Former Davis Police Chief Finds New Department Subject of Federal Class Action Lawsuit

Police Allegedly Targeting African-American Tenants in Antioch

According to a lawsuit filed by Antioch Community Members and four Bay Area non-profit civil rights organizations, the City of Antioch and its police department are engaged in a concerted campaign of intimidation, harassment and discrimination against citizens, specifically African-American residents, who receive federally funded Section 8 housing rent assistance.

This is the apparent culmination of a long and controversial dispute in Antioch between longer term residents and those who have moved their families to Antioch in search of more affordable housing.

The city of Antioch rejected the lawsuit’s claims, arguing that

“any objective review of our city’s policing efforts will reveal that these efforts are focused exclusively on criminal and/or dangerous behavior.”

However, according to Brad Seligman of the Impact Fund, one of the four groups to file the lawsuit on behalf of community members in Antioch:

“There is no question that the City and its police department are targeting Section 8 families, particularly African American recipients… The Police have a deliberate policy of coercion, intimidation and threats that target these Section 8 families and their landlords. The City’s goal is to force these families to move out of town.”

According to a release from the ACLU:

Plaintiff Alyce Payne moved to Antioch with her children to show her family they could “make it” outside of Oakland and so that her children could attend public schools there. But after her landlord received several letters from the police department, her tenancy was terminated. Ms. Payne relocated her family out of the City.

“Everyone should have the right to live in peace in the community they choose,” said Payne, who testified before the Antioch City Council about the discrimination she encountered from police officers. “We all want to live in a place where our families and our rights are respected.”

The suit alleges among other things that the Antioch Police Deparment:

– Established a special unit in 2006, the Community Action Team (CAT) for the purpose of targeting Section 8 residents, and the unit has directed the majority of its activities at African American families.

– Frequently searches the homes of African American families in the Section 8 program (or those erroneously believed to participate in the program) without their consent and without a warrant in an attempt to gather evidence to be used against Section 8 participants.

– Engages in a pattern of informing neighbors of African-American Section 8 households that the household is receiving Section 8 housing assistance and suggesting that neighbors file nuisance or disturbance reports against the Section 8 household.

– Threatens landlords with letters and visits by suggesting that landlords will be held liable for the activities of Section 8 tenants, and police officers actively encourage landlords to evict Section 8 tenants.

– Attempts to pressure the local Housing Authority in charge of the Section 8 program to terminate the voucher benefits of tenants whom the police department has targeted. Over 70% of these attempts have been directed at African Americans. A majority of these complaints were not sustained by the Housing Authority.

According to the complaint filed, in July of 2006, the City and the Antioch Police Department created a unit called the “Community Action Team” or “CAT” within the department. The CAT has disproportionately focused on Section 8 voucher participants, particularly on those residing in the more affluent neighborhoods of Antioch. “The city and APD [Antioch Police Department] have specifically targeted African-Americans they believe hold Section 8 vouchers.”

During this time, former Davis Police Chief Jim Hyde had become Chief of Police for the City of Antioch. While these processes were underway, he was clearly in the position to facilitate the program, and in addition “he is responsible for the administration of APD and the training and supervision of its officers.” Furthermore, “Defendant City, APD and Police Chief Hyde are, and at all times material to this complaint were, responsible for the employment, training, supervision, and discipline” of three named officers.

Former Davis Police Chief Jim Hyde remains the subject of another federal lawsuit, this one stemming from the 2005 arrest of then-16 year old Halema Buzayan stemming from a disputed hit-and-run accident in a Safeway parking lot and allegations of unlawful arrest, poor police procedures, and violations of Miranda Rights. A judge in April of 2006 dismissed the charges against Ms. Buzayan. The Buzayan federal lawsuit is moving slowly through the court process, having survived efforts from multiple defendants to drop the complaint.

When Police Chief Jim Hyde resigned from the city of Davis, the city was rife with turmoil and complaints against the police department. The Buzayan case was the most publicized and notable. However, in February of 2006, a large number of African-American students and faculty, came before the Davis City Council to complain about racial profiling. In May of the same year, several hundred mostly African-American students marched from the Memorial Union on campus to the Davis Police Department.

While it was the efforts of the Human Relations Commission and my wife Cecilia Escamilla-Greenwald, in pushing for police oversight and reform, that earned widespread media attention and criticism by many suggesting they had gone too far in their demands, it was the anger of these separate groups that contributed to an overall sense that the police department under Jim Hyde’s leadership was under siege.

In June, following the 2006 elections, Jim Hyde abruptly resigned from his position at the Davis Police Department to take the same position for more pay in the City of Antioch.

As he left, he threw more fuel on the fire, blaming my wife, Cecilia Escamilla-Greenwald, and the HRC.

“In my 27 years of government service, 10 years of clinical psychology and 16 years of working with nonprofit organizations, the HRC is the most dysfunctional and incestuous group I have ever witnessed. I hope that (the) City Council will correct this community problem.”

The Davis City Council would act quickly before newly elected Councilmember Lamar Heystek, a strong ally of the HRC and supporter of reform, could be seated. On June 26, 2006, the Davis City Council voted by a 4-1 margin to disband the Human Relations Commission.

To be very honest, this blog would likely not exist had it not been for the events in the Spring of 2006 and the actions by Chief Jim Hyde that led the HRC being disbanded.

Even two years later on the campaign trail, I ran into a number of individuals who still hold anger for the fact that Chief Jim Hyde was perceived to have been run off by Cecilia and the HRC.

And yet at the same time, it seems to me that Chief Jim Hyde was a huge precipitator of both the underlying problems in the Davis Police Department as well as an instigator to many of the tensions that arose in the Spring of 2006. When he left, overnight, tension plummeted. Even more than the hiring of a police ombudsman, the hiring of Chief Landy Black in the spring of 2007 served to cut down on the public complaints. I am not suggesting that things are perfect, I still think things could be better, but we have also not had public marches in the streets the last two years. We have not had hundreds of young African-American students coming into city council complaining about police tactics. In my dealings with Chief Black, he has always been willing to listen and has been completely professional, even on those occasions when we have disagreed.

As Cecilia Escamilla-Greenwald said to Davis Enterprise reporter Claire St. John during her run for City Council in a Davis Enterprise article:

“I think we all learned from that process,” she said. “How communications, situations, can be improved. It’s those experiences that make us better people.”

Escamilla-Greenwald said the things that came of that time have improved the city. The City Council, although it rejected an independent police oversight commission, did appoint a police advisory commission and hired an ombudsman. The new police chief, Landy Black, is a good fit for the city, Escamilla-Greenwald said.

“We have a new chief of police who is doing a great job as far as I’ve seen,” she said. “I’ve met with him, I did a ride-along with the police, that was an eye-opener. People are happy, from what I hear. There’s now a process in place.”

While the situation in Antioch may be somewhat different from that in Davis, the basic scenario seems to follow a similar pattern. The police are alleged to take an overly broad approach to law enforcement. It is unclear the extent to which Section 8 Voucher recipients are being perceived to be causing problems or if they are actually causing those problems. But irrespective of that point, the response by the police in Antioch seems to be to allegedly harass all African-Americans, regardless of their Section 8 status. This is the heart of the racial-profiling allegation.

What we see then is a pattern of behavior not only in terms of police profiling, or perceptions thereof, but in terms of the handling of the matter.

Throughout the Buzayan case, a more honest and forthright approach really could have avoided many of the lawsuits and legal remedies that ultimately resulted.

The acrimony between the police and the HRC did not necessarily have to result from events.

As Cecilia Escamilla-Greenwald wrote in 2006 in response to Jim Hyde’s parting words:

“After many months of hearing from members of the public, last summer we met with the police chief over concerns about the growing number of complaints about police misconduct. These meetings and interactions quickly turned adversarial as the police chief became defensive. Instead of engaging in public dialogue over these very serious issues, Chief Hyde retreated–he cut off communications with the HRC, he pulled his liaisons to the commission, and began a concerted public campaign to discredit the efforts of the HRC to reach common ground on reforms that could be done within the department.”

Furthermore:

“The Human Relations Commission, after hearing repeated accounts from credible citizens in our community, recommended the formation of a Citizen’s Review Board of the police department. The Police Chief reacted negatively and with attacks upon the HRC as well myself and members of the community for even suggesting such a body. Once again, Chief Hyde reacted defensively and inappropriately instead of working with the community to resolve these problems.”

The situation could have been diffused, perhaps by both sides. The City Council could have approached this by simply acknowledging a potential problem but suggesting that the civilian oversight board would be problematic in Davis. Instead the city endured attacks and allegations and heated rhetoric. No doubt everyone involved could have handled things better.

But we what see now is a pattern. That pattern has repeated itself in Antioch, far away from Cecilia Escamilla-Greenwald, the HRC or even the Vanguard.

At the same time, the response from the Antioch City Council is eerily similar to that in Davis.

Former Councilmember Ted Puntillo at the time of Hyde resignation called Hyde

“a very talented and probably one of the best chiefs that we could ever hope to have.”

On Wednesday, the Contra Costa Times reports similar comments from the Mayor of Antioch as well as City Councilmembers.

On Tuesday, the Antioch City Council approved a nearly $17,000 per year raise for the Police Chief.

Antioch Mayor Donald Freitas:

“The salary increase has more to do with salary compaction but it also reflects an endorsement of Chief Hyde and the outstanding job he’s doing. He has performed exemplary in the last two years, and has moved the department into the 21st century with the use of new technology. He’s well-respected by the men and women under his command, as well as the community.”

Councilmember Arne Simonsen:

“I’m sure there are other cities that would like a police chief like Jim Hyde… but I think the majority of people in Antioch would like him to stay.”

I think the Davis Police Department is far better without Chief Jim Hyde here. Much work remains to be done, but so far, Landy Black’s tenure as Police Chief has gone off without major incident. The city has been relatively calm since the departure of Jim Hyde. That and subsequent law suits in Antioch simply cannot be mere coincidence.

The Vanguard will continue to monitor the situation in Antioch and in the coming weeks, we will be speaking with some of the attorneys involved in the lawsuit down there and also possibly updating the public on the ongoing Buzayan Federal Lawsuit that is currently working its way through the Federal Court in Sacramento.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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128 thoughts on “Former Davis Police Chief Finds New Department Subject of Federal Class Action Lawsuit”

  1. vanguardian

    It’s good that we have Landy Black as Chief of Police in Davis. Not only is he a better Chief, but the police officers are happier with him as Chief. There were internal departmental problems with Hyde.

    Good story DPD.

  2. vanguardian

    It’s good that we have Landy Black as Chief of Police in Davis. Not only is he a better Chief, but the police officers are happier with him as Chief. There were internal departmental problems with Hyde.

    Good story DPD.

  3. vanguardian

    It’s good that we have Landy Black as Chief of Police in Davis. Not only is he a better Chief, but the police officers are happier with him as Chief. There were internal departmental problems with Hyde.

    Good story DPD.

  4. vanguardian

    It’s good that we have Landy Black as Chief of Police in Davis. Not only is he a better Chief, but the police officers are happier with him as Chief. There were internal departmental problems with Hyde.

    Good story DPD.

  5. Anonymous

    Surprise, surprise, surprise. While the efforts and sacrifices of others are appreciated, African-American males and their families were waging “one man/woman/family” war against racism in the Davis Police Department, Yolo County DA’s Office, and Davis Unified School District for years. Some families had more resources and were verbal(namely, education, money, and private attorneys), others did what they could with limited resources. Initially, complaints of racism fell on deaf years within the Davis community and Yolo County (African-American leadership and outside support was limited or not at all, especially if your reputation was not stellar). Many of us had to enlist the help of outside activism to get recognition and use our voices solo.
    Davis Enterprise furthered the minimization of the widespread problem through its notoriously biased reporting favoring public officials and government agency or by not reporting at all.
    DPD: There were other marches in the community that recieved absolutely no coverage. There were meetings in the community that received no coverage.
    The internal departmental problems were present when Hyde took office, under his authority it definitely worsened. African-American males were being targeted and then blamed for being targeted. Many of them continue to suffer the consequence of unchecked practices of discrimination. What is happening in Antioch is not shocking to me since it was prevalent in Davis. Hopefully, Chief landy Black is truly cleaning it up.

  6. Anonymous

    Surprise, surprise, surprise. While the efforts and sacrifices of others are appreciated, African-American males and their families were waging “one man/woman/family” war against racism in the Davis Police Department, Yolo County DA’s Office, and Davis Unified School District for years. Some families had more resources and were verbal(namely, education, money, and private attorneys), others did what they could with limited resources. Initially, complaints of racism fell on deaf years within the Davis community and Yolo County (African-American leadership and outside support was limited or not at all, especially if your reputation was not stellar). Many of us had to enlist the help of outside activism to get recognition and use our voices solo.
    Davis Enterprise furthered the minimization of the widespread problem through its notoriously biased reporting favoring public officials and government agency or by not reporting at all.
    DPD: There were other marches in the community that recieved absolutely no coverage. There were meetings in the community that received no coverage.
    The internal departmental problems were present when Hyde took office, under his authority it definitely worsened. African-American males were being targeted and then blamed for being targeted. Many of them continue to suffer the consequence of unchecked practices of discrimination. What is happening in Antioch is not shocking to me since it was prevalent in Davis. Hopefully, Chief landy Black is truly cleaning it up.

  7. Anonymous

    Surprise, surprise, surprise. While the efforts and sacrifices of others are appreciated, African-American males and their families were waging “one man/woman/family” war against racism in the Davis Police Department, Yolo County DA’s Office, and Davis Unified School District for years. Some families had more resources and were verbal(namely, education, money, and private attorneys), others did what they could with limited resources. Initially, complaints of racism fell on deaf years within the Davis community and Yolo County (African-American leadership and outside support was limited or not at all, especially if your reputation was not stellar). Many of us had to enlist the help of outside activism to get recognition and use our voices solo.
    Davis Enterprise furthered the minimization of the widespread problem through its notoriously biased reporting favoring public officials and government agency or by not reporting at all.
    DPD: There were other marches in the community that recieved absolutely no coverage. There were meetings in the community that received no coverage.
    The internal departmental problems were present when Hyde took office, under his authority it definitely worsened. African-American males were being targeted and then blamed for being targeted. Many of them continue to suffer the consequence of unchecked practices of discrimination. What is happening in Antioch is not shocking to me since it was prevalent in Davis. Hopefully, Chief landy Black is truly cleaning it up.

  8. Anonymous

    Surprise, surprise, surprise. While the efforts and sacrifices of others are appreciated, African-American males and their families were waging “one man/woman/family” war against racism in the Davis Police Department, Yolo County DA’s Office, and Davis Unified School District for years. Some families had more resources and were verbal(namely, education, money, and private attorneys), others did what they could with limited resources. Initially, complaints of racism fell on deaf years within the Davis community and Yolo County (African-American leadership and outside support was limited or not at all, especially if your reputation was not stellar). Many of us had to enlist the help of outside activism to get recognition and use our voices solo.
    Davis Enterprise furthered the minimization of the widespread problem through its notoriously biased reporting favoring public officials and government agency or by not reporting at all.
    DPD: There were other marches in the community that recieved absolutely no coverage. There were meetings in the community that received no coverage.
    The internal departmental problems were present when Hyde took office, under his authority it definitely worsened. African-American males were being targeted and then blamed for being targeted. Many of them continue to suffer the consequence of unchecked practices of discrimination. What is happening in Antioch is not shocking to me since it was prevalent in Davis. Hopefully, Chief landy Black is truly cleaning it up.

  9. Davisite

    Chief Landy Black from Seattle is able to deal with the political/power incestuousness of small towns like Davis. A replacement for Chief Rose Conroy from the “outside” would similarly benefit that department.

  10. Davisite

    Chief Landy Black from Seattle is able to deal with the political/power incestuousness of small towns like Davis. A replacement for Chief Rose Conroy from the “outside” would similarly benefit that department.

  11. Davisite

    Chief Landy Black from Seattle is able to deal with the political/power incestuousness of small towns like Davis. A replacement for Chief Rose Conroy from the “outside” would similarly benefit that department.

  12. Davisite

    Chief Landy Black from Seattle is able to deal with the political/power incestuousness of small towns like Davis. A replacement for Chief Rose Conroy from the “outside” would similarly benefit that department.

  13. Anonymous

    The main problem with the past two Police Chiefs (both Ruiz and Hyde) was that the did not manage people very well. Set some reasonable policies and make sure Officers are following them – there was not review of work performed. There were just a bunch of Lone Rangers (some good and some bad)off doing their own things without any significant supervision. Sure the Chief may have been liked by his Officers because he never provided oversight and they got to do what they wanted to do. Furthermore the City Manager (Antonen) never bothered to manage the Police Chiefs.

  14. Anonymous

    The main problem with the past two Police Chiefs (both Ruiz and Hyde) was that the did not manage people very well. Set some reasonable policies and make sure Officers are following them – there was not review of work performed. There were just a bunch of Lone Rangers (some good and some bad)off doing their own things without any significant supervision. Sure the Chief may have been liked by his Officers because he never provided oversight and they got to do what they wanted to do. Furthermore the City Manager (Antonen) never bothered to manage the Police Chiefs.

  15. Anonymous

    The main problem with the past two Police Chiefs (both Ruiz and Hyde) was that the did not manage people very well. Set some reasonable policies and make sure Officers are following them – there was not review of work performed. There were just a bunch of Lone Rangers (some good and some bad)off doing their own things without any significant supervision. Sure the Chief may have been liked by his Officers because he never provided oversight and they got to do what they wanted to do. Furthermore the City Manager (Antonen) never bothered to manage the Police Chiefs.

  16. Anonymous

    The main problem with the past two Police Chiefs (both Ruiz and Hyde) was that the did not manage people very well. Set some reasonable policies and make sure Officers are following them – there was not review of work performed. There were just a bunch of Lone Rangers (some good and some bad)off doing their own things without any significant supervision. Sure the Chief may have been liked by his Officers because he never provided oversight and they got to do what they wanted to do. Furthermore the City Manager (Antonen) never bothered to manage the Police Chiefs.

  17. kick in the hyde

    Officers at DPD did not care for Hyde. He was just looking for his next stepping stone. People like him should not be in public safety. The officers deserve better and they got someone better with Chief Black.

  18. kick in the hyde

    Officers at DPD did not care for Hyde. He was just looking for his next stepping stone. People like him should not be in public safety. The officers deserve better and they got someone better with Chief Black.

  19. kick in the hyde

    Officers at DPD did not care for Hyde. He was just looking for his next stepping stone. People like him should not be in public safety. The officers deserve better and they got someone better with Chief Black.

  20. kick in the hyde

    Officers at DPD did not care for Hyde. He was just looking for his next stepping stone. People like him should not be in public safety. The officers deserve better and they got someone better with Chief Black.

  21. Anonymous

    Now lets rid the County of Jeff Reisig when election time comes. Hopefully by doing so we do not inflict his brand of prosecution on another county’s general population. Reisig, like Hyde, had aspirations for something much bigger at the expense of others. Current “exposure” may impede any future political goals. These public officials and others were definitely advancing themselves with their collaborative effort to persecute groups of people through labeling.

  22. Anonymous

    Now lets rid the County of Jeff Reisig when election time comes. Hopefully by doing so we do not inflict his brand of prosecution on another county’s general population. Reisig, like Hyde, had aspirations for something much bigger at the expense of others. Current “exposure” may impede any future political goals. These public officials and others were definitely advancing themselves with their collaborative effort to persecute groups of people through labeling.

  23. Anonymous

    Now lets rid the County of Jeff Reisig when election time comes. Hopefully by doing so we do not inflict his brand of prosecution on another county’s general population. Reisig, like Hyde, had aspirations for something much bigger at the expense of others. Current “exposure” may impede any future political goals. These public officials and others were definitely advancing themselves with their collaborative effort to persecute groups of people through labeling.

  24. Anonymous

    Now lets rid the County of Jeff Reisig when election time comes. Hopefully by doing so we do not inflict his brand of prosecution on another county’s general population. Reisig, like Hyde, had aspirations for something much bigger at the expense of others. Current “exposure” may impede any future political goals. These public officials and others were definitely advancing themselves with their collaborative effort to persecute groups of people through labeling.

  25. Wait and See

    Up until now, we only have accusations. A definitive ruling has not been handed down in the Buzayan case, nor in the Antioch case. Only time will tell if the charges are founded are not. Unfortunately, in both cases, it will probably be settled out of court – so there will be no definitive ruling.

    That said, the similar pattern is disturbing, just as the pattern of Tahir Ahad is repeating itself elsewhere in relation to the school district mess. The bottom line is that citizens must speak up when injustice occurs, or if budgets don’t add up. We cannot stick our heads in the sand any longer, and assume gov’t officials will adequately take care of us.

    Too often things are allowed to fester for a long time, until it gets so bad the pot boils and the lid gets blown off. It is far better to address situations as they arise, and question things AT THE TIME THEY HAPPEN. We also need to demand better of our elected officials and gov’t employees.

    So far, I have been happily impressed with our new police chief Landy Black. I tend to see him at City Council meetings, visible and accessible to the public. This tends to be the sign of a good leader. My hope is that his actions continue to foster better citizen/police relations, and improve the DPD for the better internally as well.

    We will have to wait and see what the outcome of the lawsuit is, as to whether Chief Hyde’s reputation precedes him. His cheap shot as he left was certainly indicative of someone who is unwilling to face the music, i.e. cowardly.

    I and many others did not care for the way the HRC handled things, but when beleaguered, it can force one into uncomfortable positions that are almost impossible to handle well. Mismanagement of situations tends to beget more of the same, which is what happened with the HRC. Had Hyde and the City Council/Manager handled things better to begin with, perhaps the entire situation would not have gotten out of hand in the first place.

  26. Wait and See

    Up until now, we only have accusations. A definitive ruling has not been handed down in the Buzayan case, nor in the Antioch case. Only time will tell if the charges are founded are not. Unfortunately, in both cases, it will probably be settled out of court – so there will be no definitive ruling.

    That said, the similar pattern is disturbing, just as the pattern of Tahir Ahad is repeating itself elsewhere in relation to the school district mess. The bottom line is that citizens must speak up when injustice occurs, or if budgets don’t add up. We cannot stick our heads in the sand any longer, and assume gov’t officials will adequately take care of us.

    Too often things are allowed to fester for a long time, until it gets so bad the pot boils and the lid gets blown off. It is far better to address situations as they arise, and question things AT THE TIME THEY HAPPEN. We also need to demand better of our elected officials and gov’t employees.

    So far, I have been happily impressed with our new police chief Landy Black. I tend to see him at City Council meetings, visible and accessible to the public. This tends to be the sign of a good leader. My hope is that his actions continue to foster better citizen/police relations, and improve the DPD for the better internally as well.

    We will have to wait and see what the outcome of the lawsuit is, as to whether Chief Hyde’s reputation precedes him. His cheap shot as he left was certainly indicative of someone who is unwilling to face the music, i.e. cowardly.

    I and many others did not care for the way the HRC handled things, but when beleaguered, it can force one into uncomfortable positions that are almost impossible to handle well. Mismanagement of situations tends to beget more of the same, which is what happened with the HRC. Had Hyde and the City Council/Manager handled things better to begin with, perhaps the entire situation would not have gotten out of hand in the first place.

  27. Wait and See

    Up until now, we only have accusations. A definitive ruling has not been handed down in the Buzayan case, nor in the Antioch case. Only time will tell if the charges are founded are not. Unfortunately, in both cases, it will probably be settled out of court – so there will be no definitive ruling.

    That said, the similar pattern is disturbing, just as the pattern of Tahir Ahad is repeating itself elsewhere in relation to the school district mess. The bottom line is that citizens must speak up when injustice occurs, or if budgets don’t add up. We cannot stick our heads in the sand any longer, and assume gov’t officials will adequately take care of us.

    Too often things are allowed to fester for a long time, until it gets so bad the pot boils and the lid gets blown off. It is far better to address situations as they arise, and question things AT THE TIME THEY HAPPEN. We also need to demand better of our elected officials and gov’t employees.

    So far, I have been happily impressed with our new police chief Landy Black. I tend to see him at City Council meetings, visible and accessible to the public. This tends to be the sign of a good leader. My hope is that his actions continue to foster better citizen/police relations, and improve the DPD for the better internally as well.

    We will have to wait and see what the outcome of the lawsuit is, as to whether Chief Hyde’s reputation precedes him. His cheap shot as he left was certainly indicative of someone who is unwilling to face the music, i.e. cowardly.

    I and many others did not care for the way the HRC handled things, but when beleaguered, it can force one into uncomfortable positions that are almost impossible to handle well. Mismanagement of situations tends to beget more of the same, which is what happened with the HRC. Had Hyde and the City Council/Manager handled things better to begin with, perhaps the entire situation would not have gotten out of hand in the first place.

  28. Wait and See

    Up until now, we only have accusations. A definitive ruling has not been handed down in the Buzayan case, nor in the Antioch case. Only time will tell if the charges are founded are not. Unfortunately, in both cases, it will probably be settled out of court – so there will be no definitive ruling.

    That said, the similar pattern is disturbing, just as the pattern of Tahir Ahad is repeating itself elsewhere in relation to the school district mess. The bottom line is that citizens must speak up when injustice occurs, or if budgets don’t add up. We cannot stick our heads in the sand any longer, and assume gov’t officials will adequately take care of us.

    Too often things are allowed to fester for a long time, until it gets so bad the pot boils and the lid gets blown off. It is far better to address situations as they arise, and question things AT THE TIME THEY HAPPEN. We also need to demand better of our elected officials and gov’t employees.

    So far, I have been happily impressed with our new police chief Landy Black. I tend to see him at City Council meetings, visible and accessible to the public. This tends to be the sign of a good leader. My hope is that his actions continue to foster better citizen/police relations, and improve the DPD for the better internally as well.

    We will have to wait and see what the outcome of the lawsuit is, as to whether Chief Hyde’s reputation precedes him. His cheap shot as he left was certainly indicative of someone who is unwilling to face the music, i.e. cowardly.

    I and many others did not care for the way the HRC handled things, but when beleaguered, it can force one into uncomfortable positions that are almost impossible to handle well. Mismanagement of situations tends to beget more of the same, which is what happened with the HRC. Had Hyde and the City Council/Manager handled things better to begin with, perhaps the entire situation would not have gotten out of hand in the first place.

  29. Anonymous

    Now read this – http://www.antiochpress.com/article.cfm?articleID=20036

    Apparently one of the women allowed her boyfriend who was on parole and had an outstanding warrant to move in with her in violation of her Section 8 agreement. Criminals cannot live in Section 8 housing. People cannot move into a Section 8 rental unless their names are added to the lease and their income is added to the calculation for rent. Renters try to get around this by saying that they are just visiting, but unless the “visitor” can show proof of residing at another address, they are not “visiting.”

    It sounds like the Housing Authority messed up and then let her remain in the program, but I suspect that she had to confirm her understanding to not to allow people to crash at her house who were not on the lease, who were on parole or had been arrested for drug offenses. I wonder why the lawsuit is not against the Housing Authority instead of the Police Department, in that it was that department’s decision to disqualify her.

  30. Anonymous

    Now read this – http://www.antiochpress.com/article.cfm?articleID=20036

    Apparently one of the women allowed her boyfriend who was on parole and had an outstanding warrant to move in with her in violation of her Section 8 agreement. Criminals cannot live in Section 8 housing. People cannot move into a Section 8 rental unless their names are added to the lease and their income is added to the calculation for rent. Renters try to get around this by saying that they are just visiting, but unless the “visitor” can show proof of residing at another address, they are not “visiting.”

    It sounds like the Housing Authority messed up and then let her remain in the program, but I suspect that she had to confirm her understanding to not to allow people to crash at her house who were not on the lease, who were on parole or had been arrested for drug offenses. I wonder why the lawsuit is not against the Housing Authority instead of the Police Department, in that it was that department’s decision to disqualify her.

  31. Anonymous

    Now read this – http://www.antiochpress.com/article.cfm?articleID=20036

    Apparently one of the women allowed her boyfriend who was on parole and had an outstanding warrant to move in with her in violation of her Section 8 agreement. Criminals cannot live in Section 8 housing. People cannot move into a Section 8 rental unless their names are added to the lease and their income is added to the calculation for rent. Renters try to get around this by saying that they are just visiting, but unless the “visitor” can show proof of residing at another address, they are not “visiting.”

    It sounds like the Housing Authority messed up and then let her remain in the program, but I suspect that she had to confirm her understanding to not to allow people to crash at her house who were not on the lease, who were on parole or had been arrested for drug offenses. I wonder why the lawsuit is not against the Housing Authority instead of the Police Department, in that it was that department’s decision to disqualify her.

  32. Anonymous

    Now read this – http://www.antiochpress.com/article.cfm?articleID=20036

    Apparently one of the women allowed her boyfriend who was on parole and had an outstanding warrant to move in with her in violation of her Section 8 agreement. Criminals cannot live in Section 8 housing. People cannot move into a Section 8 rental unless their names are added to the lease and their income is added to the calculation for rent. Renters try to get around this by saying that they are just visiting, but unless the “visitor” can show proof of residing at another address, they are not “visiting.”

    It sounds like the Housing Authority messed up and then let her remain in the program, but I suspect that she had to confirm her understanding to not to allow people to crash at her house who were not on the lease, who were on parole or had been arrested for drug offenses. I wonder why the lawsuit is not against the Housing Authority instead of the Police Department, in that it was that department’s decision to disqualify her.

  33. Anonymous

    Maybe I am missing something but I understood the complaint to allege a pattern of harassment by Antioch police department towards residents of section 8 housing. If what you write is accurate than the housing authority was correct in its decision to evict this specific tenent. However, that has no bearing on the alleged police maltreatment of this tenant during the process and any other Section 8 resident in general. It seems that the Antioch police department harassment is broader than this specific case.

  34. Anonymous

    Maybe I am missing something but I understood the complaint to allege a pattern of harassment by Antioch police department towards residents of section 8 housing. If what you write is accurate than the housing authority was correct in its decision to evict this specific tenent. However, that has no bearing on the alleged police maltreatment of this tenant during the process and any other Section 8 resident in general. It seems that the Antioch police department harassment is broader than this specific case.

  35. Anonymous

    Maybe I am missing something but I understood the complaint to allege a pattern of harassment by Antioch police department towards residents of section 8 housing. If what you write is accurate than the housing authority was correct in its decision to evict this specific tenent. However, that has no bearing on the alleged police maltreatment of this tenant during the process and any other Section 8 resident in general. It seems that the Antioch police department harassment is broader than this specific case.

  36. Anonymous

    Maybe I am missing something but I understood the complaint to allege a pattern of harassment by Antioch police department towards residents of section 8 housing. If what you write is accurate than the housing authority was correct in its decision to evict this specific tenent. However, that has no bearing on the alleged police maltreatment of this tenant during the process and any other Section 8 resident in general. It seems that the Antioch police department harassment is broader than this specific case.

  37. Wait and See

    “Maybe I am missing something but I understood the complaint to allege a pattern of harassment by Antioch police department towards residents of section 8 housing. If what you write is accurate than the housing authority was correct in its decision to evict this specific tenent. However, that has no bearing on the alleged police maltreatment of this tenant during the process and any other Section 8 resident in general. It seems that the Antioch police department harassment is broader than this specific case.”

    We just don’t know enough to say one way or the other. Accusations are floating out there, but no definitive ruling. However, it makes for intriguing speculation, in light of what we know about Chief Hyde!!!

  38. Wait and See

    “Maybe I am missing something but I understood the complaint to allege a pattern of harassment by Antioch police department towards residents of section 8 housing. If what you write is accurate than the housing authority was correct in its decision to evict this specific tenent. However, that has no bearing on the alleged police maltreatment of this tenant during the process and any other Section 8 resident in general. It seems that the Antioch police department harassment is broader than this specific case.”

    We just don’t know enough to say one way or the other. Accusations are floating out there, but no definitive ruling. However, it makes for intriguing speculation, in light of what we know about Chief Hyde!!!

  39. Wait and See

    “Maybe I am missing something but I understood the complaint to allege a pattern of harassment by Antioch police department towards residents of section 8 housing. If what you write is accurate than the housing authority was correct in its decision to evict this specific tenent. However, that has no bearing on the alleged police maltreatment of this tenant during the process and any other Section 8 resident in general. It seems that the Antioch police department harassment is broader than this specific case.”

    We just don’t know enough to say one way or the other. Accusations are floating out there, but no definitive ruling. However, it makes for intriguing speculation, in light of what we know about Chief Hyde!!!

  40. Wait and See

    “Maybe I am missing something but I understood the complaint to allege a pattern of harassment by Antioch police department towards residents of section 8 housing. If what you write is accurate than the housing authority was correct in its decision to evict this specific tenent. However, that has no bearing on the alleged police maltreatment of this tenant during the process and any other Section 8 resident in general. It seems that the Antioch police department harassment is broader than this specific case.”

    We just don’t know enough to say one way or the other. Accusations are floating out there, but no definitive ruling. However, it makes for intriguing speculation, in light of what we know about Chief Hyde!!!

  41. Anonymous

    Former Chief Hyde is obviously not a good police chief. It’s disturbing that the council in Antioch chose to reward his behavior by giving him thousands more in pay.

    If the Buzayan case is still set to be heard in federal court then the city of Davis is still paying for Hyde’s defense, since he has been names in the lawsuit. It would be wise for the city of Davis to not represent him any longer. He is a major liability.

  42. Anonymous

    Former Chief Hyde is obviously not a good police chief. It’s disturbing that the council in Antioch chose to reward his behavior by giving him thousands more in pay.

    If the Buzayan case is still set to be heard in federal court then the city of Davis is still paying for Hyde’s defense, since he has been names in the lawsuit. It would be wise for the city of Davis to not represent him any longer. He is a major liability.

  43. Anonymous

    Former Chief Hyde is obviously not a good police chief. It’s disturbing that the council in Antioch chose to reward his behavior by giving him thousands more in pay.

    If the Buzayan case is still set to be heard in federal court then the city of Davis is still paying for Hyde’s defense, since he has been names in the lawsuit. It would be wise for the city of Davis to not represent him any longer. He is a major liability.

  44. Anonymous

    Former Chief Hyde is obviously not a good police chief. It’s disturbing that the council in Antioch chose to reward his behavior by giving him thousands more in pay.

    If the Buzayan case is still set to be heard in federal court then the city of Davis is still paying for Hyde’s defense, since he has been names in the lawsuit. It would be wise for the city of Davis to not represent him any longer. He is a major liability.

  45. Anonymous

    Jim Hyde deserves to be hung out to dry in his ability as a police chief. On the same note d. greenwald is always off base in claims he states or makes on this blog regarding the subject of racial bias.
    The human rights commission, on which, escamilla-greenwald served, was disbanded because they were always prejudicial in their findings. Yes readers, the commission was composed of bigots.

  46. Anonymous

    Jim Hyde deserves to be hung out to dry in his ability as a police chief. On the same note d. greenwald is always off base in claims he states or makes on this blog regarding the subject of racial bias.
    The human rights commission, on which, escamilla-greenwald served, was disbanded because they were always prejudicial in their findings. Yes readers, the commission was composed of bigots.

  47. Anonymous

    Jim Hyde deserves to be hung out to dry in his ability as a police chief. On the same note d. greenwald is always off base in claims he states or makes on this blog regarding the subject of racial bias.
    The human rights commission, on which, escamilla-greenwald served, was disbanded because they were always prejudicial in their findings. Yes readers, the commission was composed of bigots.

  48. Anonymous

    Jim Hyde deserves to be hung out to dry in his ability as a police chief. On the same note d. greenwald is always off base in claims he states or makes on this blog regarding the subject of racial bias.
    The human rights commission, on which, escamilla-greenwald served, was disbanded because they were always prejudicial in their findings. Yes readers, the commission was composed of bigots.

  49. Anonymous

    “Yes readers, the commission was composed of bigots.”

    That is a completely false statement.
    I think it is fair to say they were a little over zealous and they let political correctness interfere in their decision making. The irony was that two organizations, the Davis Poice Department and the Yolo DA’s office pushed them (and used them) in that direction. In the end the tables turned and the same two organizations came under DHRC scrutiny. Both the DA and the Police found the DHRC actions to be perfectly acceptable as long as they were pursuing a bunch of kids. As the focus changed (the DHRC did a 180), the DA and the Police spearheaded the effort to disband the DHRC.

  50. Anonymous

    “Yes readers, the commission was composed of bigots.”

    That is a completely false statement.
    I think it is fair to say they were a little over zealous and they let political correctness interfere in their decision making. The irony was that two organizations, the Davis Poice Department and the Yolo DA’s office pushed them (and used them) in that direction. In the end the tables turned and the same two organizations came under DHRC scrutiny. Both the DA and the Police found the DHRC actions to be perfectly acceptable as long as they were pursuing a bunch of kids. As the focus changed (the DHRC did a 180), the DA and the Police spearheaded the effort to disband the DHRC.

  51. Anonymous

    “Yes readers, the commission was composed of bigots.”

    That is a completely false statement.
    I think it is fair to say they were a little over zealous and they let political correctness interfere in their decision making. The irony was that two organizations, the Davis Poice Department and the Yolo DA’s office pushed them (and used them) in that direction. In the end the tables turned and the same two organizations came under DHRC scrutiny. Both the DA and the Police found the DHRC actions to be perfectly acceptable as long as they were pursuing a bunch of kids. As the focus changed (the DHRC did a 180), the DA and the Police spearheaded the effort to disband the DHRC.

  52. Anonymous

    “Yes readers, the commission was composed of bigots.”

    That is a completely false statement.
    I think it is fair to say they were a little over zealous and they let political correctness interfere in their decision making. The irony was that two organizations, the Davis Poice Department and the Yolo DA’s office pushed them (and used them) in that direction. In the end the tables turned and the same two organizations came under DHRC scrutiny. Both the DA and the Police found the DHRC actions to be perfectly acceptable as long as they were pursuing a bunch of kids. As the focus changed (the DHRC did a 180), the DA and the Police spearheaded the effort to disband the DHRC.

  53. Anonymous

    To the Above,

    Only in your mind are the statements false. I know the people that were on that commission and I agree with the fact they were very racially biased.

    It is too easy to blame some government entity for the failure of this group of predjudicial people. Simpy put, you are wrong.

  54. Anonymous

    To the Above,

    Only in your mind are the statements false. I know the people that were on that commission and I agree with the fact they were very racially biased.

    It is too easy to blame some government entity for the failure of this group of predjudicial people. Simpy put, you are wrong.

  55. Anonymous

    To the Above,

    Only in your mind are the statements false. I know the people that were on that commission and I agree with the fact they were very racially biased.

    It is too easy to blame some government entity for the failure of this group of predjudicial people. Simpy put, you are wrong.

  56. Anonymous

    To the Above,

    Only in your mind are the statements false. I know the people that were on that commission and I agree with the fact they were very racially biased.

    It is too easy to blame some government entity for the failure of this group of predjudicial people. Simpy put, you are wrong.

  57. Doug Paul Davis

    Instead of getting into a hypothetical debate over this, why do you not provide us with specific example that you believe constitute evidence that the HRC was “racist”?

  58. Doug Paul Davis

    Instead of getting into a hypothetical debate over this, why do you not provide us with specific example that you believe constitute evidence that the HRC was “racist”?

  59. Doug Paul Davis

    Instead of getting into a hypothetical debate over this, why do you not provide us with specific example that you believe constitute evidence that the HRC was “racist”?

  60. Doug Paul Davis

    Instead of getting into a hypothetical debate over this, why do you not provide us with specific example that you believe constitute evidence that the HRC was “racist”?

  61. Anonymous

    We have some very intelligent and articulate folks who visit this blog. While he was Davis Police Chief I had many encouters with Chief Hyde and his staff. You lost a good man and a good leader. He is the consumate professional and absolutely was the best person for the job. Now with Chief Black, you are fortunate to have another superb individual. I predict that in time, you also will find faults in him and run him out of town. Too bad, sometimes you are simply your own worst enemy.

  62. Anonymous

    We have some very intelligent and articulate folks who visit this blog. While he was Davis Police Chief I had many encouters with Chief Hyde and his staff. You lost a good man and a good leader. He is the consumate professional and absolutely was the best person for the job. Now with Chief Black, you are fortunate to have another superb individual. I predict that in time, you also will find faults in him and run him out of town. Too bad, sometimes you are simply your own worst enemy.

  63. Anonymous

    We have some very intelligent and articulate folks who visit this blog. While he was Davis Police Chief I had many encouters with Chief Hyde and his staff. You lost a good man and a good leader. He is the consumate professional and absolutely was the best person for the job. Now with Chief Black, you are fortunate to have another superb individual. I predict that in time, you also will find faults in him and run him out of town. Too bad, sometimes you are simply your own worst enemy.

  64. Anonymous

    We have some very intelligent and articulate folks who visit this blog. While he was Davis Police Chief I had many encouters with Chief Hyde and his staff. You lost a good man and a good leader. He is the consumate professional and absolutely was the best person for the job. Now with Chief Black, you are fortunate to have another superb individual. I predict that in time, you also will find faults in him and run him out of town. Too bad, sometimes you are simply your own worst enemy.

  65. Doug Paul Davis

    Unfortunately anonymous, not all of us shared the same positive experiences with Chief Hyde as you had. That was part of the problem and I think the reason so much of the community became polarized during the tenure of Chief Hyde. You may be right about Chief Black, it is difficult to tell.

  66. Doug Paul Davis

    Unfortunately anonymous, not all of us shared the same positive experiences with Chief Hyde as you had. That was part of the problem and I think the reason so much of the community became polarized during the tenure of Chief Hyde. You may be right about Chief Black, it is difficult to tell.

  67. Doug Paul Davis

    Unfortunately anonymous, not all of us shared the same positive experiences with Chief Hyde as you had. That was part of the problem and I think the reason so much of the community became polarized during the tenure of Chief Hyde. You may be right about Chief Black, it is difficult to tell.

  68. Doug Paul Davis

    Unfortunately anonymous, not all of us shared the same positive experiences with Chief Hyde as you had. That was part of the problem and I think the reason so much of the community became polarized during the tenure of Chief Hyde. You may be right about Chief Black, it is difficult to tell.

  69. Cant Stand Cheap Shots

    ” While he was Davis Police Chief I had many encouters with Chief Hyde and his staff. You lost a good man and a good leader. He is the consumate professional and absolutely was the best person for the job.”

    A consummate professional does not take a cheap shot as he leaves office, when he knows his comment cannot be answered because he will have left town. The time for him to have taken the cheap shot was when he was under fire, and needed to respond, so others had a chance to answer his accusations. Extremely unprofessional, IMHO.

  70. Cant Stand Cheap Shots

    ” While he was Davis Police Chief I had many encouters with Chief Hyde and his staff. You lost a good man and a good leader. He is the consumate professional and absolutely was the best person for the job.”

    A consummate professional does not take a cheap shot as he leaves office, when he knows his comment cannot be answered because he will have left town. The time for him to have taken the cheap shot was when he was under fire, and needed to respond, so others had a chance to answer his accusations. Extremely unprofessional, IMHO.

  71. Cant Stand Cheap Shots

    ” While he was Davis Police Chief I had many encouters with Chief Hyde and his staff. You lost a good man and a good leader. He is the consumate professional and absolutely was the best person for the job.”

    A consummate professional does not take a cheap shot as he leaves office, when he knows his comment cannot be answered because he will have left town. The time for him to have taken the cheap shot was when he was under fire, and needed to respond, so others had a chance to answer his accusations. Extremely unprofessional, IMHO.

  72. Cant Stand Cheap Shots

    ” While he was Davis Police Chief I had many encouters with Chief Hyde and his staff. You lost a good man and a good leader. He is the consumate professional and absolutely was the best person for the job.”

    A consummate professional does not take a cheap shot as he leaves office, when he knows his comment cannot be answered because he will have left town. The time for him to have taken the cheap shot was when he was under fire, and needed to respond, so others had a chance to answer his accusations. Extremely unprofessional, IMHO.

  73. Anonymous

    Those of us who had the misfortune of encounters with staff under Chief Hyde’s ” authority”, definitely do not share your sentiments regarding his character and/or leadership. I do not know Hyde personally, but the police department’s blatant harassment of specific groups of people without consequence speaks volumes about Hyde’s “guidance”, ” “direction”, and/or “vision” (and the City’s ability to look the other way).
    There are-and have been- some very good police officers in Davis. However, there is a notably different approach to policing now that Hyde is gone. Its called accountability.

  74. Anonymous

    Those of us who had the misfortune of encounters with staff under Chief Hyde’s ” authority”, definitely do not share your sentiments regarding his character and/or leadership. I do not know Hyde personally, but the police department’s blatant harassment of specific groups of people without consequence speaks volumes about Hyde’s “guidance”, ” “direction”, and/or “vision” (and the City’s ability to look the other way).
    There are-and have been- some very good police officers in Davis. However, there is a notably different approach to policing now that Hyde is gone. Its called accountability.

  75. Anonymous

    Those of us who had the misfortune of encounters with staff under Chief Hyde’s ” authority”, definitely do not share your sentiments regarding his character and/or leadership. I do not know Hyde personally, but the police department’s blatant harassment of specific groups of people without consequence speaks volumes about Hyde’s “guidance”, ” “direction”, and/or “vision” (and the City’s ability to look the other way).
    There are-and have been- some very good police officers in Davis. However, there is a notably different approach to policing now that Hyde is gone. Its called accountability.

  76. Anonymous

    Those of us who had the misfortune of encounters with staff under Chief Hyde’s ” authority”, definitely do not share your sentiments regarding his character and/or leadership. I do not know Hyde personally, but the police department’s blatant harassment of specific groups of people without consequence speaks volumes about Hyde’s “guidance”, ” “direction”, and/or “vision” (and the City’s ability to look the other way).
    There are-and have been- some very good police officers in Davis. However, there is a notably different approach to policing now that Hyde is gone. Its called accountability.

  77. Anonymous

    To the Above,

    Hyde,nor his depatment members, have not been racist in any way. You are clueless. Jim Hyde was just a poor choice for chief. And that one belongs to the city council.

  78. Anonymous

    To the Above,

    Hyde,nor his depatment members, have not been racist in any way. You are clueless. Jim Hyde was just a poor choice for chief. And that one belongs to the city council.

  79. Anonymous

    To the Above,

    Hyde,nor his depatment members, have not been racist in any way. You are clueless. Jim Hyde was just a poor choice for chief. And that one belongs to the city council.

  80. Anonymous

    To the Above,

    Hyde,nor his depatment members, have not been racist in any way. You are clueless. Jim Hyde was just a poor choice for chief. And that one belongs to the city council.

  81. Anonymous

    DPD,
    I can provide evidence of prejudice and racism on members of the defunct commission. On the other hand why don’t you explain why they were disbanded and how they were’nt racist. It is your blog and your wife was on that commission.

    And while you’re at it, in remembering some of the older comments here, why don’t you add some info about your involvement in C.A.R.O.L.E.? For those who don’t know, it was an attempt by certain parties to pull the race card on the police department and other City departments.

    Don’t offer your phone number for a private conversation, tell everybody that reads this blog. “The truth shall set you free”.

  82. Anonymous

    DPD,
    I can provide evidence of prejudice and racism on members of the defunct commission. On the other hand why don’t you explain why they were disbanded and how they were’nt racist. It is your blog and your wife was on that commission.

    And while you’re at it, in remembering some of the older comments here, why don’t you add some info about your involvement in C.A.R.O.L.E.? For those who don’t know, it was an attempt by certain parties to pull the race card on the police department and other City departments.

    Don’t offer your phone number for a private conversation, tell everybody that reads this blog. “The truth shall set you free”.

  83. Anonymous

    DPD,
    I can provide evidence of prejudice and racism on members of the defunct commission. On the other hand why don’t you explain why they were disbanded and how they were’nt racist. It is your blog and your wife was on that commission.

    And while you’re at it, in remembering some of the older comments here, why don’t you add some info about your involvement in C.A.R.O.L.E.? For those who don’t know, it was an attempt by certain parties to pull the race card on the police department and other City departments.

    Don’t offer your phone number for a private conversation, tell everybody that reads this blog. “The truth shall set you free”.

  84. Anonymous

    DPD,
    I can provide evidence of prejudice and racism on members of the defunct commission. On the other hand why don’t you explain why they were disbanded and how they were’nt racist. It is your blog and your wife was on that commission.

    And while you’re at it, in remembering some of the older comments here, why don’t you add some info about your involvement in C.A.R.O.L.E.? For those who don’t know, it was an attempt by certain parties to pull the race card on the police department and other City departments.

    Don’t offer your phone number for a private conversation, tell everybody that reads this blog. “The truth shall set you free”.

  85. Anonymous

    Clueless?

    Maybe you should broaden your horizons and step outside the
    " box"; open your eyes & ears; and truly listen to the complaints that rocked this city for the past several years. Some news significant enough to make news outside of Davis and Sacramento.
    Just because racism is not your
    experience (reality check), does not mean it does not exist. Consider yourself " privileged" (maybe that's the problem causing your denial).
    When it effects one, it effects all-especially when some of us are able to look the other way and pretend that it isn't happening.

    News flash: it takes great leadership, community awareness and citizens' freedom/comfort to make noise & complain to make certain that a police force dealing with diverse population is operating fairly.
    Read race statistics about allegations of harassment, abuse, arrest, and prosecution.
    Do not be the ostrich with its head in the sand, clueless.

  86. Anonymous

    Clueless?

    Maybe you should broaden your horizons and step outside the
    " box"; open your eyes & ears; and truly listen to the complaints that rocked this city for the past several years. Some news significant enough to make news outside of Davis and Sacramento.
    Just because racism is not your
    experience (reality check), does not mean it does not exist. Consider yourself " privileged" (maybe that's the problem causing your denial).
    When it effects one, it effects all-especially when some of us are able to look the other way and pretend that it isn't happening.

    News flash: it takes great leadership, community awareness and citizens' freedom/comfort to make noise & complain to make certain that a police force dealing with diverse population is operating fairly.
    Read race statistics about allegations of harassment, abuse, arrest, and prosecution.
    Do not be the ostrich with its head in the sand, clueless.

  87. Anonymous

    Clueless?

    Maybe you should broaden your horizons and step outside the
    " box"; open your eyes & ears; and truly listen to the complaints that rocked this city for the past several years. Some news significant enough to make news outside of Davis and Sacramento.
    Just because racism is not your
    experience (reality check), does not mean it does not exist. Consider yourself " privileged" (maybe that's the problem causing your denial).
    When it effects one, it effects all-especially when some of us are able to look the other way and pretend that it isn't happening.

    News flash: it takes great leadership, community awareness and citizens' freedom/comfort to make noise & complain to make certain that a police force dealing with diverse population is operating fairly.
    Read race statistics about allegations of harassment, abuse, arrest, and prosecution.
    Do not be the ostrich with its head in the sand, clueless.

  88. Anonymous

    Clueless?

    Maybe you should broaden your horizons and step outside the
    " box"; open your eyes & ears; and truly listen to the complaints that rocked this city for the past several years. Some news significant enough to make news outside of Davis and Sacramento.
    Just because racism is not your
    experience (reality check), does not mean it does not exist. Consider yourself " privileged" (maybe that's the problem causing your denial).
    When it effects one, it effects all-especially when some of us are able to look the other way and pretend that it isn't happening.

    News flash: it takes great leadership, community awareness and citizens' freedom/comfort to make noise & complain to make certain that a police force dealing with diverse population is operating fairly.
    Read race statistics about allegations of harassment, abuse, arrest, and prosecution.
    Do not be the ostrich with its head in the sand, clueless.

  89. Anonymous

    “For those who don’t know, it was an attempt by certain parties to pull the race card on the police department and other City departments.”

    Can you cite a single quote by CAROLE showing them pulling the race card?

  90. Anonymous

    “For those who don’t know, it was an attempt by certain parties to pull the race card on the police department and other City departments.”

    Can you cite a single quote by CAROLE showing them pulling the race card?

  91. Anonymous

    “For those who don’t know, it was an attempt by certain parties to pull the race card on the police department and other City departments.”

    Can you cite a single quote by CAROLE showing them pulling the race card?

  92. Anonymous

    “For those who don’t know, it was an attempt by certain parties to pull the race card on the police department and other City departments.”

    Can you cite a single quote by CAROLE showing them pulling the race card?

  93. Anonymous

    I previously wrote that, ” …just because racism is not your experience does not mean that it does not exist…”

    To the above, thank you for providing clarity when cynics try to detract from the real issue. Maybe I am missing something, but I did not see a “race card” being played in the pubs provided.

    Its not a ” race card” when there’s true racism. Nor do those of us who must deal with racism, consider it a card ” game”.

  94. Anonymous

    I previously wrote that, ” …just because racism is not your experience does not mean that it does not exist…”

    To the above, thank you for providing clarity when cynics try to detract from the real issue. Maybe I am missing something, but I did not see a “race card” being played in the pubs provided.

    Its not a ” race card” when there’s true racism. Nor do those of us who must deal with racism, consider it a card ” game”.

  95. Anonymous

    I previously wrote that, ” …just because racism is not your experience does not mean that it does not exist…”

    To the above, thank you for providing clarity when cynics try to detract from the real issue. Maybe I am missing something, but I did not see a “race card” being played in the pubs provided.

    Its not a ” race card” when there’s true racism. Nor do those of us who must deal with racism, consider it a card ” game”.

  96. Anonymous

    I previously wrote that, ” …just because racism is not your experience does not mean that it does not exist…”

    To the above, thank you for providing clarity when cynics try to detract from the real issue. Maybe I am missing something, but I did not see a “race card” being played in the pubs provided.

    Its not a ” race card” when there’s true racism. Nor do those of us who must deal with racism, consider it a card ” game”.

  97. Anonymous

    I previously wrote, "…maybe I am missing something…." Thank you for providing additional information to support my assertion that Chief Hyde's leadership of & vision for the Davis Police Department was a significant problem, specifically for African American and Hispanic male residents. According to your Antioch update, he is no longer gender biased.

    Race card? Thank goodness for audio and video. Hopefully, these Federal cases will cause cities to take the selection of police chiefs more seriously.
    Highly publicized claims and the awarding of punitive damages has its benefits to making changes.

    Now can we stop slapping Jeff Reisig's wrist and give him due consequences for his overtly racist tactics and questionable leadership? Or does he, too, have to resign and move his brand of prosecution to another County to be exposed?

  98. Anonymous

    I previously wrote, "…maybe I am missing something…." Thank you for providing additional information to support my assertion that Chief Hyde's leadership of & vision for the Davis Police Department was a significant problem, specifically for African American and Hispanic male residents. According to your Antioch update, he is no longer gender biased.

    Race card? Thank goodness for audio and video. Hopefully, these Federal cases will cause cities to take the selection of police chiefs more seriously.
    Highly publicized claims and the awarding of punitive damages has its benefits to making changes.

    Now can we stop slapping Jeff Reisig's wrist and give him due consequences for his overtly racist tactics and questionable leadership? Or does he, too, have to resign and move his brand of prosecution to another County to be exposed?

  99. Anonymous

    I previously wrote, "…maybe I am missing something…." Thank you for providing additional information to support my assertion that Chief Hyde's leadership of & vision for the Davis Police Department was a significant problem, specifically for African American and Hispanic male residents. According to your Antioch update, he is no longer gender biased.

    Race card? Thank goodness for audio and video. Hopefully, these Federal cases will cause cities to take the selection of police chiefs more seriously.
    Highly publicized claims and the awarding of punitive damages has its benefits to making changes.

    Now can we stop slapping Jeff Reisig's wrist and give him due consequences for his overtly racist tactics and questionable leadership? Or does he, too, have to resign and move his brand of prosecution to another County to be exposed?

  100. Anonymous

    I previously wrote, "…maybe I am missing something…." Thank you for providing additional information to support my assertion that Chief Hyde's leadership of & vision for the Davis Police Department was a significant problem, specifically for African American and Hispanic male residents. According to your Antioch update, he is no longer gender biased.

    Race card? Thank goodness for audio and video. Hopefully, these Federal cases will cause cities to take the selection of police chiefs more seriously.
    Highly publicized claims and the awarding of punitive damages has its benefits to making changes.

    Now can we stop slapping Jeff Reisig's wrist and give him due consequences for his overtly racist tactics and questionable leadership? Or does he, too, have to resign and move his brand of prosecution to another County to be exposed?

  101. chester

    “When he left [Chief Hyde], overnight, tension plummeted.”

    First, much of the “tension” caused was instigated by the HRC and their race-obsessed activist support group. Second, the “tension” in the city didn’t plummet until the HRC was disbanded.

    DPD, it is apparent that you and Cecilia are still wounded from this sorry series of past events in Davis history. You continue to seek some type of validation that your view was correct and that the opposition supporting Jim Hyde and the police department in general, were wrong. Can we move on please?

    Even if there is evidence to justify these dubious claims of racism with the Antioch police, what does this have to do with Davis? Are you going to rename your blog to include every town where Jim Hyde works from since leaving Davis?

    You also fail to include the following bit of related information. The Antioch police were simply responding to complaints from citizens funneled through a Community Action Team (CAT). 70 percent of the complaints were for African-American inhabited section 8 households located primarily in affluent neighborhoods where African-American families comprised 78% of the section 8 households. There are two points here: one – the police are only responding to complaints of the citizens (not instigating actions on their own); two – because 78% percent of the section 8 households in these affluent areas are African-American, and almost 70% of the complaints were for section 8 households in these affluent areas, it makes statistical sense that 70% of the total complaints were against African American section 8 households. Statistics do not support the claim of racism.

    I think a more interesting story is why African-Americans comprise 78% of the section 8 households in affluent Antioch neighborhoods, and 56% of the section 8 households throughout Antioch when they only comprise about 10% of the population in California. It seems that racial profiling is happening within our government housing authority.
    .

  102. chester

    “When he left [Chief Hyde], overnight, tension plummeted.”

    First, much of the “tension” caused was instigated by the HRC and their race-obsessed activist support group. Second, the “tension” in the city didn’t plummet until the HRC was disbanded.

    DPD, it is apparent that you and Cecilia are still wounded from this sorry series of past events in Davis history. You continue to seek some type of validation that your view was correct and that the opposition supporting Jim Hyde and the police department in general, were wrong. Can we move on please?

    Even if there is evidence to justify these dubious claims of racism with the Antioch police, what does this have to do with Davis? Are you going to rename your blog to include every town where Jim Hyde works from since leaving Davis?

    You also fail to include the following bit of related information. The Antioch police were simply responding to complaints from citizens funneled through a Community Action Team (CAT). 70 percent of the complaints were for African-American inhabited section 8 households located primarily in affluent neighborhoods where African-American families comprised 78% of the section 8 households. There are two points here: one – the police are only responding to complaints of the citizens (not instigating actions on their own); two – because 78% percent of the section 8 households in these affluent areas are African-American, and almost 70% of the complaints were for section 8 households in these affluent areas, it makes statistical sense that 70% of the total complaints were against African American section 8 households. Statistics do not support the claim of racism.

    I think a more interesting story is why African-Americans comprise 78% of the section 8 households in affluent Antioch neighborhoods, and 56% of the section 8 households throughout Antioch when they only comprise about 10% of the population in California. It seems that racial profiling is happening within our government housing authority.
    .

  103. chester

    “When he left [Chief Hyde], overnight, tension plummeted.”

    First, much of the “tension” caused was instigated by the HRC and their race-obsessed activist support group. Second, the “tension” in the city didn’t plummet until the HRC was disbanded.

    DPD, it is apparent that you and Cecilia are still wounded from this sorry series of past events in Davis history. You continue to seek some type of validation that your view was correct and that the opposition supporting Jim Hyde and the police department in general, were wrong. Can we move on please?

    Even if there is evidence to justify these dubious claims of racism with the Antioch police, what does this have to do with Davis? Are you going to rename your blog to include every town where Jim Hyde works from since leaving Davis?

    You also fail to include the following bit of related information. The Antioch police were simply responding to complaints from citizens funneled through a Community Action Team (CAT). 70 percent of the complaints were for African-American inhabited section 8 households located primarily in affluent neighborhoods where African-American families comprised 78% of the section 8 households. There are two points here: one – the police are only responding to complaints of the citizens (not instigating actions on their own); two – because 78% percent of the section 8 households in these affluent areas are African-American, and almost 70% of the complaints were for section 8 households in these affluent areas, it makes statistical sense that 70% of the total complaints were against African American section 8 households. Statistics do not support the claim of racism.

    I think a more interesting story is why African-Americans comprise 78% of the section 8 households in affluent Antioch neighborhoods, and 56% of the section 8 households throughout Antioch when they only comprise about 10% of the population in California. It seems that racial profiling is happening within our government housing authority.
    .

  104. chester

    “When he left [Chief Hyde], overnight, tension plummeted.”

    First, much of the “tension” caused was instigated by the HRC and their race-obsessed activist support group. Second, the “tension” in the city didn’t plummet until the HRC was disbanded.

    DPD, it is apparent that you and Cecilia are still wounded from this sorry series of past events in Davis history. You continue to seek some type of validation that your view was correct and that the opposition supporting Jim Hyde and the police department in general, were wrong. Can we move on please?

    Even if there is evidence to justify these dubious claims of racism with the Antioch police, what does this have to do with Davis? Are you going to rename your blog to include every town where Jim Hyde works from since leaving Davis?

    You also fail to include the following bit of related information. The Antioch police were simply responding to complaints from citizens funneled through a Community Action Team (CAT). 70 percent of the complaints were for African-American inhabited section 8 households located primarily in affluent neighborhoods where African-American families comprised 78% of the section 8 households. There are two points here: one – the police are only responding to complaints of the citizens (not instigating actions on their own); two – because 78% percent of the section 8 households in these affluent areas are African-American, and almost 70% of the complaints were for section 8 households in these affluent areas, it makes statistical sense that 70% of the total complaints were against African American section 8 households. Statistics do not support the claim of racism.

    I think a more interesting story is why African-Americans comprise 78% of the section 8 households in affluent Antioch neighborhoods, and 56% of the section 8 households throughout Antioch when they only comprise about 10% of the population in California. It seems that racial profiling is happening within our government housing authority.
    .

  105. Doug Paul Davis

    Chester:

    “First, much of the “tension” caused was instigated by the HRC and their race-obsessed activist support group.”

    It generally takes two to tango. The records requests I made when I started this blog generally show that Hyde and some of his staff did as much to inflame the situation as the HRC. The council did not help either. I can get specific if you are interested.

    “Second, the “tension” in the city didn’t plummet until the HRC was disbanded.”

    From my standpoint, I was lying around on a couch when I got a call that Hyde had resigned. Frankly things had already pretty much run their course with the election results. The disbanding of the HRC and the process thereof reignited some of the controversy, but at the end of the day, there was a choice to be made. Many cities have private HRC type organizations. There was some thought behind the scenes about creating such an organization but there was never really a precipitating event. Hence I believe the climate in the city changed with Hyde leaving, with the disbanding of the HRC, with Heystek on council, with the new ombudsman hired in the fall… You could point to all of those events, but at the core I think the city realized that they had to do business differently because if things erupted again, it would be more difficult to explain away. Heck some of the biggest occurrances and protests Cecilia and the HRC had nothing to do with.

    “DPD, it is apparent that you and Cecilia are still wounded from this sorry series of past events in Davis history. “

    I would use the word “angry” rather than “wounded.” In fact, I would argue that what happened did the opposite of wounding me, it empowered me to make changes.

    “Can we move on please?”

    No we cannot. Sorry to be blunt, but this blog was founded on a notion of exposing malfeasance in local government, I saw the Antioch issue as another example, an issue of interest to Davisites.

    Given the length of time and number of comments that the topic has received, I think the issue has some ressonance for this readership. Contrary to what some think, while Davis is the main focal point of this blog, it is not the only topic of interest and as time has gone on, I have branched out to regional events of interest as well. My coverage for instance of Waterford had a Davis connection but was not about Davis. Same with Hyde in Antioch. And this is likely not going to be the article on it.

    “You also fail to include the following bit of related information. The Antioch police were simply responding to complaints from citizens funneled through a Community Action Team (CAT).”

    I find that an interesting remark if for no other reason than the fact that Cecilia and the HRC took up the police issue primarily because a number of people had approached the HRC with complaints against the police department and there was no mechanism in place at that time to investigate them except through the obvious conflicted investigation through the IA process.

    We’ll see if the issue has legs in Antioch. From my perspective though it is interesting that the ACLU has picked it up. Why you say? The ACLU is extremely stingy about what cases to join on. They must think this is pretty compelling.

  106. Doug Paul Davis

    Chester:

    “First, much of the “tension” caused was instigated by the HRC and their race-obsessed activist support group.”

    It generally takes two to tango. The records requests I made when I started this blog generally show that Hyde and some of his staff did as much to inflame the situation as the HRC. The council did not help either. I can get specific if you are interested.

    “Second, the “tension” in the city didn’t plummet until the HRC was disbanded.”

    From my standpoint, I was lying around on a couch when I got a call that Hyde had resigned. Frankly things had already pretty much run their course with the election results. The disbanding of the HRC and the process thereof reignited some of the controversy, but at the end of the day, there was a choice to be made. Many cities have private HRC type organizations. There was some thought behind the scenes about creating such an organization but there was never really a precipitating event. Hence I believe the climate in the city changed with Hyde leaving, with the disbanding of the HRC, with Heystek on council, with the new ombudsman hired in the fall… You could point to all of those events, but at the core I think the city realized that they had to do business differently because if things erupted again, it would be more difficult to explain away. Heck some of the biggest occurrances and protests Cecilia and the HRC had nothing to do with.

    “DPD, it is apparent that you and Cecilia are still wounded from this sorry series of past events in Davis history. “

    I would use the word “angry” rather than “wounded.” In fact, I would argue that what happened did the opposite of wounding me, it empowered me to make changes.

    “Can we move on please?”

    No we cannot. Sorry to be blunt, but this blog was founded on a notion of exposing malfeasance in local government, I saw the Antioch issue as another example, an issue of interest to Davisites.

    Given the length of time and number of comments that the topic has received, I think the issue has some ressonance for this readership. Contrary to what some think, while Davis is the main focal point of this blog, it is not the only topic of interest and as time has gone on, I have branched out to regional events of interest as well. My coverage for instance of Waterford had a Davis connection but was not about Davis. Same with Hyde in Antioch. And this is likely not going to be the article on it.

    “You also fail to include the following bit of related information. The Antioch police were simply responding to complaints from citizens funneled through a Community Action Team (CAT).”

    I find that an interesting remark if for no other reason than the fact that Cecilia and the HRC took up the police issue primarily because a number of people had approached the HRC with complaints against the police department and there was no mechanism in place at that time to investigate them except through the obvious conflicted investigation through the IA process.

    We’ll see if the issue has legs in Antioch. From my perspective though it is interesting that the ACLU has picked it up. Why you say? The ACLU is extremely stingy about what cases to join on. They must think this is pretty compelling.

  107. Doug Paul Davis

    Chester:

    “First, much of the “tension” caused was instigated by the HRC and their race-obsessed activist support group.”

    It generally takes two to tango. The records requests I made when I started this blog generally show that Hyde and some of his staff did as much to inflame the situation as the HRC. The council did not help either. I can get specific if you are interested.

    “Second, the “tension” in the city didn’t plummet until the HRC was disbanded.”

    From my standpoint, I was lying around on a couch when I got a call that Hyde had resigned. Frankly things had already pretty much run their course with the election results. The disbanding of the HRC and the process thereof reignited some of the controversy, but at the end of the day, there was a choice to be made. Many cities have private HRC type organizations. There was some thought behind the scenes about creating such an organization but there was never really a precipitating event. Hence I believe the climate in the city changed with Hyde leaving, with the disbanding of the HRC, with Heystek on council, with the new ombudsman hired in the fall… You could point to all of those events, but at the core I think the city realized that they had to do business differently because if things erupted again, it would be more difficult to explain away. Heck some of the biggest occurrances and protests Cecilia and the HRC had nothing to do with.

    “DPD, it is apparent that you and Cecilia are still wounded from this sorry series of past events in Davis history. “

    I would use the word “angry” rather than “wounded.” In fact, I would argue that what happened did the opposite of wounding me, it empowered me to make changes.

    “Can we move on please?”

    No we cannot. Sorry to be blunt, but this blog was founded on a notion of exposing malfeasance in local government, I saw the Antioch issue as another example, an issue of interest to Davisites.

    Given the length of time and number of comments that the topic has received, I think the issue has some ressonance for this readership. Contrary to what some think, while Davis is the main focal point of this blog, it is not the only topic of interest and as time has gone on, I have branched out to regional events of interest as well. My coverage for instance of Waterford had a Davis connection but was not about Davis. Same with Hyde in Antioch. And this is likely not going to be the article on it.

    “You also fail to include the following bit of related information. The Antioch police were simply responding to complaints from citizens funneled through a Community Action Team (CAT).”

    I find that an interesting remark if for no other reason than the fact that Cecilia and the HRC took up the police issue primarily because a number of people had approached the HRC with complaints against the police department and there was no mechanism in place at that time to investigate them except through the obvious conflicted investigation through the IA process.

    We’ll see if the issue has legs in Antioch. From my perspective though it is interesting that the ACLU has picked it up. Why you say? The ACLU is extremely stingy about what cases to join on. They must think this is pretty compelling.

  108. Doug Paul Davis

    Chester:

    “First, much of the “tension” caused was instigated by the HRC and their race-obsessed activist support group.”

    It generally takes two to tango. The records requests I made when I started this blog generally show that Hyde and some of his staff did as much to inflame the situation as the HRC. The council did not help either. I can get specific if you are interested.

    “Second, the “tension” in the city didn’t plummet until the HRC was disbanded.”

    From my standpoint, I was lying around on a couch when I got a call that Hyde had resigned. Frankly things had already pretty much run their course with the election results. The disbanding of the HRC and the process thereof reignited some of the controversy, but at the end of the day, there was a choice to be made. Many cities have private HRC type organizations. There was some thought behind the scenes about creating such an organization but there was never really a precipitating event. Hence I believe the climate in the city changed with Hyde leaving, with the disbanding of the HRC, with Heystek on council, with the new ombudsman hired in the fall… You could point to all of those events, but at the core I think the city realized that they had to do business differently because if things erupted again, it would be more difficult to explain away. Heck some of the biggest occurrances and protests Cecilia and the HRC had nothing to do with.

    “DPD, it is apparent that you and Cecilia are still wounded from this sorry series of past events in Davis history. “

    I would use the word “angry” rather than “wounded.” In fact, I would argue that what happened did the opposite of wounding me, it empowered me to make changes.

    “Can we move on please?”

    No we cannot. Sorry to be blunt, but this blog was founded on a notion of exposing malfeasance in local government, I saw the Antioch issue as another example, an issue of interest to Davisites.

    Given the length of time and number of comments that the topic has received, I think the issue has some ressonance for this readership. Contrary to what some think, while Davis is the main focal point of this blog, it is not the only topic of interest and as time has gone on, I have branched out to regional events of interest as well. My coverage for instance of Waterford had a Davis connection but was not about Davis. Same with Hyde in Antioch. And this is likely not going to be the article on it.

    “You also fail to include the following bit of related information. The Antioch police were simply responding to complaints from citizens funneled through a Community Action Team (CAT).”

    I find that an interesting remark if for no other reason than the fact that Cecilia and the HRC took up the police issue primarily because a number of people had approached the HRC with complaints against the police department and there was no mechanism in place at that time to investigate them except through the obvious conflicted investigation through the IA process.

    We’ll see if the issue has legs in Antioch. From my perspective though it is interesting that the ACLU has picked it up. Why you say? The ACLU is extremely stingy about what cases to join on. They must think this is pretty compelling.

  109. chester

    I’m sorry you cannot get past your anger with Chief Hyde. In my experience it is very difficult to be objective when angry.

    “The ACLU is extremely stingy about what cases to join on.”

    Maybe so, but do you remember Twanna Brawley and the Duke stripper rape case? I would not use ACLU judgment as backing for your cause.

    In any case, just because the police take action against a person of color does not automatically indicate racism. These days it is an easy flip to a sensationalistic story to portray the person(s) of color as a victim of race-motivated policing. You would think at least the statistics should cover the claim. Maybe neither you nor the ACLU care about the math, but I don’t understand how this can be such a large story when the percent of African-Americans inhabiting section 8 housing in these neighborhoods is greater than the distribution of the percent of claims. It is not a pleasing statistic, but it seem that the police are not responsible for it.

  110. chester

    I’m sorry you cannot get past your anger with Chief Hyde. In my experience it is very difficult to be objective when angry.

    “The ACLU is extremely stingy about what cases to join on.”

    Maybe so, but do you remember Twanna Brawley and the Duke stripper rape case? I would not use ACLU judgment as backing for your cause.

    In any case, just because the police take action against a person of color does not automatically indicate racism. These days it is an easy flip to a sensationalistic story to portray the person(s) of color as a victim of race-motivated policing. You would think at least the statistics should cover the claim. Maybe neither you nor the ACLU care about the math, but I don’t understand how this can be such a large story when the percent of African-Americans inhabiting section 8 housing in these neighborhoods is greater than the distribution of the percent of claims. It is not a pleasing statistic, but it seem that the police are not responsible for it.

  111. chester

    I’m sorry you cannot get past your anger with Chief Hyde. In my experience it is very difficult to be objective when angry.

    “The ACLU is extremely stingy about what cases to join on.”

    Maybe so, but do you remember Twanna Brawley and the Duke stripper rape case? I would not use ACLU judgment as backing for your cause.

    In any case, just because the police take action against a person of color does not automatically indicate racism. These days it is an easy flip to a sensationalistic story to portray the person(s) of color as a victim of race-motivated policing. You would think at least the statistics should cover the claim. Maybe neither you nor the ACLU care about the math, but I don’t understand how this can be such a large story when the percent of African-Americans inhabiting section 8 housing in these neighborhoods is greater than the distribution of the percent of claims. It is not a pleasing statistic, but it seem that the police are not responsible for it.

  112. chester

    I’m sorry you cannot get past your anger with Chief Hyde. In my experience it is very difficult to be objective when angry.

    “The ACLU is extremely stingy about what cases to join on.”

    Maybe so, but do you remember Twanna Brawley and the Duke stripper rape case? I would not use ACLU judgment as backing for your cause.

    In any case, just because the police take action against a person of color does not automatically indicate racism. These days it is an easy flip to a sensationalistic story to portray the person(s) of color as a victim of race-motivated policing. You would think at least the statistics should cover the claim. Maybe neither you nor the ACLU care about the math, but I don’t understand how this can be such a large story when the percent of African-Americans inhabiting section 8 housing in these neighborhoods is greater than the distribution of the percent of claims. It is not a pleasing statistic, but it seem that the police are not responsible for it.

  113. Doug Paul Davis

    I’m not sorry… I don’t think it was very responsible to help polarize the community, and then leave, and instead of letting it go, through some parting words that became the impetus for the council do more divisions.

    ACLU is not perfect of course they are generally cautious.

  114. Doug Paul Davis

    I’m not sorry… I don’t think it was very responsible to help polarize the community, and then leave, and instead of letting it go, through some parting words that became the impetus for the council do more divisions.

    ACLU is not perfect of course they are generally cautious.

  115. Doug Paul Davis

    I’m not sorry… I don’t think it was very responsible to help polarize the community, and then leave, and instead of letting it go, through some parting words that became the impetus for the council do more divisions.

    ACLU is not perfect of course they are generally cautious.

  116. Doug Paul Davis

    I’m not sorry… I don’t think it was very responsible to help polarize the community, and then leave, and instead of letting it go, through some parting words that became the impetus for the council do more divisions.

    ACLU is not perfect of course they are generally cautious.

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