    Here again the People’s Vanguard opinion-spinners fail to make the proper distinction between a person and her work.

    “And comments likened to attempting to stalwart her education or career?”
    “…stalwart her career?”
    What does that even mean? Obviously, you are no professional journalist, merely another opinion-spinner, who’s put not much thought into this comment…get a dictionary, go back and take Remedial (Bonehead) English and then write us what you really mean.
    The point about Ms. Kennedy is she’s just learning her language skills, unlike you. As well the Aggie writers.
    So, until you learn how to write English and deal objectively with their concerns, give them a break.

  176. Anonymous

    Anonymous said…
    Those from The California Aggie still posting about their former colleague are pathetic. Seriously, you need some professional help — your comments are obsessive. Leave her alone — she’s probably long forgotten about you. And comments likened to attempting to stalwart her education or career? You better be careful because legal action could be taken against you.

    Also, the Vanguard doesn’t even appear to have attempted to contact Kennedy for this story. I hope she’s aware of all this stalker-like behavior following her around.

    The bottom line is, get over it and move on.
    ————————-
    “Pathetic…you need some professional help…”
    Here again the People’s Vanguard opinion-spinners fail to make the proper distinction between a person and her work.

    “And comments likened to attempting to stalwart her education or career?”
    “…stalwart her career?”
    What does that even mean? Obviously, you are no professional journalist, merely another opinion-spinner, who’s put not much thought into this comment…get a dictionary, go back and take Remedial (Bonehead) English and then write us what you really mean.
    The point about Ms. Kennedy is she’s just learning her language skills, unlike you. As well the Aggie writers.
    So, until you learn how to write English and deal objectively with their concerns, give them a break.

  177. Michael

    The article in the Davis Enterprise was correct!!! Smith has discriminated against David Gharagozlou and many others in the department based on ethnicity. She also enacts preferential treatment (See: Grad students and lecturers on her facebook) and does not take into consideration achievement.

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