Board Approves $120 Parcel Tax for November Ballot

The Davis Joint Unified School Board met early on Wednesday to determine among other things, the amount that the District would seek for the November Parcel Tax.The Board determined that the new parcel tax would be a $120 increase–the amount that they determined was needed to continue to provide the current level of service to the students and the community.

The board also made the determination that the apartment unit rate would be $50 (a slight decrease from the projected $60 increase). That means that the renter’s share would like be no more than $25 or around a $2 per month increase. Given all of the rental expenses, the average renter will not even notice the parcel tax even if the property owner passes along the cost to the tenants.

Despite the early hour, a number of community members came to the meeting to express both support and opposition to the board. Representatives from the Teach Peace organization lobbied the board to add a component for peace and conflict resolution education as an inducement to get a number of activists to help on the parcel tax.

There were also a few renters who came to speak out against the parcel tax in response apparently to the flier that circulated in some apartment complexes [see yesterday’s Vanguard story].

A fair amount of disinformation and misperceptions are being spread around the community about the parcel tax and the type of taxes that the school district can levy.

Contrary to popular belief, Chief Business Officer Bruce Colby told the board that the school district had no authority to levy a sales tax. Moreover, they also did not have the authority to request another agency levy a sales tax on their behalf. Schools are funded at the local level primarily through property taxes and property owners receive some protection from Proposition 13 that requires a two-thirds vote in order to raise any sort of taxes.

In addition, the district is required to lay out to the public exactly how the parcel tax will be used and the type of programs it will fund. This is a very specific requirement and the district will have an oversight committee that examines the spending to make sure parcel tax money is spent appropriately.

One important point to make, is that almost all of the spending is to hire teachers to run key programs. As one board member put it, these are the programs that make Davis schools what they are.

At the elementary school level, the parcel tax funds three programs–the elementary science program (8 positions), the music program (3.4 positions), and the librarian program (just over 4 positions). Those three programs account for %1.25 million of the $2.37 million total.

At the secondary level, the parcel tax will pay for a number of partial positions including science, math, music, and English. It funds 1.5 positions for the Junior High Librarian Services and it also funds $325,000 for the athletics programs.

In all, these are the programs that faced cutbacks last winter and spring. These are the programs that brought parents, students, and teachers to school board meetings in protest of proposed cuts. These represent a total of around 27 positions that would be saved.

Commentary:

I was expecting that school board to approve a parcel tax that was just slightly under $100 per year. I was surprised that they went as high as $120. However, the reason they decided to do that is that that is what they determined their needs to be. If the community passes this parcel tax, the school district can continue to fund the key programs that differentiates Davis from another school district.

This will be a tough fight. Polling showed at the $140 level, that the public support was only around 57%, well below the two-thirds requirement. The school district is going to have to launch and run a campaign to win this. It is going to be expensive and difficult. They will be running it during a time when most are going to focus on the Presidential Election.

We have seen already that there will be those who actively oppose the parcel tax. In the past, the district has been able to run opposition free. Two weeks ago, John Munn, former School Board Member who represents the local taxpayers association came before the board to lay out what the board needed to do in order to gain the support of the taxpayers association–it was basically accountability factors that the district had already done for the Measure Q campaign and the passage of that parcel tax.

Finally, yesterday at the board meeting, I publicly endorsed the parcel tax. Last winter and spring, I sat in on the board meetings. I talked with students, parents, and teachers. I saw the pain that the budget cuts would cause. I saw the fear in the eyes of the students at the thought of losing their teachers and their programs. And I decided at that point that I never wanted another child to have to go through that painful process again. The idea that children had to march to save their schools, to save their teachers, to save their classes, is simply wrong.

Those who want to hold the district accountable for mistakes made under the direction of others are wanting to punish the wrong people for the wrong reasons. The bulk of the budget crisis that we see is not due to fiscal mismanagement by the current board and district staff, it is due to a devastating statewide economic picture combined with a drop in attendance in the local school district.

The bottom line is that the amount of money needed to bridge the gap without a new revenue source means that teachers and programs will have to be cut. At the end of the day, it is unfair to punish these students for the perceived mistakes of others.

This parcel tax will sunset in three years. The previous parcel tax was passed for four years. That means that the two parcel taxes will sunset at the same time and the district can make the determination at that point, how much the district needs. And the public can then decide if the district has spent its money wisely and can make the determination as to whether to continue to supplement statewide educational spending to make Davis Schools among the best in the state.

The voters of Davis have much in the way of recourse here. They will have full authority to approve this current parcel tax in November. The next year will see three school board members face reelection. And there are always more radical means of expression, just ask Woodland.

Once again, I fully support the passage of the parcel tax. I firmly believe we have no other choice in order to continue to educate the students of Davis to the best of our ability.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

Related posts

572 thoughts on “Board Approves $120 Parcel Tax for November Ballot”

  1. Anonymous

    This is not going to be smooth sailing whatsoever. Davisities just approved Measure Q and are going to be saying, “More???” Wallets are not limitless and I don’t think that the people of Davis are going to be openly willing this time around.

    I support the parcel tax because I support the schools. However, a lot of others are going to be very reticient with dollars so tight.

  2. Anonymous

    This is not going to be smooth sailing whatsoever. Davisities just approved Measure Q and are going to be saying, “More???” Wallets are not limitless and I don’t think that the people of Davis are going to be openly willing this time around.

    I support the parcel tax because I support the schools. However, a lot of others are going to be very reticient with dollars so tight.

  3. Anonymous

    This is not going to be smooth sailing whatsoever. Davisities just approved Measure Q and are going to be saying, “More???” Wallets are not limitless and I don’t think that the people of Davis are going to be openly willing this time around.

    I support the parcel tax because I support the schools. However, a lot of others are going to be very reticient with dollars so tight.

  4. Anonymous

    This is not going to be smooth sailing whatsoever. Davisities just approved Measure Q and are going to be saying, “More???” Wallets are not limitless and I don’t think that the people of Davis are going to be openly willing this time around.

    I support the parcel tax because I support the schools. However, a lot of others are going to be very reticient with dollars so tight.

  5. Doug Paul Davis

    “Had the board held to the more rational 80, they would have – begrudgingly – had my vote.”

    And then when they had only two-thirds of the money they needed and did more cuts, you would have been first to stand up and say: “hey we just approved a parcel tax, why the cuts.”

    “Davisities just approved Measure Q and are going to be saying, “More???””

    A lot will probably remember the spring when we faced severe cuts and realize why they are asking for more. It’s not pleasant, but they had very little choice.

  6. Doug Paul Davis

    “Had the board held to the more rational 80, they would have – begrudgingly – had my vote.”

    And then when they had only two-thirds of the money they needed and did more cuts, you would have been first to stand up and say: “hey we just approved a parcel tax, why the cuts.”

    “Davisities just approved Measure Q and are going to be saying, “More???””

    A lot will probably remember the spring when we faced severe cuts and realize why they are asking for more. It’s not pleasant, but they had very little choice.

  7. Doug Paul Davis

    “Had the board held to the more rational 80, they would have – begrudgingly – had my vote.”

    And then when they had only two-thirds of the money they needed and did more cuts, you would have been first to stand up and say: “hey we just approved a parcel tax, why the cuts.”

    “Davisities just approved Measure Q and are going to be saying, “More???””

    A lot will probably remember the spring when we faced severe cuts and realize why they are asking for more. It’s not pleasant, but they had very little choice.

  8. Doug Paul Davis

    “Had the board held to the more rational 80, they would have – begrudgingly – had my vote.”

    And then when they had only two-thirds of the money they needed and did more cuts, you would have been first to stand up and say: “hey we just approved a parcel tax, why the cuts.”

    “Davisities just approved Measure Q and are going to be saying, “More???””

    A lot will probably remember the spring when we faced severe cuts and realize why they are asking for more. It’s not pleasant, but they had very little choice.

  9. Anonymous

    The 57% approval response to the poll is undoubtedly higher than will ultimately be registered. This issue has been publicly framed as the good people(pro-additional parcel tax)vs the bad people(against additional parcel tax)and many will reserve their judgement for the privacy of the polling booth.
    Did Colby quote State law “chapter and verse” concerning the total inability of the School District to utilize sales tax funds?

  10. Anonymous

    The 57% approval response to the poll is undoubtedly higher than will ultimately be registered. This issue has been publicly framed as the good people(pro-additional parcel tax)vs the bad people(against additional parcel tax)and many will reserve their judgement for the privacy of the polling booth.
    Did Colby quote State law “chapter and verse” concerning the total inability of the School District to utilize sales tax funds?

  11. Anonymous

    The 57% approval response to the poll is undoubtedly higher than will ultimately be registered. This issue has been publicly framed as the good people(pro-additional parcel tax)vs the bad people(against additional parcel tax)and many will reserve their judgement for the privacy of the polling booth.
    Did Colby quote State law “chapter and verse” concerning the total inability of the School District to utilize sales tax funds?

  12. Anonymous

    The 57% approval response to the poll is undoubtedly higher than will ultimately be registered. This issue has been publicly framed as the good people(pro-additional parcel tax)vs the bad people(against additional parcel tax)and many will reserve their judgement for the privacy of the polling booth.
    Did Colby quote State law “chapter and verse” concerning the total inability of the School District to utilize sales tax funds?

  13. Robin W

    This has my support. A strong school system is what Davis is all about. If it is necessary to go through with the massive cuts to teachers and programs that were on the table this past year (and would have happened but for some very generous donors), it will dramatically affect the nature of our city. How many people in this town really can’t afford $120 a year (or $25 for renters)? If you go to Starbucks one less time a week, that more than covers it (once less a month for renters).

  14. Robin W

    This has my support. A strong school system is what Davis is all about. If it is necessary to go through with the massive cuts to teachers and programs that were on the table this past year (and would have happened but for some very generous donors), it will dramatically affect the nature of our city. How many people in this town really can’t afford $120 a year (or $25 for renters)? If you go to Starbucks one less time a week, that more than covers it (once less a month for renters).

  15. Robin W

    This has my support. A strong school system is what Davis is all about. If it is necessary to go through with the massive cuts to teachers and programs that were on the table this past year (and would have happened but for some very generous donors), it will dramatically affect the nature of our city. How many people in this town really can’t afford $120 a year (or $25 for renters)? If you go to Starbucks one less time a week, that more than covers it (once less a month for renters).

  16. Robin W

    This has my support. A strong school system is what Davis is all about. If it is necessary to go through with the massive cuts to teachers and programs that were on the table this past year (and would have happened but for some very generous donors), it will dramatically affect the nature of our city. How many people in this town really can’t afford $120 a year (or $25 for renters)? If you go to Starbucks one less time a week, that more than covers it (once less a month for renters).

  17. Anonymous

    DPD said,
    “Those who want to hold the district accountable for mistakes made under the direction of others are wanting to punish the wrong people for the wrong reasons.”
    AND
    “That means that the two parcel taxes will sunset at the same time and the district can make the determination at that point, how much the district needs. And the public can then decide if the district has spent its money wisely…”

    These two circular arguments will be used over and over to justify future parcel taxes.
    1. The current administration is not at fault for previous mistakes. Vote for this parcel tax.
    2. Vote for this parcel tax. If four years later you think we mismanaged the funds see 1 above.

  18. Anonymous

    DPD said,
    “Those who want to hold the district accountable for mistakes made under the direction of others are wanting to punish the wrong people for the wrong reasons.”
    AND
    “That means that the two parcel taxes will sunset at the same time and the district can make the determination at that point, how much the district needs. And the public can then decide if the district has spent its money wisely…”

    These two circular arguments will be used over and over to justify future parcel taxes.
    1. The current administration is not at fault for previous mistakes. Vote for this parcel tax.
    2. Vote for this parcel tax. If four years later you think we mismanaged the funds see 1 above.

  19. Anonymous

    DPD said,
    “Those who want to hold the district accountable for mistakes made under the direction of others are wanting to punish the wrong people for the wrong reasons.”
    AND
    “That means that the two parcel taxes will sunset at the same time and the district can make the determination at that point, how much the district needs. And the public can then decide if the district has spent its money wisely…”

    These two circular arguments will be used over and over to justify future parcel taxes.
    1. The current administration is not at fault for previous mistakes. Vote for this parcel tax.
    2. Vote for this parcel tax. If four years later you think we mismanaged the funds see 1 above.

  20. Anonymous

    DPD said,
    “Those who want to hold the district accountable for mistakes made under the direction of others are wanting to punish the wrong people for the wrong reasons.”
    AND
    “That means that the two parcel taxes will sunset at the same time and the district can make the determination at that point, how much the district needs. And the public can then decide if the district has spent its money wisely…”

    These two circular arguments will be used over and over to justify future parcel taxes.
    1. The current administration is not at fault for previous mistakes. Vote for this parcel tax.
    2. Vote for this parcel tax. If four years later you think we mismanaged the funds see 1 above.

  21. Mike Hart

    This morning, the Sac Bee ran an article about a Duck whose ducklings had all fallen down a storm drain. A group successfully mobilized to rescue the ducklings. The Sacramento writer was astonished that a teenager went into the drain and conducted the rescue. When asked the teen , responded “I go to school in Davis, they teach you this kind of thing there”

    How can you put a price on that?

  22. Mike Hart

    This morning, the Sac Bee ran an article about a Duck whose ducklings had all fallen down a storm drain. A group successfully mobilized to rescue the ducklings. The Sacramento writer was astonished that a teenager went into the drain and conducted the rescue. When asked the teen , responded “I go to school in Davis, they teach you this kind of thing there”

    How can you put a price on that?

  23. Mike Hart

    This morning, the Sac Bee ran an article about a Duck whose ducklings had all fallen down a storm drain. A group successfully mobilized to rescue the ducklings. The Sacramento writer was astonished that a teenager went into the drain and conducted the rescue. When asked the teen , responded “I go to school in Davis, they teach you this kind of thing there”

    How can you put a price on that?

  24. Mike Hart

    This morning, the Sac Bee ran an article about a Duck whose ducklings had all fallen down a storm drain. A group successfully mobilized to rescue the ducklings. The Sacramento writer was astonished that a teenager went into the drain and conducted the rescue. When asked the teen , responded “I go to school in Davis, they teach you this kind of thing there”

    How can you put a price on that?

  25. Doug Paul Davis

    Good find Mike…

    >>>Kim Tucker was heading home to West Sac last week and saw a sight that can’t rightly be ignored.

    There, by the side of the road, was a remarkably agitated duck, pacing the pavement and flapping in fear.

    Her ducklings, Tucker learned on subsequent inspection, had fallen through a drainage grate and were desperately treading water in the filthy bog below.

    She looked for help, eventually enlisting a burly construction worker (to pry off the grate), a slew of onlookers and, she was surprised to note, a teenage boy, who whipped off his shoes and, without hesitation, slipped into the drain and started retrieving the ducklings in distress, one by one.

    “He was right on it,” an impressed Tucker said. “It was (a very) human moment.”

    But not all 13-year-olds are so human, judging by the number of like-aged boys who passed by the scene with little more than a glance.

    What made this particular kid stop and help? Tucker inquired.

    “I go to school in Davis,” he reported. “They teach us that kind of stuff.”< << Duckling Story

  26. Doug Paul Davis

    Good find Mike…

    >>>Kim Tucker was heading home to West Sac last week and saw a sight that can’t rightly be ignored.

    There, by the side of the road, was a remarkably agitated duck, pacing the pavement and flapping in fear.

    Her ducklings, Tucker learned on subsequent inspection, had fallen through a drainage grate and were desperately treading water in the filthy bog below.

    She looked for help, eventually enlisting a burly construction worker (to pry off the grate), a slew of onlookers and, she was surprised to note, a teenage boy, who whipped off his shoes and, without hesitation, slipped into the drain and started retrieving the ducklings in distress, one by one.

    “He was right on it,” an impressed Tucker said. “It was (a very) human moment.”

    But not all 13-year-olds are so human, judging by the number of like-aged boys who passed by the scene with little more than a glance.

    What made this particular kid stop and help? Tucker inquired.

    “I go to school in Davis,” he reported. “They teach us that kind of stuff.”< << Duckling Story

  27. Doug Paul Davis

    Good find Mike…

    >>>Kim Tucker was heading home to West Sac last week and saw a sight that can’t rightly be ignored.

    There, by the side of the road, was a remarkably agitated duck, pacing the pavement and flapping in fear.

    Her ducklings, Tucker learned on subsequent inspection, had fallen through a drainage grate and were desperately treading water in the filthy bog below.

    She looked for help, eventually enlisting a burly construction worker (to pry off the grate), a slew of onlookers and, she was surprised to note, a teenage boy, who whipped off his shoes and, without hesitation, slipped into the drain and started retrieving the ducklings in distress, one by one.

    “He was right on it,” an impressed Tucker said. “It was (a very) human moment.”

    But not all 13-year-olds are so human, judging by the number of like-aged boys who passed by the scene with little more than a glance.

    What made this particular kid stop and help? Tucker inquired.

    “I go to school in Davis,” he reported. “They teach us that kind of stuff.”< << Duckling Story

  28. Doug Paul Davis

    Good find Mike…

    >>>Kim Tucker was heading home to West Sac last week and saw a sight that can’t rightly be ignored.

    There, by the side of the road, was a remarkably agitated duck, pacing the pavement and flapping in fear.

    Her ducklings, Tucker learned on subsequent inspection, had fallen through a drainage grate and were desperately treading water in the filthy bog below.

    She looked for help, eventually enlisting a burly construction worker (to pry off the grate), a slew of onlookers and, she was surprised to note, a teenage boy, who whipped off his shoes and, without hesitation, slipped into the drain and started retrieving the ducklings in distress, one by one.

    “He was right on it,” an impressed Tucker said. “It was (a very) human moment.”

    But not all 13-year-olds are so human, judging by the number of like-aged boys who passed by the scene with little more than a glance.

    What made this particular kid stop and help? Tucker inquired.

    “I go to school in Davis,” he reported. “They teach us that kind of stuff.”< << Duckling Story

  29. Anonymous

    “…Given all of the rental expenses, the average renter will not even notice the parcel tax even if the property owner passes along the cost to the tenants….”
    BUT THE AVERAGE DAVIS HOMEOWNER CERTAINLY WILL!!!

    This parcel tax will fail because of the bitterly negative fiscal and political climate that will exist in the fall within California. This climate will exist because of the failed FY 08-09 State Budget process and the extensive cost overruns resulting from the disasterous Jun-Oct fire season. Wake up, wipe the cinders from your eyes, and see the red ink!

  30. Anonymous

    “…Given all of the rental expenses, the average renter will not even notice the parcel tax even if the property owner passes along the cost to the tenants….”
    BUT THE AVERAGE DAVIS HOMEOWNER CERTAINLY WILL!!!

    This parcel tax will fail because of the bitterly negative fiscal and political climate that will exist in the fall within California. This climate will exist because of the failed FY 08-09 State Budget process and the extensive cost overruns resulting from the disasterous Jun-Oct fire season. Wake up, wipe the cinders from your eyes, and see the red ink!

  31. Anonymous

    “…Given all of the rental expenses, the average renter will not even notice the parcel tax even if the property owner passes along the cost to the tenants….”
    BUT THE AVERAGE DAVIS HOMEOWNER CERTAINLY WILL!!!

    This parcel tax will fail because of the bitterly negative fiscal and political climate that will exist in the fall within California. This climate will exist because of the failed FY 08-09 State Budget process and the extensive cost overruns resulting from the disasterous Jun-Oct fire season. Wake up, wipe the cinders from your eyes, and see the red ink!

  32. Anonymous

    “…Given all of the rental expenses, the average renter will not even notice the parcel tax even if the property owner passes along the cost to the tenants….”
    BUT THE AVERAGE DAVIS HOMEOWNER CERTAINLY WILL!!!

    This parcel tax will fail because of the bitterly negative fiscal and political climate that will exist in the fall within California. This climate will exist because of the failed FY 08-09 State Budget process and the extensive cost overruns resulting from the disasterous Jun-Oct fire season. Wake up, wipe the cinders from your eyes, and see the red ink!

  33. Doug Paul Davis

    One the more interesting findings of the polling and focus groups is that the anger and anxiety about the state and national fiscal climate did not bleed onto local governance which generally got pretty high ratings.

    I’m convinced this will be tough, but I’m also convinced at the end of the day Davisites will not turn down this tax.

  34. Doug Paul Davis

    One the more interesting findings of the polling and focus groups is that the anger and anxiety about the state and national fiscal climate did not bleed onto local governance which generally got pretty high ratings.

    I’m convinced this will be tough, but I’m also convinced at the end of the day Davisites will not turn down this tax.

  35. Doug Paul Davis

    One the more interesting findings of the polling and focus groups is that the anger and anxiety about the state and national fiscal climate did not bleed onto local governance which generally got pretty high ratings.

    I’m convinced this will be tough, but I’m also convinced at the end of the day Davisites will not turn down this tax.

  36. Doug Paul Davis

    One the more interesting findings of the polling and focus groups is that the anger and anxiety about the state and national fiscal climate did not bleed onto local governance which generally got pretty high ratings.

    I’m convinced this will be tough, but I’m also convinced at the end of the day Davisites will not turn down this tax.

  37. Anonymous

    “These two circular arguments will be used over and over to justify future parcel taxes.
    1. The current administration is not at fault for previous mistakes. Vote for this parcel tax.
    2. Vote for this parcel tax. If four years later you think we mismanaged the funds see 1 above.”

    Hey! Try out this argument for those who want justification to oppose any parcel tax or bond issue:

    There is always something wrong with the local schools: [insert your criticism here]. Vote against this parcel tax.

  38. Anonymous

    “These two circular arguments will be used over and over to justify future parcel taxes.
    1. The current administration is not at fault for previous mistakes. Vote for this parcel tax.
    2. Vote for this parcel tax. If four years later you think we mismanaged the funds see 1 above.”

    Hey! Try out this argument for those who want justification to oppose any parcel tax or bond issue:

    There is always something wrong with the local schools: [insert your criticism here]. Vote against this parcel tax.

  39. Anonymous

    “These two circular arguments will be used over and over to justify future parcel taxes.
    1. The current administration is not at fault for previous mistakes. Vote for this parcel tax.
    2. Vote for this parcel tax. If four years later you think we mismanaged the funds see 1 above.”

    Hey! Try out this argument for those who want justification to oppose any parcel tax or bond issue:

    There is always something wrong with the local schools: [insert your criticism here]. Vote against this parcel tax.

  40. Anonymous

    “These two circular arguments will be used over and over to justify future parcel taxes.
    1. The current administration is not at fault for previous mistakes. Vote for this parcel tax.
    2. Vote for this parcel tax. If four years later you think we mismanaged the funds see 1 above.”

    Hey! Try out this argument for those who want justification to oppose any parcel tax or bond issue:

    There is always something wrong with the local schools: [insert your criticism here]. Vote against this parcel tax.

  41. Anonymous

    Along the same lines, does denying the district money make those problems get better or does it just make the problems that exist worse and create more problems?

  42. Anonymous

    Along the same lines, does denying the district money make those problems get better or does it just make the problems that exist worse and create more problems?

  43. Anonymous

    Along the same lines, does denying the district money make those problems get better or does it just make the problems that exist worse and create more problems?

  44. Anonymous

    Along the same lines, does denying the district money make those problems get better or does it just make the problems that exist worse and create more problems?

  45. Anonymous

    “Along the same lines, does denying the district money make those problems get better or does it just make the problems that exist worse and create more problems?”

    I suppose one needs to evaluate the context of the situation and make a judgement.

    I’ve spent hours/days/weeks/months/years studying and asking questions of and about the district, and I’m comfortable supporting this parcel tax.

    A number of the criticisms of the district center around the closure of VO and the possible closure/reorganization of another school (at least a couple of bloggers like to mention Emerson as the likely target).

    In 2000 Davis was experiencing rapid growth (for Davis), and was looking at potential overcrowded schools. Measure J was passed by 57% that year in March, which limited how Davis would grow.

    Two months later the district passed a bond measure to secure funding to build two new elementary schools (Montgomery and Korematsu) and a new JH (Harper). This measure passed by 85%!! It sure looked like a good idea at the time.

    Amazing what clarity hindsight offers. If you seek blame for the mess connected with excess schools in the district, you may want to look in the mirror if you lived in Davis in 2000. If that bond measure had been rejected, a lot of recent problems might have been avoided — having to close Valley Oak, worrying about low enrollments at Emerson, missing the deadline for state funds for Montgomery, maybe some of the budget issues we are currently dealing with, perhaps Murphy wouldn’t have looked as bad and would have had to have the last year of his contract bought out.

    And in case you think that this was Davis’ typical liberal majority weighing in to pass that 2000 bond measure, consider that John Munn, resident Republican, former school board member, and current representative of the Yolo County Taxpayer’s Association, was a leading supporter of that bond measure.

  46. Anonymous

    “Along the same lines, does denying the district money make those problems get better or does it just make the problems that exist worse and create more problems?”

    I suppose one needs to evaluate the context of the situation and make a judgement.

    I’ve spent hours/days/weeks/months/years studying and asking questions of and about the district, and I’m comfortable supporting this parcel tax.

    A number of the criticisms of the district center around the closure of VO and the possible closure/reorganization of another school (at least a couple of bloggers like to mention Emerson as the likely target).

    In 2000 Davis was experiencing rapid growth (for Davis), and was looking at potential overcrowded schools. Measure J was passed by 57% that year in March, which limited how Davis would grow.

    Two months later the district passed a bond measure to secure funding to build two new elementary schools (Montgomery and Korematsu) and a new JH (Harper). This measure passed by 85%!! It sure looked like a good idea at the time.

    Amazing what clarity hindsight offers. If you seek blame for the mess connected with excess schools in the district, you may want to look in the mirror if you lived in Davis in 2000. If that bond measure had been rejected, a lot of recent problems might have been avoided — having to close Valley Oak, worrying about low enrollments at Emerson, missing the deadline for state funds for Montgomery, maybe some of the budget issues we are currently dealing with, perhaps Murphy wouldn’t have looked as bad and would have had to have the last year of his contract bought out.

    And in case you think that this was Davis’ typical liberal majority weighing in to pass that 2000 bond measure, consider that John Munn, resident Republican, former school board member, and current representative of the Yolo County Taxpayer’s Association, was a leading supporter of that bond measure.

  47. Anonymous

    “Along the same lines, does denying the district money make those problems get better or does it just make the problems that exist worse and create more problems?”

    I suppose one needs to evaluate the context of the situation and make a judgement.

    I’ve spent hours/days/weeks/months/years studying and asking questions of and about the district, and I’m comfortable supporting this parcel tax.

    A number of the criticisms of the district center around the closure of VO and the possible closure/reorganization of another school (at least a couple of bloggers like to mention Emerson as the likely target).

    In 2000 Davis was experiencing rapid growth (for Davis), and was looking at potential overcrowded schools. Measure J was passed by 57% that year in March, which limited how Davis would grow.

    Two months later the district passed a bond measure to secure funding to build two new elementary schools (Montgomery and Korematsu) and a new JH (Harper). This measure passed by 85%!! It sure looked like a good idea at the time.

    Amazing what clarity hindsight offers. If you seek blame for the mess connected with excess schools in the district, you may want to look in the mirror if you lived in Davis in 2000. If that bond measure had been rejected, a lot of recent problems might have been avoided — having to close Valley Oak, worrying about low enrollments at Emerson, missing the deadline for state funds for Montgomery, maybe some of the budget issues we are currently dealing with, perhaps Murphy wouldn’t have looked as bad and would have had to have the last year of his contract bought out.

    And in case you think that this was Davis’ typical liberal majority weighing in to pass that 2000 bond measure, consider that John Munn, resident Republican, former school board member, and current representative of the Yolo County Taxpayer’s Association, was a leading supporter of that bond measure.

  48. Anonymous

    “Along the same lines, does denying the district money make those problems get better or does it just make the problems that exist worse and create more problems?”

    I suppose one needs to evaluate the context of the situation and make a judgement.

    I’ve spent hours/days/weeks/months/years studying and asking questions of and about the district, and I’m comfortable supporting this parcel tax.

    A number of the criticisms of the district center around the closure of VO and the possible closure/reorganization of another school (at least a couple of bloggers like to mention Emerson as the likely target).

    In 2000 Davis was experiencing rapid growth (for Davis), and was looking at potential overcrowded schools. Measure J was passed by 57% that year in March, which limited how Davis would grow.

    Two months later the district passed a bond measure to secure funding to build two new elementary schools (Montgomery and Korematsu) and a new JH (Harper). This measure passed by 85%!! It sure looked like a good idea at the time.

    Amazing what clarity hindsight offers. If you seek blame for the mess connected with excess schools in the district, you may want to look in the mirror if you lived in Davis in 2000. If that bond measure had been rejected, a lot of recent problems might have been avoided — having to close Valley Oak, worrying about low enrollments at Emerson, missing the deadline for state funds for Montgomery, maybe some of the budget issues we are currently dealing with, perhaps Murphy wouldn’t have looked as bad and would have had to have the last year of his contract bought out.

    And in case you think that this was Davis’ typical liberal majority weighing in to pass that 2000 bond measure, consider that John Munn, resident Republican, former school board member, and current representative of the Yolo County Taxpayer’s Association, was a leading supporter of that bond measure.

  49. Anonymous

    http://www.smartvoter.org/2004/11/02/ca/sf/meas/J/

    “THE WAY IT IS NOW: There is an 8.5% (eight-and-one-half percent) sales tax on most retail goods purchased in San Francisco. This includes a Statewide 6 % sales tax that is controlled and spent by the State. The remaining 2.5% (two-and-one-half percent) sales tax funds are controlled and spent by the City and other local agencies, including the Bay Area Rapid Transit District, the San Francisco County Transportation Authority and the SAN FRANCISCO SCHOOL DISTRICT.

  50. Anonymous

    http://www.smartvoter.org/2004/11/02/ca/sf/meas/J/

    “THE WAY IT IS NOW: There is an 8.5% (eight-and-one-half percent) sales tax on most retail goods purchased in San Francisco. This includes a Statewide 6 % sales tax that is controlled and spent by the State. The remaining 2.5% (two-and-one-half percent) sales tax funds are controlled and spent by the City and other local agencies, including the Bay Area Rapid Transit District, the San Francisco County Transportation Authority and the SAN FRANCISCO SCHOOL DISTRICT.

  51. Anonymous

    http://www.smartvoter.org/2004/11/02/ca/sf/meas/J/

    “THE WAY IT IS NOW: There is an 8.5% (eight-and-one-half percent) sales tax on most retail goods purchased in San Francisco. This includes a Statewide 6 % sales tax that is controlled and spent by the State. The remaining 2.5% (two-and-one-half percent) sales tax funds are controlled and spent by the City and other local agencies, including the Bay Area Rapid Transit District, the San Francisco County Transportation Authority and the SAN FRANCISCO SCHOOL DISTRICT.

  52. Anonymous

    http://www.smartvoter.org/2004/11/02/ca/sf/meas/J/

    “THE WAY IT IS NOW: There is an 8.5% (eight-and-one-half percent) sales tax on most retail goods purchased in San Francisco. This includes a Statewide 6 % sales tax that is controlled and spent by the State. The remaining 2.5% (two-and-one-half percent) sales tax funds are controlled and spent by the City and other local agencies, including the Bay Area Rapid Transit District, the San Francisco County Transportation Authority and the SAN FRANCISCO SCHOOL DISTRICT.

  53. wdf

    San Francisco City and San Francisco County are the same entity, as are the city and county educational jurisdictions. That allowed the city/county to pass the sales tax and allow it to go to SF schools.

    If the city of Davis, DJUSD, and Yolo County shared exactly the same jurisdictional boundaries, probably a sales tax could be passed. SF is not a valid comparison for Davis schools on this issue.

  54. wdf

    San Francisco City and San Francisco County are the same entity, as are the city and county educational jurisdictions. That allowed the city/county to pass the sales tax and allow it to go to SF schools.

    If the city of Davis, DJUSD, and Yolo County shared exactly the same jurisdictional boundaries, probably a sales tax could be passed. SF is not a valid comparison for Davis schools on this issue.

  55. wdf

    San Francisco City and San Francisco County are the same entity, as are the city and county educational jurisdictions. That allowed the city/county to pass the sales tax and allow it to go to SF schools.

    If the city of Davis, DJUSD, and Yolo County shared exactly the same jurisdictional boundaries, probably a sales tax could be passed. SF is not a valid comparison for Davis schools on this issue.

  56. wdf

    San Francisco City and San Francisco County are the same entity, as are the city and county educational jurisdictions. That allowed the city/county to pass the sales tax and allow it to go to SF schools.

    If the city of Davis, DJUSD, and Yolo County shared exactly the same jurisdictional boundaries, probably a sales tax could be passed. SF is not a valid comparison for Davis schools on this issue.

  57. chester

    “What made this particular kid stop and help [save the duck]? Tucker inquired. ‘I go to school in Davis, they teach you this kind of thing there'”

    Heartwarming for sure, but isn’t this an indication of overspending on luxury curricula? Certainly there are kids whose parents don’t do a good job teaching kindness and compassion to animals, but why should we expect the schools to do this? Just like our overspending state government, with our schools we have developed an overly-complex charter for the purpose of the institution. If either were run like a real business, decisions for funding would be based on the assessed value of the service relative to the net cost.

    I’m sure the schools brought in the PETA people to mold young minds into understanding the pain and suffering humans inflict on animals. I wonder how we would feel if the schools brought in people from Ducks Unlimited to teach proper duck-hunting? The point is that both of these are inappropriate for a cash-starved school. There is a cost-per-minute metric to run the school and every minute should be dedicated to the highest priority instruction. Instead, the school expands to spend every dollar and then pulls our heartstrings and threatens impacts to the students when funding contraction occurs (and it will always occur when the state economy drops).

    Run like a real company, when faced with funding (revenue) contraction, administrators and educators would work together to streamline all curricula at a detailed level and reallocate resources to provide the highest possible value to the customer (parents and students). Low-performing employees (including those with a bad and toxic attitude) would be cut, and the remaining employees would take on a larger or changed workload. The end result would be a better performing school.

    With my own children attending Davis schools, I appreciate the curricula excess when we can afford it. However, when money is tight these things non-necessities should be trimmed. I feel bad for the few ducks that might not get saved by future students of the Davis school system, but parents, not the school, should be held accountable for this type of teaching.

  58. chester

    “What made this particular kid stop and help [save the duck]? Tucker inquired. ‘I go to school in Davis, they teach you this kind of thing there'”

    Heartwarming for sure, but isn’t this an indication of overspending on luxury curricula? Certainly there are kids whose parents don’t do a good job teaching kindness and compassion to animals, but why should we expect the schools to do this? Just like our overspending state government, with our schools we have developed an overly-complex charter for the purpose of the institution. If either were run like a real business, decisions for funding would be based on the assessed value of the service relative to the net cost.

    I’m sure the schools brought in the PETA people to mold young minds into understanding the pain and suffering humans inflict on animals. I wonder how we would feel if the schools brought in people from Ducks Unlimited to teach proper duck-hunting? The point is that both of these are inappropriate for a cash-starved school. There is a cost-per-minute metric to run the school and every minute should be dedicated to the highest priority instruction. Instead, the school expands to spend every dollar and then pulls our heartstrings and threatens impacts to the students when funding contraction occurs (and it will always occur when the state economy drops).

    Run like a real company, when faced with funding (revenue) contraction, administrators and educators would work together to streamline all curricula at a detailed level and reallocate resources to provide the highest possible value to the customer (parents and students). Low-performing employees (including those with a bad and toxic attitude) would be cut, and the remaining employees would take on a larger or changed workload. The end result would be a better performing school.

    With my own children attending Davis schools, I appreciate the curricula excess when we can afford it. However, when money is tight these things non-necessities should be trimmed. I feel bad for the few ducks that might not get saved by future students of the Davis school system, but parents, not the school, should be held accountable for this type of teaching.

  59. chester

    “What made this particular kid stop and help [save the duck]? Tucker inquired. ‘I go to school in Davis, they teach you this kind of thing there'”

    Heartwarming for sure, but isn’t this an indication of overspending on luxury curricula? Certainly there are kids whose parents don’t do a good job teaching kindness and compassion to animals, but why should we expect the schools to do this? Just like our overspending state government, with our schools we have developed an overly-complex charter for the purpose of the institution. If either were run like a real business, decisions for funding would be based on the assessed value of the service relative to the net cost.

    I’m sure the schools brought in the PETA people to mold young minds into understanding the pain and suffering humans inflict on animals. I wonder how we would feel if the schools brought in people from Ducks Unlimited to teach proper duck-hunting? The point is that both of these are inappropriate for a cash-starved school. There is a cost-per-minute metric to run the school and every minute should be dedicated to the highest priority instruction. Instead, the school expands to spend every dollar and then pulls our heartstrings and threatens impacts to the students when funding contraction occurs (and it will always occur when the state economy drops).

    Run like a real company, when faced with funding (revenue) contraction, administrators and educators would work together to streamline all curricula at a detailed level and reallocate resources to provide the highest possible value to the customer (parents and students). Low-performing employees (including those with a bad and toxic attitude) would be cut, and the remaining employees would take on a larger or changed workload. The end result would be a better performing school.

    With my own children attending Davis schools, I appreciate the curricula excess when we can afford it. However, when money is tight these things non-necessities should be trimmed. I feel bad for the few ducks that might not get saved by future students of the Davis school system, but parents, not the school, should be held accountable for this type of teaching.

  60. chester

    “What made this particular kid stop and help [save the duck]? Tucker inquired. ‘I go to school in Davis, they teach you this kind of thing there'”

    Heartwarming for sure, but isn’t this an indication of overspending on luxury curricula? Certainly there are kids whose parents don’t do a good job teaching kindness and compassion to animals, but why should we expect the schools to do this? Just like our overspending state government, with our schools we have developed an overly-complex charter for the purpose of the institution. If either were run like a real business, decisions for funding would be based on the assessed value of the service relative to the net cost.

    I’m sure the schools brought in the PETA people to mold young minds into understanding the pain and suffering humans inflict on animals. I wonder how we would feel if the schools brought in people from Ducks Unlimited to teach proper duck-hunting? The point is that both of these are inappropriate for a cash-starved school. There is a cost-per-minute metric to run the school and every minute should be dedicated to the highest priority instruction. Instead, the school expands to spend every dollar and then pulls our heartstrings and threatens impacts to the students when funding contraction occurs (and it will always occur when the state economy drops).

    Run like a real company, when faced with funding (revenue) contraction, administrators and educators would work together to streamline all curricula at a detailed level and reallocate resources to provide the highest possible value to the customer (parents and students). Low-performing employees (including those with a bad and toxic attitude) would be cut, and the remaining employees would take on a larger or changed workload. The end result would be a better performing school.

    With my own children attending Davis schools, I appreciate the curricula excess when we can afford it. However, when money is tight these things non-necessities should be trimmed. I feel bad for the few ducks that might not get saved by future students of the Davis school system, but parents, not the school, should be held accountable for this type of teaching.

  61. Anonymous

    “And in case you think that this was Davis’ typical liberal majority weighing in to pass that 2000 bond measure, consider that John Munn,..”

    There needs to be less “turf wars” and more cooperation between the JUSD and the City. Perhaps a portion of a sales tax that goes to the DJUSD would facilitate this. In hindsight, the Council of 2000 might have recommended to the DJUSD that they wait on their bond measure until Davis voters made their choice on Measure J. It should have been clear that the growth curve in Davis would change after Measure J was strongly supported by the electorate.

  62. Anonymous

    “And in case you think that this was Davis’ typical liberal majority weighing in to pass that 2000 bond measure, consider that John Munn,..”

    There needs to be less “turf wars” and more cooperation between the JUSD and the City. Perhaps a portion of a sales tax that goes to the DJUSD would facilitate this. In hindsight, the Council of 2000 might have recommended to the DJUSD that they wait on their bond measure until Davis voters made their choice on Measure J. It should have been clear that the growth curve in Davis would change after Measure J was strongly supported by the electorate.

  63. Anonymous

    “And in case you think that this was Davis’ typical liberal majority weighing in to pass that 2000 bond measure, consider that John Munn,..”

    There needs to be less “turf wars” and more cooperation between the JUSD and the City. Perhaps a portion of a sales tax that goes to the DJUSD would facilitate this. In hindsight, the Council of 2000 might have recommended to the DJUSD that they wait on their bond measure until Davis voters made their choice on Measure J. It should have been clear that the growth curve in Davis would change after Measure J was strongly supported by the electorate.

  64. Anonymous

    “And in case you think that this was Davis’ typical liberal majority weighing in to pass that 2000 bond measure, consider that John Munn,..”

    There needs to be less “turf wars” and more cooperation between the JUSD and the City. Perhaps a portion of a sales tax that goes to the DJUSD would facilitate this. In hindsight, the Council of 2000 might have recommended to the DJUSD that they wait on their bond measure until Davis voters made their choice on Measure J. It should have been clear that the growth curve in Davis would change after Measure J was strongly supported by the electorate.

  65. Anonymous

    “Measure J was passed BEFORE the bond measure.”

    …my point. The DJUSD planned, promoted and went ahead with Measure K without apparent regard/interest in what the voters thought of Measure J and the future of large peripheral residential development in Davis.

  66. Anonymous

    “Measure J was passed BEFORE the bond measure.”

    …my point. The DJUSD planned, promoted and went ahead with Measure K without apparent regard/interest in what the voters thought of Measure J and the future of large peripheral residential development in Davis.

  67. Anonymous

    “Measure J was passed BEFORE the bond measure.”

    …my point. The DJUSD planned, promoted and went ahead with Measure K without apparent regard/interest in what the voters thought of Measure J and the future of large peripheral residential development in Davis.

  68. Anonymous

    “Measure J was passed BEFORE the bond measure.”

    …my point. The DJUSD planned, promoted and went ahead with Measure K without apparent regard/interest in what the voters thought of Measure J and the future of large peripheral residential development in Davis.

  69. Disgusted Taxpayer

    “Anonymous said…
    Along the same lines, does denying the district money make those problems get better or does it just make the problems that exist worse and create more problems?
    7/10/08 9:06 AM”

    The better question to ask is does approving a parcel tax make those problems get better? VO was slated for closure before the state budget cuts came down, even though the citizens voted for Measure Q. The fallacy here is in thinking that passing another parcel tax is going to fix any problems.

    Think of it this way. If you gave your child a $25 a week allowance which included buying lunch, and he/she sqandered it on candy, then came to you complaining when there was no money left to buy lunch as early as Tuesday, what do you do as a responsible parent? You don’t hand him/her $20 more dollars and hope for the best. Instead the naughty kid has to live within his/her means and brown bag it.

    For instance, it has become clear to me that another parcel tax is not going to stop the closure of Emerson Junior High. While the School Board talks about “saving music programs or foreign language”, it has no problem ruthlessly cutting all the programs at an entire school that serves one third of the city. Not to mention horrendous overcrowding that will result, along with gargantuan transportation problems. The kids on this end of town won’t be able to take Unitrans, as the School Board suggested, because funds have been cut for that route.

    It is also important to note that the last parcel tax did not pass by its usual margin of over 80%. It came in at around 72% if I remember correctly. Support for another parcel tax is highly doubtful. Even the School Board’s hired consultant (for which they paid big bucks I am sure) indicates there will not be enough support for a $120 parcel tax. Yet the School Board arrogantly goes full steam ahead, just as a naughty child would who didn’t manage their money properly but asks for more anyway.

    It is the actions of the School Board that are chipping away at any support for another parcel tax. If the School Board put forth a way of saving Emerson, I suspect the support very well might be there. Somehow the School Board/District just can’t get its priorities straight. Saving music teachers while closing an entire school just doesn’t make sense. Keeping frills an the expense of doing away with basics just is not acceptable.

  70. Disgusted Taxpayer

    “Anonymous said…
    Along the same lines, does denying the district money make those problems get better or does it just make the problems that exist worse and create more problems?
    7/10/08 9:06 AM”

    The better question to ask is does approving a parcel tax make those problems get better? VO was slated for closure before the state budget cuts came down, even though the citizens voted for Measure Q. The fallacy here is in thinking that passing another parcel tax is going to fix any problems.

    Think of it this way. If you gave your child a $25 a week allowance which included buying lunch, and he/she sqandered it on candy, then came to you complaining when there was no money left to buy lunch as early as Tuesday, what do you do as a responsible parent? You don’t hand him/her $20 more dollars and hope for the best. Instead the naughty kid has to live within his/her means and brown bag it.

    For instance, it has become clear to me that another parcel tax is not going to stop the closure of Emerson Junior High. While the School Board talks about “saving music programs or foreign language”, it has no problem ruthlessly cutting all the programs at an entire school that serves one third of the city. Not to mention horrendous overcrowding that will result, along with gargantuan transportation problems. The kids on this end of town won’t be able to take Unitrans, as the School Board suggested, because funds have been cut for that route.

    It is also important to note that the last parcel tax did not pass by its usual margin of over 80%. It came in at around 72% if I remember correctly. Support for another parcel tax is highly doubtful. Even the School Board’s hired consultant (for which they paid big bucks I am sure) indicates there will not be enough support for a $120 parcel tax. Yet the School Board arrogantly goes full steam ahead, just as a naughty child would who didn’t manage their money properly but asks for more anyway.

    It is the actions of the School Board that are chipping away at any support for another parcel tax. If the School Board put forth a way of saving Emerson, I suspect the support very well might be there. Somehow the School Board/District just can’t get its priorities straight. Saving music teachers while closing an entire school just doesn’t make sense. Keeping frills an the expense of doing away with basics just is not acceptable.

  71. Disgusted Taxpayer

    “Anonymous said…
    Along the same lines, does denying the district money make those problems get better or does it just make the problems that exist worse and create more problems?
    7/10/08 9:06 AM”

    The better question to ask is does approving a parcel tax make those problems get better? VO was slated for closure before the state budget cuts came down, even though the citizens voted for Measure Q. The fallacy here is in thinking that passing another parcel tax is going to fix any problems.

    Think of it this way. If you gave your child a $25 a week allowance which included buying lunch, and he/she sqandered it on candy, then came to you complaining when there was no money left to buy lunch as early as Tuesday, what do you do as a responsible parent? You don’t hand him/her $20 more dollars and hope for the best. Instead the naughty kid has to live within his/her means and brown bag it.

    For instance, it has become clear to me that another parcel tax is not going to stop the closure of Emerson Junior High. While the School Board talks about “saving music programs or foreign language”, it has no problem ruthlessly cutting all the programs at an entire school that serves one third of the city. Not to mention horrendous overcrowding that will result, along with gargantuan transportation problems. The kids on this end of town won’t be able to take Unitrans, as the School Board suggested, because funds have been cut for that route.

    It is also important to note that the last parcel tax did not pass by its usual margin of over 80%. It came in at around 72% if I remember correctly. Support for another parcel tax is highly doubtful. Even the School Board’s hired consultant (for which they paid big bucks I am sure) indicates there will not be enough support for a $120 parcel tax. Yet the School Board arrogantly goes full steam ahead, just as a naughty child would who didn’t manage their money properly but asks for more anyway.

    It is the actions of the School Board that are chipping away at any support for another parcel tax. If the School Board put forth a way of saving Emerson, I suspect the support very well might be there. Somehow the School Board/District just can’t get its priorities straight. Saving music teachers while closing an entire school just doesn’t make sense. Keeping frills an the expense of doing away with basics just is not acceptable.

  72. Disgusted Taxpayer

    “Anonymous said…
    Along the same lines, does denying the district money make those problems get better or does it just make the problems that exist worse and create more problems?
    7/10/08 9:06 AM”

    The better question to ask is does approving a parcel tax make those problems get better? VO was slated for closure before the state budget cuts came down, even though the citizens voted for Measure Q. The fallacy here is in thinking that passing another parcel tax is going to fix any problems.

    Think of it this way. If you gave your child a $25 a week allowance which included buying lunch, and he/she sqandered it on candy, then came to you complaining when there was no money left to buy lunch as early as Tuesday, what do you do as a responsible parent? You don’t hand him/her $20 more dollars and hope for the best. Instead the naughty kid has to live within his/her means and brown bag it.

    For instance, it has become clear to me that another parcel tax is not going to stop the closure of Emerson Junior High. While the School Board talks about “saving music programs or foreign language”, it has no problem ruthlessly cutting all the programs at an entire school that serves one third of the city. Not to mention horrendous overcrowding that will result, along with gargantuan transportation problems. The kids on this end of town won’t be able to take Unitrans, as the School Board suggested, because funds have been cut for that route.

    It is also important to note that the last parcel tax did not pass by its usual margin of over 80%. It came in at around 72% if I remember correctly. Support for another parcel tax is highly doubtful. Even the School Board’s hired consultant (for which they paid big bucks I am sure) indicates there will not be enough support for a $120 parcel tax. Yet the School Board arrogantly goes full steam ahead, just as a naughty child would who didn’t manage their money properly but asks for more anyway.

    It is the actions of the School Board that are chipping away at any support for another parcel tax. If the School Board put forth a way of saving Emerson, I suspect the support very well might be there. Somehow the School Board/District just can’t get its priorities straight. Saving music teachers while closing an entire school just doesn’t make sense. Keeping frills an the expense of doing away with basics just is not acceptable.

  73. Redd Herring

    “The bulk of the budget crisis that we see is not due to fiscal mismanagement by the current board and district staff, it is due to a devastating statewide economic picture combined with a drop in attendance in the local school district.”

    Why do the supporters of the parcel tax keep up the mantra of declining enrollment, when in fact that is not true? I believe it was Don Shor who pointed out the actual figures do not support that argument. There was a shift in students, so that there were less going to elementary school and an increase at the junior and senior high level.

    Any School Board/District should be able to handle minor fluctuations in enrollment. Even the School Board/District has admitted enrollment is projected to hold steady over the next few years. The declining enrollment argument is a red herring IMHO.

  74. Redd Herring

    “The bulk of the budget crisis that we see is not due to fiscal mismanagement by the current board and district staff, it is due to a devastating statewide economic picture combined with a drop in attendance in the local school district.”

    Why do the supporters of the parcel tax keep up the mantra of declining enrollment, when in fact that is not true? I believe it was Don Shor who pointed out the actual figures do not support that argument. There was a shift in students, so that there were less going to elementary school and an increase at the junior and senior high level.

    Any School Board/District should be able to handle minor fluctuations in enrollment. Even the School Board/District has admitted enrollment is projected to hold steady over the next few years. The declining enrollment argument is a red herring IMHO.

  75. Redd Herring

    “The bulk of the budget crisis that we see is not due to fiscal mismanagement by the current board and district staff, it is due to a devastating statewide economic picture combined with a drop in attendance in the local school district.”

    Why do the supporters of the parcel tax keep up the mantra of declining enrollment, when in fact that is not true? I believe it was Don Shor who pointed out the actual figures do not support that argument. There was a shift in students, so that there were less going to elementary school and an increase at the junior and senior high level.

    Any School Board/District should be able to handle minor fluctuations in enrollment. Even the School Board/District has admitted enrollment is projected to hold steady over the next few years. The declining enrollment argument is a red herring IMHO.

  76. Redd Herring

    “The bulk of the budget crisis that we see is not due to fiscal mismanagement by the current board and district staff, it is due to a devastating statewide economic picture combined with a drop in attendance in the local school district.”

    Why do the supporters of the parcel tax keep up the mantra of declining enrollment, when in fact that is not true? I believe it was Don Shor who pointed out the actual figures do not support that argument. There was a shift in students, so that there were less going to elementary school and an increase at the junior and senior high level.

    Any School Board/District should be able to handle minor fluctuations in enrollment. Even the School Board/District has admitted enrollment is projected to hold steady over the next few years. The declining enrollment argument is a red herring IMHO.

  77. No More Frills

    “With my own children attending Davis schools, I appreciate the curricula excess when we can afford it. However, when money is tight these things non-necessities should be trimmed.”

    And yet you have many who think Mandarin Chinese 3 or 4 is a necessity, even though there were only one or two students in the entire class. Or that programs like DaVinci High School are a necessity. Or that Davis has to have the highest paid Supt. This kind of excess has got to stop.

  78. No More Frills

    “With my own children attending Davis schools, I appreciate the curricula excess when we can afford it. However, when money is tight these things non-necessities should be trimmed.”

    And yet you have many who think Mandarin Chinese 3 or 4 is a necessity, even though there were only one or two students in the entire class. Or that programs like DaVinci High School are a necessity. Or that Davis has to have the highest paid Supt. This kind of excess has got to stop.

  79. No More Frills

    “With my own children attending Davis schools, I appreciate the curricula excess when we can afford it. However, when money is tight these things non-necessities should be trimmed.”

    And yet you have many who think Mandarin Chinese 3 or 4 is a necessity, even though there were only one or two students in the entire class. Or that programs like DaVinci High School are a necessity. Or that Davis has to have the highest paid Supt. This kind of excess has got to stop.

  80. No More Frills

    “With my own children attending Davis schools, I appreciate the curricula excess when we can afford it. However, when money is tight these things non-necessities should be trimmed.”

    And yet you have many who think Mandarin Chinese 3 or 4 is a necessity, even though there were only one or two students in the entire class. Or that programs like DaVinci High School are a necessity. Or that Davis has to have the highest paid Supt. This kind of excess has got to stop.

  81. wdf

    Why do the supporters of the parcel tax keep up the mantra of declining enrollment, when in fact that is not true? I believe it was Don Shor who pointed out the actual figures do not support that argument. There was a shift in students, so that there were less going to elementary school and an increase at the junior and senior high level.

    What Don Shor pointed out was trends in total enrollment. School districts don’t receive funds based on total enrollment. They receive funds based on ADA, average daily attendance. That’s to encourage efforts to maintain high attendance in the schools. Although Don’s observation is correct, it isn’t directly relevant to what the state looks at to fund the district.

    ADA is usually about 95% of the total enrollment in Davis, meaning that on average, about 95% of the kids show up for school on any one day.

    95% is a very good percentage for a school district. Attendance problems are often greater in secondary schools, when you begin to have issues with truancy.

    ADA has been declining more than total enrollment because of the trend toward an increase in secondary students.

    The good news, if you’ve been following school board meetings, is that the district succeeding in raising ADA to above 96% in the last year. It helps the district some with funding issues, but this is a statewide budget problem, and there are still bigger budget issues than are dealt with simply over enrollment.

    Other districts are dealing with similar issues, or will be dealing with worsening issues next year.

  82. wdf

    Why do the supporters of the parcel tax keep up the mantra of declining enrollment, when in fact that is not true? I believe it was Don Shor who pointed out the actual figures do not support that argument. There was a shift in students, so that there were less going to elementary school and an increase at the junior and senior high level.

    What Don Shor pointed out was trends in total enrollment. School districts don’t receive funds based on total enrollment. They receive funds based on ADA, average daily attendance. That’s to encourage efforts to maintain high attendance in the schools. Although Don’s observation is correct, it isn’t directly relevant to what the state looks at to fund the district.

    ADA is usually about 95% of the total enrollment in Davis, meaning that on average, about 95% of the kids show up for school on any one day.

    95% is a very good percentage for a school district. Attendance problems are often greater in secondary schools, when you begin to have issues with truancy.

    ADA has been declining more than total enrollment because of the trend toward an increase in secondary students.

    The good news, if you’ve been following school board meetings, is that the district succeeding in raising ADA to above 96% in the last year. It helps the district some with funding issues, but this is a statewide budget problem, and there are still bigger budget issues than are dealt with simply over enrollment.

    Other districts are dealing with similar issues, or will be dealing with worsening issues next year.

  83. wdf

    Why do the supporters of the parcel tax keep up the mantra of declining enrollment, when in fact that is not true? I believe it was Don Shor who pointed out the actual figures do not support that argument. There was a shift in students, so that there were less going to elementary school and an increase at the junior and senior high level.

    What Don Shor pointed out was trends in total enrollment. School districts don’t receive funds based on total enrollment. They receive funds based on ADA, average daily attendance. That’s to encourage efforts to maintain high attendance in the schools. Although Don’s observation is correct, it isn’t directly relevant to what the state looks at to fund the district.

    ADA is usually about 95% of the total enrollment in Davis, meaning that on average, about 95% of the kids show up for school on any one day.

    95% is a very good percentage for a school district. Attendance problems are often greater in secondary schools, when you begin to have issues with truancy.

    ADA has been declining more than total enrollment because of the trend toward an increase in secondary students.

    The good news, if you’ve been following school board meetings, is that the district succeeding in raising ADA to above 96% in the last year. It helps the district some with funding issues, but this is a statewide budget problem, and there are still bigger budget issues than are dealt with simply over enrollment.

    Other districts are dealing with similar issues, or will be dealing with worsening issues next year.

  84. wdf

    Why do the supporters of the parcel tax keep up the mantra of declining enrollment, when in fact that is not true? I believe it was Don Shor who pointed out the actual figures do not support that argument. There was a shift in students, so that there were less going to elementary school and an increase at the junior and senior high level.

    What Don Shor pointed out was trends in total enrollment. School districts don’t receive funds based on total enrollment. They receive funds based on ADA, average daily attendance. That’s to encourage efforts to maintain high attendance in the schools. Although Don’s observation is correct, it isn’t directly relevant to what the state looks at to fund the district.

    ADA is usually about 95% of the total enrollment in Davis, meaning that on average, about 95% of the kids show up for school on any one day.

    95% is a very good percentage for a school district. Attendance problems are often greater in secondary schools, when you begin to have issues with truancy.

    ADA has been declining more than total enrollment because of the trend toward an increase in secondary students.

    The good news, if you’ve been following school board meetings, is that the district succeeding in raising ADA to above 96% in the last year. It helps the district some with funding issues, but this is a statewide budget problem, and there are still bigger budget issues than are dealt with simply over enrollment.

    Other districts are dealing with similar issues, or will be dealing with worsening issues next year.

  85. parcel supporter

    I’m a renter and I’m not happy about the past DJUSD administration, but I am not going to hold the children or our schools hostage for past wrong doings. Dave Murphy, Tahir Ahad, et al were bad administrators and our district is still paying for it.

    I am supporting the $120 parcel tax, but I do want to know that the board isn’t going to make dumb recommendations like, “build more schools” once some developments start going up within a year or two.

    I urge others to support the parcel tax too, but let’s just hold them accountable.

  86. parcel supporter

    I’m a renter and I’m not happy about the past DJUSD administration, but I am not going to hold the children or our schools hostage for past wrong doings. Dave Murphy, Tahir Ahad, et al were bad administrators and our district is still paying for it.

    I am supporting the $120 parcel tax, but I do want to know that the board isn’t going to make dumb recommendations like, “build more schools” once some developments start going up within a year or two.

    I urge others to support the parcel tax too, but let’s just hold them accountable.

  87. parcel supporter

    I’m a renter and I’m not happy about the past DJUSD administration, but I am not going to hold the children or our schools hostage for past wrong doings. Dave Murphy, Tahir Ahad, et al were bad administrators and our district is still paying for it.

    I am supporting the $120 parcel tax, but I do want to know that the board isn’t going to make dumb recommendations like, “build more schools” once some developments start going up within a year or two.

    I urge others to support the parcel tax too, but let’s just hold them accountable.

  88. parcel supporter

    I’m a renter and I’m not happy about the past DJUSD administration, but I am not going to hold the children or our schools hostage for past wrong doings. Dave Murphy, Tahir Ahad, et al were bad administrators and our district is still paying for it.

    I am supporting the $120 parcel tax, but I do want to know that the board isn’t going to make dumb recommendations like, “build more schools” once some developments start going up within a year or two.

    I urge others to support the parcel tax too, but let’s just hold them accountable.

  89. question

    My only question is that if we pass this tax, will Emerson be kept open? Because the $120/year tax is nothing compared to the $1000/year that would have to be spent on gas to shuttle the kids across town if Emerson closes. So if it won’t stop Emerson from closing, then I’d be hard pressed to vote for it, since it would be an expense on top of the commuting costs. But if it will, then it is a bargain.

    And don’t bring up John Munn…he’s the Pat Paulsen of local politics…a perennial candidate for Assembly who held no chance of winning.

  90. question

    My only question is that if we pass this tax, will Emerson be kept open? Because the $120/year tax is nothing compared to the $1000/year that would have to be spent on gas to shuttle the kids across town if Emerson closes. So if it won’t stop Emerson from closing, then I’d be hard pressed to vote for it, since it would be an expense on top of the commuting costs. But if it will, then it is a bargain.

    And don’t bring up John Munn…he’s the Pat Paulsen of local politics…a perennial candidate for Assembly who held no chance of winning.

  91. question

    My only question is that if we pass this tax, will Emerson be kept open? Because the $120/year tax is nothing compared to the $1000/year that would have to be spent on gas to shuttle the kids across town if Emerson closes. So if it won’t stop Emerson from closing, then I’d be hard pressed to vote for it, since it would be an expense on top of the commuting costs. But if it will, then it is a bargain.

    And don’t bring up John Munn…he’s the Pat Paulsen of local politics…a perennial candidate for Assembly who held no chance of winning.

  92. question

    My only question is that if we pass this tax, will Emerson be kept open? Because the $120/year tax is nothing compared to the $1000/year that would have to be spent on gas to shuttle the kids across town if Emerson closes. So if it won’t stop Emerson from closing, then I’d be hard pressed to vote for it, since it would be an expense on top of the commuting costs. But if it will, then it is a bargain.

    And don’t bring up John Munn…he’s the Pat Paulsen of local politics…a perennial candidate for Assembly who held no chance of winning.

  93. money management

    Emerson currently receives a higher proportion of operating expenses from the district relative to Harper and Holmes because its lower population means that it requires greater funding per student (fewer students to fill the classes, fixed costs such as a custodian spread over fewer students, etc.). If you want to save Emerson, cutting operating expenses by not passing a parcel tax isn’t going to help.

    “Any School Board/District should be able to handle minor fluctuations in enrollment.”

    One of the problems with these minor fluctuations is that they are spread across the whole district. If an elementary school loses, say, 10 or 20 students spread across all grades K-6, it is very difficult to cut one teaching position since it’s no more than a few students per grade level who are lost – yet the school now has lost the equivalent of a half to one position in funding. When you see the same kinds of losses consistently across the whole district it can be difficult to manage. Because of these fluctuations many schools end up having to run classes below capacity. If the 3rd grade has 55 students rather than 60 you still need 3 teachers unless you want to bump 5 kids over to other schools. This kind of thing is happening across the district.

  94. money management

    Emerson currently receives a higher proportion of operating expenses from the district relative to Harper and Holmes because its lower population means that it requires greater funding per student (fewer students to fill the classes, fixed costs such as a custodian spread over fewer students, etc.). If you want to save Emerson, cutting operating expenses by not passing a parcel tax isn’t going to help.

    “Any School Board/District should be able to handle minor fluctuations in enrollment.”

    One of the problems with these minor fluctuations is that they are spread across the whole district. If an elementary school loses, say, 10 or 20 students spread across all grades K-6, it is very difficult to cut one teaching position since it’s no more than a few students per grade level who are lost – yet the school now has lost the equivalent of a half to one position in funding. When you see the same kinds of losses consistently across the whole district it can be difficult to manage. Because of these fluctuations many schools end up having to run classes below capacity. If the 3rd grade has 55 students rather than 60 you still need 3 teachers unless you want to bump 5 kids over to other schools. This kind of thing is happening across the district.

  95. money management

    Emerson currently receives a higher proportion of operating expenses from the district relative to Harper and Holmes because its lower population means that it requires greater funding per student (fewer students to fill the classes, fixed costs such as a custodian spread over fewer students, etc.). If you want to save Emerson, cutting operating expenses by not passing a parcel tax isn’t going to help.

    “Any School Board/District should be able to handle minor fluctuations in enrollment.”

    One of the problems with these minor fluctuations is that they are spread across the whole district. If an elementary school loses, say, 10 or 20 students spread across all grades K-6, it is very difficult to cut one teaching position since it’s no more than a few students per grade level who are lost – yet the school now has lost the equivalent of a half to one position in funding. When you see the same kinds of losses consistently across the whole district it can be difficult to manage. Because of these fluctuations many schools end up having to run classes below capacity. If the 3rd grade has 55 students rather than 60 you still need 3 teachers unless you want to bump 5 kids over to other schools. This kind of thing is happening across the district.

  96. money management

    Emerson currently receives a higher proportion of operating expenses from the district relative to Harper and Holmes because its lower population means that it requires greater funding per student (fewer students to fill the classes, fixed costs such as a custodian spread over fewer students, etc.). If you want to save Emerson, cutting operating expenses by not passing a parcel tax isn’t going to help.

    “Any School Board/District should be able to handle minor fluctuations in enrollment.”

    One of the problems with these minor fluctuations is that they are spread across the whole district. If an elementary school loses, say, 10 or 20 students spread across all grades K-6, it is very difficult to cut one teaching position since it’s no more than a few students per grade level who are lost – yet the school now has lost the equivalent of a half to one position in funding. When you see the same kinds of losses consistently across the whole district it can be difficult to manage. Because of these fluctuations many schools end up having to run classes below capacity. If the 3rd grade has 55 students rather than 60 you still need 3 teachers unless you want to bump 5 kids over to other schools. This kind of thing is happening across the district.

  97. Fast Fweddy

    FF says: “Don’t be a stooge, which they are counting on you being, join me in voting NO”-sometimes you just have to punish those associated with bad decisions, greed and incompetence. If you pass this parcel tax, you send a clear message that WE forgive the wasting of our money. The whole thing w/ TSS was more than enough for me to NEVER again pass a parcel tax. Too late now. Don’t be a stooge!

  98. Fast Fweddy

    FF says: “Don’t be a stooge, which they are counting on you being, join me in voting NO”-sometimes you just have to punish those associated with bad decisions, greed and incompetence. If you pass this parcel tax, you send a clear message that WE forgive the wasting of our money. The whole thing w/ TSS was more than enough for me to NEVER again pass a parcel tax. Too late now. Don’t be a stooge!

  99. Fast Fweddy

    FF says: “Don’t be a stooge, which they are counting on you being, join me in voting NO”-sometimes you just have to punish those associated with bad decisions, greed and incompetence. If you pass this parcel tax, you send a clear message that WE forgive the wasting of our money. The whole thing w/ TSS was more than enough for me to NEVER again pass a parcel tax. Too late now. Don’t be a stooge!

  100. Fast Fweddy

    FF says: “Don’t be a stooge, which they are counting on you being, join me in voting NO”-sometimes you just have to punish those associated with bad decisions, greed and incompetence. If you pass this parcel tax, you send a clear message that WE forgive the wasting of our money. The whole thing w/ TSS was more than enough for me to NEVER again pass a parcel tax. Too late now. Don’t be a stooge!

  101. Fed Up

    “Emerson currently receives a higher proportion of operating expenses from the district relative to Harper and Holmes because its lower population means that it requires greater funding per student (fewer students to fill the classes, fixed costs such as a custodian spread over fewer students, etc.). If you want to save Emerson, cutting operating expenses by not passing a parcel tax isn’t going to help.”

    Trust me, school boundary lines can be changed so that Emerson is overcrowded, not undercrowded – so I am not buying this argument.

    “One of the problems with these minor fluctuations is that they are spread across the whole district. If an elementary school loses, say, 10 or 20 students spread across all grades K-6, it is very difficult to cut one teaching position since it’s no more than a few students per grade level who are lost – yet the school now has lost the equivalent of a half to one position in funding.”

    Somehow Woodland manages it, without having to lay off any teachers or close any schools.

    “I am supporting the $120 parcel tax, but I do want to know that the board isn’t going to make dumb recommendations like, “build more schools” once some developments start going up within a year or two. I urge others to support the parcel tax too, but let’s just hold them accountable.”

    How is giving them what they want holding them accountable?

    “If you pass this parcel tax, you send a clear message that WE forgive the wasting of our money.”

    From what I can see, it is business as usual for this School Board. What guarantees do we have that not one too many schools will be built again, for instance? How can we save Emerson, or is that just a done deal in the minds of the School Board, that it will be the sacrificial lamb on the alter of “save our teachers and programs, not buildings”?

  102. Fed Up

    “Emerson currently receives a higher proportion of operating expenses from the district relative to Harper and Holmes because its lower population means that it requires greater funding per student (fewer students to fill the classes, fixed costs such as a custodian spread over fewer students, etc.). If you want to save Emerson, cutting operating expenses by not passing a parcel tax isn’t going to help.”

    Trust me, school boundary lines can be changed so that Emerson is overcrowded, not undercrowded – so I am not buying this argument.

    “One of the problems with these minor fluctuations is that they are spread across the whole district. If an elementary school loses, say, 10 or 20 students spread across all grades K-6, it is very difficult to cut one teaching position since it’s no more than a few students per grade level who are lost – yet the school now has lost the equivalent of a half to one position in funding.”

    Somehow Woodland manages it, without having to lay off any teachers or close any schools.

    “I am supporting the $120 parcel tax, but I do want to know that the board isn’t going to make dumb recommendations like, “build more schools” once some developments start going up within a year or two. I urge others to support the parcel tax too, but let’s just hold them accountable.”

    How is giving them what they want holding them accountable?

    “If you pass this parcel tax, you send a clear message that WE forgive the wasting of our money.”

    From what I can see, it is business as usual for this School Board. What guarantees do we have that not one too many schools will be built again, for instance? How can we save Emerson, or is that just a done deal in the minds of the School Board, that it will be the sacrificial lamb on the alter of “save our teachers and programs, not buildings”?

  103. Fed Up

    “Emerson currently receives a higher proportion of operating expenses from the district relative to Harper and Holmes because its lower population means that it requires greater funding per student (fewer students to fill the classes, fixed costs such as a custodian spread over fewer students, etc.). If you want to save Emerson, cutting operating expenses by not passing a parcel tax isn’t going to help.”

    Trust me, school boundary lines can be changed so that Emerson is overcrowded, not undercrowded – so I am not buying this argument.

    “One of the problems with these minor fluctuations is that they are spread across the whole district. If an elementary school loses, say, 10 or 20 students spread across all grades K-6, it is very difficult to cut one teaching position since it’s no more than a few students per grade level who are lost – yet the school now has lost the equivalent of a half to one position in funding.”

    Somehow Woodland manages it, without having to lay off any teachers or close any schools.

    “I am supporting the $120 parcel tax, but I do want to know that the board isn’t going to make dumb recommendations like, “build more schools” once some developments start going up within a year or two. I urge others to support the parcel tax too, but let’s just hold them accountable.”

    How is giving them what they want holding them accountable?

    “If you pass this parcel tax, you send a clear message that WE forgive the wasting of our money.”

    From what I can see, it is business as usual for this School Board. What guarantees do we have that not one too many schools will be built again, for instance? How can we save Emerson, or is that just a done deal in the minds of the School Board, that it will be the sacrificial lamb on the alter of “save our teachers and programs, not buildings”?

  104. Fed Up

    “Emerson currently receives a higher proportion of operating expenses from the district relative to Harper and Holmes because its lower population means that it requires greater funding per student (fewer students to fill the classes, fixed costs such as a custodian spread over fewer students, etc.). If you want to save Emerson, cutting operating expenses by not passing a parcel tax isn’t going to help.”

    Trust me, school boundary lines can be changed so that Emerson is overcrowded, not undercrowded – so I am not buying this argument.

    “One of the problems with these minor fluctuations is that they are spread across the whole district. If an elementary school loses, say, 10 or 20 students spread across all grades K-6, it is very difficult to cut one teaching position since it’s no more than a few students per grade level who are lost – yet the school now has lost the equivalent of a half to one position in funding.”

    Somehow Woodland manages it, without having to lay off any teachers or close any schools.

    “I am supporting the $120 parcel tax, but I do want to know that the board isn’t going to make dumb recommendations like, “build more schools” once some developments start going up within a year or two. I urge others to support the parcel tax too, but let’s just hold them accountable.”

    How is giving them what they want holding them accountable?

    “If you pass this parcel tax, you send a clear message that WE forgive the wasting of our money.”

    From what I can see, it is business as usual for this School Board. What guarantees do we have that not one too many schools will be built again, for instance? How can we save Emerson, or is that just a done deal in the minds of the School Board, that it will be the sacrificial lamb on the alter of “save our teachers and programs, not buildings”?

  105. Anonymous

    “…make dumb recommendations like, “build more schools” once some developments start going up “

    Developers WANT new schools for their projects. It greatly increases their sale value. This was the primary driving force for the closing of Valley Oak Elementary to make sure that a new school would be needed if/when peripheral development took off to the north of Davis. If you are concerned about these “dumb decisions”, pay careful attention to the supporters of School Board candidates and their future political ambitions for higher office that requires support from the local “deep pockets”.

  106. Anonymous

    “…make dumb recommendations like, “build more schools” once some developments start going up “

    Developers WANT new schools for their projects. It greatly increases their sale value. This was the primary driving force for the closing of Valley Oak Elementary to make sure that a new school would be needed if/when peripheral development took off to the north of Davis. If you are concerned about these “dumb decisions”, pay careful attention to the supporters of School Board candidates and their future political ambitions for higher office that requires support from the local “deep pockets”.

  107. Anonymous

    “…make dumb recommendations like, “build more schools” once some developments start going up “

    Developers WANT new schools for their projects. It greatly increases their sale value. This was the primary driving force for the closing of Valley Oak Elementary to make sure that a new school would be needed if/when peripheral development took off to the north of Davis. If you are concerned about these “dumb decisions”, pay careful attention to the supporters of School Board candidates and their future political ambitions for higher office that requires support from the local “deep pockets”.

  108. Anonymous

    “…make dumb recommendations like, “build more schools” once some developments start going up “

    Developers WANT new schools for their projects. It greatly increases their sale value. This was the primary driving force for the closing of Valley Oak Elementary to make sure that a new school would be needed if/when peripheral development took off to the north of Davis. If you are concerned about these “dumb decisions”, pay careful attention to the supporters of School Board candidates and their future political ambitions for higher office that requires support from the local “deep pockets”.

  109. Anonymous

    school boundary lines can be changed so that Emerson is overcrowded, not undercrowded – so I am not buying this argument.

    Emerson already has numerous IDT requests out because of parents wanting their children out for one reason or another – partly because of its size and partly because people are unhappy with the principal – so I am not so sure about your argument.

  110. Anonymous

    school boundary lines can be changed so that Emerson is overcrowded, not undercrowded – so I am not buying this argument.

    Emerson already has numerous IDT requests out because of parents wanting their children out for one reason or another – partly because of its size and partly because people are unhappy with the principal – so I am not so sure about your argument.

  111. Anonymous

    school boundary lines can be changed so that Emerson is overcrowded, not undercrowded – so I am not buying this argument.

    Emerson already has numerous IDT requests out because of parents wanting their children out for one reason or another – partly because of its size and partly because people are unhappy with the principal – so I am not so sure about your argument.

  112. Anonymous

    school boundary lines can be changed so that Emerson is overcrowded, not undercrowded – so I am not buying this argument.

    Emerson already has numerous IDT requests out because of parents wanting their children out for one reason or another – partly because of its size and partly because people are unhappy with the principal – so I am not so sure about your argument.

  113. Doug Paul Davis

    “The better question to ask is does approving a parcel tax make those problems get better? “

    Approving a parcel tax will keep the Elementary Science Program, Music Program, librarians, and a number of HS and Junior High Programs as well.

    If the Parcel Tax is not passed, those programs will end. That will make those problems worse.

    There is no one who was more in favor of keeping Valley Oak open than I was. I strongly supported keeping Emerson open as well.

    Voting against the parcel tax will not teach them a lesson. It will not bring Valley Oak back. It will not keep Emerson open. It will punish hundreds of innocent students who have nothing to do with those decisions. It will make things far worse.

    Be angry. Be upset. But think things through: is there anything that will change for the better if this parcel tax does not pass? Do you think the district will keep valley oak open? Do you think this town has the will to do so anyway? People had a choice in the last school board election and guess what, the Valley Oak issue did not resonate with the public.

    I’m sorry because I think it was a mistake to close it, but I also think it would be as big a tragedy if we had to cut the elementary science programs, or language programs, or music programs, or athletic programs.

  114. Doug Paul Davis

    “The better question to ask is does approving a parcel tax make those problems get better? “

    Approving a parcel tax will keep the Elementary Science Program, Music Program, librarians, and a number of HS and Junior High Programs as well.

    If the Parcel Tax is not passed, those programs will end. That will make those problems worse.

    There is no one who was more in favor of keeping Valley Oak open than I was. I strongly supported keeping Emerson open as well.

    Voting against the parcel tax will not teach them a lesson. It will not bring Valley Oak back. It will not keep Emerson open. It will punish hundreds of innocent students who have nothing to do with those decisions. It will make things far worse.

    Be angry. Be upset. But think things through: is there anything that will change for the better if this parcel tax does not pass? Do you think the district will keep valley oak open? Do you think this town has the will to do so anyway? People had a choice in the last school board election and guess what, the Valley Oak issue did not resonate with the public.

    I’m sorry because I think it was a mistake to close it, but I also think it would be as big a tragedy if we had to cut the elementary science programs, or language programs, or music programs, or athletic programs.

  115. Doug Paul Davis

    “The better question to ask is does approving a parcel tax make those problems get better? “

    Approving a parcel tax will keep the Elementary Science Program, Music Program, librarians, and a number of HS and Junior High Programs as well.

    If the Parcel Tax is not passed, those programs will end. That will make those problems worse.

    There is no one who was more in favor of keeping Valley Oak open than I was. I strongly supported keeping Emerson open as well.

    Voting against the parcel tax will not teach them a lesson. It will not bring Valley Oak back. It will not keep Emerson open. It will punish hundreds of innocent students who have nothing to do with those decisions. It will make things far worse.

    Be angry. Be upset. But think things through: is there anything that will change for the better if this parcel tax does not pass? Do you think the district will keep valley oak open? Do you think this town has the will to do so anyway? People had a choice in the last school board election and guess what, the Valley Oak issue did not resonate with the public.

    I’m sorry because I think it was a mistake to close it, but I also think it would be as big a tragedy if we had to cut the elementary science programs, or language programs, or music programs, or athletic programs.

  116. Doug Paul Davis

    “The better question to ask is does approving a parcel tax make those problems get better? “

    Approving a parcel tax will keep the Elementary Science Program, Music Program, librarians, and a number of HS and Junior High Programs as well.

    If the Parcel Tax is not passed, those programs will end. That will make those problems worse.

    There is no one who was more in favor of keeping Valley Oak open than I was. I strongly supported keeping Emerson open as well.

    Voting against the parcel tax will not teach them a lesson. It will not bring Valley Oak back. It will not keep Emerson open. It will punish hundreds of innocent students who have nothing to do with those decisions. It will make things far worse.

    Be angry. Be upset. But think things through: is there anything that will change for the better if this parcel tax does not pass? Do you think the district will keep valley oak open? Do you think this town has the will to do so anyway? People had a choice in the last school board election and guess what, the Valley Oak issue did not resonate with the public.

    I’m sorry because I think it was a mistake to close it, but I also think it would be as big a tragedy if we had to cut the elementary science programs, or language programs, or music programs, or athletic programs.

  117. Anonymous

    “Be angry. Be upset.”

    For all the venting done on this blog, some of you don’t seem to take the time to educate yourself about the process or to make your views known where it really matters.

    I don’t hear these critical comments during public comment at school board meetings.

    There was a budget advisory committee meeting yesterday afternoon at the district office. It was open to the public. The announcement has been on the district website for a few days, with a posted agenda.

    Compared to the discussion here, it was a very bland affair. There were plenty of opportunities to raise many of the issues presented here.

    How can you complain about wanting transparency and accountability if you don’t show up to make yourselves heard?

    Many of these folks — district staff, trustees — will respond to e-mail if you have questions.

    If you are really serious about wanting a change, you have to do a little more than just sit on your butts and blog.

  118. Anonymous

    “Be angry. Be upset.”

    For all the venting done on this blog, some of you don’t seem to take the time to educate yourself about the process or to make your views known where it really matters.

    I don’t hear these critical comments during public comment at school board meetings.

    There was a budget advisory committee meeting yesterday afternoon at the district office. It was open to the public. The announcement has been on the district website for a few days, with a posted agenda.

    Compared to the discussion here, it was a very bland affair. There were plenty of opportunities to raise many of the issues presented here.

    How can you complain about wanting transparency and accountability if you don’t show up to make yourselves heard?

    Many of these folks — district staff, trustees — will respond to e-mail if you have questions.

    If you are really serious about wanting a change, you have to do a little more than just sit on your butts and blog.

  119. Anonymous

    “Be angry. Be upset.”

    For all the venting done on this blog, some of you don’t seem to take the time to educate yourself about the process or to make your views known where it really matters.

    I don’t hear these critical comments during public comment at school board meetings.

    There was a budget advisory committee meeting yesterday afternoon at the district office. It was open to the public. The announcement has been on the district website for a few days, with a posted agenda.

    Compared to the discussion here, it was a very bland affair. There were plenty of opportunities to raise many of the issues presented here.

    How can you complain about wanting transparency and accountability if you don’t show up to make yourselves heard?

    Many of these folks — district staff, trustees — will respond to e-mail if you have questions.

    If you are really serious about wanting a change, you have to do a little more than just sit on your butts and blog.

  120. Anonymous

    “Be angry. Be upset.”

    For all the venting done on this blog, some of you don’t seem to take the time to educate yourself about the process or to make your views known where it really matters.

    I don’t hear these critical comments during public comment at school board meetings.

    There was a budget advisory committee meeting yesterday afternoon at the district office. It was open to the public. The announcement has been on the district website for a few days, with a posted agenda.

    Compared to the discussion here, it was a very bland affair. There were plenty of opportunities to raise many of the issues presented here.

    How can you complain about wanting transparency and accountability if you don’t show up to make yourselves heard?

    Many of these folks — district staff, trustees — will respond to e-mail if you have questions.

    If you are really serious about wanting a change, you have to do a little more than just sit on your butts and blog.

  121. Anonymous

    “”Measure J was passed BEFORE the bond measure.”

    …my point. The DJUSD planned, promoted and went ahead with Measure K without apparent regard/interest in what the voters thought of Measure J and the future of large peripheral residential development in Davis.”

    And 85% of the voters in that election approved it! I don’t think any parcel tax has ever received such high support. How did you vote in that election?

  122. Anonymous

    “”Measure J was passed BEFORE the bond measure.”

    …my point. The DJUSD planned, promoted and went ahead with Measure K without apparent regard/interest in what the voters thought of Measure J and the future of large peripheral residential development in Davis.”

    And 85% of the voters in that election approved it! I don’t think any parcel tax has ever received such high support. How did you vote in that election?

  123. Anonymous

    “”Measure J was passed BEFORE the bond measure.”

    …my point. The DJUSD planned, promoted and went ahead with Measure K without apparent regard/interest in what the voters thought of Measure J and the future of large peripheral residential development in Davis.”

    And 85% of the voters in that election approved it! I don’t think any parcel tax has ever received such high support. How did you vote in that election?

  124. Anonymous

    “”Measure J was passed BEFORE the bond measure.”

    …my point. The DJUSD planned, promoted and went ahead with Measure K without apparent regard/interest in what the voters thought of Measure J and the future of large peripheral residential development in Davis.”

    And 85% of the voters in that election approved it! I don’t think any parcel tax has ever received such high support. How did you vote in that election?

  125. Rich Rifkin

    “Why do the supporters of the parcel tax keep up the mantra of declining enrollment, when in fact that is not true?”

    From 2000 to 2007, the ADA at Davis district schools was fairly stable. However, from 02/03 to 06/07, the ADA fell by 158:

    2000-2001 8,355
    2001-2002 8,489
    2002-2003 8,534
    2003-2004 8,484
    2004-2005 8,399
    2005-2006 8,313
    2006-2007 8,376
    2007-2008 8,494*

    * The 2007-2008 number only is total enrollment, not ADA.

  126. Rich Rifkin

    “Why do the supporters of the parcel tax keep up the mantra of declining enrollment, when in fact that is not true?”

    From 2000 to 2007, the ADA at Davis district schools was fairly stable. However, from 02/03 to 06/07, the ADA fell by 158:

    2000-2001 8,355
    2001-2002 8,489
    2002-2003 8,534
    2003-2004 8,484
    2004-2005 8,399
    2005-2006 8,313
    2006-2007 8,376
    2007-2008 8,494*

    * The 2007-2008 number only is total enrollment, not ADA.

  127. Rich Rifkin

    “Why do the supporters of the parcel tax keep up the mantra of declining enrollment, when in fact that is not true?”

    From 2000 to 2007, the ADA at Davis district schools was fairly stable. However, from 02/03 to 06/07, the ADA fell by 158:

    2000-2001 8,355
    2001-2002 8,489
    2002-2003 8,534
    2003-2004 8,484
    2004-2005 8,399
    2005-2006 8,313
    2006-2007 8,376
    2007-2008 8,494*

    * The 2007-2008 number only is total enrollment, not ADA.

  128. Rich Rifkin

    “Why do the supporters of the parcel tax keep up the mantra of declining enrollment, when in fact that is not true?”

    From 2000 to 2007, the ADA at Davis district schools was fairly stable. However, from 02/03 to 06/07, the ADA fell by 158:

    2000-2001 8,355
    2001-2002 8,489
    2002-2003 8,534
    2003-2004 8,484
    2004-2005 8,399
    2005-2006 8,313
    2006-2007 8,376
    2007-2008 8,494*

    * The 2007-2008 number only is total enrollment, not ADA.

  129. FDS

    “That means that the renter’s share would like be no more than $25 or around a $2 per month increase. Given all of the rental expenses, the average renter will not even notice the parcel tax even if the property owner passes along the cost to the tenants.”

    yes, but we know these parcel taxes increase all the time. we just got measure Q passed. That, in addition to this. IT ADDS UP DAVID!

    Pretty soon, we’ll run out of letters from the alphabet, so it would be better to number the taxes off… i.e. t(1),
    t(2), ….t(n),

  130. FDS

    “That means that the renter’s share would like be no more than $25 or around a $2 per month increase. Given all of the rental expenses, the average renter will not even notice the parcel tax even if the property owner passes along the cost to the tenants.”

    yes, but we know these parcel taxes increase all the time. we just got measure Q passed. That, in addition to this. IT ADDS UP DAVID!

    Pretty soon, we’ll run out of letters from the alphabet, so it would be better to number the taxes off… i.e. t(1),
    t(2), ….t(n),

  131. FDS

    “That means that the renter’s share would like be no more than $25 or around a $2 per month increase. Given all of the rental expenses, the average renter will not even notice the parcel tax even if the property owner passes along the cost to the tenants.”

    yes, but we know these parcel taxes increase all the time. we just got measure Q passed. That, in addition to this. IT ADDS UP DAVID!

    Pretty soon, we’ll run out of letters from the alphabet, so it would be better to number the taxes off… i.e. t(1),
    t(2), ….t(n),

  132. FDS

    “That means that the renter’s share would like be no more than $25 or around a $2 per month increase. Given all of the rental expenses, the average renter will not even notice the parcel tax even if the property owner passes along the cost to the tenants.”

    yes, but we know these parcel taxes increase all the time. we just got measure Q passed. That, in addition to this. IT ADDS UP DAVID!

    Pretty soon, we’ll run out of letters from the alphabet, so it would be better to number the taxes off… i.e. t(1),
    t(2), ….t(n),

  133. FDS

    “If the community passes this parcel tax, the school district can continue to fund the key programs that differentiates Davis from another school district.”

    Valley Oak was terminated, and Emerson is not that far behind.

    WHAT GOOD IS IT TO FUND PROGRAMS TO GO TO SCHOOLS THAT DON’T EXIST?!!

  134. FDS

    “If the community passes this parcel tax, the school district can continue to fund the key programs that differentiates Davis from another school district.”

    Valley Oak was terminated, and Emerson is not that far behind.

    WHAT GOOD IS IT TO FUND PROGRAMS TO GO TO SCHOOLS THAT DON’T EXIST?!!

  135. FDS

    “If the community passes this parcel tax, the school district can continue to fund the key programs that differentiates Davis from another school district.”

    Valley Oak was terminated, and Emerson is not that far behind.

    WHAT GOOD IS IT TO FUND PROGRAMS TO GO TO SCHOOLS THAT DON’T EXIST?!!

  136. FDS

    “If the community passes this parcel tax, the school district can continue to fund the key programs that differentiates Davis from another school district.”

    Valley Oak was terminated, and Emerson is not that far behind.

    WHAT GOOD IS IT TO FUND PROGRAMS TO GO TO SCHOOLS THAT DON’T EXIST?!!

  137. Don Shor

    “From 2000 to 2007, the ADA at Davis district schools was fairly stable. However, from 02/03 to 06/07, the ADA fell by 158:

    2000-2001 8,355
    2001-2002 8,489
    2002-2003 8,534
    2003-2004 8,484
    2004-2005 8,399
    2005-2006 8,313
    2006-2007 8,376″

    It went up by 179 (00-01 to 02-03), then it went down by 158.

    Enrollment has varied by less than 5% for a decade. Contrary to what the Best Uses Task force projected, it has not declined by 100 students a year (or whatever the exact figures were that they used to justify closing Valley Oak).

    Enrollment is now projected to be basically flat — continuing to be flat — for the next decade.

    Enrollment has shifted somewhat from the lower to the upper grades.

    Total enrollment is not a major factor in the budget problems of the school district. ADA is not a major factor in the budget problems in the school district.

  138. Don Shor

    “From 2000 to 2007, the ADA at Davis district schools was fairly stable. However, from 02/03 to 06/07, the ADA fell by 158:

    2000-2001 8,355
    2001-2002 8,489
    2002-2003 8,534
    2003-2004 8,484
    2004-2005 8,399
    2005-2006 8,313
    2006-2007 8,376″

    It went up by 179 (00-01 to 02-03), then it went down by 158.

    Enrollment has varied by less than 5% for a decade. Contrary to what the Best Uses Task force projected, it has not declined by 100 students a year (or whatever the exact figures were that they used to justify closing Valley Oak).

    Enrollment is now projected to be basically flat — continuing to be flat — for the next decade.

    Enrollment has shifted somewhat from the lower to the upper grades.

    Total enrollment is not a major factor in the budget problems of the school district. ADA is not a major factor in the budget problems in the school district.

  139. Don Shor

    “From 2000 to 2007, the ADA at Davis district schools was fairly stable. However, from 02/03 to 06/07, the ADA fell by 158:

    2000-2001 8,355
    2001-2002 8,489
    2002-2003 8,534
    2003-2004 8,484
    2004-2005 8,399
    2005-2006 8,313
    2006-2007 8,376″

    It went up by 179 (00-01 to 02-03), then it went down by 158.

    Enrollment has varied by less than 5% for a decade. Contrary to what the Best Uses Task force projected, it has not declined by 100 students a year (or whatever the exact figures were that they used to justify closing Valley Oak).

    Enrollment is now projected to be basically flat — continuing to be flat — for the next decade.

    Enrollment has shifted somewhat from the lower to the upper grades.

    Total enrollment is not a major factor in the budget problems of the school district. ADA is not a major factor in the budget problems in the school district.

  140. Don Shor

    “From 2000 to 2007, the ADA at Davis district schools was fairly stable. However, from 02/03 to 06/07, the ADA fell by 158:

    2000-2001 8,355
    2001-2002 8,489
    2002-2003 8,534
    2003-2004 8,484
    2004-2005 8,399
    2005-2006 8,313
    2006-2007 8,376″

    It went up by 179 (00-01 to 02-03), then it went down by 158.

    Enrollment has varied by less than 5% for a decade. Contrary to what the Best Uses Task force projected, it has not declined by 100 students a year (or whatever the exact figures were that they used to justify closing Valley Oak).

    Enrollment is now projected to be basically flat — continuing to be flat — for the next decade.

    Enrollment has shifted somewhat from the lower to the upper grades.

    Total enrollment is not a major factor in the budget problems of the school district. ADA is not a major factor in the budget problems in the school district.

  141. Anonymous

    No More Taxes for anything!

    P.S. FDS, You might consider changing your moniker. Why? Because all of us older readers remember the TV commercial for FDS. (Feminine deodorant Spray).

  142. Anonymous

    No More Taxes for anything!

    P.S. FDS, You might consider changing your moniker. Why? Because all of us older readers remember the TV commercial for FDS. (Feminine deodorant Spray).

  143. Anonymous

    No More Taxes for anything!

    P.S. FDS, You might consider changing your moniker. Why? Because all of us older readers remember the TV commercial for FDS. (Feminine deodorant Spray).

  144. Anonymous

    No More Taxes for anything!

    P.S. FDS, You might consider changing your moniker. Why? Because all of us older readers remember the TV commercial for FDS. (Feminine deodorant Spray).

  145. Vincente

    “Total enrollment is not a major factor in the budget problems of the school district. “

    This is not completely true. The enrollment has been steady over the period of time, however the decline in enrollment between 2006-07 and 2007-08 contributed $1.7 million to the budget deficit. That is a major factor in the current budget problem.

    What’s more is that we are not likely going to regain those students next year.

    That means that we still have to find a way to account for that loss in revenue.

    We can cut programs or we can raise taxes. The community recoiled at the prospect of cutting programs, other than on this blog, I have not seen a parallel recoil to raising taxes.

  146. Vincente

    “Total enrollment is not a major factor in the budget problems of the school district. “

    This is not completely true. The enrollment has been steady over the period of time, however the decline in enrollment between 2006-07 and 2007-08 contributed $1.7 million to the budget deficit. That is a major factor in the current budget problem.

    What’s more is that we are not likely going to regain those students next year.

    That means that we still have to find a way to account for that loss in revenue.

    We can cut programs or we can raise taxes. The community recoiled at the prospect of cutting programs, other than on this blog, I have not seen a parallel recoil to raising taxes.

  147. Vincente

    “Total enrollment is not a major factor in the budget problems of the school district. “

    This is not completely true. The enrollment has been steady over the period of time, however the decline in enrollment between 2006-07 and 2007-08 contributed $1.7 million to the budget deficit. That is a major factor in the current budget problem.

    What’s more is that we are not likely going to regain those students next year.

    That means that we still have to find a way to account for that loss in revenue.

    We can cut programs or we can raise taxes. The community recoiled at the prospect of cutting programs, other than on this blog, I have not seen a parallel recoil to raising taxes.

  148. Vincente

    “Total enrollment is not a major factor in the budget problems of the school district. “

    This is not completely true. The enrollment has been steady over the period of time, however the decline in enrollment between 2006-07 and 2007-08 contributed $1.7 million to the budget deficit. That is a major factor in the current budget problem.

    What’s more is that we are not likely going to regain those students next year.

    That means that we still have to find a way to account for that loss in revenue.

    We can cut programs or we can raise taxes. The community recoiled at the prospect of cutting programs, other than on this blog, I have not seen a parallel recoil to raising taxes.

  149. Anonymous

    “no more frills…

    And yet you have many who think Mandarin Chinese 3 or 4 is a necessity, even though there were only one or two students in the entire class.”

    And where do you get that information about 1 or 2 students in the entire class? I hope this isn’t more garbage that you’re making up.

  150. Anonymous

    “no more frills…

    And yet you have many who think Mandarin Chinese 3 or 4 is a necessity, even though there were only one or two students in the entire class.”

    And where do you get that information about 1 or 2 students in the entire class? I hope this isn’t more garbage that you’re making up.

  151. Anonymous

    “no more frills…

    And yet you have many who think Mandarin Chinese 3 or 4 is a necessity, even though there were only one or two students in the entire class.”

    And where do you get that information about 1 or 2 students in the entire class? I hope this isn’t more garbage that you’re making up.

  152. Anonymous

    “no more frills…

    And yet you have many who think Mandarin Chinese 3 or 4 is a necessity, even though there were only one or two students in the entire class.”

    And where do you get that information about 1 or 2 students in the entire class? I hope this isn’t more garbage that you’re making up.

  153. wdf

    “DJUSD is reporting that 2007-08 ADA (P-2) is 8,137”

    Where?

    Go to the school board calendarfrom off the district website, select the June 18 meeting, find the agenda item on the budget, Item V. d. The first document available for download is the PP presentation from the June 18 meeting. The second item for download is the official budget documentation that the district submits to the state. This is a ~40 page pdf document that may be slow to download if you are using a slow connection. Look about 6 pages in at “3. Criterion: ADA to Enrollment”. It will show P-2 ADA and CBEDS enrollments.

    I would include a direct link to the pdf document, but I think there is some sort of firewall that prevents direct linking from outside.

    Their other P-2 ADA numbers don’t match what ed-data has. It may be that ed-data includes an aggregate of K-12 and adult ed together, where as the district is only reporting K-12 numbers, but I’m investigating that.

    Good luck.

  154. wdf

    “DJUSD is reporting that 2007-08 ADA (P-2) is 8,137”

    Where?

    Go to the school board calendarfrom off the district website, select the June 18 meeting, find the agenda item on the budget, Item V. d. The first document available for download is the PP presentation from the June 18 meeting. The second item for download is the official budget documentation that the district submits to the state. This is a ~40 page pdf document that may be slow to download if you are using a slow connection. Look about 6 pages in at “3. Criterion: ADA to Enrollment”. It will show P-2 ADA and CBEDS enrollments.

    I would include a direct link to the pdf document, but I think there is some sort of firewall that prevents direct linking from outside.

    Their other P-2 ADA numbers don’t match what ed-data has. It may be that ed-data includes an aggregate of K-12 and adult ed together, where as the district is only reporting K-12 numbers, but I’m investigating that.

    Good luck.

  155. wdf

    “DJUSD is reporting that 2007-08 ADA (P-2) is 8,137”

    Where?

    Go to the school board calendarfrom off the district website, select the June 18 meeting, find the agenda item on the budget, Item V. d. The first document available for download is the PP presentation from the June 18 meeting. The second item for download is the official budget documentation that the district submits to the state. This is a ~40 page pdf document that may be slow to download if you are using a slow connection. Look about 6 pages in at “3. Criterion: ADA to Enrollment”. It will show P-2 ADA and CBEDS enrollments.

    I would include a direct link to the pdf document, but I think there is some sort of firewall that prevents direct linking from outside.

    Their other P-2 ADA numbers don’t match what ed-data has. It may be that ed-data includes an aggregate of K-12 and adult ed together, where as the district is only reporting K-12 numbers, but I’m investigating that.

    Good luck.

  156. wdf

    “DJUSD is reporting that 2007-08 ADA (P-2) is 8,137”

    Where?

    Go to the school board calendarfrom off the district website, select the June 18 meeting, find the agenda item on the budget, Item V. d. The first document available for download is the PP presentation from the June 18 meeting. The second item for download is the official budget documentation that the district submits to the state. This is a ~40 page pdf document that may be slow to download if you are using a slow connection. Look about 6 pages in at “3. Criterion: ADA to Enrollment”. It will show P-2 ADA and CBEDS enrollments.

    I would include a direct link to the pdf document, but I think there is some sort of firewall that prevents direct linking from outside.

    Their other P-2 ADA numbers don’t match what ed-data has. It may be that ed-data includes an aggregate of K-12 and adult ed together, where as the district is only reporting K-12 numbers, but I’m investigating that.

    Good luck.

  157. supporter of parcel tax

    David – Can you please convey to the members of the school board that they need to be transparent and very clear about how they are spending this money?

    I support the parcel tax, but I have friends that are reluctant. It will make our jobs easier if they show transparency and accountability.

    Thank you for covering this VERY important story.

  158. supporter of parcel tax

    David – Can you please convey to the members of the school board that they need to be transparent and very clear about how they are spending this money?

    I support the parcel tax, but I have friends that are reluctant. It will make our jobs easier if they show transparency and accountability.

    Thank you for covering this VERY important story.

  159. supporter of parcel tax

    David – Can you please convey to the members of the school board that they need to be transparent and very clear about how they are spending this money?

    I support the parcel tax, but I have friends that are reluctant. It will make our jobs easier if they show transparency and accountability.

    Thank you for covering this VERY important story.

  160. supporter of parcel tax

    David – Can you please convey to the members of the school board that they need to be transparent and very clear about how they are spending this money?

    I support the parcel tax, but I have friends that are reluctant. It will make our jobs easier if they show transparency and accountability.

    Thank you for covering this VERY important story.

  161. 1000 is enough

    76.77
    165.90
    144.60
    598.24
    ——-
    985.51

    what do those numbers represent? the $ amounts for DJUSD on my yolo county tax bill…I bought my house in 1998. I have no mello roos.

    I have no kids – by choice – and believe i am paying more than my fair share.

    count me as a no in november

  162. 1000 is enough

    76.77
    165.90
    144.60
    598.24
    ——-
    985.51

    what do those numbers represent? the $ amounts for DJUSD on my yolo county tax bill…I bought my house in 1998. I have no mello roos.

    I have no kids – by choice – and believe i am paying more than my fair share.

    count me as a no in november

  163. 1000 is enough

    76.77
    165.90
    144.60
    598.24
    ——-
    985.51

    what do those numbers represent? the $ amounts for DJUSD on my yolo county tax bill…I bought my house in 1998. I have no mello roos.

    I have no kids – by choice – and believe i am paying more than my fair share.

    count me as a no in november

  164. 1000 is enough

    76.77
    165.90
    144.60
    598.24
    ——-
    985.51

    what do those numbers represent? the $ amounts for DJUSD on my yolo county tax bill…I bought my house in 1998. I have no mello roos.

    I have no kids – by choice – and believe i am paying more than my fair share.

    count me as a no in november

  165. Doug Paul Davis

    “David – Can you please convey to the members of the school board that they need to be transparent and very clear about how they are spending this money?”

    They know that. The graphic I posted is how they are spending this money.

  166. Doug Paul Davis

    “David – Can you please convey to the members of the school board that they need to be transparent and very clear about how they are spending this money?”

    They know that. The graphic I posted is how they are spending this money.

  167. Doug Paul Davis

    “David – Can you please convey to the members of the school board that they need to be transparent and very clear about how they are spending this money?”

    They know that. The graphic I posted is how they are spending this money.

  168. Doug Paul Davis

    “David – Can you please convey to the members of the school board that they need to be transparent and very clear about how they are spending this money?”

    They know that. The graphic I posted is how they are spending this money.

  169. Doug Paul Davis

    One thing that would be helpful is for people opposed to the parcel tax to show us where they plan to cut roughly $2.5 million from the budget in order to balance it next year?

  170. Doug Paul Davis

    One thing that would be helpful is for people opposed to the parcel tax to show us where they plan to cut roughly $2.5 million from the budget in order to balance it next year?

  171. Doug Paul Davis

    One thing that would be helpful is for people opposed to the parcel tax to show us where they plan to cut roughly $2.5 million from the budget in order to balance it next year?

  172. Doug Paul Davis

    One thing that would be helpful is for people opposed to the parcel tax to show us where they plan to cut roughly $2.5 million from the budget in order to balance it next year?

  173. 1000 is enough

    why do those opposed need to show where to cut 2.5 million? show me where my 1000 dollars a year go – which is just what i pay to djusd. this does not count any state money that is also received.

  174. 1000 is enough

    why do those opposed need to show where to cut 2.5 million? show me where my 1000 dollars a year go – which is just what i pay to djusd. this does not count any state money that is also received.

  175. 1000 is enough

    why do those opposed need to show where to cut 2.5 million? show me where my 1000 dollars a year go – which is just what i pay to djusd. this does not count any state money that is also received.

  176. 1000 is enough

    why do those opposed need to show where to cut 2.5 million? show me where my 1000 dollars a year go – which is just what i pay to djusd. this does not count any state money that is also received.

  177. 1000 is enough

    not sure why i am being questioned about amounts but…amounts are for

    davis jt assessment
    davis ju bond
    davis jt u cfd#1
    davis jt u cfd#2

  178. 1000 is enough

    not sure why i am being questioned about amounts but…amounts are for

    davis jt assessment
    davis ju bond
    davis jt u cfd#1
    davis jt u cfd#2

  179. 1000 is enough

    not sure why i am being questioned about amounts but…amounts are for

    davis jt assessment
    davis ju bond
    davis jt u cfd#1
    davis jt u cfd#2

  180. 1000 is enough

    not sure why i am being questioned about amounts but…amounts are for

    davis jt assessment
    davis ju bond
    davis jt u cfd#1
    davis jt u cfd#2

  181. Anonymous

    Bottom line for me is as a community we have to support our schools. It would be nice if the state fully funded education but we all know that’s never going to happen, so it’s up to us to make up the difference. I think that $120 (or even $320 if you add in the cost of last year’s parcel tax) a year is a bargin when you consider everything the schools do for our kids. As an earlier poster said, it’s less than the DSF was asking for, and more equitable since everyone would pay his/her fair share instead of relying on a few generous donors.

  182. Anonymous

    Bottom line for me is as a community we have to support our schools. It would be nice if the state fully funded education but we all know that’s never going to happen, so it’s up to us to make up the difference. I think that $120 (or even $320 if you add in the cost of last year’s parcel tax) a year is a bargin when you consider everything the schools do for our kids. As an earlier poster said, it’s less than the DSF was asking for, and more equitable since everyone would pay his/her fair share instead of relying on a few generous donors.

  183. Anonymous

    Bottom line for me is as a community we have to support our schools. It would be nice if the state fully funded education but we all know that’s never going to happen, so it’s up to us to make up the difference. I think that $120 (or even $320 if you add in the cost of last year’s parcel tax) a year is a bargin when you consider everything the schools do for our kids. As an earlier poster said, it’s less than the DSF was asking for, and more equitable since everyone would pay his/her fair share instead of relying on a few generous donors.

  184. Anonymous

    Bottom line for me is as a community we have to support our schools. It would be nice if the state fully funded education but we all know that’s never going to happen, so it’s up to us to make up the difference. I think that $120 (or even $320 if you add in the cost of last year’s parcel tax) a year is a bargin when you consider everything the schools do for our kids. As an earlier poster said, it’s less than the DSF was asking for, and more equitable since everyone would pay his/her fair share instead of relying on a few generous donors.

  185. Doug Paul Davis

    The district has two choices–cut programs or pass a parcel tax. If you believe that you are paying too much, then that tells me you believe that you know how best to spend the district’s money. So put your money where your mouth is and tell us where and how you would cut the money necessary for the district to remain solvent while not raising your taxes.

  186. Doug Paul Davis

    The district has two choices–cut programs or pass a parcel tax. If you believe that you are paying too much, then that tells me you believe that you know how best to spend the district’s money. So put your money where your mouth is and tell us where and how you would cut the money necessary for the district to remain solvent while not raising your taxes.

  187. Doug Paul Davis

    The district has two choices–cut programs or pass a parcel tax. If you believe that you are paying too much, then that tells me you believe that you know how best to spend the district’s money. So put your money where your mouth is and tell us where and how you would cut the money necessary for the district to remain solvent while not raising your taxes.

  188. Doug Paul Davis

    The district has two choices–cut programs or pass a parcel tax. If you believe that you are paying too much, then that tells me you believe that you know how best to spend the district’s money. So put your money where your mouth is and tell us where and how you would cut the money necessary for the district to remain solvent while not raising your taxes.

  189. Doug Paul Davis

    Which ones? We went through this whole process once before–which programs? If we have a spending problem, then tell us what we should not be spending money on.

  190. Doug Paul Davis

    Which ones? We went through this whole process once before–which programs? If we have a spending problem, then tell us what we should not be spending money on.

  191. Doug Paul Davis

    Which ones? We went through this whole process once before–which programs? If we have a spending problem, then tell us what we should not be spending money on.

  192. Doug Paul Davis

    Which ones? We went through this whole process once before–which programs? If we have a spending problem, then tell us what we should not be spending money on.

  193. Anonymous

    “76.77
    165.90
    144.60
    598.24
    ——-
    985.51

    what do those numbers represent? the $ amounts for DJUSD on my yolo county tax bill…I bought my house in 1998. I have no mello roos.

    I have no kids – by choice – and believe i am paying more than my fair share.”

    In plenty of other states you would be getting off really easy.

    If you bought your house in Davis without realizing that the voting public would occasionally pass a parcel tax, then you really didn’t do your homework. Maybe you’ll get lucky and future parcel taxes will get voted down.

    Because of those assessments, your house and everyone’s house in Davis is worth quite a bit more than houses in many other surrounding communities. It likely has built a lot of equity even in this tough economy.

    There are plenty of reasons why a person would choose to live in Davis. The public schools are probably one of the strongest reasons.

  194. Anonymous

    “76.77
    165.90
    144.60
    598.24
    ——-
    985.51

    what do those numbers represent? the $ amounts for DJUSD on my yolo county tax bill…I bought my house in 1998. I have no mello roos.

    I have no kids – by choice – and believe i am paying more than my fair share.”

    In plenty of other states you would be getting off really easy.

    If you bought your house in Davis without realizing that the voting public would occasionally pass a parcel tax, then you really didn’t do your homework. Maybe you’ll get lucky and future parcel taxes will get voted down.

    Because of those assessments, your house and everyone’s house in Davis is worth quite a bit more than houses in many other surrounding communities. It likely has built a lot of equity even in this tough economy.

    There are plenty of reasons why a person would choose to live in Davis. The public schools are probably one of the strongest reasons.

  195. Anonymous

    “76.77
    165.90
    144.60
    598.24
    ——-
    985.51

    what do those numbers represent? the $ amounts for DJUSD on my yolo county tax bill…I bought my house in 1998. I have no mello roos.

    I have no kids – by choice – and believe i am paying more than my fair share.”

    In plenty of other states you would be getting off really easy.

    If you bought your house in Davis without realizing that the voting public would occasionally pass a parcel tax, then you really didn’t do your homework. Maybe you’ll get lucky and future parcel taxes will get voted down.

    Because of those assessments, your house and everyone’s house in Davis is worth quite a bit more than houses in many other surrounding communities. It likely has built a lot of equity even in this tough economy.

    There are plenty of reasons why a person would choose to live in Davis. The public schools are probably one of the strongest reasons.

  196. Anonymous

    “76.77
    165.90
    144.60
    598.24
    ——-
    985.51

    what do those numbers represent? the $ amounts for DJUSD on my yolo county tax bill…I bought my house in 1998. I have no mello roos.

    I have no kids – by choice – and believe i am paying more than my fair share.”

    In plenty of other states you would be getting off really easy.

    If you bought your house in Davis without realizing that the voting public would occasionally pass a parcel tax, then you really didn’t do your homework. Maybe you’ll get lucky and future parcel taxes will get voted down.

    Because of those assessments, your house and everyone’s house in Davis is worth quite a bit more than houses in many other surrounding communities. It likely has built a lot of equity even in this tough economy.

    There are plenty of reasons why a person would choose to live in Davis. The public schools are probably one of the strongest reasons.

  197. 1000 is enough

    “If you bought your house in Davis without realizing that the voting public would occasionally pass a parcel tax, then you really didn’t do your homework. Maybe you’ll get lucky and future parcel taxes will get voted down.”

    that is a non-sensical statement — I did my research and have lived here for over 10 years. I went to school here twice DID ALL MY HOMEWORK and bought my house…

    Occasionally pass a parcel tax? If you have done your homework it is not occasionally — it is all the time. However now there seems to be a lot of money wasted — new schools that are not needed being opened, superintendent contracts being renewewd and then “firing” of superintendit

    tired of paying and getting nothing and i might say not alone.

  198. 1000 is enough

    “If you bought your house in Davis without realizing that the voting public would occasionally pass a parcel tax, then you really didn’t do your homework. Maybe you’ll get lucky and future parcel taxes will get voted down.”

    that is a non-sensical statement — I did my research and have lived here for over 10 years. I went to school here twice DID ALL MY HOMEWORK and bought my house…

    Occasionally pass a parcel tax? If you have done your homework it is not occasionally — it is all the time. However now there seems to be a lot of money wasted — new schools that are not needed being opened, superintendent contracts being renewewd and then “firing” of superintendit

    tired of paying and getting nothing and i might say not alone.

  199. 1000 is enough

    “If you bought your house in Davis without realizing that the voting public would occasionally pass a parcel tax, then you really didn’t do your homework. Maybe you’ll get lucky and future parcel taxes will get voted down.”

    that is a non-sensical statement — I did my research and have lived here for over 10 years. I went to school here twice DID ALL MY HOMEWORK and bought my house…

    Occasionally pass a parcel tax? If you have done your homework it is not occasionally — it is all the time. However now there seems to be a lot of money wasted — new schools that are not needed being opened, superintendent contracts being renewewd and then “firing” of superintendit

    tired of paying and getting nothing and i might say not alone.

  200. 1000 is enough

    “If you bought your house in Davis without realizing that the voting public would occasionally pass a parcel tax, then you really didn’t do your homework. Maybe you’ll get lucky and future parcel taxes will get voted down.”

    that is a non-sensical statement — I did my research and have lived here for over 10 years. I went to school here twice DID ALL MY HOMEWORK and bought my house…

    Occasionally pass a parcel tax? If you have done your homework it is not occasionally — it is all the time. However now there seems to be a lot of money wasted — new schools that are not needed being opened, superintendent contracts being renewewd and then “firing” of superintendit

    tired of paying and getting nothing and i might say not alone.

  201. Doug Paul Davis

    There appears to be other Mello Roos areas:

    Mello Roos

    “However now there seems to be a lot of money wasted — new schools that are not needed being opened, superintendent contracts being renewewd and then “firing” of superintendit”

    * The new schools were opened using facilities money not general fund money

    * Superintendent firing cost only a modest amount but it was in one time funds rather than an ongoing expense

  202. Doug Paul Davis

    There appears to be other Mello Roos areas:

    Mello Roos

    “However now there seems to be a lot of money wasted — new schools that are not needed being opened, superintendent contracts being renewewd and then “firing” of superintendit”

    * The new schools were opened using facilities money not general fund money

    * Superintendent firing cost only a modest amount but it was in one time funds rather than an ongoing expense

  203. Doug Paul Davis

    There appears to be other Mello Roos areas:

    Mello Roos

    “However now there seems to be a lot of money wasted — new schools that are not needed being opened, superintendent contracts being renewewd and then “firing” of superintendit”

    * The new schools were opened using facilities money not general fund money

    * Superintendent firing cost only a modest amount but it was in one time funds rather than an ongoing expense

  204. Doug Paul Davis

    There appears to be other Mello Roos areas:

    Mello Roos

    “However now there seems to be a lot of money wasted — new schools that are not needed being opened, superintendent contracts being renewewd and then “firing” of superintendit”

    * The new schools were opened using facilities money not general fund money

    * Superintendent firing cost only a modest amount but it was in one time funds rather than an ongoing expense

  205. Anonymous

    DPD,
    Cut programs? What do you suggest in cuts? Where should we spend our money on education here in Davis? Do you support more taxes? How much more should we pay on a continual basis?
    You put your money where your mouth is, (that should cover a large area). I await your well thought out plan for the DJUSD and a justification for that answer.

  206. Anonymous

    DPD,
    Cut programs? What do you suggest in cuts? Where should we spend our money on education here in Davis? Do you support more taxes? How much more should we pay on a continual basis?
    You put your money where your mouth is, (that should cover a large area). I await your well thought out plan for the DJUSD and a justification for that answer.

  207. Anonymous

    DPD,
    Cut programs? What do you suggest in cuts? Where should we spend our money on education here in Davis? Do you support more taxes? How much more should we pay on a continual basis?
    You put your money where your mouth is, (that should cover a large area). I await your well thought out plan for the DJUSD and a justification for that answer.

  208. Anonymous

    DPD,
    Cut programs? What do you suggest in cuts? Where should we spend our money on education here in Davis? Do you support more taxes? How much more should we pay on a continual basis?
    You put your money where your mouth is, (that should cover a large area). I await your well thought out plan for the DJUSD and a justification for that answer.

  209. Anonymous

    Currently Davis spends about $300 less per student than the state average. They need more money so they can remain about $300 less than the state average. Do people really think Davis kids deserve less than what they are already getting? Remember they are already getting less than most of the kids in the state.

  210. Anonymous

    Currently Davis spends about $300 less per student than the state average. They need more money so they can remain about $300 less than the state average. Do people really think Davis kids deserve less than what they are already getting? Remember they are already getting less than most of the kids in the state.

  211. Anonymous

    Currently Davis spends about $300 less per student than the state average. They need more money so they can remain about $300 less than the state average. Do people really think Davis kids deserve less than what they are already getting? Remember they are already getting less than most of the kids in the state.

  212. Anonymous

    Currently Davis spends about $300 less per student than the state average. They need more money so they can remain about $300 less than the state average. Do people really think Davis kids deserve less than what they are already getting? Remember they are already getting less than most of the kids in the state.

  213. Don Shor

    ” wdf said…

    “DJUSD is reporting that 2007-08 ADA (P-2) is 8,137”

    Where?

    Go to the school board calendarfrom off the district website, select the June 18 meeting, find the agenda item on the budget, Item V. d. The first document available for download is the PP presentation from the June 18 meeting.”

    A figure I found on last year’s 07-08 budget passed by the outgoing board was 8233 ADA. That’s probably close enough. These numbers are very hard to pin down. BTW, I don’t fault the district for that; I imagine it is very difficult to get an exact ADA number. I use the state Ed Dept numbers for previous years.

    The point is, the numbers haven’t varied that much. That particular document showed an ADA COLA increase of $2 million for 07-08, reduced by about $0.6 million due to lower enrollment. That is one reason I say the purported decline in enrollment, which did not even occur when compared over the last decade, is not the main factor in the district’s budget problems. For example, the Step and Column increases ($0.8 million for automatic salary increases) are about as much as the loss in revenue from reduced ADA enrollment.

    Here are some figures that you may wish to address, DPD, dealing with the unrestricted part of the budget.

    From the Understanding School Finance document (pdf) on the district’s web site:

    2006-07: Revenues $53 million
    Expenditures $54 million

    2007-8: Revenues $55 million Expenditures $58 million

    2008-9: Revenues $53 million Expenditures $58 million

    One thing that would be helpful is for people opposed to the parcel tax to show us where they plan to cut roughly $2.5 million from the budget in order to balance it next year?

    Ok, but first, just to be fair….

    What cost $4 million more between 06-07 and 07-08? What is going to continue to cost that much more, with enrollment flat? 83% of the budget goes to salaries and benefits. Did DJUSD hire $4 million worth of new teachers with a flat enrollment? (That seems unlikely…). Were programs added?

    These figures don’t jibe with the budget figures shown on the Adoption Budget (pdf file) passed by the previous board. There is a discrepancy of $2-3 million between the two documents produced a, making it very hard for anyone to assess the actual budget situation in the district.

    Two other points:
    The gap between expenditures and revenues in the unrestricted portion is expected to narrow significantly, and nearly vanish, by 09-10, according to the adoption budget.

    The major factor in the budget problem is that revenues in the restricted category are dropping faster than expenditures in that category. That deficit, which was nearly $3.5 million in 06-07, is shown as nearly $6 million in 07-08 in the adoption budget. I don’t know what the number is in the updated budget.

  214. Don Shor

    ” wdf said…

    “DJUSD is reporting that 2007-08 ADA (P-2) is 8,137”

    Where?

    Go to the school board calendarfrom off the district website, select the June 18 meeting, find the agenda item on the budget, Item V. d. The first document available for download is the PP presentation from the June 18 meeting.”

    A figure I found on last year’s 07-08 budget passed by the outgoing board was 8233 ADA. That’s probably close enough. These numbers are very hard to pin down. BTW, I don’t fault the district for that; I imagine it is very difficult to get an exact ADA number. I use the state Ed Dept numbers for previous years.

    The point is, the numbers haven’t varied that much. That particular document showed an ADA COLA increase of $2 million for 07-08, reduced by about $0.6 million due to lower enrollment. That is one reason I say the purported decline in enrollment, which did not even occur when compared over the last decade, is not the main factor in the district’s budget problems. For example, the Step and Column increases ($0.8 million for automatic salary increases) are about as much as the loss in revenue from reduced ADA enrollment.

    Here are some figures that you may wish to address, DPD, dealing with the unrestricted part of the budget.

    From the Understanding School Finance document (pdf) on the district’s web site:

    2006-07: Revenues $53 million
    Expenditures $54 million

    2007-8: Revenues $55 million Expenditures $58 million

    2008-9: Revenues $53 million Expenditures $58 million

    One thing that would be helpful is for people opposed to the parcel tax to show us where they plan to cut roughly $2.5 million from the budget in order to balance it next year?

    Ok, but first, just to be fair….

    What cost $4 million more between 06-07 and 07-08? What is going to continue to cost that much more, with enrollment flat? 83% of the budget goes to salaries and benefits. Did DJUSD hire $4 million worth of new teachers with a flat enrollment? (That seems unlikely…). Were programs added?

    These figures don’t jibe with the budget figures shown on the Adoption Budget (pdf file) passed by the previous board. There is a discrepancy of $2-3 million between the two documents produced a, making it very hard for anyone to assess the actual budget situation in the district.

    Two other points:
    The gap between expenditures and revenues in the unrestricted portion is expected to narrow significantly, and nearly vanish, by 09-10, according to the adoption budget.

    The major factor in the budget problem is that revenues in the restricted category are dropping faster than expenditures in that category. That deficit, which was nearly $3.5 million in 06-07, is shown as nearly $6 million in 07-08 in the adoption budget. I don’t know what the number is in the updated budget.

  215. Don Shor

    ” wdf said…

    “DJUSD is reporting that 2007-08 ADA (P-2) is 8,137”

    Where?

    Go to the school board calendarfrom off the district website, select the June 18 meeting, find the agenda item on the budget, Item V. d. The first document available for download is the PP presentation from the June 18 meeting.”

    A figure I found on last year’s 07-08 budget passed by the outgoing board was 8233 ADA. That’s probably close enough. These numbers are very hard to pin down. BTW, I don’t fault the district for that; I imagine it is very difficult to get an exact ADA number. I use the state Ed Dept numbers for previous years.

    The point is, the numbers haven’t varied that much. That particular document showed an ADA COLA increase of $2 million for 07-08, reduced by about $0.6 million due to lower enrollment. That is one reason I say the purported decline in enrollment, which did not even occur when compared over the last decade, is not the main factor in the district’s budget problems. For example, the Step and Column increases ($0.8 million for automatic salary increases) are about as much as the loss in revenue from reduced ADA enrollment.

    Here are some figures that you may wish to address, DPD, dealing with the unrestricted part of the budget.

    From the Understanding School Finance document (pdf) on the district’s web site:

    2006-07: Revenues $53 million
    Expenditures $54 million

    2007-8: Revenues $55 million Expenditures $58 million

    2008-9: Revenues $53 million Expenditures $58 million

    One thing that would be helpful is for people opposed to the parcel tax to show us where they plan to cut roughly $2.5 million from the budget in order to balance it next year?

    Ok, but first, just to be fair….

    What cost $4 million more between 06-07 and 07-08? What is going to continue to cost that much more, with enrollment flat? 83% of the budget goes to salaries and benefits. Did DJUSD hire $4 million worth of new teachers with a flat enrollment? (That seems unlikely…). Were programs added?

    These figures don’t jibe with the budget figures shown on the Adoption Budget (pdf file) passed by the previous board. There is a discrepancy of $2-3 million between the two documents produced a, making it very hard for anyone to assess the actual budget situation in the district.

    Two other points:
    The gap between expenditures and revenues in the unrestricted portion is expected to narrow significantly, and nearly vanish, by 09-10, according to the adoption budget.

    The major factor in the budget problem is that revenues in the restricted category are dropping faster than expenditures in that category. That deficit, which was nearly $3.5 million in 06-07, is shown as nearly $6 million in 07-08 in the adoption budget. I don’t know what the number is in the updated budget.

  216. Don Shor

    ” wdf said…

    “DJUSD is reporting that 2007-08 ADA (P-2) is 8,137”

    Where?

    Go to the school board calendarfrom off the district website, select the June 18 meeting, find the agenda item on the budget, Item V. d. The first document available for download is the PP presentation from the June 18 meeting.”

    A figure I found on last year’s 07-08 budget passed by the outgoing board was 8233 ADA. That’s probably close enough. These numbers are very hard to pin down. BTW, I don’t fault the district for that; I imagine it is very difficult to get an exact ADA number. I use the state Ed Dept numbers for previous years.

    The point is, the numbers haven’t varied that much. That particular document showed an ADA COLA increase of $2 million for 07-08, reduced by about $0.6 million due to lower enrollment. That is one reason I say the purported decline in enrollment, which did not even occur when compared over the last decade, is not the main factor in the district’s budget problems. For example, the Step and Column increases ($0.8 million for automatic salary increases) are about as much as the loss in revenue from reduced ADA enrollment.

    Here are some figures that you may wish to address, DPD, dealing with the unrestricted part of the budget.

    From the Understanding School Finance document (pdf) on the district’s web site:

    2006-07: Revenues $53 million
    Expenditures $54 million

    2007-8: Revenues $55 million Expenditures $58 million

    2008-9: Revenues $53 million Expenditures $58 million

    One thing that would be helpful is for people opposed to the parcel tax to show us where they plan to cut roughly $2.5 million from the budget in order to balance it next year?

    Ok, but first, just to be fair….

    What cost $4 million more between 06-07 and 07-08? What is going to continue to cost that much more, with enrollment flat? 83% of the budget goes to salaries and benefits. Did DJUSD hire $4 million worth of new teachers with a flat enrollment? (That seems unlikely…). Were programs added?

    These figures don’t jibe with the budget figures shown on the Adoption Budget (pdf file) passed by the previous board. There is a discrepancy of $2-3 million between the two documents produced a, making it very hard for anyone to assess the actual budget situation in the district.

    Two other points:
    The gap between expenditures and revenues in the unrestricted portion is expected to narrow significantly, and nearly vanish, by 09-10, according to the adoption budget.

    The major factor in the budget problem is that revenues in the restricted category are dropping faster than expenditures in that category. That deficit, which was nearly $3.5 million in 06-07, is shown as nearly $6 million in 07-08 in the adoption budget. I don’t know what the number is in the updated budget.

  217. Don Shor

    Just for the record, I would probably support a parcel tax (which I pay even though I can’t vote on it). I am dubious about it passing for a number of reasons. I also think it’s time for fewer rhetorical gambits on this blog, and more hard information about current expenditures (83% of the budget goes to salary and benefits), how they’ve changed over the last couple of years, and what the district would actually do if they did NOT get the parcel tax. The elected board members owe it to us to explain specifically how expenses have increased, and how they would deal with the shortfall.

  218. Don Shor

    Just for the record, I would probably support a parcel tax (which I pay even though I can’t vote on it). I am dubious about it passing for a number of reasons. I also think it’s time for fewer rhetorical gambits on this blog, and more hard information about current expenditures (83% of the budget goes to salary and benefits), how they’ve changed over the last couple of years, and what the district would actually do if they did NOT get the parcel tax. The elected board members owe it to us to explain specifically how expenses have increased, and how they would deal with the shortfall.

  219. Don Shor

    Just for the record, I would probably support a parcel tax (which I pay even though I can’t vote on it). I am dubious about it passing for a number of reasons. I also think it’s time for fewer rhetorical gambits on this blog, and more hard information about current expenditures (83% of the budget goes to salary and benefits), how they’ve changed over the last couple of years, and what the district would actually do if they did NOT get the parcel tax. The elected board members owe it to us to explain specifically how expenses have increased, and how they would deal with the shortfall.

  220. Don Shor

    Just for the record, I would probably support a parcel tax (which I pay even though I can’t vote on it). I am dubious about it passing for a number of reasons. I also think it’s time for fewer rhetorical gambits on this blog, and more hard information about current expenditures (83% of the budget goes to salary and benefits), how they’ve changed over the last couple of years, and what the district would actually do if they did NOT get the parcel tax. The elected board members owe it to us to explain specifically how expenses have increased, and how they would deal with the shortfall.

  221. Anonymous

    Geez, what to cut?

    First I’d completely dismantle Davinci, then cut all afternoon programs, specifically sports. Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin. I’d par down the art and music programs or make it self supporting through donations only. I’d also slash the budget on misc support staff and the cadre of psychologists, speech therapists etc.

    I can keep going if you’d like. If I were to cut all those, we’d have a surplus and then you’d be able to choose what to add back in.

    The point is those programs are wonderful _when you have the additional funds. You get more money from the state or higher enrollment to cover it, you can have those programs back.

    Honestly, I think the lot of you are so worried about your property values as the gray wave nears retirement that you’d do just about anything to prop them up, including spending money you clearly don’t have.

  222. Anonymous

    Geez, what to cut?

    First I’d completely dismantle Davinci, then cut all afternoon programs, specifically sports. Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin. I’d par down the art and music programs or make it self supporting through donations only. I’d also slash the budget on misc support staff and the cadre of psychologists, speech therapists etc.

    I can keep going if you’d like. If I were to cut all those, we’d have a surplus and then you’d be able to choose what to add back in.

    The point is those programs are wonderful _when you have the additional funds. You get more money from the state or higher enrollment to cover it, you can have those programs back.

    Honestly, I think the lot of you are so worried about your property values as the gray wave nears retirement that you’d do just about anything to prop them up, including spending money you clearly don’t have.

  223. Anonymous

    Geez, what to cut?

    First I’d completely dismantle Davinci, then cut all afternoon programs, specifically sports. Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin. I’d par down the art and music programs or make it self supporting through donations only. I’d also slash the budget on misc support staff and the cadre of psychologists, speech therapists etc.

    I can keep going if you’d like. If I were to cut all those, we’d have a surplus and then you’d be able to choose what to add back in.

    The point is those programs are wonderful _when you have the additional funds. You get more money from the state or higher enrollment to cover it, you can have those programs back.

    Honestly, I think the lot of you are so worried about your property values as the gray wave nears retirement that you’d do just about anything to prop them up, including spending money you clearly don’t have.

  224. Anonymous

    Geez, what to cut?

    First I’d completely dismantle Davinci, then cut all afternoon programs, specifically sports. Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin. I’d par down the art and music programs or make it self supporting through donations only. I’d also slash the budget on misc support staff and the cadre of psychologists, speech therapists etc.

    I can keep going if you’d like. If I were to cut all those, we’d have a surplus and then you’d be able to choose what to add back in.

    The point is those programs are wonderful _when you have the additional funds. You get more money from the state or higher enrollment to cover it, you can have those programs back.

    Honestly, I think the lot of you are so worried about your property values as the gray wave nears retirement that you’d do just about anything to prop them up, including spending money you clearly don’t have.

  225. Anonymous

    This is a community investment. Maintaining the quality of Davis schools gives more Davis kids a chance to attend the very university they grow up with (UCD). Or to attend one like it.

    The state has not provided all of the “guaranteed” funding in its state budget to the district. Our kids cannot wait around for the state to try to figure this out.

    You can deny the investments to the schools and then let them cut their teachers and programs. Affluent families will accomodate and find other alternatives. It is middle and lower income families who get screwed.

    Davis schools are as good as many elite private schools, and it’s paid for at a less than average funding rate in this state. It’s not perfect, but I think Davis schools do a great job.

  226. Anonymous

    This is a community investment. Maintaining the quality of Davis schools gives more Davis kids a chance to attend the very university they grow up with (UCD). Or to attend one like it.

    The state has not provided all of the “guaranteed” funding in its state budget to the district. Our kids cannot wait around for the state to try to figure this out.

    You can deny the investments to the schools and then let them cut their teachers and programs. Affluent families will accomodate and find other alternatives. It is middle and lower income families who get screwed.

    Davis schools are as good as many elite private schools, and it’s paid for at a less than average funding rate in this state. It’s not perfect, but I think Davis schools do a great job.

  227. Anonymous

    This is a community investment. Maintaining the quality of Davis schools gives more Davis kids a chance to attend the very university they grow up with (UCD). Or to attend one like it.

    The state has not provided all of the “guaranteed” funding in its state budget to the district. Our kids cannot wait around for the state to try to figure this out.

    You can deny the investments to the schools and then let them cut their teachers and programs. Affluent families will accomodate and find other alternatives. It is middle and lower income families who get screwed.

    Davis schools are as good as many elite private schools, and it’s paid for at a less than average funding rate in this state. It’s not perfect, but I think Davis schools do a great job.

  228. Anonymous

    This is a community investment. Maintaining the quality of Davis schools gives more Davis kids a chance to attend the very university they grow up with (UCD). Or to attend one like it.

    The state has not provided all of the “guaranteed” funding in its state budget to the district. Our kids cannot wait around for the state to try to figure this out.

    You can deny the investments to the schools and then let them cut their teachers and programs. Affluent families will accomodate and find other alternatives. It is middle and lower income families who get screwed.

    Davis schools are as good as many elite private schools, and it’s paid for at a less than average funding rate in this state. It’s not perfect, but I think Davis schools do a great job.

  229. wdf

    Don,

    I suggest giving Bruce Colby a call and finding a time to chat with him about your thoughts. I find him a patient person with anyone who takes the time to figure out the budget.

    One thing that the state often avoids paying out is COLA, which is a factor that includes yearly “step and column” increases as well as any inflation factor for regular purchases. The state is not planning to pay a COLA this year. That means the district eats the additional cost, and that can account for some of the discrepency you see.

  230. wdf

    Don,

    I suggest giving Bruce Colby a call and finding a time to chat with him about your thoughts. I find him a patient person with anyone who takes the time to figure out the budget.

    One thing that the state often avoids paying out is COLA, which is a factor that includes yearly “step and column” increases as well as any inflation factor for regular purchases. The state is not planning to pay a COLA this year. That means the district eats the additional cost, and that can account for some of the discrepency you see.

  231. wdf

    Don,

    I suggest giving Bruce Colby a call and finding a time to chat with him about your thoughts. I find him a patient person with anyone who takes the time to figure out the budget.

    One thing that the state often avoids paying out is COLA, which is a factor that includes yearly “step and column” increases as well as any inflation factor for regular purchases. The state is not planning to pay a COLA this year. That means the district eats the additional cost, and that can account for some of the discrepency you see.

  232. wdf

    Don,

    I suggest giving Bruce Colby a call and finding a time to chat with him about your thoughts. I find him a patient person with anyone who takes the time to figure out the budget.

    One thing that the state often avoids paying out is COLA, which is a factor that includes yearly “step and column” increases as well as any inflation factor for regular purchases. The state is not planning to pay a COLA this year. That means the district eats the additional cost, and that can account for some of the discrepency you see.

  233. UCD Grad

    “tired of paying and getting nothing and i might say not alone.”

    I hope people are getting tired of the ridiculousness of such a statement. You are -not- “getting nothing.” Education is part of the common good of this country.

    Who paid for -your- schools when you were a youngling. Do you want to schools here to become so eroded that Davis ceases to be the bastion of exclusive, affluent goodness that it is?

    “First I’d completely dismantle Davinci, then cut all afternoon programs, specifically sports. Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin.”

    Because American students need much less world awareness (especially in terms of foreign languages) than we are already widely derided for? We’re far below Europe and other industrialized countries when it comes to these types of standards. I don’t see how we can sink any lower (although eliminating a language spoken by over a billion people world-wide seems like a good start) *sarcasm*

  234. UCD Grad

    “tired of paying and getting nothing and i might say not alone.”

    I hope people are getting tired of the ridiculousness of such a statement. You are -not- “getting nothing.” Education is part of the common good of this country.

    Who paid for -your- schools when you were a youngling. Do you want to schools here to become so eroded that Davis ceases to be the bastion of exclusive, affluent goodness that it is?

    “First I’d completely dismantle Davinci, then cut all afternoon programs, specifically sports. Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin.”

    Because American students need much less world awareness (especially in terms of foreign languages) than we are already widely derided for? We’re far below Europe and other industrialized countries when it comes to these types of standards. I don’t see how we can sink any lower (although eliminating a language spoken by over a billion people world-wide seems like a good start) *sarcasm*

  235. UCD Grad

    “tired of paying and getting nothing and i might say not alone.”

    I hope people are getting tired of the ridiculousness of such a statement. You are -not- “getting nothing.” Education is part of the common good of this country.

    Who paid for -your- schools when you were a youngling. Do you want to schools here to become so eroded that Davis ceases to be the bastion of exclusive, affluent goodness that it is?

    “First I’d completely dismantle Davinci, then cut all afternoon programs, specifically sports. Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin.”

    Because American students need much less world awareness (especially in terms of foreign languages) than we are already widely derided for? We’re far below Europe and other industrialized countries when it comes to these types of standards. I don’t see how we can sink any lower (although eliminating a language spoken by over a billion people world-wide seems like a good start) *sarcasm*

  236. UCD Grad

    “tired of paying and getting nothing and i might say not alone.”

    I hope people are getting tired of the ridiculousness of such a statement. You are -not- “getting nothing.” Education is part of the common good of this country.

    Who paid for -your- schools when you were a youngling. Do you want to schools here to become so eroded that Davis ceases to be the bastion of exclusive, affluent goodness that it is?

    “First I’d completely dismantle Davinci, then cut all afternoon programs, specifically sports. Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin.”

    Because American students need much less world awareness (especially in terms of foreign languages) than we are already widely derided for? We’re far below Europe and other industrialized countries when it comes to these types of standards. I don’t see how we can sink any lower (although eliminating a language spoken by over a billion people world-wide seems like a good start) *sarcasm*

  237. wdf

    “Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin.”

    Among EL students in Davis, Mandarin Chinese is the second most widely spoken native language (Spanish is first). It is also the most widely spoken native language in the world. From here on, Mandarin will likely be a huge asset to anyone pursuing international business. Keeping Mandarin actually makes more sense to keep curriculum relevant to a changing world.

  238. wdf

    “Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin.”

    Among EL students in Davis, Mandarin Chinese is the second most widely spoken native language (Spanish is first). It is also the most widely spoken native language in the world. From here on, Mandarin will likely be a huge asset to anyone pursuing international business. Keeping Mandarin actually makes more sense to keep curriculum relevant to a changing world.

  239. wdf

    “Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin.”

    Among EL students in Davis, Mandarin Chinese is the second most widely spoken native language (Spanish is first). It is also the most widely spoken native language in the world. From here on, Mandarin will likely be a huge asset to anyone pursuing international business. Keeping Mandarin actually makes more sense to keep curriculum relevant to a changing world.

  240. wdf

    “Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin.”

    Among EL students in Davis, Mandarin Chinese is the second most widely spoken native language (Spanish is first). It is also the most widely spoken native language in the world. From here on, Mandarin will likely be a huge asset to anyone pursuing international business. Keeping Mandarin actually makes more sense to keep curriculum relevant to a changing world.

  241. Anonymous

    “Geez, what to cut?

    First I’d completely dismantle Davinci, then cut all, etc.”

    Anon. 11:37:

    You da man! (or woman)

    I like someone who can blindly tell it like it is, and say it with conviction! That’s a trait that will get you elected president someday. It’s happened before. When are you running for school board?

  242. Anonymous

    “Geez, what to cut?

    First I’d completely dismantle Davinci, then cut all, etc.”

    Anon. 11:37:

    You da man! (or woman)

    I like someone who can blindly tell it like it is, and say it with conviction! That’s a trait that will get you elected president someday. It’s happened before. When are you running for school board?

  243. Anonymous

    “Geez, what to cut?

    First I’d completely dismantle Davinci, then cut all, etc.”

    Anon. 11:37:

    You da man! (or woman)

    I like someone who can blindly tell it like it is, and say it with conviction! That’s a trait that will get you elected president someday. It’s happened before. When are you running for school board?

  244. Anonymous

    “Geez, what to cut?

    First I’d completely dismantle Davinci, then cut all, etc.”

    Anon. 11:37:

    You da man! (or woman)

    I like someone who can blindly tell it like it is, and say it with conviction! That’s a trait that will get you elected president someday. It’s happened before. When are you running for school board?

  245. Anonymous

    Who paid for my school? My single widowed mother who sent me to the best private school she could.

    I paid for all 9 yrs of college myself. When my mother becomes too frail to live alone, she has a place with me. I pay my debts and I even plan for them.

  246. Anonymous

    Who paid for my school? My single widowed mother who sent me to the best private school she could.

    I paid for all 9 yrs of college myself. When my mother becomes too frail to live alone, she has a place with me. I pay my debts and I even plan for them.

  247. Anonymous

    Who paid for my school? My single widowed mother who sent me to the best private school she could.

    I paid for all 9 yrs of college myself. When my mother becomes too frail to live alone, she has a place with me. I pay my debts and I even plan for them.

  248. Anonymous

    Who paid for my school? My single widowed mother who sent me to the best private school she could.

    I paid for all 9 yrs of college myself. When my mother becomes too frail to live alone, she has a place with me. I pay my debts and I even plan for them.

  249. Don Shor

    “wdf said…

    Don,

    I suggest giving Bruce Colby a call and finding a time to chat with him about your thoughts. I find him a patient person with anyone who takes the time to figure out the budget.”

    I have great respect for Bruce Colby, but it would be simpler if he would put the information in a spreadsheet and put it up on the DJUSD website. No point in him explaining it to me when it could be accessible to anyone. Presently one has to download and wade through a bunch of pdf documents, with figures that don’t match and without the context of comparison to prior years.
    I do understand that it is complicated. When I was on the DSIS site council I got a glimpse of the different funding sources, and found it Byzantine.

    It is simplistic to single out any one source of the problem: enrollment, step increases, special programs, administrative overhead. But without the raw data, it’s hard to even have a rational discussion.

    Just for example:
    What has been the change in teaching positions over the last 3 – 4 years (full-time-equivalent would make it easiest to compare)?
    What has been the change in teachers’ salaries?
    What has been the change in staff positions (FTE)?
    Have programs been added?
    What operating expenses are increasing?
    Which expenses are restricted?

    People need to know exactly what they are paying for, and why the district has a problem.

    It would also be nice to know if board members are working with local legislators to try to deal with the underfunded programs, and to develop longer-term budget strategies.

  250. Don Shor

    “wdf said…

    Don,

    I suggest giving Bruce Colby a call and finding a time to chat with him about your thoughts. I find him a patient person with anyone who takes the time to figure out the budget.”

    I have great respect for Bruce Colby, but it would be simpler if he would put the information in a spreadsheet and put it up on the DJUSD website. No point in him explaining it to me when it could be accessible to anyone. Presently one has to download and wade through a bunch of pdf documents, with figures that don’t match and without the context of comparison to prior years.
    I do understand that it is complicated. When I was on the DSIS site council I got a glimpse of the different funding sources, and found it Byzantine.

    It is simplistic to single out any one source of the problem: enrollment, step increases, special programs, administrative overhead. But without the raw data, it’s hard to even have a rational discussion.

    Just for example:
    What has been the change in teaching positions over the last 3 – 4 years (full-time-equivalent would make it easiest to compare)?
    What has been the change in teachers’ salaries?
    What has been the change in staff positions (FTE)?
    Have programs been added?
    What operating expenses are increasing?
    Which expenses are restricted?

    People need to know exactly what they are paying for, and why the district has a problem.

    It would also be nice to know if board members are working with local legislators to try to deal with the underfunded programs, and to develop longer-term budget strategies.

  251. Don Shor

    “wdf said…

    Don,

    I suggest giving Bruce Colby a call and finding a time to chat with him about your thoughts. I find him a patient person with anyone who takes the time to figure out the budget.”

    I have great respect for Bruce Colby, but it would be simpler if he would put the information in a spreadsheet and put it up on the DJUSD website. No point in him explaining it to me when it could be accessible to anyone. Presently one has to download and wade through a bunch of pdf documents, with figures that don’t match and without the context of comparison to prior years.
    I do understand that it is complicated. When I was on the DSIS site council I got a glimpse of the different funding sources, and found it Byzantine.

    It is simplistic to single out any one source of the problem: enrollment, step increases, special programs, administrative overhead. But without the raw data, it’s hard to even have a rational discussion.

    Just for example:
    What has been the change in teaching positions over the last 3 – 4 years (full-time-equivalent would make it easiest to compare)?
    What has been the change in teachers’ salaries?
    What has been the change in staff positions (FTE)?
    Have programs been added?
    What operating expenses are increasing?
    Which expenses are restricted?

    People need to know exactly what they are paying for, and why the district has a problem.

    It would also be nice to know if board members are working with local legislators to try to deal with the underfunded programs, and to develop longer-term budget strategies.

  252. Don Shor

    “wdf said…

    Don,

    I suggest giving Bruce Colby a call and finding a time to chat with him about your thoughts. I find him a patient person with anyone who takes the time to figure out the budget.”

    I have great respect for Bruce Colby, but it would be simpler if he would put the information in a spreadsheet and put it up on the DJUSD website. No point in him explaining it to me when it could be accessible to anyone. Presently one has to download and wade through a bunch of pdf documents, with figures that don’t match and without the context of comparison to prior years.
    I do understand that it is complicated. When I was on the DSIS site council I got a glimpse of the different funding sources, and found it Byzantine.

    It is simplistic to single out any one source of the problem: enrollment, step increases, special programs, administrative overhead. But without the raw data, it’s hard to even have a rational discussion.

    Just for example:
    What has been the change in teaching positions over the last 3 – 4 years (full-time-equivalent would make it easiest to compare)?
    What has been the change in teachers’ salaries?
    What has been the change in staff positions (FTE)?
    Have programs been added?
    What operating expenses are increasing?
    Which expenses are restricted?

    People need to know exactly what they are paying for, and why the district has a problem.

    It would also be nice to know if board members are working with local legislators to try to deal with the underfunded programs, and to develop longer-term budget strategies.

  253. Anonymous

    “Among EL students in Davis, Mandarin Chinese is the second most widely spoken native language (Spanish is first). It is also the most widely spoken native language in the world.”

    Fine, keep spanish and mandarin and cut all the others. The point is that when you don’t have the money for everything, you make the best choices you can with what you have.

    “You da man! (or woman)

    I like someone who can blindly tell it like it is, and say it with conviction! That’s a trait that will get you elected president someday. It’s happened before. When are you running for school board?”

    Woman actually. And no I won’t be running for anything in this town. If you are going to serve the public, you need to believe in the public you are serving. I don’t actually like Davis and that would make me the the most insincere of candidates. Now Berkeley and San Francisco on the other hand…

  254. Anonymous

    “Among EL students in Davis, Mandarin Chinese is the second most widely spoken native language (Spanish is first). It is also the most widely spoken native language in the world.”

    Fine, keep spanish and mandarin and cut all the others. The point is that when you don’t have the money for everything, you make the best choices you can with what you have.

    “You da man! (or woman)

    I like someone who can blindly tell it like it is, and say it with conviction! That’s a trait that will get you elected president someday. It’s happened before. When are you running for school board?”

    Woman actually. And no I won’t be running for anything in this town. If you are going to serve the public, you need to believe in the public you are serving. I don’t actually like Davis and that would make me the the most insincere of candidates. Now Berkeley and San Francisco on the other hand…

  255. Anonymous

    “Among EL students in Davis, Mandarin Chinese is the second most widely spoken native language (Spanish is first). It is also the most widely spoken native language in the world.”

    Fine, keep spanish and mandarin and cut all the others. The point is that when you don’t have the money for everything, you make the best choices you can with what you have.

    “You da man! (or woman)

    I like someone who can blindly tell it like it is, and say it with conviction! That’s a trait that will get you elected president someday. It’s happened before. When are you running for school board?”

    Woman actually. And no I won’t be running for anything in this town. If you are going to serve the public, you need to believe in the public you are serving. I don’t actually like Davis and that would make me the the most insincere of candidates. Now Berkeley and San Francisco on the other hand…

  256. Anonymous

    “Among EL students in Davis, Mandarin Chinese is the second most widely spoken native language (Spanish is first). It is also the most widely spoken native language in the world.”

    Fine, keep spanish and mandarin and cut all the others. The point is that when you don’t have the money for everything, you make the best choices you can with what you have.

    “You da man! (or woman)

    I like someone who can blindly tell it like it is, and say it with conviction! That’s a trait that will get you elected president someday. It’s happened before. When are you running for school board?”

    Woman actually. And no I won’t be running for anything in this town. If you are going to serve the public, you need to believe in the public you are serving. I don’t actually like Davis and that would make me the the most insincere of candidates. Now Berkeley and San Francisco on the other hand…

  257. Don Shor

    “Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin.”

    It seems to me that any course that meets the University of California a-g requirements would have priority. Mandarin Chinese meets that requirement.

  258. Don Shor

    “Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin.”

    It seems to me that any course that meets the University of California a-g requirements would have priority. Mandarin Chinese meets that requirement.

  259. Don Shor

    “Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin.”

    It seems to me that any course that meets the University of California a-g requirements would have priority. Mandarin Chinese meets that requirement.

  260. Don Shor

    “Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin.”

    It seems to me that any course that meets the University of California a-g requirements would have priority. Mandarin Chinese meets that requirement.

  261. Doug Paul Davis

    “I can keep going if you’d like. If I were to cut all those, we’d have a surplus and then you’d be able to choose what to add back in.”

    You better keep going because you are still only about a fifth of the way there.

  262. Doug Paul Davis

    “I can keep going if you’d like. If I were to cut all those, we’d have a surplus and then you’d be able to choose what to add back in.”

    You better keep going because you are still only about a fifth of the way there.

  263. Doug Paul Davis

    “I can keep going if you’d like. If I were to cut all those, we’d have a surplus and then you’d be able to choose what to add back in.”

    You better keep going because you are still only about a fifth of the way there.

  264. Doug Paul Davis

    “I can keep going if you’d like. If I were to cut all those, we’d have a surplus and then you’d be able to choose what to add back in.”

    You better keep going because you are still only about a fifth of the way there.

  265. wdf

    It would also be nice to know if board members are working with local legislators to try to deal with the underfunded programs, and to develop longer-term budget strategies.

    I am aware that this has been happening, definitely since the beginning of the year. Before that I don’t know.

  266. wdf

    It would also be nice to know if board members are working with local legislators to try to deal with the underfunded programs, and to develop longer-term budget strategies.

    I am aware that this has been happening, definitely since the beginning of the year. Before that I don’t know.

  267. wdf

    It would also be nice to know if board members are working with local legislators to try to deal with the underfunded programs, and to develop longer-term budget strategies.

    I am aware that this has been happening, definitely since the beginning of the year. Before that I don’t know.

  268. wdf

    It would also be nice to know if board members are working with local legislators to try to deal with the underfunded programs, and to develop longer-term budget strategies.

    I am aware that this has been happening, definitely since the beginning of the year. Before that I don’t know.

  269. wdf

    I have great respect for Bruce Colby, but it would be simpler if he would put the information in a spreadsheet and put it up on the DJUSD website. No point in him explaining it to me when it could be accessible to anyone. Presently one has to download and wade through a bunch of pdf documents, with figures that don’t match and without the context of comparison to prior years.

    As I was responding to the request for the source of the most current ADA figure yesterday, I was tempted to comment that one area where the district has clearly avoiding costs is in keeping their website accessible and up to date.

    The City website is much easier to work with than the district website. In the spirit of community volunteerism, saving the district an additional expense, and maybe helping the district to better serve the public, maybe there is someone out there who might volunteer to redesign their website?

  270. wdf

    I have great respect for Bruce Colby, but it would be simpler if he would put the information in a spreadsheet and put it up on the DJUSD website. No point in him explaining it to me when it could be accessible to anyone. Presently one has to download and wade through a bunch of pdf documents, with figures that don’t match and without the context of comparison to prior years.

    As I was responding to the request for the source of the most current ADA figure yesterday, I was tempted to comment that one area where the district has clearly avoiding costs is in keeping their website accessible and up to date.

    The City website is much easier to work with than the district website. In the spirit of community volunteerism, saving the district an additional expense, and maybe helping the district to better serve the public, maybe there is someone out there who might volunteer to redesign their website?

  271. wdf

    I have great respect for Bruce Colby, but it would be simpler if he would put the information in a spreadsheet and put it up on the DJUSD website. No point in him explaining it to me when it could be accessible to anyone. Presently one has to download and wade through a bunch of pdf documents, with figures that don’t match and without the context of comparison to prior years.

    As I was responding to the request for the source of the most current ADA figure yesterday, I was tempted to comment that one area where the district has clearly avoiding costs is in keeping their website accessible and up to date.

    The City website is much easier to work with than the district website. In the spirit of community volunteerism, saving the district an additional expense, and maybe helping the district to better serve the public, maybe there is someone out there who might volunteer to redesign their website?

  272. wdf

    I have great respect for Bruce Colby, but it would be simpler if he would put the information in a spreadsheet and put it up on the DJUSD website. No point in him explaining it to me when it could be accessible to anyone. Presently one has to download and wade through a bunch of pdf documents, with figures that don’t match and without the context of comparison to prior years.

    As I was responding to the request for the source of the most current ADA figure yesterday, I was tempted to comment that one area where the district has clearly avoiding costs is in keeping their website accessible and up to date.

    The City website is much easier to work with than the district website. In the spirit of community volunteerism, saving the district an additional expense, and maybe helping the district to better serve the public, maybe there is someone out there who might volunteer to redesign their website?

  273. cutting class

    Getting rid of full classes – whether they are at DaVinci, are “frills” such as Mandarin or music, or otherwise – doesn’t save money, since you will then need to hire a teacher to teach the class the student will take instead. The Board may wish to look at eliminating classes that are running below capacity. I’m not sure whether the ones suggested here fall into this category.

  274. cutting class

    Getting rid of full classes – whether they are at DaVinci, are “frills” such as Mandarin or music, or otherwise – doesn’t save money, since you will then need to hire a teacher to teach the class the student will take instead. The Board may wish to look at eliminating classes that are running below capacity. I’m not sure whether the ones suggested here fall into this category.

  275. cutting class

    Getting rid of full classes – whether they are at DaVinci, are “frills” such as Mandarin or music, or otherwise – doesn’t save money, since you will then need to hire a teacher to teach the class the student will take instead. The Board may wish to look at eliminating classes that are running below capacity. I’m not sure whether the ones suggested here fall into this category.

  276. cutting class

    Getting rid of full classes – whether they are at DaVinci, are “frills” such as Mandarin or music, or otherwise – doesn’t save money, since you will then need to hire a teacher to teach the class the student will take instead. The Board may wish to look at eliminating classes that are running below capacity. I’m not sure whether the ones suggested here fall into this category.

  277. NO ON MEASURE R

    DPD, you asked where would we cut to make up for a $2.5 million dollar shortfall? Let me repeat a quote that was in yesterday’s Davis Enterprise –

    “Susan Lovenburg, another trustee, said she wished the [parcel tax] propos[al]… also included money for campus safety programs, and additional counselors and vice principals to work with students in grades 7-12. Then Lovenberg sighed and noted, ‘We never have enough money (in the school district budget) to do everything we want to do.”

    “We never have enough money” says it all. Furthermore, what makes you think we have an actual $2.5 million shortfall, rather than a perceived $2.5 million shortfall? I very much agree with Don Shor, when he points out the School District/Board is not laying out what the actual figures are in a clear and concise manner so that the public better understands what we are up against.

    For instance, if we pass this new parcel tax, Emerson is going to close anyway. If you eliminate an entire school, how much money is that going to save? We haven’t heard any information on that one. What we have heard from the School Board/District is that if Emerson were to close, it would have save $600,000 – I assume in operating expenses. We have also heard it will cost $16 million to make it come up to code properly as justification for its closure. What we haven’t heard is how much in renovations will it cost to keep it open legally.

    I agree with another blogger, who commented that it does us little good to hire teachers for a school that no longer exists. If the argument is that all the VO teachers were hired back into the Davis school system, then I am having a hard time believing that $500,000 was saved by closing VO, especially since the building itself was reopened as an “educational center”. So nothing was saved by closing the building down or having staff to run it.

    Are you starting to get the picture? The system is being gamed here, by the School Board/District. We don’t necessarily believe their assessment of the situation, because a good deal of the information we are getting does not add up.

    For those of you who criticize detractors of the new parcel tax, for not showing up at School Board meetings, think again. I went to several School Board meetings and spoke up against the closure of VO. My comments were met with rude condescension by Board members, who didn’t think much of what I had to say. Why? Because they were not there to listen to the public, but had already made up thier minds what they were going to do. Just as they have already made up their minds on the closure of Emerson. And we all know it. So I made my feelings known on the editorial page of the Davis Enterprise and on this blog.

    I agree with another blogger – save only those programs that are necessary to graduate from high school, or meet college requirements. The rest has to go, or should be privately funded. Have only one vice principal and counselor per junior and senior high. Get rid of many of the adminstrative and staff positions. We do not need the most expensive Supt. in the county (I know, I know, we have already signed the contract.) Maybe we have to increase some class sizes and lay off a few teachers. I suspect we already did that with the closure of VO. I, for one, would like the School Board to tell us specifically where they saved on the closure of VO. Was every single teacher hired back? Then where exactly was all this $500,000 in savings that is claimed?

    DPD, what you are missing is that the School District has repeatedly over the years played this same game, and all that has resulted is the mess we are currently in. At what point do you say enough is enough? Another blogger put it very well – how much more school tax do YOU think we should pay until YOU think enough is enough? Some of us have reached that point – especially because the perception is that the School Board/District are not being honest. The entire Emerson argument is a case in point.

    On the one hand the School District argued that closing Emerson would save $600,000, then argued in another case it would save $16 million, as justification for closure. If $600,000 would save Emerson from closure, don’t you think citizens would vote for it in a heartbeat? But citizens would balk at $16 million, which was why the School Board upped the ante. We need transparency and honesty, period. And we are not getting it.

  278. NO ON MEASURE R

    DPD, you asked where would we cut to make up for a $2.5 million dollar shortfall? Let me repeat a quote that was in yesterday’s Davis Enterprise –

    “Susan Lovenburg, another trustee, said she wished the [parcel tax] propos[al]… also included money for campus safety programs, and additional counselors and vice principals to work with students in grades 7-12. Then Lovenberg sighed and noted, ‘We never have enough money (in the school district budget) to do everything we want to do.”

    “We never have enough money” says it all. Furthermore, what makes you think we have an actual $2.5 million shortfall, rather than a perceived $2.5 million shortfall? I very much agree with Don Shor, when he points out the School District/Board is not laying out what the actual figures are in a clear and concise manner so that the public better understands what we are up against.

    For instance, if we pass this new parcel tax, Emerson is going to close anyway. If you eliminate an entire school, how much money is that going to save? We haven’t heard any information on that one. What we have heard from the School Board/District is that if Emerson were to close, it would have save $600,000 – I assume in operating expenses. We have also heard it will cost $16 million to make it come up to code properly as justification for its closure. What we haven’t heard is how much in renovations will it cost to keep it open legally.

    I agree with another blogger, who commented that it does us little good to hire teachers for a school that no longer exists. If the argument is that all the VO teachers were hired back into the Davis school system, then I am having a hard time believing that $500,000 was saved by closing VO, especially since the building itself was reopened as an “educational center”. So nothing was saved by closing the building down or having staff to run it.

    Are you starting to get the picture? The system is being gamed here, by the School Board/District. We don’t necessarily believe their assessment of the situation, because a good deal of the information we are getting does not add up.

    For those of you who criticize detractors of the new parcel tax, for not showing up at School Board meetings, think again. I went to several School Board meetings and spoke up against the closure of VO. My comments were met with rude condescension by Board members, who didn’t think much of what I had to say. Why? Because they were not there to listen to the public, but had already made up thier minds what they were going to do. Just as they have already made up their minds on the closure of Emerson. And we all know it. So I made my feelings known on the editorial page of the Davis Enterprise and on this blog.

    I agree with another blogger – save only those programs that are necessary to graduate from high school, or meet college requirements. The rest has to go, or should be privately funded. Have only one vice principal and counselor per junior and senior high. Get rid of many of the adminstrative and staff positions. We do not need the most expensive Supt. in the county (I know, I know, we have already signed the contract.) Maybe we have to increase some class sizes and lay off a few teachers. I suspect we already did that with the closure of VO. I, for one, would like the School Board to tell us specifically where they saved on the closure of VO. Was every single teacher hired back? Then where exactly was all this $500,000 in savings that is claimed?

    DPD, what you are missing is that the School District has repeatedly over the years played this same game, and all that has resulted is the mess we are currently in. At what point do you say enough is enough? Another blogger put it very well – how much more school tax do YOU think we should pay until YOU think enough is enough? Some of us have reached that point – especially because the perception is that the School Board/District are not being honest. The entire Emerson argument is a case in point.

    On the one hand the School District argued that closing Emerson would save $600,000, then argued in another case it would save $16 million, as justification for closure. If $600,000 would save Emerson from closure, don’t you think citizens would vote for it in a heartbeat? But citizens would balk at $16 million, which was why the School Board upped the ante. We need transparency and honesty, period. And we are not getting it.

  279. NO ON MEASURE R

    DPD, you asked where would we cut to make up for a $2.5 million dollar shortfall? Let me repeat a quote that was in yesterday’s Davis Enterprise –

    “Susan Lovenburg, another trustee, said she wished the [parcel tax] propos[al]… also included money for campus safety programs, and additional counselors and vice principals to work with students in grades 7-12. Then Lovenberg sighed and noted, ‘We never have enough money (in the school district budget) to do everything we want to do.”

    “We never have enough money” says it all. Furthermore, what makes you think we have an actual $2.5 million shortfall, rather than a perceived $2.5 million shortfall? I very much agree with Don Shor, when he points out the School District/Board is not laying out what the actual figures are in a clear and concise manner so that the public better understands what we are up against.

    For instance, if we pass this new parcel tax, Emerson is going to close anyway. If you eliminate an entire school, how much money is that going to save? We haven’t heard any information on that one. What we have heard from the School Board/District is that if Emerson were to close, it would have save $600,000 – I assume in operating expenses. We have also heard it will cost $16 million to make it come up to code properly as justification for its closure. What we haven’t heard is how much in renovations will it cost to keep it open legally.

    I agree with another blogger, who commented that it does us little good to hire teachers for a school that no longer exists. If the argument is that all the VO teachers were hired back into the Davis school system, then I am having a hard time believing that $500,000 was saved by closing VO, especially since the building itself was reopened as an “educational center”. So nothing was saved by closing the building down or having staff to run it.

    Are you starting to get the picture? The system is being gamed here, by the School Board/District. We don’t necessarily believe their assessment of the situation, because a good deal of the information we are getting does not add up.

    For those of you who criticize detractors of the new parcel tax, for not showing up at School Board meetings, think again. I went to several School Board meetings and spoke up against the closure of VO. My comments were met with rude condescension by Board members, who didn’t think much of what I had to say. Why? Because they were not there to listen to the public, but had already made up thier minds what they were going to do. Just as they have already made up their minds on the closure of Emerson. And we all know it. So I made my feelings known on the editorial page of the Davis Enterprise and on this blog.

    I agree with another blogger – save only those programs that are necessary to graduate from high school, or meet college requirements. The rest has to go, or should be privately funded. Have only one vice principal and counselor per junior and senior high. Get rid of many of the adminstrative and staff positions. We do not need the most expensive Supt. in the county (I know, I know, we have already signed the contract.) Maybe we have to increase some class sizes and lay off a few teachers. I suspect we already did that with the closure of VO. I, for one, would like the School Board to tell us specifically where they saved on the closure of VO. Was every single teacher hired back? Then where exactly was all this $500,000 in savings that is claimed?

    DPD, what you are missing is that the School District has repeatedly over the years played this same game, and all that has resulted is the mess we are currently in. At what point do you say enough is enough? Another blogger put it very well – how much more school tax do YOU think we should pay until YOU think enough is enough? Some of us have reached that point – especially because the perception is that the School Board/District are not being honest. The entire Emerson argument is a case in point.

    On the one hand the School District argued that closing Emerson would save $600,000, then argued in another case it would save $16 million, as justification for closure. If $600,000 would save Emerson from closure, don’t you think citizens would vote for it in a heartbeat? But citizens would balk at $16 million, which was why the School Board upped the ante. We need transparency and honesty, period. And we are not getting it.

  280. NO ON MEASURE R

    DPD, you asked where would we cut to make up for a $2.5 million dollar shortfall? Let me repeat a quote that was in yesterday’s Davis Enterprise –

    “Susan Lovenburg, another trustee, said she wished the [parcel tax] propos[al]… also included money for campus safety programs, and additional counselors and vice principals to work with students in grades 7-12. Then Lovenberg sighed and noted, ‘We never have enough money (in the school district budget) to do everything we want to do.”

    “We never have enough money” says it all. Furthermore, what makes you think we have an actual $2.5 million shortfall, rather than a perceived $2.5 million shortfall? I very much agree with Don Shor, when he points out the School District/Board is not laying out what the actual figures are in a clear and concise manner so that the public better understands what we are up against.

    For instance, if we pass this new parcel tax, Emerson is going to close anyway. If you eliminate an entire school, how much money is that going to save? We haven’t heard any information on that one. What we have heard from the School Board/District is that if Emerson were to close, it would have save $600,000 – I assume in operating expenses. We have also heard it will cost $16 million to make it come up to code properly as justification for its closure. What we haven’t heard is how much in renovations will it cost to keep it open legally.

    I agree with another blogger, who commented that it does us little good to hire teachers for a school that no longer exists. If the argument is that all the VO teachers were hired back into the Davis school system, then I am having a hard time believing that $500,000 was saved by closing VO, especially since the building itself was reopened as an “educational center”. So nothing was saved by closing the building down or having staff to run it.

    Are you starting to get the picture? The system is being gamed here, by the School Board/District. We don’t necessarily believe their assessment of the situation, because a good deal of the information we are getting does not add up.

    For those of you who criticize detractors of the new parcel tax, for not showing up at School Board meetings, think again. I went to several School Board meetings and spoke up against the closure of VO. My comments were met with rude condescension by Board members, who didn’t think much of what I had to say. Why? Because they were not there to listen to the public, but had already made up thier minds what they were going to do. Just as they have already made up their minds on the closure of Emerson. And we all know it. So I made my feelings known on the editorial page of the Davis Enterprise and on this blog.

    I agree with another blogger – save only those programs that are necessary to graduate from high school, or meet college requirements. The rest has to go, or should be privately funded. Have only one vice principal and counselor per junior and senior high. Get rid of many of the adminstrative and staff positions. We do not need the most expensive Supt. in the county (I know, I know, we have already signed the contract.) Maybe we have to increase some class sizes and lay off a few teachers. I suspect we already did that with the closure of VO. I, for one, would like the School Board to tell us specifically where they saved on the closure of VO. Was every single teacher hired back? Then where exactly was all this $500,000 in savings that is claimed?

    DPD, what you are missing is that the School District has repeatedly over the years played this same game, and all that has resulted is the mess we are currently in. At what point do you say enough is enough? Another blogger put it very well – how much more school tax do YOU think we should pay until YOU think enough is enough? Some of us have reached that point – especially because the perception is that the School Board/District are not being honest. The entire Emerson argument is a case in point.

    On the one hand the School District argued that closing Emerson would save $600,000, then argued in another case it would save $16 million, as justification for closure. If $600,000 would save Emerson from closure, don’t you think citizens would vote for it in a heartbeat? But citizens would balk at $16 million, which was why the School Board upped the ante. We need transparency and honesty, period. And we are not getting it.

  281. Anonymous

    Have only one vice principal and counselor per junior and senior high.

    Only one counselor at Davis High to deal with all 700+ seniors applying to college, not to mention the needs for guidance (academic and otherwise) of the 10th and 11th graders?

    I disagree. Students need adequate counseling support.

  282. Anonymous

    Have only one vice principal and counselor per junior and senior high.

    Only one counselor at Davis High to deal with all 700+ seniors applying to college, not to mention the needs for guidance (academic and otherwise) of the 10th and 11th graders?

    I disagree. Students need adequate counseling support.

  283. Anonymous

    Have only one vice principal and counselor per junior and senior high.

    Only one counselor at Davis High to deal with all 700+ seniors applying to college, not to mention the needs for guidance (academic and otherwise) of the 10th and 11th graders?

    I disagree. Students need adequate counseling support.

  284. Anonymous

    Have only one vice principal and counselor per junior and senior high.

    Only one counselor at Davis High to deal with all 700+ seniors applying to college, not to mention the needs for guidance (academic and otherwise) of the 10th and 11th graders?

    I disagree. Students need adequate counseling support.

  285. barbara

    There are scores of worthwhile causes in Davis & Yolo Co., all dependent on the generosity of citizens. All of these programs make Davis what it is and keep our property values up: hospice, mental health, Friends of Library, religious organizations, youth sports, STEAC, Boy/Girl Scouts, PTA, environmental groups, etc. The schools, in particular, tug at our heartstrings because we either think little kids are cute or want all big kids to be eligible for top universities. The problem for many people considering a NO vote is that we as a community don’t seem to want to draw a line on how much money to contribute to schools. Maybe $120 is only a few weeks of lattes (boy, am I weary of that financial argument), but it’s also a donation or two to another deserving group. Or perhaps a trip to Home Depot instead of Hibbert or Redwood Barn…

  286. barbara

    There are scores of worthwhile causes in Davis & Yolo Co., all dependent on the generosity of citizens. All of these programs make Davis what it is and keep our property values up: hospice, mental health, Friends of Library, religious organizations, youth sports, STEAC, Boy/Girl Scouts, PTA, environmental groups, etc. The schools, in particular, tug at our heartstrings because we either think little kids are cute or want all big kids to be eligible for top universities. The problem for many people considering a NO vote is that we as a community don’t seem to want to draw a line on how much money to contribute to schools. Maybe $120 is only a few weeks of lattes (boy, am I weary of that financial argument), but it’s also a donation or two to another deserving group. Or perhaps a trip to Home Depot instead of Hibbert or Redwood Barn…

  287. barbara

    There are scores of worthwhile causes in Davis & Yolo Co., all dependent on the generosity of citizens. All of these programs make Davis what it is and keep our property values up: hospice, mental health, Friends of Library, religious organizations, youth sports, STEAC, Boy/Girl Scouts, PTA, environmental groups, etc. The schools, in particular, tug at our heartstrings because we either think little kids are cute or want all big kids to be eligible for top universities. The problem for many people considering a NO vote is that we as a community don’t seem to want to draw a line on how much money to contribute to schools. Maybe $120 is only a few weeks of lattes (boy, am I weary of that financial argument), but it’s also a donation or two to another deserving group. Or perhaps a trip to Home Depot instead of Hibbert or Redwood Barn…

  288. barbara

    There are scores of worthwhile causes in Davis & Yolo Co., all dependent on the generosity of citizens. All of these programs make Davis what it is and keep our property values up: hospice, mental health, Friends of Library, religious organizations, youth sports, STEAC, Boy/Girl Scouts, PTA, environmental groups, etc. The schools, in particular, tug at our heartstrings because we either think little kids are cute or want all big kids to be eligible for top universities. The problem for many people considering a NO vote is that we as a community don’t seem to want to draw a line on how much money to contribute to schools. Maybe $120 is only a few weeks of lattes (boy, am I weary of that financial argument), but it’s also a donation or two to another deserving group. Or perhaps a trip to Home Depot instead of Hibbert or Redwood Barn…

  289. NO ON MEASURE R

    “Only one counselor at Davis High to deal with all 700+ seniors applying to college, not to mention the needs for guidance (academic and otherwise) of the 10th and 11th graders?”

    In a tight budget, yes. What is the alternative? Where would you make the cuts? Close Emerson instead?

  290. Anonymous

    “If $600,000 would save Emerson from closure, don’t you think citizens would vote for it in a heartbeat?”

    That same question was poll-tested for Valley Oak (they asked whether voters would support a tax to keep the school from being closed – the number was I believe around $35) and those numbers did not get anywhere near the 2/3 majority that would be required to levy the tax. So the answer to your question may be no.

  291. NO ON MEASURE R

    “Only one counselor at Davis High to deal with all 700+ seniors applying to college, not to mention the needs for guidance (academic and otherwise) of the 10th and 11th graders?”

    In a tight budget, yes. What is the alternative? Where would you make the cuts? Close Emerson instead?

  292. Anonymous

    “If $600,000 would save Emerson from closure, don’t you think citizens would vote for it in a heartbeat?”

    That same question was poll-tested for Valley Oak (they asked whether voters would support a tax to keep the school from being closed – the number was I believe around $35) and those numbers did not get anywhere near the 2/3 majority that would be required to levy the tax. So the answer to your question may be no.

  293. NO ON MEASURE R

    “Only one counselor at Davis High to deal with all 700+ seniors applying to college, not to mention the needs for guidance (academic and otherwise) of the 10th and 11th graders?”

    In a tight budget, yes. What is the alternative? Where would you make the cuts? Close Emerson instead?

  294. Anonymous

    “If $600,000 would save Emerson from closure, don’t you think citizens would vote for it in a heartbeat?”

    That same question was poll-tested for Valley Oak (they asked whether voters would support a tax to keep the school from being closed – the number was I believe around $35) and those numbers did not get anywhere near the 2/3 majority that would be required to levy the tax. So the answer to your question may be no.

  295. NO ON MEASURE R

    “Only one counselor at Davis High to deal with all 700+ seniors applying to college, not to mention the needs for guidance (academic and otherwise) of the 10th and 11th graders?”

    In a tight budget, yes. What is the alternative? Where would you make the cuts? Close Emerson instead?

  296. Anonymous

    “If $600,000 would save Emerson from closure, don’t you think citizens would vote for it in a heartbeat?”

    That same question was poll-tested for Valley Oak (they asked whether voters would support a tax to keep the school from being closed – the number was I believe around $35) and those numbers did not get anywhere near the 2/3 majority that would be required to levy the tax. So the answer to your question may be no.

  297. yes on measure R

    “Where would you make the cuts? Close Emerson instead?”

    Personally, I’ll be voting yes on measure R, in hopes of not having to choose either one.

  298. yes on measure R

    “Where would you make the cuts? Close Emerson instead?”

    Personally, I’ll be voting yes on measure R, in hopes of not having to choose either one.

  299. yes on measure R

    “Where would you make the cuts? Close Emerson instead?”

    Personally, I’ll be voting yes on measure R, in hopes of not having to choose either one.

  300. yes on measure R

    “Where would you make the cuts? Close Emerson instead?”

    Personally, I’ll be voting yes on measure R, in hopes of not having to choose either one.

  301. Anonymous

    “The problem for many people considering a NO vote is that we as a community don’t seem to want to draw a line on how much money to contribute to schools.”

    That may be true but other truth is that the community has not provided enough althernative ways to support schools. Davis maintains a lifesyle which prevents the types of business that could help support schools and other services. As a result the burden of supporting schools falls heavily on the tax payers in the form of parcel taxes. You will continue to have to pay more in taxes because of your own decisions.

    You can not blame the schools for needing a reasonable amount of money to operate.

  302. Anonymous

    “The problem for many people considering a NO vote is that we as a community don’t seem to want to draw a line on how much money to contribute to schools.”

    That may be true but other truth is that the community has not provided enough althernative ways to support schools. Davis maintains a lifesyle which prevents the types of business that could help support schools and other services. As a result the burden of supporting schools falls heavily on the tax payers in the form of parcel taxes. You will continue to have to pay more in taxes because of your own decisions.

    You can not blame the schools for needing a reasonable amount of money to operate.

  303. Anonymous

    “The problem for many people considering a NO vote is that we as a community don’t seem to want to draw a line on how much money to contribute to schools.”

    That may be true but other truth is that the community has not provided enough althernative ways to support schools. Davis maintains a lifesyle which prevents the types of business that could help support schools and other services. As a result the burden of supporting schools falls heavily on the tax payers in the form of parcel taxes. You will continue to have to pay more in taxes because of your own decisions.

    You can not blame the schools for needing a reasonable amount of money to operate.

  304. Anonymous

    “The problem for many people considering a NO vote is that we as a community don’t seem to want to draw a line on how much money to contribute to schools.”

    That may be true but other truth is that the community has not provided enough althernative ways to support schools. Davis maintains a lifesyle which prevents the types of business that could help support schools and other services. As a result the burden of supporting schools falls heavily on the tax payers in the form of parcel taxes. You will continue to have to pay more in taxes because of your own decisions.

    You can not blame the schools for needing a reasonable amount of money to operate.

  305. Anonymous

    “the community has not provided enough althernative ways to support schools. Davis maintains a lifesyle which prevents the types of business that could help support schools and other services.”

    That would be a compelling argument if other districts and cities had better schools and resources than Davis, but they do not. Communities with lots of businesses are hurting just as much as Davis.

  306. Anonymous

    “the community has not provided enough althernative ways to support schools. Davis maintains a lifesyle which prevents the types of business that could help support schools and other services.”

    That would be a compelling argument if other districts and cities had better schools and resources than Davis, but they do not. Communities with lots of businesses are hurting just as much as Davis.

  307. Anonymous

    “the community has not provided enough althernative ways to support schools. Davis maintains a lifesyle which prevents the types of business that could help support schools and other services.”

    That would be a compelling argument if other districts and cities had better schools and resources than Davis, but they do not. Communities with lots of businesses are hurting just as much as Davis.

  308. Anonymous

    “the community has not provided enough althernative ways to support schools. Davis maintains a lifesyle which prevents the types of business that could help support schools and other services.”

    That would be a compelling argument if other districts and cities had better schools and resources than Davis, but they do not. Communities with lots of businesses are hurting just as much as Davis.

  309. CdS

    If I had to make cuts to programs at DHS, I would cut all advanced placement classses (apologies Gina). If students meet the criteria for taking college-level classes (having exhausted all possibilities at DHS) then they may take such classes through UC Davis or Sacramento City College. The students would receive college credit upon satisfactory completion of such courses. This was the route truly advanced students took prior to advanced placement courses being offered in the high schools. This would not negatively impact the high school’s ranking because the students’ needs are being met via DHS and suroounding college resources.

  310. CdS

    If I had to make cuts to programs at DHS, I would cut all advanced placement classses (apologies Gina). If students meet the criteria for taking college-level classes (having exhausted all possibilities at DHS) then they may take such classes through UC Davis or Sacramento City College. The students would receive college credit upon satisfactory completion of such courses. This was the route truly advanced students took prior to advanced placement courses being offered in the high schools. This would not negatively impact the high school’s ranking because the students’ needs are being met via DHS and suroounding college resources.

  311. CdS

    If I had to make cuts to programs at DHS, I would cut all advanced placement classses (apologies Gina). If students meet the criteria for taking college-level classes (having exhausted all possibilities at DHS) then they may take such classes through UC Davis or Sacramento City College. The students would receive college credit upon satisfactory completion of such courses. This was the route truly advanced students took prior to advanced placement courses being offered in the high schools. This would not negatively impact the high school’s ranking because the students’ needs are being met via DHS and suroounding college resources.

  312. CdS

    If I had to make cuts to programs at DHS, I would cut all advanced placement classses (apologies Gina). If students meet the criteria for taking college-level classes (having exhausted all possibilities at DHS) then they may take such classes through UC Davis or Sacramento City College. The students would receive college credit upon satisfactory completion of such courses. This was the route truly advanced students took prior to advanced placement courses being offered in the high schools. This would not negatively impact the high school’s ranking because the students’ needs are being met via DHS and suroounding college resources.

  313. Anonymous

    “That would be a compelling argument if other districts and cities had better schools and resources than Davis, but they do not. Communities with lots of businesses are hurting just as much as Davis.”

    Davis was hit pretty hard – harder than many districts. Many districts did not have to distribute layoff notices – there is a reason for that.

    It seems that there are many costs flowing down the pipeline( schools, city worker pensions, new water system) toward Davis and the community should be thinking about how to spread those costs. Higher taxes might be the best answer but other things should be considered also.

  314. Anonymous

    “That would be a compelling argument if other districts and cities had better schools and resources than Davis, but they do not. Communities with lots of businesses are hurting just as much as Davis.”

    Davis was hit pretty hard – harder than many districts. Many districts did not have to distribute layoff notices – there is a reason for that.

    It seems that there are many costs flowing down the pipeline( schools, city worker pensions, new water system) toward Davis and the community should be thinking about how to spread those costs. Higher taxes might be the best answer but other things should be considered also.

  315. Anonymous

    “That would be a compelling argument if other districts and cities had better schools and resources than Davis, but they do not. Communities with lots of businesses are hurting just as much as Davis.”

    Davis was hit pretty hard – harder than many districts. Many districts did not have to distribute layoff notices – there is a reason for that.

    It seems that there are many costs flowing down the pipeline( schools, city worker pensions, new water system) toward Davis and the community should be thinking about how to spread those costs. Higher taxes might be the best answer but other things should be considered also.

  316. Anonymous

    “That would be a compelling argument if other districts and cities had better schools and resources than Davis, but they do not. Communities with lots of businesses are hurting just as much as Davis.”

    Davis was hit pretty hard – harder than many districts. Many districts did not have to distribute layoff notices – there is a reason for that.

    It seems that there are many costs flowing down the pipeline( schools, city worker pensions, new water system) toward Davis and the community should be thinking about how to spread those costs. Higher taxes might be the best answer but other things should be considered also.

  317. its our $ first

    ” you believe that you are paying too much, then that tells me you believe that you know how best to spend the district’s money.”

    Excuse me David, but the $ is ours before it is theirs. They don’t earn a dime of that money, the taxpayers do.

  318. its our $ first

    ” you believe that you are paying too much, then that tells me you believe that you know how best to spend the district’s money.”

    Excuse me David, but the $ is ours before it is theirs. They don’t earn a dime of that money, the taxpayers do.

  319. its our $ first

    ” you believe that you are paying too much, then that tells me you believe that you know how best to spend the district’s money.”

    Excuse me David, but the $ is ours before it is theirs. They don’t earn a dime of that money, the taxpayers do.

  320. its our $ first

    ” you believe that you are paying too much, then that tells me you believe that you know how best to spend the district’s money.”

    Excuse me David, but the $ is ours before it is theirs. They don’t earn a dime of that money, the taxpayers do.

  321. from the Darkside

    I told people on this blog almost immediately after measure Q, that measure R was coming. I was correct. The school board couldn’t balance a budget to save their lives.

    Also, notice how the school board chose 9AM to have their meeting about the tax. Sometime when people are at work and will not be able to scrutinize them.

    This lack of transparency is another reason not to put $ in their pockets.

  322. from the Darkside

    I told people on this blog almost immediately after measure Q, that measure R was coming. I was correct. The school board couldn’t balance a budget to save their lives.

    Also, notice how the school board chose 9AM to have their meeting about the tax. Sometime when people are at work and will not be able to scrutinize them.

    This lack of transparency is another reason not to put $ in their pockets.

  323. from the Darkside

    I told people on this blog almost immediately after measure Q, that measure R was coming. I was correct. The school board couldn’t balance a budget to save their lives.

    Also, notice how the school board chose 9AM to have their meeting about the tax. Sometime when people are at work and will not be able to scrutinize them.

    This lack of transparency is another reason not to put $ in their pockets.

  324. from the Darkside

    I told people on this blog almost immediately after measure Q, that measure R was coming. I was correct. The school board couldn’t balance a budget to save their lives.

    Also, notice how the school board chose 9AM to have their meeting about the tax. Sometime when people are at work and will not be able to scrutinize them.

    This lack of transparency is another reason not to put $ in their pockets.

  325. Anonymous

    They are just plain greedy.

    You have a bizarre definition of greed. They are not lining their own pockets, they are spending the money on the district, primarily on teacher salaries.

  326. Anonymous

    They are just plain greedy.

    You have a bizarre definition of greed. They are not lining their own pockets, they are spending the money on the district, primarily on teacher salaries.

  327. Anonymous

    They are just plain greedy.

    You have a bizarre definition of greed. They are not lining their own pockets, they are spending the money on the district, primarily on teacher salaries.

  328. Anonymous

    They are just plain greedy.

    You have a bizarre definition of greed. They are not lining their own pockets, they are spending the money on the district, primarily on teacher salaries.

  329. Doug Paul Davis

    “They don’t earn a dime of that money, the taxpayers do. “

    What do you mean they don’t earn a dime of that money–they educate our kids

  330. Doug Paul Davis

    “They don’t earn a dime of that money, the taxpayers do. “

    What do you mean they don’t earn a dime of that money–they educate our kids

  331. Doug Paul Davis

    “They don’t earn a dime of that money, the taxpayers do. “

    What do you mean they don’t earn a dime of that money–they educate our kids

  332. Doug Paul Davis

    “They don’t earn a dime of that money, the taxpayers do. “

    What do you mean they don’t earn a dime of that money–they educate our kids

  333. says you

    “You have a bizarre definition of greed. They are not lining their own pockets, they are spending the money on the district, primarily on teacher salaries.”

    Says you.

  334. says you

    “You have a bizarre definition of greed. They are not lining their own pockets, they are spending the money on the district, primarily on teacher salaries.”

    Says you.

  335. says you

    “You have a bizarre definition of greed. They are not lining their own pockets, they are spending the money on the district, primarily on teacher salaries.”

    Says you.

  336. says you

    “You have a bizarre definition of greed. They are not lining their own pockets, they are spending the money on the district, primarily on teacher salaries.”

    Says you.

  337. Don Shor

    “says you said…

    “You have a bizarre definition of greed. They are not lining their own pockets, they are spending the money on the district, primarily on teacher salaries.”

    Says you.”

    83% of the district expenditures are for salaries and benefits.

  338. Don Shor

    “says you said…

    “You have a bizarre definition of greed. They are not lining their own pockets, they are spending the money on the district, primarily on teacher salaries.”

    Says you.”

    83% of the district expenditures are for salaries and benefits.

  339. Don Shor

    “says you said…

    “You have a bizarre definition of greed. They are not lining their own pockets, they are spending the money on the district, primarily on teacher salaries.”

    Says you.”

    83% of the district expenditures are for salaries and benefits.

  340. Don Shor

    “says you said…

    “You have a bizarre definition of greed. They are not lining their own pockets, they are spending the money on the district, primarily on teacher salaries.”

    Says you.”

    83% of the district expenditures are for salaries and benefits.

  341. Budget Conscious

    “83% of the district expenditures are for salaries and benefits.”

    I could believe that. One reason is all the special classes we have in Davis. DaVinci comes to mind, Mandarin Chinese comes to mind, etc., etc., etc. ad nauseum. Another thought I toyed with is the slight increase in class size. What if we offered a few less classes, laid off some teachers, so that students attended classes that were 42 in size as opposed to 35? I taught a classroom of 42 eighth graders – and my kids scored significantly higher than the other teachers, who were given brighter kids. We made do.

    We need to have a core cirriculum taught at neighborhood schools. Let the frills be paid by parents who can afford them. They can put the money in one large pot for a frill, so that scholarships can be given for those low income that can’t afford to chip in. Advanced classes at Sac City Davis campus is a good idea too. In essence, we have to budget if the school district won’t. How else are we going to make them accountable?

  342. Budget Conscious

    “83% of the district expenditures are for salaries and benefits.”

    I could believe that. One reason is all the special classes we have in Davis. DaVinci comes to mind, Mandarin Chinese comes to mind, etc., etc., etc. ad nauseum. Another thought I toyed with is the slight increase in class size. What if we offered a few less classes, laid off some teachers, so that students attended classes that were 42 in size as opposed to 35? I taught a classroom of 42 eighth graders – and my kids scored significantly higher than the other teachers, who were given brighter kids. We made do.

    We need to have a core cirriculum taught at neighborhood schools. Let the frills be paid by parents who can afford them. They can put the money in one large pot for a frill, so that scholarships can be given for those low income that can’t afford to chip in. Advanced classes at Sac City Davis campus is a good idea too. In essence, we have to budget if the school district won’t. How else are we going to make them accountable?

  343. Budget Conscious

    “83% of the district expenditures are for salaries and benefits.”

    I could believe that. One reason is all the special classes we have in Davis. DaVinci comes to mind, Mandarin Chinese comes to mind, etc., etc., etc. ad nauseum. Another thought I toyed with is the slight increase in class size. What if we offered a few less classes, laid off some teachers, so that students attended classes that were 42 in size as opposed to 35? I taught a classroom of 42 eighth graders – and my kids scored significantly higher than the other teachers, who were given brighter kids. We made do.

    We need to have a core cirriculum taught at neighborhood schools. Let the frills be paid by parents who can afford them. They can put the money in one large pot for a frill, so that scholarships can be given for those low income that can’t afford to chip in. Advanced classes at Sac City Davis campus is a good idea too. In essence, we have to budget if the school district won’t. How else are we going to make them accountable?

  344. Budget Conscious

    “83% of the district expenditures are for salaries and benefits.”

    I could believe that. One reason is all the special classes we have in Davis. DaVinci comes to mind, Mandarin Chinese comes to mind, etc., etc., etc. ad nauseum. Another thought I toyed with is the slight increase in class size. What if we offered a few less classes, laid off some teachers, so that students attended classes that were 42 in size as opposed to 35? I taught a classroom of 42 eighth graders – and my kids scored significantly higher than the other teachers, who were given brighter kids. We made do.

    We need to have a core cirriculum taught at neighborhood schools. Let the frills be paid by parents who can afford them. They can put the money in one large pot for a frill, so that scholarships can be given for those low income that can’t afford to chip in. Advanced classes at Sac City Davis campus is a good idea too. In essence, we have to budget if the school district won’t. How else are we going to make them accountable?

  345. Don Shor

    “Anonymous said…
    …. Davis maintains a lifesyle which prevents the types of business that could help support schools and other services. As a result the burden of supporting schools falls heavily on the tax payers in the form of parcel taxes. You will continue to have to pay more in taxes because of your own decisions.

    7/11/08 12:29 PM”
    I’m curious exactly what you mean by this. What types of businesses ‘help support schools’ that we don’t have here?

  346. Don Shor

    “Anonymous said…
    …. Davis maintains a lifesyle which prevents the types of business that could help support schools and other services. As a result the burden of supporting schools falls heavily on the tax payers in the form of parcel taxes. You will continue to have to pay more in taxes because of your own decisions.

    7/11/08 12:29 PM”
    I’m curious exactly what you mean by this. What types of businesses ‘help support schools’ that we don’t have here?

  347. Don Shor

    “Anonymous said…
    …. Davis maintains a lifesyle which prevents the types of business that could help support schools and other services. As a result the burden of supporting schools falls heavily on the tax payers in the form of parcel taxes. You will continue to have to pay more in taxes because of your own decisions.

    7/11/08 12:29 PM”
    I’m curious exactly what you mean by this. What types of businesses ‘help support schools’ that we don’t have here?

  348. Don Shor

    “Anonymous said…
    …. Davis maintains a lifesyle which prevents the types of business that could help support schools and other services. As a result the burden of supporting schools falls heavily on the tax payers in the form of parcel taxes. You will continue to have to pay more in taxes because of your own decisions.

    7/11/08 12:29 PM”
    I’m curious exactly what you mean by this. What types of businesses ‘help support schools’ that we don’t have here?

  349. Anonymous

    “First I’d completely dismantle Davinci, then cut all afternoon programs, specifically sports. Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin. I’d par down the art and music programs or make it self supporting through donations only.”

    Why kill those programs? Personally I think my kid got a hell of a lot more out of band and football than he did out of algebra or chemistry.

    I also happen to think there is far more value to music and athletics than there is to a lot of other core curriculum.

  350. Anonymous

    “First I’d completely dismantle Davinci, then cut all afternoon programs, specifically sports. Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin. I’d par down the art and music programs or make it self supporting through donations only.”

    Why kill those programs? Personally I think my kid got a hell of a lot more out of band and football than he did out of algebra or chemistry.

    I also happen to think there is far more value to music and athletics than there is to a lot of other core curriculum.

  351. Anonymous

    “First I’d completely dismantle Davinci, then cut all afternoon programs, specifically sports. Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin. I’d par down the art and music programs or make it self supporting through donations only.”

    Why kill those programs? Personally I think my kid got a hell of a lot more out of band and football than he did out of algebra or chemistry.

    I also happen to think there is far more value to music and athletics than there is to a lot of other core curriculum.

  352. Anonymous

    “First I’d completely dismantle Davinci, then cut all afternoon programs, specifically sports. Keep spanish and maybe french for the univ requirements but kill electives like mandarin. I’d par down the art and music programs or make it self supporting through donations only.”

    Why kill those programs? Personally I think my kid got a hell of a lot more out of band and football than he did out of algebra or chemistry.

    I also happen to think there is far more value to music and athletics than there is to a lot of other core curriculum.

  353. Anonymous

    “I could believe that. One reason is all the special classes we have in Davis. DaVinci comes to mind, “

    Why is DaVinci a special class? They teach all the core curriculum classes that DHS teaches, and they often run higher class sizes.

    Without further explanation and justification, dismantling DaVinci is a completely dumb idea.

    And while my sarcastic juices are flowing, let’s just cancel kindergarten while we’re at it. When I grew up I didn’t have kindergarten. Kindergarten is just high-priced babysitting.

  354. Anonymous

    “I could believe that. One reason is all the special classes we have in Davis. DaVinci comes to mind, “

    Why is DaVinci a special class? They teach all the core curriculum classes that DHS teaches, and they often run higher class sizes.

    Without further explanation and justification, dismantling DaVinci is a completely dumb idea.

    And while my sarcastic juices are flowing, let’s just cancel kindergarten while we’re at it. When I grew up I didn’t have kindergarten. Kindergarten is just high-priced babysitting.

  355. Anonymous

    “I could believe that. One reason is all the special classes we have in Davis. DaVinci comes to mind, “

    Why is DaVinci a special class? They teach all the core curriculum classes that DHS teaches, and they often run higher class sizes.

    Without further explanation and justification, dismantling DaVinci is a completely dumb idea.

    And while my sarcastic juices are flowing, let’s just cancel kindergarten while we’re at it. When I grew up I didn’t have kindergarten. Kindergarten is just high-priced babysitting.

  356. Anonymous

    “I could believe that. One reason is all the special classes we have in Davis. DaVinci comes to mind, “

    Why is DaVinci a special class? They teach all the core curriculum classes that DHS teaches, and they often run higher class sizes.

    Without further explanation and justification, dismantling DaVinci is a completely dumb idea.

    And while my sarcastic juices are flowing, let’s just cancel kindergarten while we’re at it. When I grew up I didn’t have kindergarten. Kindergarten is just high-priced babysitting.

  357. Anonymous

    I see the pattern here:

    If there are problems with the schools, then it’s their own damn fault. If there are no problems with the schools, then great. Leave me alone. It’s blame the victim.

  358. Anonymous

    I see the pattern here:

    If there are problems with the schools, then it’s their own damn fault. If there are no problems with the schools, then great. Leave me alone. It’s blame the victim.

  359. Anonymous

    I see the pattern here:

    If there are problems with the schools, then it’s their own damn fault. If there are no problems with the schools, then great. Leave me alone. It’s blame the victim.

  360. Anonymous

    I see the pattern here:

    If there are problems with the schools, then it’s their own damn fault. If there are no problems with the schools, then great. Leave me alone. It’s blame the victim.

  361. wdf

    If the argument is that all the VO teachers were hired back into the Davis school system, then I am having a hard time believing that $500,000 was saved by closing VO, especially since the building itself was reopened as an “educational center”. So nothing was saved by closing the building down or having staff to run it.

    Best Uses Task Force Final Report, pages 6 lists
    Principal
    2 Secretaries
    Reading teacher
    Librarian
    Library Tech
    Nurse
    Custodial services
    Maintenance

    as additional expenses of keeping an elementary school open, in addition to regular teacher salaries.

  362. wdf

    If the argument is that all the VO teachers were hired back into the Davis school system, then I am having a hard time believing that $500,000 was saved by closing VO, especially since the building itself was reopened as an “educational center”. So nothing was saved by closing the building down or having staff to run it.

    Best Uses Task Force Final Report, pages 6 lists
    Principal
    2 Secretaries
    Reading teacher
    Librarian
    Library Tech
    Nurse
    Custodial services
    Maintenance

    as additional expenses of keeping an elementary school open, in addition to regular teacher salaries.

  363. wdf

    If the argument is that all the VO teachers were hired back into the Davis school system, then I am having a hard time believing that $500,000 was saved by closing VO, especially since the building itself was reopened as an “educational center”. So nothing was saved by closing the building down or having staff to run it.

    Best Uses Task Force Final Report, pages 6 lists
    Principal
    2 Secretaries
    Reading teacher
    Librarian
    Library Tech
    Nurse
    Custodial services
    Maintenance

    as additional expenses of keeping an elementary school open, in addition to regular teacher salaries.

  364. wdf

    If the argument is that all the VO teachers were hired back into the Davis school system, then I am having a hard time believing that $500,000 was saved by closing VO, especially since the building itself was reopened as an “educational center”. So nothing was saved by closing the building down or having staff to run it.

    Best Uses Task Force Final Report, pages 6 lists
    Principal
    2 Secretaries
    Reading teacher
    Librarian
    Library Tech
    Nurse
    Custodial services
    Maintenance

    as additional expenses of keeping an elementary school open, in addition to regular teacher salaries.

  365. Oh Brother!

    Comment: “If the argument is that all the VO teachers were hired back into the Davis school system, then I am having a hard time believing that $500,000 was saved by closing VO, especially since the building itself was reopened as an “educational center”. So nothing was saved by closing the building down or having staff to run it.”
    Response: “Best Uses Task Force Final Report, pages 6 lists
    Principal
    2 Secretaries
    Reading teacher
    Librarian
    Library Tech
    Nurse
    Custodial services
    Maintenance

    as additional expenses of keeping an elementary school open, in addition to regular teacher salaries.”

    But what staff are required to keep VO open as an “educational center”? Are you telling me none at all? I don’t believe that for one minute. No custodial services? No secretaries? No maintenance?

    Comment: “Why is DaVinci a special class? They teach all the core curriculum classes that DHS teaches, and they often run higher class sizes.”

    Because we cannot afford to fund the principal’s position or whatever extra costs there are to keep this frill in place.

    Comment: “Why kill those programs? Personally I think my kid got a hell of a lot more out of band and football than he did out of algebra or chemistry.”

    This is like saying if your budget won’t pay for everything, then you will decide not to pay your electricity bill, but you will pay for your kid’s soccer program because it’s more fun. Not responsible budgeting – and your utility company will eventually turn the electricity off.

    Comment: “And while my sarcastic juices are flowing, let’s just cancel kindergarten while we’re at it. When I grew up I didn’t have kindergarten. Kindergarten is just high-priced babysitting.”

    I agree – kindergarten has to go. I didn’t attend kindergarten either, and I hold advanced degrees, so not going to kindergarten didn’t seem to hurt me much.

    Comment: “83% of the district expenditures are for salaries and benefits.”

    If the greatest proportion of expenditures are for salaries and benefits, then it would seem that is where the cuts need to be made. Make classes larger in size, but cut some teachers. Get rid of many in the top-heavy administration. Move advanced classes to Sac City Davis campus. Cut out the funding of frills that do not support graduation from high school or are needed for admission to college.

    For those that insist frills are necessary, let the public funnel private funds to support that sort of thing. If the citizens have to live within a budget, so does the School District. Mandarin Chinese and Football are not, by any stretch of the imagination, a necessity. Nor is DaVinci – we got along without it prior to its recent inception just fine.

    Comment: “They don’t earn a dime of that money, the taxpayers do. “
    Response: “What do you mean they don’t earn a dime of that money–they educate our kids”

    Are you telling me we should be greatful to the School District/Board for only taking $120 a year of our money to cover their fiscal mismanagement? That is taxpayer’s money to give, not the School District’s!

    Comment: “Also, notice how the school board chose 9AM to have their meeting about the tax. Sometime when people are at work and will not be able to scrutinize them.”

    Not to mention, even if you were there to speak up, the School Board is not listening. They didn’t even listen to their own consultant, who advised them any parcel tax over $80 won’t pass. So one has to ask oneself why would the School Board ask for an amount they know will probably not pass?

    Here is my guess. It will give them the cover they need to close Emerson. Then they will come back again in March, threaten more school closures if we don’t pony up.

    Well my comment to all of this is forget it. We won’t pass another parcel tax, bc all that will do is give an irresponsible School Board a blank check to waste money again as they have in the past. As Lovenburg said, they can never have enough. Go ahead and close Emerson, and citizens will make sure to open it back up as a charter school. Valley Oak can go charter too. The concept of charter schools is looking better and better.

    Comment: “I think it will pass. Compared to DSF asking for $500 per child enrolled per family, this is cheap.”

    Dream on! Even Davis’s unscientific poll is in agreement with the consultant’s assessment. The only thing that has a chance of passing is an $80 parcel tax.

    Comment: “If $600,000 would save Emerson from closure, don’t you think citizens would vote for it in a heartbeat?”

    Response: “That same question was poll-tested for Valley Oak (they asked whether voters would support a tax to keep the school from being closed – the number was I believe around $35) and those numbers did not get anywhere near the 2/3 majority that would be required to levy the tax. So the answer to your question may be no.”

    People didn’t really believe VO would close. Nor did its closure effect as many students as the closure of Emerson would. VO also served lower income folks, who often are not as well connected with members of the School Board or other important dignitaries.

    On the other hand, Emerson serves an entire third of the city. It is located near the wealthy enclave of Stonegate. To close it would cause excessive crowding at both junior highs and the high school. There are no way for kids to get there other than a long trek across town or have parents drive them. We also have the example of VO to know the School Board really means it when they slate a school for closure.

    If paying an additional parcel tax of $30 would keep Emerson open, don’t you think citizens would jump at that chance? If they would approve $80 as the consultant predicts, then why not a measely $30?

  366. Oh Brother!

    Comment: “If the argument is that all the VO teachers were hired back into the Davis school system, then I am having a hard time believing that $500,000 was saved by closing VO, especially since the building itself was reopened as an “educational center”. So nothing was saved by closing the building down or having staff to run it.”
    Response: “Best Uses Task Force Final Report, pages 6 lists
    Principal
    2 Secretaries
    Reading teacher
    Librarian
    Library Tech
    Nurse
    Custodial services
    Maintenance

    as additional expenses of keeping an elementary school open, in addition to regular teacher salaries.”

    But what staff are required to keep VO open as an “educational center”? Are you telling me none at all? I don’t believe that for one minute. No custodial services? No secretaries? No maintenance?

    Comment: “Why is DaVinci a special class? They teach all the core curriculum classes that DHS teaches, and they often run higher class sizes.”

    Because we cannot afford to fund the principal’s position or whatever extra costs there are to keep this frill in place.

    Comment: “Why kill those programs? Personally I think my kid got a hell of a lot more out of band and football than he did out of algebra or chemistry.”

    This is like saying if your budget won’t pay for everything, then you will decide not to pay your electricity bill, but you will pay for your kid’s soccer program because it’s more fun. Not responsible budgeting – and your utility company will eventually turn the electricity off.

    Comment: “And while my sarcastic juices are flowing, let’s just cancel kindergarten while we’re at it. When I grew up I didn’t have kindergarten. Kindergarten is just high-priced babysitting.”

    I agree – kindergarten has to go. I didn’t attend kindergarten either, and I hold advanced degrees, so not going to kindergarten didn’t seem to hurt me much.

    Comment: “83% of the district expenditures are for salaries and benefits.”

    If the greatest proportion of expenditures are for salaries and benefits, then it would seem that is where the cuts need to be made. Make classes larger in size, but cut some teachers. Get rid of many in the top-heavy administration. Move advanced classes to Sac City Davis campus. Cut out the funding of frills that do not support graduation from high school or are needed for admission to college.

    For those that insist frills are necessary, let the public funnel private funds to support that sort of thing. If the citizens have to live within a budget, so does the School District. Mandarin Chinese and Football are not, by any stretch of the imagination, a necessity. Nor is DaVinci – we got along without it prior to its recent inception just fine.

    Comment: “They don’t earn a dime of that money, the taxpayers do. “
    Response: “What do you mean they don’t earn a dime of that money–they educate our kids”

    Are you telling me we should be greatful to the School District/Board for only taking $120 a year of our money to cover their fiscal mismanagement? That is taxpayer’s money to give, not the School District’s!

    Comment: “Also, notice how the school board chose 9AM to have their meeting about the tax. Sometime when people are at work and will not be able to scrutinize them.”

    Not to mention, even if you were there to speak up, the School Board is not listening. They didn’t even listen to their own consultant, who advised them any parcel tax over $80 won’t pass. So one has to ask oneself why would the School Board ask for an amount they know will probably not pass?

    Here is my guess. It will give them the cover they need to close Emerson. Then they will come back again in March, threaten more school closures if we don’t pony up.

    Well my comment to all of this is forget it. We won’t pass another parcel tax, bc all that will do is give an irresponsible School Board a blank check to waste money again as they have in the past. As Lovenburg said, they can never have enough. Go ahead and close Emerson, and citizens will make sure to open it back up as a charter school. Valley Oak can go charter too. The concept of charter schools is looking better and better.

    Comment: “I think it will pass. Compared to DSF asking for $500 per child enrolled per family, this is cheap.”

    Dream on! Even Davis’s unscientific poll is in agreement with the consultant’s assessment. The only thing that has a chance of passing is an $80 parcel tax.

    Comment: “If $600,000 would save Emerson from closure, don’t you think citizens would vote for it in a heartbeat?”

    Response: “That same question was poll-tested for Valley Oak (they asked whether voters would support a tax to keep the school from being closed – the number was I believe around $35) and those numbers did not get anywhere near the 2/3 majority that would be required to levy the tax. So the answer to your question may be no.”

    People didn’t really believe VO would close. Nor did its closure effect as many students as the closure of Emerson would. VO also served lower income folks, who often are not as well connected with members of the School Board or other important dignitaries.

    On the other hand, Emerson serves an entire third of the city. It is located near the wealthy enclave of Stonegate. To close it would cause excessive crowding at both junior highs and the high school. There are no way for kids to get there other than a long trek across town or have parents drive them. We also have the example of VO to know the School Board really means it when they slate a school for closure.

    If paying an additional parcel tax of $30 would keep Emerson open, don’t you think citizens would jump at that chance? If they would approve $80 as the consultant predicts, then why not a measely $30?

  367. Oh Brother!

    Comment: “If the argument is that all the VO teachers were hired back into the Davis school system, then I am having a hard time believing that $500,000 was saved by closing VO, especially since the building itself was reopened as an “educational center”. So nothing was saved by closing the building down or having staff to run it.”
    Response: “Best Uses Task Force Final Report, pages 6 lists
    Principal
    2 Secretaries
    Reading teacher
    Librarian
    Library Tech
    Nurse
    Custodial services
    Maintenance

    as additional expenses of keeping an elementary school open, in addition to regular teacher salaries.”

    But what staff are required to keep VO open as an “educational center”? Are you telling me none at all? I don’t believe that for one minute. No custodial services? No secretaries? No maintenance?

    Comment: “Why is DaVinci a special class? They teach all the core curriculum classes that DHS teaches, and they often run higher class sizes.”

    Because we cannot afford to fund the principal’s position or whatever extra costs there are to keep this frill in place.

    Comment: “Why kill those programs? Personally I think my kid got a hell of a lot more out of band and football than he did out of algebra or chemistry.”

    This is like saying if your budget won’t pay for everything, then you will decide not to pay your electricity bill, but you will pay for your kid’s soccer program because it’s more fun. Not responsible budgeting – and your utility company will eventually turn the electricity off.

    Comment: “And while my sarcastic juices are flowing, let’s just cancel kindergarten while we’re at it. When I grew up I didn’t have kindergarten. Kindergarten is just high-priced babysitting.”

    I agree – kindergarten has to go. I didn’t attend kindergarten either, and I hold advanced degrees, so not going to kindergarten didn’t seem to hurt me much.

    Comment: “83% of the district expenditures are for salaries and benefits.”

    If the greatest proportion of expenditures are for salaries and benefits, then it would seem that is where the cuts need to be made. Make classes larger in size, but cut some teachers. Get rid of many in the top-heavy administration. Move advanced classes to Sac City Davis campus. Cut out the funding of frills that do not support graduation from high school or are needed for admission to college.

    For those that insist frills are necessary, let the public funnel private funds to support that sort of thing. If the citizens have to live within a budget, so does the School District. Mandarin Chinese and Football are not, by any stretch of the imagination, a necessity. Nor is DaVinci – we got along without it prior to its recent inception just fine.

    Comment: “They don’t earn a dime of that money, the taxpayers do. “
    Response: “What do you mean they don’t earn a dime of that money–they educate our kids”

    Are you telling me we should be greatful to the School District/Board for only taking $120 a year of our money to cover their fiscal mismanagement? That is taxpayer’s money to give, not the School District’s!

    Comment: “Also, notice how the school board chose 9AM to have their meeting about the tax. Sometime when people are at work and will not be able to scrutinize them.”

    Not to mention, even if you were there to speak up, the School Board is not listening. They didn’t even listen to their own consultant, who advised them any parcel tax over $80 won’t pass. So one has to ask oneself why would the School Board ask for an amount they know will probably not pass?

    Here is my guess. It will give them the cover they need to close Emerson. Then they will come back again in March, threaten more school closures if we don’t pony up.

    Well my comment to all of this is forget it. We won’t pass another parcel tax, bc all that will do is give an irresponsible School Board a blank check to waste money again as they have in the past. As Lovenburg said, they can never have enough. Go ahead and close Emerson, and citizens will make sure to open it back up as a charter school. Valley Oak can go charter too. The concept of charter schools is looking better and better.

    Comment: “I think it will pass. Compared to DSF asking for $500 per child enrolled per family, this is cheap.”

    Dream on! Even Davis’s unscientific poll is in agreement with the consultant’s assessment. The only thing that has a chance of passing is an $80 parcel tax.

    Comment: “If $600,000 would save Emerson from closure, don’t you think citizens would vote for it in a heartbeat?”

    Response: “That same question was poll-tested for Valley Oak (they asked whether voters would support a tax to keep the school from being closed – the number was I believe around $35) and those numbers did not get anywhere near the 2/3 majority that would be required to levy the tax. So the answer to your question may be no.”

    People didn’t really believe VO would close. Nor did its closure effect as many students as the closure of Emerson would. VO also served lower income folks, who often are not as well connected with members of the School Board or other important dignitaries.

    On the other hand, Emerson serves an entire third of the city. It is located near the wealthy enclave of Stonegate. To close it would cause excessive crowding at both junior highs and the high school. There are no way for kids to get there other than a long trek across town or have parents drive them. We also have the example of VO to know the School Board really means it when they slate a school for closure.

    If paying an additional parcel tax of $30 would keep Emerson open, don’t you think citizens would jump at that chance? If they would approve $80 as the consultant predicts, then why not a measely $30?

  368. Oh Brother!

    Comment: “If the argument is that all the VO teachers were hired back into the Davis school system, then I am having a hard time believing that $500,000 was saved by closing VO, especially since the building itself was reopened as an “educational center”. So nothing was saved by closing the building down or having staff to run it.”
    Response: “Best Uses Task Force Final Report, pages 6 lists
    Principal
    2 Secretaries
    Reading teacher
    Librarian
    Library Tech
    Nurse
    Custodial services
    Maintenance

    as additional expenses of keeping an elementary school open, in addition to regular teacher salaries.”

    But what staff are required to keep VO open as an “educational center”? Are you telling me none at all? I don’t believe that for one minute. No custodial services? No secretaries? No maintenance?

    Comment: “Why is DaVinci a special class? They teach all the core curriculum classes that DHS teaches, and they often run higher class sizes.”

    Because we cannot afford to fund the principal’s position or whatever extra costs there are to keep this frill in place.

    Comment: “Why kill those programs? Personally I think my kid got a hell of a lot more out of band and football than he did out of algebra or chemistry.”

    This is like saying if your budget won’t pay for everything, then you will decide not to pay your electricity bill, but you will pay for your kid’s soccer program because it’s more fun. Not responsible budgeting – and your utility company will eventually turn the electricity off.

    Comment: “And while my sarcastic juices are flowing, let’s just cancel kindergarten while we’re at it. When I grew up I didn’t have kindergarten. Kindergarten is just high-priced babysitting.”

    I agree – kindergarten has to go. I didn’t attend kindergarten either, and I hold advanced degrees, so not going to kindergarten didn’t seem to hurt me much.

    Comment: “83% of the district expenditures are for salaries and benefits.”

    If the greatest proportion of expenditures are for salaries and benefits, then it would seem that is where the cuts need to be made. Make classes larger in size, but cut some teachers. Get rid of many in the top-heavy administration. Move advanced classes to Sac City Davis campus. Cut out the funding of frills that do not support graduation from high school or are needed for admission to college.

    For those that insist frills are necessary, let the public funnel private funds to support that sort of thing. If the citizens have to live within a budget, so does the School District. Mandarin Chinese and Football are not, by any stretch of the imagination, a necessity. Nor is DaVinci – we got along without it prior to its recent inception just fine.

    Comment: “They don’t earn a dime of that money, the taxpayers do. “
    Response: “What do you mean they don’t earn a dime of that money–they educate our kids”

    Are you telling me we should be greatful to the School District/Board for only taking $120 a year of our money to cover their fiscal mismanagement? That is taxpayer’s money to give, not the School District’s!

    Comment: “Also, notice how the school board chose 9AM to have their meeting about the tax. Sometime when people are at work and will not be able to scrutinize them.”

    Not to mention, even if you were there to speak up, the School Board is not listening. They didn’t even listen to their own consultant, who advised them any parcel tax over $80 won’t pass. So one has to ask oneself why would the School Board ask for an amount they know will probably not pass?

    Here is my guess. It will give them the cover they need to close Emerson. Then they will come back again in March, threaten more school closures if we don’t pony up.

    Well my comment to all of this is forget it. We won’t pass another parcel tax, bc all that will do is give an irresponsible School Board a blank check to waste money again as they have in the past. As Lovenburg said, they can never have enough. Go ahead and close Emerson, and citizens will make sure to open it back up as a charter school. Valley Oak can go charter too. The concept of charter schools is looking better and better.

    Comment: “I think it will pass. Compared to DSF asking for $500 per child enrolled per family, this is cheap.”

    Dream on! Even Davis’s unscientific poll is in agreement with the consultant’s assessment. The only thing that has a chance of passing is an $80 parcel tax.

    Comment: “If $600,000 would save Emerson from closure, don’t you think citizens would vote for it in a heartbeat?”

    Response: “That same question was poll-tested for Valley Oak (they asked whether voters would support a tax to keep the school from being closed – the number was I believe around $35) and those numbers did not get anywhere near the 2/3 majority that would be required to levy the tax. So the answer to your question may be no.”

    People didn’t really believe VO would close. Nor did its closure effect as many students as the closure of Emerson would. VO also served lower income folks, who often are not as well connected with members of the School Board or other important dignitaries.

    On the other hand, Emerson serves an entire third of the city. It is located near the wealthy enclave of Stonegate. To close it would cause excessive crowding at both junior highs and the high school. There are no way for kids to get there other than a long trek across town or have parents drive them. We also have the example of VO to know the School Board really means it when they slate a school for closure.

    If paying an additional parcel tax of $30 would keep Emerson open, don’t you think citizens would jump at that chance? If they would approve $80 as the consultant predicts, then why not a measely $30?

  369. Doug Paul Davis

    On Emerson: The only reason that Emerson would have to close has to do with the condition of the facility. For that reason, a parcel tax cannot be the solution to that. Parcel tax money goes to the general fund not facilities. You would need to pass a facilities bond in order to assure that Emerson stayed open. That said, I suspect it will remain open, in my conversation with a board member, the geography of where the schools exist probably necessitates Emerson staying open.

  370. Doug Paul Davis

    On Emerson: The only reason that Emerson would have to close has to do with the condition of the facility. For that reason, a parcel tax cannot be the solution to that. Parcel tax money goes to the general fund not facilities. You would need to pass a facilities bond in order to assure that Emerson stayed open. That said, I suspect it will remain open, in my conversation with a board member, the geography of where the schools exist probably necessitates Emerson staying open.

  371. Doug Paul Davis

    On Emerson: The only reason that Emerson would have to close has to do with the condition of the facility. For that reason, a parcel tax cannot be the solution to that. Parcel tax money goes to the general fund not facilities. You would need to pass a facilities bond in order to assure that Emerson stayed open. That said, I suspect it will remain open, in my conversation with a board member, the geography of where the schools exist probably necessitates Emerson staying open.

  372. Doug Paul Davis

    On Emerson: The only reason that Emerson would have to close has to do with the condition of the facility. For that reason, a parcel tax cannot be the solution to that. Parcel tax money goes to the general fund not facilities. You would need to pass a facilities bond in order to assure that Emerson stayed open. That said, I suspect it will remain open, in my conversation with a board member, the geography of where the schools exist probably necessitates Emerson staying open.

  373. wdf

    Comment: “If the argument is that all the VO teachers were hired back into the Davis school system, then I am having a hard time believing that $500,000 was saved by closing VO, especially since the building itself was reopened as an “educational center”. So nothing was saved by closing the building down or having staff to run it.”
    Response: “Best Uses Task Force Final Report, pages 6 lists
    Principal
    2 Secretaries
    Reading teacher
    Librarian
    Library Tech
    Nurse
    Custodial services
    Maintenance

    as additional expenses of keeping an elementary school open, in addition to regular teacher salaries.”

    But what staff are required to keep VO open as an “educational center”? Are you telling me none at all? I don’t believe that for one minute. No custodial services? No secretaries? No maintenance?

    For what the district has proposed for next year, I don’t see anything justified for more than minimal custodial and some maintenance expenses. Everyone else who would be there is already on the payroll this year. I don’t have time to look it up right now, but I think the Bridge Program, and the teen parent center will be there, as well as the DTA office, which DTA will pay rent for. Maybe there’s another program or two. I can’t imagine that custodial expenses would equal what is required to clean up after 450-500 kids.

  374. wdf

    Comment: “If the argument is that all the VO teachers were hired back into the Davis school system, then I am having a hard time believing that $500,000 was saved by closing VO, especially since the building itself was reopened as an “educational center”. So nothing was saved by closing the building down or having staff to run it.”
    Response: “Best Uses Task Force Final Report, pages 6 lists
    Principal
    2 Secretaries
    Reading teacher
    Librarian
    Library Tech
    Nurse
    Custodial services
    Maintenance

    as additional expenses of keeping an elementary school open, in addition to regular teacher salaries.”

    But what staff are required to keep VO open as an “educational center”? Are you telling me none at all? I don’t believe that for one minute. No custodial services? No secretaries? No maintenance?

    For what the district has proposed for next year, I don’t see anything justified for more than minimal custodial and some maintenance expenses. Everyone else who would be there is already on the payroll this year. I don’t have time to look it up right now, but I think the Bridge Program, and the teen parent center will be there, as well as the DTA office, which DTA will pay rent for. Maybe there’s another program or two. I can’t imagine that custodial expenses would equal what is required to clean up after 450-500 kids.

  375. wdf

    Comment: “If the argument is that all the VO teachers were hired back into the Davis school system, then I am having a hard time believing that $500,000 was saved by closing VO, especially since the building itself was reopened as an “educational center”. So nothing was saved by closing the building down or having staff to run it.”
    Response: “Best Uses Task Force Final Report, pages 6 lists
    Principal
    2 Secretaries
    Reading teacher
    Librarian
    Library Tech
    Nurse
    Custodial services
    Maintenance

    as additional expenses of keeping an elementary school open, in addition to regular teacher salaries.”

    But what staff are required to keep VO open as an “educational center”? Are you telling me none at all? I don’t believe that for one minute. No custodial services? No secretaries? No maintenance?

    For what the district has proposed for next year, I don’t see anything justified for more than minimal custodial and some maintenance expenses. Everyone else who would be there is already on the payroll this year. I don’t have time to look it up right now, but I think the Bridge Program, and the teen parent center will be there, as well as the DTA office, which DTA will pay rent for. Maybe there’s another program or two. I can’t imagine that custodial expenses would equal what is required to clean up after 450-500 kids.

  376. wdf

    Comment: “If the argument is that all the VO teachers were hired back into the Davis school system, then I am having a hard time believing that $500,000 was saved by closing VO, especially since the building itself was reopened as an “educational center”. So nothing was saved by closing the building down or having staff to run it.”
    Response: “Best Uses Task Force Final Report, pages 6 lists
    Principal
    2 Secretaries
    Reading teacher
    Librarian
    Library Tech
    Nurse
    Custodial services
    Maintenance

    as additional expenses of keeping an elementary school open, in addition to regular teacher salaries.”

    But what staff are required to keep VO open as an “educational center”? Are you telling me none at all? I don’t believe that for one minute. No custodial services? No secretaries? No maintenance?

    For what the district has proposed for next year, I don’t see anything justified for more than minimal custodial and some maintenance expenses. Everyone else who would be there is already on the payroll this year. I don’t have time to look it up right now, but I think the Bridge Program, and the teen parent center will be there, as well as the DTA office, which DTA will pay rent for. Maybe there’s another program or two. I can’t imagine that custodial expenses would equal what is required to clean up after 450-500 kids.

  377. Anonymous

    School Boards made up of local citizens with no particular expertise or experience, elected by parent voters whose focus is almost entirely on THEIR OWN offspring is an example of direct democracy at its worst. Our School Board had the opportunity to follow the expert advice of its recently hired Superintendent(to the tune of near 1/4 million/yr.) and give the VO Charter proposal a chance to succeed. They failed miserably as leaders of our community.

  378. Anonymous

    School Boards made up of local citizens with no particular expertise or experience, elected by parent voters whose focus is almost entirely on THEIR OWN offspring is an example of direct democracy at its worst. Our School Board had the opportunity to follow the expert advice of its recently hired Superintendent(to the tune of near 1/4 million/yr.) and give the VO Charter proposal a chance to succeed. They failed miserably as leaders of our community.

  379. Anonymous

    School Boards made up of local citizens with no particular expertise or experience, elected by parent voters whose focus is almost entirely on THEIR OWN offspring is an example of direct democracy at its worst. Our School Board had the opportunity to follow the expert advice of its recently hired Superintendent(to the tune of near 1/4 million/yr.) and give the VO Charter proposal a chance to succeed. They failed miserably as leaders of our community.

  380. Anonymous

    School Boards made up of local citizens with no particular expertise or experience, elected by parent voters whose focus is almost entirely on THEIR OWN offspring is an example of direct democracy at its worst. Our School Board had the opportunity to follow the expert advice of its recently hired Superintendent(to the tune of near 1/4 million/yr.) and give the VO Charter proposal a chance to succeed. They failed miserably as leaders of our community.

  381. Doug Paul Davis

    Direct democracy is when the citizens directly vote on a policy initiative, such as the parcel tax vote. You are describing representative democracy, when citizens elect representatives who set policy.

  382. Doug Paul Davis

    Direct democracy is when the citizens directly vote on a policy initiative, such as the parcel tax vote. You are describing representative democracy, when citizens elect representatives who set policy.

  383. Doug Paul Davis

    Direct democracy is when the citizens directly vote on a policy initiative, such as the parcel tax vote. You are describing representative democracy, when citizens elect representatives who set policy.

  384. Doug Paul Davis

    Direct democracy is when the citizens directly vote on a policy initiative, such as the parcel tax vote. You are describing representative democracy, when citizens elect representatives who set policy.

  385. Anonymous

    In the case of the closure of Valley Oak, the election of the new Board members who ran on this issue and the pathetic polling decision-making process, it “smelt” more like direct rather than representative democracy.

  386. Anonymous

    In the case of the closure of Valley Oak, the election of the new Board members who ran on this issue and the pathetic polling decision-making process, it “smelt” more like direct rather than representative democracy.

  387. Anonymous

    In the case of the closure of Valley Oak, the election of the new Board members who ran on this issue and the pathetic polling decision-making process, it “smelt” more like direct rather than representative democracy.

  388. Anonymous

    In the case of the closure of Valley Oak, the election of the new Board members who ran on this issue and the pathetic polling decision-making process, it “smelt” more like direct rather than representative democracy.

  389. A Pox on School Board/District

    “On Emerson: The only reason that Emerson would have to close has to do with the condition of the facility. For that reason, a parcel tax cannot be the solution to that. Parcel tax money goes to the general fund not facilities. You would need to pass a facilities bond in order to assure that Emerson stayed open. That said, I suspect it will remain open, in my conversation with a board member, the geography of where the schools exist probably necessitates Emerson staying open.”

    This is the gambit the School Board has used over and over again – facilities money is not the same as operating expenses. However, let’s look at the argument put forth for the closure of Emerson.

    On the one hand, the School Board said if Emerson was closed, it would save $600,000 – presumably in operating expenses. Parents raised an ungodly stink. Closing Emerson was pulled off the table temporarily, but arguments for its closure have floated out yet again.

    This time the argument is that it does not come up to code – $16 million would be needed in FACILITIES MONEY. Note how the argument “evolved” from one of saving $600,000 in operating expenses to one of needing $16 million in facilities money to fix it. How convenient.

    So my question, which still has not been answered, is how much will it take in facilities money to keep Emerson open legally? From what you have heard, it looks as if it will cost nothing at all to keep Emerson open legally. Thus citizens could chip in a parcel tax of $30 per year to keep it open, without impacting operating expenses whatsoever.

    Yet that is not what the School Board is asking for – because they still plan to keep the closure of Emerson on the table, either as a bargaining chip or as a way to save money. Too much double speak by half!

    “For what the district has proposed for next year, I don’t see anything justified for more than minimal custodial and some maintenance expenses.”

    So, in other words, the savings was not $500,000! Yet again, double speak by the School Board/District.

    “Our School Board had the opportunity to follow the expert advice of its recently hired Superintendent(to the tune of near 1/4 million/yr.) and give the VO Charter proposal a chance to succeed. They failed miserably as leaders of our community.”

    Amen! One has to ask, what are they afraid of? Losing control of the money? Seems to me just what is needed.

  390. A Pox on School Board/District

    “On Emerson: The only reason that Emerson would have to close has to do with the condition of the facility. For that reason, a parcel tax cannot be the solution to that. Parcel tax money goes to the general fund not facilities. You would need to pass a facilities bond in order to assure that Emerson stayed open. That said, I suspect it will remain open, in my conversation with a board member, the geography of where the schools exist probably necessitates Emerson staying open.”

    This is the gambit the School Board has used over and over again – facilities money is not the same as operating expenses. However, let’s look at the argument put forth for the closure of Emerson.

    On the one hand, the School Board said if Emerson was closed, it would save $600,000 – presumably in operating expenses. Parents raised an ungodly stink. Closing Emerson was pulled off the table temporarily, but arguments for its closure have floated out yet again.

    This time the argument is that it does not come up to code – $16 million would be needed in FACILITIES MONEY. Note how the argument “evolved” from one of saving $600,000 in operating expenses to one of needing $16 million in facilities money to fix it. How convenient.

    So my question, which still has not been answered, is how much will it take in facilities money to keep Emerson open legally? From what you have heard, it looks as if it will cost nothing at all to keep Emerson open legally. Thus citizens could chip in a parcel tax of $30 per year to keep it open, without impacting operating expenses whatsoever.

    Yet that is not what the School Board is asking for – because they still plan to keep the closure of Emerson on the table, either as a bargaining chip or as a way to save money. Too much double speak by half!

    “For what the district has proposed for next year, I don’t see anything justified for more than minimal custodial and some maintenance expenses.”

    So, in other words, the savings was not $500,000! Yet again, double speak by the School Board/District.

    “Our School Board had the opportunity to follow the expert advice of its recently hired Superintendent(to the tune of near 1/4 million/yr.) and give the VO Charter proposal a chance to succeed. They failed miserably as leaders of our community.”

    Amen! One has to ask, what are they afraid of? Losing control of the money? Seems to me just what is needed.

  391. A Pox on School Board/District

    “On Emerson: The only reason that Emerson would have to close has to do with the condition of the facility. For that reason, a parcel tax cannot be the solution to that. Parcel tax money goes to the general fund not facilities. You would need to pass a facilities bond in order to assure that Emerson stayed open. That said, I suspect it will remain open, in my conversation with a board member, the geography of where the schools exist probably necessitates Emerson staying open.”

    This is the gambit the School Board has used over and over again – facilities money is not the same as operating expenses. However, let’s look at the argument put forth for the closure of Emerson.

    On the one hand, the School Board said if Emerson was closed, it would save $600,000 – presumably in operating expenses. Parents raised an ungodly stink. Closing Emerson was pulled off the table temporarily, but arguments for its closure have floated out yet again.

    This time the argument is that it does not come up to code – $16 million would be needed in FACILITIES MONEY. Note how the argument “evolved” from one of saving $600,000 in operating expenses to one of needing $16 million in facilities money to fix it. How convenient.

    So my question, which still has not been answered, is how much will it take in facilities money to keep Emerson open legally? From what you have heard, it looks as if it will cost nothing at all to keep Emerson open legally. Thus citizens could chip in a parcel tax of $30 per year to keep it open, without impacting operating expenses whatsoever.

    Yet that is not what the School Board is asking for – because they still plan to keep the closure of Emerson on the table, either as a bargaining chip or as a way to save money. Too much double speak by half!

    “For what the district has proposed for next year, I don’t see anything justified for more than minimal custodial and some maintenance expenses.”

    So, in other words, the savings was not $500,000! Yet again, double speak by the School Board/District.

    “Our School Board had the opportunity to follow the expert advice of its recently hired Superintendent(to the tune of near 1/4 million/yr.) and give the VO Charter proposal a chance to succeed. They failed miserably as leaders of our community.”

    Amen! One has to ask, what are they afraid of? Losing control of the money? Seems to me just what is needed.

  392. A Pox on School Board/District

    “On Emerson: The only reason that Emerson would have to close has to do with the condition of the facility. For that reason, a parcel tax cannot be the solution to that. Parcel tax money goes to the general fund not facilities. You would need to pass a facilities bond in order to assure that Emerson stayed open. That said, I suspect it will remain open, in my conversation with a board member, the geography of where the schools exist probably necessitates Emerson staying open.”

    This is the gambit the School Board has used over and over again – facilities money is not the same as operating expenses. However, let’s look at the argument put forth for the closure of Emerson.

    On the one hand, the School Board said if Emerson was closed, it would save $600,000 – presumably in operating expenses. Parents raised an ungodly stink. Closing Emerson was pulled off the table temporarily, but arguments for its closure have floated out yet again.

    This time the argument is that it does not come up to code – $16 million would be needed in FACILITIES MONEY. Note how the argument “evolved” from one of saving $600,000 in operating expenses to one of needing $16 million in facilities money to fix it. How convenient.

    So my question, which still has not been answered, is how much will it take in facilities money to keep Emerson open legally? From what you have heard, it looks as if it will cost nothing at all to keep Emerson open legally. Thus citizens could chip in a parcel tax of $30 per year to keep it open, without impacting operating expenses whatsoever.

    Yet that is not what the School Board is asking for – because they still plan to keep the closure of Emerson on the table, either as a bargaining chip or as a way to save money. Too much double speak by half!

    “For what the district has proposed for next year, I don’t see anything justified for more than minimal custodial and some maintenance expenses.”

    So, in other words, the savings was not $500,000! Yet again, double speak by the School Board/District.

    “Our School Board had the opportunity to follow the expert advice of its recently hired Superintendent(to the tune of near 1/4 million/yr.) and give the VO Charter proposal a chance to succeed. They failed miserably as leaders of our community.”

    Amen! One has to ask, what are they afraid of? Losing control of the money? Seems to me just what is needed.

  393. Doug Paul Davis

    The problem with your argument is that you are not recognizing why the explanation shifted. The initial view of Emerson was in light of trying to get the budget balanced. They looked at $600,000 in operating expenses as a means to preserve the programs in the district while cutting spending.

    However, they took that option off the table during the course of public outcry. So now, the operating expense is not the issue because they budget will be balanced through the parcel tax.

    If you look beneath the initial reason for closing Emerson, it was not just a random occurrence, they knew and mentioned at the time, concerns about the cost of repairs. That was part of the reason why it was a good idea to close Emerson.

    So the debate really hasn’t shifted, the initial priority was budget but there were other concerns that went along with it.

    I still don’t think they will close Emerson and it comes down to the arguments used against closing Emerson. The proximity of the other two Junior Highs to each other, leaves Emerson as the only option that is even reasonably close for students in West Davis. That is a real concern for the board as well and probably the reason they will look for ways to finance repairs for Emerson rather than close it.

    However they need to get the general fund in order first. So really, I think if the Parcel Tax does not pass, Emerson is gone for sure. If it does pass, I think it stays with about 75% confidence. So if Emerson is really your big concern, you need to support the parcel tax. But that’s just my opinion and my read on things based on conversations with school board members.

  394. Doug Paul Davis

    The problem with your argument is that you are not recognizing why the explanation shifted. The initial view of Emerson was in light of trying to get the budget balanced. They looked at $600,000 in operating expenses as a means to preserve the programs in the district while cutting spending.

    However, they took that option off the table during the course of public outcry. So now, the operating expense is not the issue because they budget will be balanced through the parcel tax.

    If you look beneath the initial reason for closing Emerson, it was not just a random occurrence, they knew and mentioned at the time, concerns about the cost of repairs. That was part of the reason why it was a good idea to close Emerson.

    So the debate really hasn’t shifted, the initial priority was budget but there were other concerns that went along with it.

    I still don’t think they will close Emerson and it comes down to the arguments used against closing Emerson. The proximity of the other two Junior Highs to each other, leaves Emerson as the only option that is even reasonably close for students in West Davis. That is a real concern for the board as well and probably the reason they will look for ways to finance repairs for Emerson rather than close it.

    However they need to get the general fund in order first. So really, I think if the Parcel Tax does not pass, Emerson is gone for sure. If it does pass, I think it stays with about 75% confidence. So if Emerson is really your big concern, you need to support the parcel tax. But that’s just my opinion and my read on things based on conversations with school board members.

  395. Doug Paul Davis

    The problem with your argument is that you are not recognizing why the explanation shifted. The initial view of Emerson was in light of trying to get the budget balanced. They looked at $600,000 in operating expenses as a means to preserve the programs in the district while cutting spending.

    However, they took that option off the table during the course of public outcry. So now, the operating expense is not the issue because they budget will be balanced through the parcel tax.

    If you look beneath the initial reason for closing Emerson, it was not just a random occurrence, they knew and mentioned at the time, concerns about the cost of repairs. That was part of the reason why it was a good idea to close Emerson.

    So the debate really hasn’t shifted, the initial priority was budget but there were other concerns that went along with it.

    I still don’t think they will close Emerson and it comes down to the arguments used against closing Emerson. The proximity of the other two Junior Highs to each other, leaves Emerson as the only option that is even reasonably close for students in West Davis. That is a real concern for the board as well and probably the reason they will look for ways to finance repairs for Emerson rather than close it.

    However they need to get the general fund in order first. So really, I think if the Parcel Tax does not pass, Emerson is gone for sure. If it does pass, I think it stays with about 75% confidence. So if Emerson is really your big concern, you need to support the parcel tax. But that’s just my opinion and my read on things based on conversations with school board members.

  396. Doug Paul Davis

    The problem with your argument is that you are not recognizing why the explanation shifted. The initial view of Emerson was in light of trying to get the budget balanced. They looked at $600,000 in operating expenses as a means to preserve the programs in the district while cutting spending.

    However, they took that option off the table during the course of public outcry. So now, the operating expense is not the issue because they budget will be balanced through the parcel tax.

    If you look beneath the initial reason for closing Emerson, it was not just a random occurrence, they knew and mentioned at the time, concerns about the cost of repairs. That was part of the reason why it was a good idea to close Emerson.

    So the debate really hasn’t shifted, the initial priority was budget but there were other concerns that went along with it.

    I still don’t think they will close Emerson and it comes down to the arguments used against closing Emerson. The proximity of the other two Junior Highs to each other, leaves Emerson as the only option that is even reasonably close for students in West Davis. That is a real concern for the board as well and probably the reason they will look for ways to finance repairs for Emerson rather than close it.

    However they need to get the general fund in order first. So really, I think if the Parcel Tax does not pass, Emerson is gone for sure. If it does pass, I think it stays with about 75% confidence. So if Emerson is really your big concern, you need to support the parcel tax. But that’s just my opinion and my read on things based on conversations with school board members.

  397. Anonymous

    “People didn’t really believe VO would close.”

    What!?!?! What did you think was going on, then? or what were people thinking was going on? This is like coming back to the classic discussion, “when does no mean no, or when does it mean yes?”

    There has been a serious structural deficit in the budget that has been in play for a few years now. Are you going to say that people don’t really believe that, too?

    Are you expecting the district staff and school board to stand up one day and say, “just kidding!!!”?

    You seem to be an intelligent person, but that is the most puzzling and bizarre statement you’ve offered.

  398. Anonymous

    “People didn’t really believe VO would close.”

    What!?!?! What did you think was going on, then? or what were people thinking was going on? This is like coming back to the classic discussion, “when does no mean no, or when does it mean yes?”

    There has been a serious structural deficit in the budget that has been in play for a few years now. Are you going to say that people don’t really believe that, too?

    Are you expecting the district staff and school board to stand up one day and say, “just kidding!!!”?

    You seem to be an intelligent person, but that is the most puzzling and bizarre statement you’ve offered.

  399. Anonymous

    “People didn’t really believe VO would close.”

    What!?!?! What did you think was going on, then? or what were people thinking was going on? This is like coming back to the classic discussion, “when does no mean no, or when does it mean yes?”

    There has been a serious structural deficit in the budget that has been in play for a few years now. Are you going to say that people don’t really believe that, too?

    Are you expecting the district staff and school board to stand up one day and say, “just kidding!!!”?

    You seem to be an intelligent person, but that is the most puzzling and bizarre statement you’ve offered.

  400. Anonymous

    “People didn’t really believe VO would close.”

    What!?!?! What did you think was going on, then? or what were people thinking was going on? This is like coming back to the classic discussion, “when does no mean no, or when does it mean yes?”

    There has been a serious structural deficit in the budget that has been in play for a few years now. Are you going to say that people don’t really believe that, too?

    Are you expecting the district staff and school board to stand up one day and say, “just kidding!!!”?

    You seem to be an intelligent person, but that is the most puzzling and bizarre statement you’ve offered.

  401. Anonymous

    Comment: “Why kill those programs? Personally I think my kid got a hell of a lot more out of band and football than he did out of algebra or chemistry.”

    This is like saying if your budget won’t pay for everything, then you will decide not to pay your electricity bill, but you will pay for your kid’s soccer program because it’s more fun. Not responsible budgeting – and your utility company will eventually turn the electricity off.

    Cute analogy, but your point misses a very important values judgement.

    A lot of adults with little personal experience with school music or athletics likely imagine that the only possible value of those programs is in their content — being able to play music or sports. Personally I won’t be that disappointed if my kids abandoned their music studies or sports after graduation.

    To me the real value is in *how* those activities are done rather than in their content. Team sports and performing arts are collaborative, cooperative, performance-based activities. They depend on the discipline of regular (daily) practice to improve the final performance before a broad audience. They depend on developing and projecting a disciplined, confident attitude. Through their collaboration, cooperation, teamwork, and practice, students develop social relationships and respect for each other. Through their performance, they learn to represent their school in public and to receive public recognition for it. Some learn leadership roles in these activities.

    Where else in school will my kids get these values and experiences? I don’t show up to school to watch my kids take a test. The Enterprise is not going to announce that a history project is due next Tuesday, but they will announce when is the next DHS basketball game, jazz band concert, or school play. They will likelier write about the successes in music or sports than for good math or chemistry grades.

    Outside of math classes, I have never used the quadratic equation. I acknowledge that I have found some basic math skills to be useful in my career and daily life, but that is only a fraction of what was taught. I am comfortable arguing that most kids will not need nearly as much math as we teach them, and that their overall experience would be much improved if we raised the importance of athletics and performing arts in the curriculum.

    What do you think would be more widely appreciated job skills? The ability to do math well, or the ability to work in a collaborative, performance-based environment?

    A quick reply to my argument at this moment would be that if I want my kids to have these experiences, then I should damn well pay for it myself.

    My response is that then it becomes an activity that is private and has nothing to do with school. The fact that the current programs are connected with the public schools gives many students a positive reason to appreciate school. Students who participate in athletics or the performing arts rarely lack having friends in school. It also allows for students from varied backgrounds, ethnicities, and economic levels to participate and socialize in a positive environment.

    When kids feel socially and emotionally connected in that way to their schools, they are likelier to get more interested in English, math, and science. These programs in the school are “good gangs” that offer structured creativity. Without these programs, many of those kids might still gravitate to gangs, but they won’t be the ones we want.

    So to turn your analogy around, paying for athletics and performing arts is like paying for the electric bill. When there is group discipline and collaboration present, then other learning is more effective, and kids will more readily put up with all the math, English, science, language, and history that we throw at them. And that’s why I say that my kids got a lot more out of music and sports than they have out of the traditionally revered core subjects.

  402. Anonymous

    Comment: “Why kill those programs? Personally I think my kid got a hell of a lot more out of band and football than he did out of algebra or chemistry.”

    This is like saying if your budget won’t pay for everything, then you will decide not to pay your electricity bill, but you will pay for your kid’s soccer program because it’s more fun. Not responsible budgeting – and your utility company will eventually turn the electricity off.

    Cute analogy, but your point misses a very important values judgement.

    A lot of adults with little personal experience with school music or athletics likely imagine that the only possible value of those programs is in their content — being able to play music or sports. Personally I won’t be that disappointed if my kids abandoned their music studies or sports after graduation.

    To me the real value is in *how* those activities are done rather than in their content. Team sports and performing arts are collaborative, cooperative, performance-based activities. They depend on the discipline of regular (daily) practice to improve the final performance before a broad audience. They depend on developing and projecting a disciplined, confident attitude. Through their collaboration, cooperation, teamwork, and practice, students develop social relationships and respect for each other. Through their performance, they learn to represent their school in public and to receive public recognition for it. Some learn leadership roles in these activities.

    Where else in school will my kids get these values and experiences? I don’t show up to school to watch my kids take a test. The Enterprise is not going to announce that a history project is due next Tuesday, but they will announce when is the next DHS basketball game, jazz band concert, or school play. They will likelier write about the successes in music or sports than for good math or chemistry grades.

    Outside of math classes, I have never used the quadratic equation. I acknowledge that I have found some basic math skills to be useful in my career and daily life, but that is only a fraction of what was taught. I am comfortable arguing that most kids will not need nearly as much math as we teach them, and that their overall experience would be much improved if we raised the importance of athletics and performing arts in the curriculum.

    What do you think would be more widely appreciated job skills? The ability to do math well, or the ability to work in a collaborative, performance-based environment?

    A quick reply to my argument at this moment would be that if I want my kids to have these experiences, then I should damn well pay for it myself.

    My response is that then it becomes an activity that is private and has nothing to do with school. The fact that the current programs are connected with the public schools gives many students a positive reason to appreciate school. Students who participate in athletics or the performing arts rarely lack having friends in school. It also allows for students from varied backgrounds, ethnicities, and economic levels to participate and socialize in a positive environment.

    When kids feel socially and emotionally connected in that way to their schools, they are likelier to get more interested in English, math, and science. These programs in the school are “good gangs” that offer structured creativity. Without these programs, many of those kids might still gravitate to gangs, but they won’t be the ones we want.

    So to turn your analogy around, paying for athletics and performing arts is like paying for the electric bill. When there is group discipline and collaboration present, then other learning is more effective, and kids will more readily put up with all the math, English, science, language, and history that we throw at them. And that’s why I say that my kids got a lot more out of music and sports than they have out of the traditionally revered core subjects.

  403. Anonymous

    Comment: “Why kill those programs? Personally I think my kid got a hell of a lot more out of band and football than he did out of algebra or chemistry.”

    This is like saying if your budget won’t pay for everything, then you will decide not to pay your electricity bill, but you will pay for your kid’s soccer program because it’s more fun. Not responsible budgeting – and your utility company will eventually turn the electricity off.

    Cute analogy, but your point misses a very important values judgement.

    A lot of adults with little personal experience with school music or athletics likely imagine that the only possible value of those programs is in their content — being able to play music or sports. Personally I won’t be that disappointed if my kids abandoned their music studies or sports after graduation.

    To me the real value is in *how* those activities are done rather than in their content. Team sports and performing arts are collaborative, cooperative, performance-based activities. They depend on the discipline of regular (daily) practice to improve the final performance before a broad audience. They depend on developing and projecting a disciplined, confident attitude. Through their collaboration, cooperation, teamwork, and practice, students develop social relationships and respect for each other. Through their performance, they learn to represent their school in public and to receive public recognition for it. Some learn leadership roles in these activities.

    Where else in school will my kids get these values and experiences? I don’t show up to school to watch my kids take a test. The Enterprise is not going to announce that a history project is due next Tuesday, but they will announce when is the next DHS basketball game, jazz band concert, or school play. They will likelier write about the successes in music or sports than for good math or chemistry grades.

    Outside of math classes, I have never used the quadratic equation. I acknowledge that I have found some basic math skills to be useful in my career and daily life, but that is only a fraction of what was taught. I am comfortable arguing that most kids will not need nearly as much math as we teach them, and that their overall experience would be much improved if we raised the importance of athletics and performing arts in the curriculum.

    What do you think would be more widely appreciated job skills? The ability to do math well, or the ability to work in a collaborative, performance-based environment?

    A quick reply to my argument at this moment would be that if I want my kids to have these experiences, then I should damn well pay for it myself.

    My response is that then it becomes an activity that is private and has nothing to do with school. The fact that the current programs are connected with the public schools gives many students a positive reason to appreciate school. Students who participate in athletics or the performing arts rarely lack having friends in school. It also allows for students from varied backgrounds, ethnicities, and economic levels to participate and socialize in a positive environment.

    When kids feel socially and emotionally connected in that way to their schools, they are likelier to get more interested in English, math, and science. These programs in the school are “good gangs” that offer structured creativity. Without these programs, many of those kids might still gravitate to gangs, but they won’t be the ones we want.

    So to turn your analogy around, paying for athletics and performing arts is like paying for the electric bill. When there is group discipline and collaboration present, then other learning is more effective, and kids will more readily put up with all the math, English, science, language, and history that we throw at them. And that’s why I say that my kids got a lot more out of music and sports than they have out of the traditionally revered core subjects.

  404. Anonymous

    Comment: “Why kill those programs? Personally I think my kid got a hell of a lot more out of band and football than he did out of algebra or chemistry.”

    This is like saying if your budget won’t pay for everything, then you will decide not to pay your electricity bill, but you will pay for your kid’s soccer program because it’s more fun. Not responsible budgeting – and your utility company will eventually turn the electricity off.

    Cute analogy, but your point misses a very important values judgement.

    A lot of adults with little personal experience with school music or athletics likely imagine that the only possible value of those programs is in their content — being able to play music or sports. Personally I won’t be that disappointed if my kids abandoned their music studies or sports after graduation.

    To me the real value is in *how* those activities are done rather than in their content. Team sports and performing arts are collaborative, cooperative, performance-based activities. They depend on the discipline of regular (daily) practice to improve the final performance before a broad audience. They depend on developing and projecting a disciplined, confident attitude. Through their collaboration, cooperation, teamwork, and practice, students develop social relationships and respect for each other. Through their performance, they learn to represent their school in public and to receive public recognition for it. Some learn leadership roles in these activities.

    Where else in school will my kids get these values and experiences? I don’t show up to school to watch my kids take a test. The Enterprise is not going to announce that a history project is due next Tuesday, but they will announce when is the next DHS basketball game, jazz band concert, or school play. They will likelier write about the successes in music or sports than for good math or chemistry grades.

    Outside of math classes, I have never used the quadratic equation. I acknowledge that I have found some basic math skills to be useful in my career and daily life, but that is only a fraction of what was taught. I am comfortable arguing that most kids will not need nearly as much math as we teach them, and that their overall experience would be much improved if we raised the importance of athletics and performing arts in the curriculum.

    What do you think would be more widely appreciated job skills? The ability to do math well, or the ability to work in a collaborative, performance-based environment?

    A quick reply to my argument at this moment would be that if I want my kids to have these experiences, then I should damn well pay for it myself.

    My response is that then it becomes an activity that is private and has nothing to do with school. The fact that the current programs are connected with the public schools gives many students a positive reason to appreciate school. Students who participate in athletics or the performing arts rarely lack having friends in school. It also allows for students from varied backgrounds, ethnicities, and economic levels to participate and socialize in a positive environment.

    When kids feel socially and emotionally connected in that way to their schools, they are likelier to get more interested in English, math, and science. These programs in the school are “good gangs” that offer structured creativity. Without these programs, many of those kids might still gravitate to gangs, but they won’t be the ones we want.

    So to turn your analogy around, paying for athletics and performing arts is like paying for the electric bill. When there is group discipline and collaboration present, then other learning is more effective, and kids will more readily put up with all the math, English, science, language, and history that we throw at them. And that’s why I say that my kids got a lot more out of music and sports than they have out of the traditionally revered core subjects.

  405. Anonymous

    “Comment: “And while my sarcastic juices are flowing, let’s just cancel kindergarten while we’re at it. When I grew up I didn’t have kindergarten. Kindergarten is just high-priced babysitting.”

    I agree – kindergarten has to go. I didn’t attend kindergarten either, and I hold advanced degrees, so not going to kindergarten didn’t seem to hurt me much.”

    You are one data point. It seems that the general consensus is that kindergarten is basically a beneficial program. The Elk Grove school district proposed increasing the kindergarten class size from 20 to 30+ (I think only grades 1-3 have a state mandate of a cap around 20) this past spring to cut on costs and inspired an uproar almost as great as we have seen in Davis in the past year.

    The quickest way to lose a popularity contest in Davis would probably be to propose cutting kindergarten from the schools.

    Anyway, isn’t kindergarten required by the state?

  406. Anonymous

    “Comment: “And while my sarcastic juices are flowing, let’s just cancel kindergarten while we’re at it. When I grew up I didn’t have kindergarten. Kindergarten is just high-priced babysitting.”

    I agree – kindergarten has to go. I didn’t attend kindergarten either, and I hold advanced degrees, so not going to kindergarten didn’t seem to hurt me much.”

    You are one data point. It seems that the general consensus is that kindergarten is basically a beneficial program. The Elk Grove school district proposed increasing the kindergarten class size from 20 to 30+ (I think only grades 1-3 have a state mandate of a cap around 20) this past spring to cut on costs and inspired an uproar almost as great as we have seen in Davis in the past year.

    The quickest way to lose a popularity contest in Davis would probably be to propose cutting kindergarten from the schools.

    Anyway, isn’t kindergarten required by the state?

  407. Anonymous

    “Comment: “And while my sarcastic juices are flowing, let’s just cancel kindergarten while we’re at it. When I grew up I didn’t have kindergarten. Kindergarten is just high-priced babysitting.”

    I agree – kindergarten has to go. I didn’t attend kindergarten either, and I hold advanced degrees, so not going to kindergarten didn’t seem to hurt me much.”

    You are one data point. It seems that the general consensus is that kindergarten is basically a beneficial program. The Elk Grove school district proposed increasing the kindergarten class size from 20 to 30+ (I think only grades 1-3 have a state mandate of a cap around 20) this past spring to cut on costs and inspired an uproar almost as great as we have seen in Davis in the past year.

    The quickest way to lose a popularity contest in Davis would probably be to propose cutting kindergarten from the schools.

    Anyway, isn’t kindergarten required by the state?

  408. Anonymous

    “Comment: “And while my sarcastic juices are flowing, let’s just cancel kindergarten while we’re at it. When I grew up I didn’t have kindergarten. Kindergarten is just high-priced babysitting.”

    I agree – kindergarten has to go. I didn’t attend kindergarten either, and I hold advanced degrees, so not going to kindergarten didn’t seem to hurt me much.”

    You are one data point. It seems that the general consensus is that kindergarten is basically a beneficial program. The Elk Grove school district proposed increasing the kindergarten class size from 20 to 30+ (I think only grades 1-3 have a state mandate of a cap around 20) this past spring to cut on costs and inspired an uproar almost as great as we have seen in Davis in the past year.

    The quickest way to lose a popularity contest in Davis would probably be to propose cutting kindergarten from the schools.

    Anyway, isn’t kindergarten required by the state?

  409. Ron Glick

    To whoever posted the comment on cutting psychologists. Fewer psychologists means more teen suicide. Don’t think it can happen here, it already has on occasion. How many have been prevented we will never know.

  410. Ron Glick

    To whoever posted the comment on cutting psychologists. Fewer psychologists means more teen suicide. Don’t think it can happen here, it already has on occasion. How many have been prevented we will never know.

  411. Ron Glick

    To whoever posted the comment on cutting psychologists. Fewer psychologists means more teen suicide. Don’t think it can happen here, it already has on occasion. How many have been prevented we will never know.

  412. Ron Glick

    To whoever posted the comment on cutting psychologists. Fewer psychologists means more teen suicide. Don’t think it can happen here, it already has on occasion. How many have been prevented we will never know.

  413. OhMyGosh!

    “However they need to get the general fund in order first. So really, I think if the Parcel Tax does not pass, Emerson is gone for sure. If it does pass, I think it stays with about 75% confidence.”

    But I thought you said the issues of operating expenses and facilities expenses were seperate, one having nothing to do with the other? Let’s face it, we all know Emerson can survive a while with no upgrades from a legal standpoint. So all the noise about closing Emerson is either because the School Board has already decided to do so, or they want to keep the threat of its closing to hold over the taxpayers heads to convince them to pass the parcel tax. Either way, it is intellectually dishonest.

    “The quickest way to lose a popularity contest in Davis would probably be to propose cutting kindergarten from the schools.”

    I’ll take eliminating kindergarten over closing an entire Junior High.

    “So to turn your analogy around, paying for athletics and performing arts is like paying for the electric bill. When there is group discipline and collaboration present, then other learning is more effective, and kids will more readily put up with all the math, English, science, language, and history that we throw at them. And that’s why I say that my kids got a lot more out of music and sports than they have out of the traditionally revered core subjects.”

    Your arguments might hold water if the colleges agreed with you. But last time I looked football was not a college requirement. When times are lean, you pare down frills – which in this case means all classes not required to graduate from high school or to go to college. Football is not required for either one, and neither is Mandarin Chinese. There are other ways to fund these programs – WHICH ARE FRILLS BY GOV’T STANDARDS.

  414. OhMyGosh!

    “However they need to get the general fund in order first. So really, I think if the Parcel Tax does not pass, Emerson is gone for sure. If it does pass, I think it stays with about 75% confidence.”

    But I thought you said the issues of operating expenses and facilities expenses were seperate, one having nothing to do with the other? Let’s face it, we all know Emerson can survive a while with no upgrades from a legal standpoint. So all the noise about closing Emerson is either because the School Board has already decided to do so, or they want to keep the threat of its closing to hold over the taxpayers heads to convince them to pass the parcel tax. Either way, it is intellectually dishonest.

    “The quickest way to lose a popularity contest in Davis would probably be to propose cutting kindergarten from the schools.”

    I’ll take eliminating kindergarten over closing an entire Junior High.

    “So to turn your analogy around, paying for athletics and performing arts is like paying for the electric bill. When there is group discipline and collaboration present, then other learning is more effective, and kids will more readily put up with all the math, English, science, language, and history that we throw at them. And that’s why I say that my kids got a lot more out of music and sports than they have out of the traditionally revered core subjects.”

    Your arguments might hold water if the colleges agreed with you. But last time I looked football was not a college requirement. When times are lean, you pare down frills – which in this case means all classes not required to graduate from high school or to go to college. Football is not required for either one, and neither is Mandarin Chinese. There are other ways to fund these programs – WHICH ARE FRILLS BY GOV’T STANDARD