Davis Enterprise Anti-Environmental Policies

I write this in part based on Matt Rexroad’s blog entry from yesterday, but frankly I have had similar thoughts lately. There was a time, I would wake up and read newspapers first thing in the morning. But that was really before the advent of the internet and the ability of newspapers to put their content online–much of the time for free. Now if the newspaper is not on the internet, I will not likely read it.

Most newspapers have most of their content available for free on the internet. However, the Davis Enterprise is an exception, though their policy has varied over the two and a half years I have read it. At one point, only the front page articles were available on their website. Then all of their content was posted on the website. Now they have all of the content on the website but it is protected by password and available to those who subscribe.
So I have subscribed to the Davis Enterprise because given what I do on a daily basis, I need to know what is going on in the community–or at least what the local papers–Davis Enterprise, Sacramento Bee, and Woodland Daily Democrat are covering. However, what happens in my household is that I usually read the content online before the paper is delivered and we have a neat stack (sometimes less than neat) of unopened Davis Enterprises that end up going directly into the recycle bin.

Apparently I am not the only one with that problem. Supervisor Matt Rexroad had a similar problem and actually called the paper to see about changing things.

So I was looking around my house the other day for ways to simplify things.

One thing I noticed is that I subscribe to the Davis Enterprise at home. However, I read it on-line most of the time so I never actually open it when it arrives at my door.

That was an idea. I will tell the Enterprise that they did not need to waste the paper or the effort to get me the paper. Then I would not have to recycle it. They would save time and effort. Life would be great.”

Sounded like a good plan to me. In fact, I have been thinking about doing the same thing. Unfortunately that is not how the Davis Enterprise works.

[Mrs. Rexroad] called to tell them to stop delivering even though we would still pay the bill — I want the on-line access to the news. They told us they could not do that because of the advertising rates were dependent upon it.

Are you kidding me? Somehow the rest of the newspapers in the world are able to manage. But there are multiple points of illogic going on here.

First, they are not actually opening the paper, so in a way, the Davis Enterprise’s advertising are not reaping the benefit of the subscription anyway. In fact, by keeping a newspaper delivery where the subscribers do not open the paper, the advertisers are getting a false impression of the coverage of the paper. I wonder how many other people end up doing similar things.

Second, this is Davis. We are supposed to be the environmental model for the rest region if not the state. Yet our newspaper is engaging in unnecessarily wasteful practices by requiring people to use paper when they would prefer to still pay for the service but still have to waste paper.

I use very little paper–or at least as little as I can afford. I get most of my bills online. I read articles and the like directly on the computer screen and I rarely print things out. So it bothers me that I am wasting paper because of a newspaper’s policies.

Frankly if I did not blog everyday on Davis and Yolo County events, I probably would not take the Davis Enterprise anyway, but given that I do, I do not feel I have a luxury that many have taken of canceling their subscription.

Papers everywhere are facing difficult times and part of it is because they have not adapted to the new medium. The Davis Enterprise has created blogs on their site that are largely unused and rarely usable. They could do so much more with even their modest resources to create a much better and more innovative product on their website. Some have complained about the McNaughtons in this capacity and suggested that there is a lot they would like to do if they were not being held back.

This is just a single example of where they can improve. I hope that environmentally conscious-Davisites will be concerned about this very simple and very wasteful policy by their local newspaper.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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84 thoughts on “Davis Enterprise Anti-Environmental Policies”

  1. Doug Paul Davis

    Someone will probably comment that it must be a slow news day. Perhaps, but Elaine’s column is the main story today, this was just a last minute blurb that I saw when I read Rexroad’s blog last night and thought it was a good issue to raise.

  2. Doug Paul Davis

    Someone will probably comment that it must be a slow news day. Perhaps, but Elaine’s column is the main story today, this was just a last minute blurb that I saw when I read Rexroad’s blog last night and thought it was a good issue to raise.

  3. Doug Paul Davis

    Someone will probably comment that it must be a slow news day. Perhaps, but Elaine’s column is the main story today, this was just a last minute blurb that I saw when I read Rexroad’s blog last night and thought it was a good issue to raise.

  4. Doug Paul Davis

    Someone will probably comment that it must be a slow news day. Perhaps, but Elaine’s column is the main story today, this was just a last minute blurb that I saw when I read Rexroad’s blog last night and thought it was a good issue to raise.

  5. Anonymous

    Why don’t you subscribe and have the paper send to another location like a senior center or homeless outreach facility? Then the paper would be read and you would not have to worry about the recycling issue.

  6. Anonymous

    Why don’t you subscribe and have the paper send to another location like a senior center or homeless outreach facility? Then the paper would be read and you would not have to worry about the recycling issue.

  7. Anonymous

    Why don’t you subscribe and have the paper send to another location like a senior center or homeless outreach facility? Then the paper would be read and you would not have to worry about the recycling issue.

  8. Anonymous

    Why don’t you subscribe and have the paper send to another location like a senior center or homeless outreach facility? Then the paper would be read and you would not have to worry about the recycling issue.

  9. Old Skool Davis

    Talk about convoluted media access in this town.
    FYI, to those few that may care. Recently the death nell sounded for home delivery of The Democrat in Davis. Very little information was provided by the publisher as to this ceasement. That paper was available as a home delivery alternative/augmenter in Davis since the begining of time. The only place now in Davis to get a physical copy of the Democrat is from my old pal Terry Lott at Newsbeat downtown.

    How will old school Davis citizens now remain apprised of the next auto destruction derby’s, or cow milking contests?

  10. Old Skool Davis

    Talk about convoluted media access in this town.
    FYI, to those few that may care. Recently the death nell sounded for home delivery of The Democrat in Davis. Very little information was provided by the publisher as to this ceasement. That paper was available as a home delivery alternative/augmenter in Davis since the begining of time. The only place now in Davis to get a physical copy of the Democrat is from my old pal Terry Lott at Newsbeat downtown.

    How will old school Davis citizens now remain apprised of the next auto destruction derby’s, or cow milking contests?

  11. Old Skool Davis

    Talk about convoluted media access in this town.
    FYI, to those few that may care. Recently the death nell sounded for home delivery of The Democrat in Davis. Very little information was provided by the publisher as to this ceasement. That paper was available as a home delivery alternative/augmenter in Davis since the begining of time. The only place now in Davis to get a physical copy of the Democrat is from my old pal Terry Lott at Newsbeat downtown.

    How will old school Davis citizens now remain apprised of the next auto destruction derby’s, or cow milking contests?

  12. Old Skool Davis

    Talk about convoluted media access in this town.
    FYI, to those few that may care. Recently the death nell sounded for home delivery of The Democrat in Davis. Very little information was provided by the publisher as to this ceasement. That paper was available as a home delivery alternative/augmenter in Davis since the begining of time. The only place now in Davis to get a physical copy of the Democrat is from my old pal Terry Lott at Newsbeat downtown.

    How will old school Davis citizens now remain apprised of the next auto destruction derby’s, or cow milking contests?

  13. Guessing

    Probably most readers don’t use the online service. If there were enough requests like yours, the Davis Enterprise might change their policy. Just a guess.

  14. Guessing

    Probably most readers don’t use the online service. If there were enough requests like yours, the Davis Enterprise might change their policy. Just a guess.

  15. Guessing

    Probably most readers don’t use the online service. If there were enough requests like yours, the Davis Enterprise might change their policy. Just a guess.

  16. Guessing

    Probably most readers don’t use the online service. If there were enough requests like yours, the Davis Enterprise might change their policy. Just a guess.

  17. Anonymous

    Split your subscription with a neighbor. You take the online access version, and neighbor takes delivery. You both save money, Enterprise loses. Enough of that behavior and they’ll change the policy.

  18. Anonymous

    Split your subscription with a neighbor. You take the online access version, and neighbor takes delivery. You both save money, Enterprise loses. Enough of that behavior and they’ll change the policy.

  19. Anonymous

    Split your subscription with a neighbor. You take the online access version, and neighbor takes delivery. You both save money, Enterprise loses. Enough of that behavior and they’ll change the policy.

  20. Anonymous

    Split your subscription with a neighbor. You take the online access version, and neighbor takes delivery. You both save money, Enterprise loses. Enough of that behavior and they’ll change the policy.

  21. former subscriber

    I stopped subscribing to the Enterprise years ago, when I realized that other than maybe 3 local articles each day, the rest was reprints from wire services, and most of those were a day or so old and I’d already seen them online. Once I stopped my $100/year subscription, they offered it to me for $25/year. That made mea realize I’d been paying too much to begin with, for very little ‘news’. Since then, I’ve found I can get 90% of what the article is talking about by reading the headline online. And it is nice not filling up the paper recycling each week. I have no use for the Enterprise anymore, yet am still current on local events.

  22. former subscriber

    I stopped subscribing to the Enterprise years ago, when I realized that other than maybe 3 local articles each day, the rest was reprints from wire services, and most of those were a day or so old and I’d already seen them online. Once I stopped my $100/year subscription, they offered it to me for $25/year. That made mea realize I’d been paying too much to begin with, for very little ‘news’. Since then, I’ve found I can get 90% of what the article is talking about by reading the headline online. And it is nice not filling up the paper recycling each week. I have no use for the Enterprise anymore, yet am still current on local events.

  23. former subscriber

    I stopped subscribing to the Enterprise years ago, when I realized that other than maybe 3 local articles each day, the rest was reprints from wire services, and most of those were a day or so old and I’d already seen them online. Once I stopped my $100/year subscription, they offered it to me for $25/year. That made mea realize I’d been paying too much to begin with, for very little ‘news’. Since then, I’ve found I can get 90% of what the article is talking about by reading the headline online. And it is nice not filling up the paper recycling each week. I have no use for the Enterprise anymore, yet am still current on local events.

  24. former subscriber

    I stopped subscribing to the Enterprise years ago, when I realized that other than maybe 3 local articles each day, the rest was reprints from wire services, and most of those were a day or so old and I’d already seen them online. Once I stopped my $100/year subscription, they offered it to me for $25/year. That made mea realize I’d been paying too much to begin with, for very little ‘news’. Since then, I’ve found I can get 90% of what the article is talking about by reading the headline online. And it is nice not filling up the paper recycling each week. I have no use for the Enterprise anymore, yet am still current on local events.

  25. Anonymous

    Delivering the paper to a neighbor is a very good idea. Maybe someone who is elderly and on a fixed income.

    I read the paper online. I usually read the e-version which are pdfs of each actual page. That way I see the ads and announcements.

  26. Anonymous

    Delivering the paper to a neighbor is a very good idea. Maybe someone who is elderly and on a fixed income.

    I read the paper online. I usually read the e-version which are pdfs of each actual page. That way I see the ads and announcements.

  27. Anonymous

    Delivering the paper to a neighbor is a very good idea. Maybe someone who is elderly and on a fixed income.

    I read the paper online. I usually read the e-version which are pdfs of each actual page. That way I see the ads and announcements.

  28. Anonymous

    Delivering the paper to a neighbor is a very good idea. Maybe someone who is elderly and on a fixed income.

    I read the paper online. I usually read the e-version which are pdfs of each actual page. That way I see the ads and announcements.

  29. Richard

    This column misses the larger question as to the environmental cost of printing the newspaper in light of the poor quality of what it contains.n Unfortunately, the Bee, and McClatchy newspapers generally, are moving in the same direction as the Enterprise, hire low cost young reporters, fill the rest of the paper with wire stories and publish a few local columnists, with presumed value for their colorful interpretation of people and events. In both instances, the notion of more broadly covering the community beyond the business scene, local politicos and longtime, well known residents has been rejected.

  30. Richard

    This column misses the larger question as to the environmental cost of printing the newspaper in light of the poor quality of what it contains.n Unfortunately, the Bee, and McClatchy newspapers generally, are moving in the same direction as the Enterprise, hire low cost young reporters, fill the rest of the paper with wire stories and publish a few local columnists, with presumed value for their colorful interpretation of people and events. In both instances, the notion of more broadly covering the community beyond the business scene, local politicos and longtime, well known residents has been rejected.

  31. Richard

    This column misses the larger question as to the environmental cost of printing the newspaper in light of the poor quality of what it contains.n Unfortunately, the Bee, and McClatchy newspapers generally, are moving in the same direction as the Enterprise, hire low cost young reporters, fill the rest of the paper with wire stories and publish a few local columnists, with presumed value for their colorful interpretation of people and events. In both instances, the notion of more broadly covering the community beyond the business scene, local politicos and longtime, well known residents has been rejected.

  32. Richard

    This column misses the larger question as to the environmental cost of printing the newspaper in light of the poor quality of what it contains.n Unfortunately, the Bee, and McClatchy newspapers generally, are moving in the same direction as the Enterprise, hire low cost young reporters, fill the rest of the paper with wire stories and publish a few local columnists, with presumed value for their colorful interpretation of people and events. In both instances, the notion of more broadly covering the community beyond the business scene, local politicos and longtime, well known residents has been rejected.

  33. Anonymous

    Years ago, the Davis Enterprise was published once a week. It came out on Thursdays, in time to announce the weekly change in the movie playing at the Varsity, include weekend announcements and upcoming meetings for that week. I remember that it was chock full of Davis news and events, stories about DHS, Aggie, Aquadarts, Davis Divers, Little League and other local sports. The front page was always some city issue. Everyone subscribed. Maybe it should go back to that?

  34. Anonymous

    Years ago, the Davis Enterprise was published once a week. It came out on Thursdays, in time to announce the weekly change in the movie playing at the Varsity, include weekend announcements and upcoming meetings for that week. I remember that it was chock full of Davis news and events, stories about DHS, Aggie, Aquadarts, Davis Divers, Little League and other local sports. The front page was always some city issue. Everyone subscribed. Maybe it should go back to that?

  35. Anonymous

    Years ago, the Davis Enterprise was published once a week. It came out on Thursdays, in time to announce the weekly change in the movie playing at the Varsity, include weekend announcements and upcoming meetings for that week. I remember that it was chock full of Davis news and events, stories about DHS, Aggie, Aquadarts, Davis Divers, Little League and other local sports. The front page was always some city issue. Everyone subscribed. Maybe it should go back to that?

  36. Anonymous

    Years ago, the Davis Enterprise was published once a week. It came out on Thursdays, in time to announce the weekly change in the movie playing at the Varsity, include weekend announcements and upcoming meetings for that week. I remember that it was chock full of Davis news and events, stories about DHS, Aggie, Aquadarts, Davis Divers, Little League and other local sports. The front page was always some city issue. Everyone subscribed. Maybe it should go back to that?

  37. Anonymous

    We subscribe to the paper in my name. My husband attempted to activate the online subscription in his name (I use his last name not my maiden name) with all the contact info otherwise the same. The enterprise will not allow access because HE doesn’t have a subscription.
    Go figure.

  38. Anonymous

    We subscribe to the paper in my name. My husband attempted to activate the online subscription in his name (I use his last name not my maiden name) with all the contact info otherwise the same. The enterprise will not allow access because HE doesn’t have a subscription.
    Go figure.

  39. Anonymous

    We subscribe to the paper in my name. My husband attempted to activate the online subscription in his name (I use his last name not my maiden name) with all the contact info otherwise the same. The enterprise will not allow access because HE doesn’t have a subscription.
    Go figure.

  40. Anonymous

    We subscribe to the paper in my name. My husband attempted to activate the online subscription in his name (I use his last name not my maiden name) with all the contact info otherwise the same. The enterprise will not allow access because HE doesn’t have a subscription.
    Go figure.

  41. Phil Coleman

    This is certainly not a “slow news day” topic. We are witnessing history and the beginnings of the death of a 300-year-old institution. In about another decade or so, there will be no print publication of any material. And that includes books, mail, and currency.

    Everything that we now receive in hard print form will cease to exist. Instead we will have wireless electronic devices in our vehicles and every room in our homes that can send and receive any kind of information or entertainment at the speed of light. If you want a hard-copy of something, you’ll “publish” it yourself from your home printer.

    Your grandchildren will crawl up on your lap and ask you, “What’s a mail box? What’s a telephone pole? What’s a library building?” And most certainly, they will have no concept of a newspaper thrown on the driveway.

  42. Phil Coleman

    This is certainly not a “slow news day” topic. We are witnessing history and the beginnings of the death of a 300-year-old institution. In about another decade or so, there will be no print publication of any material. And that includes books, mail, and currency.

    Everything that we now receive in hard print form will cease to exist. Instead we will have wireless electronic devices in our vehicles and every room in our homes that can send and receive any kind of information or entertainment at the speed of light. If you want a hard-copy of something, you’ll “publish” it yourself from your home printer.

    Your grandchildren will crawl up on your lap and ask you, “What’s a mail box? What’s a telephone pole? What’s a library building?” And most certainly, they will have no concept of a newspaper thrown on the driveway.

  43. Phil Coleman

    This is certainly not a “slow news day” topic. We are witnessing history and the beginnings of the death of a 300-year-old institution. In about another decade or so, there will be no print publication of any material. And that includes books, mail, and currency.

    Everything that we now receive in hard print form will cease to exist. Instead we will have wireless electronic devices in our vehicles and every room in our homes that can send and receive any kind of information or entertainment at the speed of light. If you want a hard-copy of something, you’ll “publish” it yourself from your home printer.

    Your grandchildren will crawl up on your lap and ask you, “What’s a mail box? What’s a telephone pole? What’s a library building?” And most certainly, they will have no concept of a newspaper thrown on the driveway.

  44. Phil Coleman

    This is certainly not a “slow news day” topic. We are witnessing history and the beginnings of the death of a 300-year-old institution. In about another decade or so, there will be no print publication of any material. And that includes books, mail, and currency.

    Everything that we now receive in hard print form will cease to exist. Instead we will have wireless electronic devices in our vehicles and every room in our homes that can send and receive any kind of information or entertainment at the speed of light. If you want a hard-copy of something, you’ll “publish” it yourself from your home printer.

    Your grandchildren will crawl up on your lap and ask you, “What’s a mail box? What’s a telephone pole? What’s a library building?” And most certainly, they will have no concept of a newspaper thrown on the driveway.

  45. Anonymous

    Moving to total electronic publication is a great idea. The environmental and energy cost of printing out information, distributing it to everyone, then collecting the discarded paper, is silly.

  46. Anonymous

    Moving to total electronic publication is a great idea. The environmental and energy cost of printing out information, distributing it to everyone, then collecting the discarded paper, is silly.

  47. Anonymous

    Moving to total electronic publication is a great idea. The environmental and energy cost of printing out information, distributing it to everyone, then collecting the discarded paper, is silly.

  48. Anonymous

    Moving to total electronic publication is a great idea. The environmental and energy cost of printing out information, distributing it to everyone, then collecting the discarded paper, is silly.

  49. Anonymous

    What a blogocentric, self-righteous post.

    Mr. Coleman is probably right we are witnessing the winding down of a age old format, but like this blog the online version of the DE only serves a minority.

    Also, unlike this blog, at least the Enterprise has to adhere to journalistic integrity – although this will be/is debated on this blog – the “People’s Vanguard” is just that, one person. Not a group of Journalists who have reported on an issue or event. Although you can comment and that allows for some retort, but that can/is censored.

    The paper is printed and is out there for all to see and can not be edited on the fly as criticism or errors are brought to the editors attention.

    What do we want in this world, a bunch of bloggers with questionable background sitting around in their underwear critiquing and blasting those who are held accountable?

    Not all like to sit at their computers hacking out “information” for the “People”.

    Somewhere the future will land on this, I hope we don’t look back and wish we hadn’t buried something before we understood what we will miss.

  50. Anonymous

    What a blogocentric, self-righteous post.

    Mr. Coleman is probably right we are witnessing the winding down of a age old format, but like this blog the online version of the DE only serves a minority.

    Also, unlike this blog, at least the Enterprise has to adhere to journalistic integrity – although this will be/is debated on this blog – the “People’s Vanguard” is just that, one person. Not a group of Journalists who have reported on an issue or event. Although you can comment and that allows for some retort, but that can/is censored.

    The paper is printed and is out there for all to see and can not be edited on the fly as criticism or errors are brought to the editors attention.

    What do we want in this world, a bunch of bloggers with questionable background sitting around in their underwear critiquing and blasting those who are held accountable?

    Not all like to sit at their computers hacking out “information” for the “People”.

    Somewhere the future will land on this, I hope we don’t look back and wish we hadn’t buried something before we understood what we will miss.

  51. Anonymous

    What a blogocentric, self-righteous post.

    Mr. Coleman is probably right we are witnessing the winding down of a age old format, but like this blog the online version of the DE only serves a minority.

    Also, unlike this blog, at least the Enterprise has to adhere to journalistic integrity – although this will be/is debated on this blog – the “People’s Vanguard” is just that, one person. Not a group of Journalists who have reported on an issue or event. Although you can comment and that allows for some retort, but that can/is censored.

    The paper is printed and is out there for all to see and can not be edited on the fly as criticism or errors are brought to the editors attention.

    What do we want in this world, a bunch of bloggers with questionable background sitting around in their underwear critiquing and blasting those who are held accountable?

    Not all like to sit at their computers hacking out “information” for the “People”.

    Somewhere the future will land on this, I hope we don’t look back and wish we hadn’t buried something before we understood what we will miss.

  52. Anonymous

    What a blogocentric, self-righteous post.

    Mr. Coleman is probably right we are witnessing the winding down of a age old format, but like this blog the online version of the DE only serves a minority.

    Also, unlike this blog, at least the Enterprise has to adhere to journalistic integrity – although this will be/is debated on this blog – the “People’s Vanguard” is just that, one person. Not a group of Journalists who have reported on an issue or event. Although you can comment and that allows for some retort, but that can/is censored.

    The paper is printed and is out there for all to see and can not be edited on the fly as criticism or errors are brought to the editors attention.

    What do we want in this world, a bunch of bloggers with questionable background sitting around in their underwear critiquing and blasting those who are held accountable?

    Not all like to sit at their computers hacking out “information” for the “People”.

    Somewhere the future will land on this, I hope we don’t look back and wish we hadn’t buried something before we understood what we will miss.

  53. Anonymous

    It’s telling that the blogger of this blog warns that “posts whose primary purpose is to correct spelling and/or grammar are also subject to deletion.”

    At least the Davis Enterprise has a copy editor to handle this elementary kind of thing…
    The point to keep in mind is that somebody might actually read these blog posts. Any writer who cares how their writing is received by readers is not going to delete posts on grammar, but learn from and act on them.

  54. Anonymous

    It’s telling that the blogger of this blog warns that “posts whose primary purpose is to correct spelling and/or grammar are also subject to deletion.”

    At least the Davis Enterprise has a copy editor to handle this elementary kind of thing…
    The point to keep in mind is that somebody might actually read these blog posts. Any writer who cares how their writing is received by readers is not going to delete posts on grammar, but learn from and act on them.

  55. Anonymous

    It’s telling that the blogger of this blog warns that “posts whose primary purpose is to correct spelling and/or grammar are also subject to deletion.”

    At least the Davis Enterprise has a copy editor to handle this elementary kind of thing…
    The point to keep in mind is that somebody might actually read these blog posts. Any writer who cares how their writing is received by readers is not going to delete posts on grammar, but learn from and act on them.

  56. Anonymous

    It’s telling that the blogger of this blog warns that “posts whose primary purpose is to correct spelling and/or grammar are also subject to deletion.”

    At least the Davis Enterprise has a copy editor to handle this elementary kind of thing…
    The point to keep in mind is that somebody might actually read these blog posts. Any writer who cares how their writing is received by readers is not going to delete posts on grammar, but learn from and act on them.

  57. Richard

    In about another decade or so, there will be no print publication of any material. And that includes books, mail, and currency.

    Yes, I see this trend, but I doubt that it will be this extreme. Note that CDs did not eliminate vinyl records, it just moved them both upmarket (to elite genres and collectors) and downmarket (to bands that either couldn’t afford CD recording technology or disliked what it did to the quality of sound). The broad middle of consumers went with CDs for reasons of functionality.

    There will still be print for particular segments of the populace. University publishers have created a niche for themselves publishing books rejected by mainstream commercial publishers and that, amazing enough, will ensure their survival as the mainstream publishers die. Community and socially oriented bookstores will survive, the big box ones won’t.

    Newspapers will remain, but they will no longer serve the gatekeeper function so prized by today’s owners, publishers and reporters. They will have to much more transparent in regard to their sources and public comment than they have been to date. Ideally, they would get rid of the barrier between the reporter and the reader, basically, the editor, because, rightly or wrongly, editors are blamed for all kinds of bias and reporting inadequacies.

    Of course, there will be fewer of them, but they will persist. Unless, of course, like the Enterprise and McClatchy, they keep lecturing everyone about how they possess journalistic standards of credibility while no one else does. You know, while letting people like Bob Dunning make up things about people, and then, when he’s called on it, allowing him to subject the people who sought a correction to ridicule. That’s about the fastest way to bankrupcty you can imagine.

    –Richard Estes

  58. Richard

    In about another decade or so, there will be no print publication of any material. And that includes books, mail, and currency.

    Yes, I see this trend, but I doubt that it will be this extreme. Note that CDs did not eliminate vinyl records, it just moved them both upmarket (to elite genres and collectors) and downmarket (to bands that either couldn’t afford CD recording technology or disliked what it did to the quality of sound). The broad middle of consumers went with CDs for reasons of functionality.

    There will still be print for particular segments of the populace. University publishers have created a niche for themselves publishing books rejected by mainstream commercial publishers and that, amazing enough, will ensure their survival as the mainstream publishers die. Community and socially oriented bookstores will survive, the big box ones won’t.

    Newspapers will remain, but they will no longer serve the gatekeeper function so prized by today’s owners, publishers and reporters. They will have to much more transparent in regard to their sources and public comment than they have been to date. Ideally, they would get rid of the barrier between the reporter and the reader, basically, the editor, because, rightly or wrongly, editors are blamed for all kinds of bias and reporting inadequacies.

    Of course, there will be fewer of them, but they will persist. Unless, of course, like the Enterprise and McClatchy, they keep lecturing everyone about how they possess journalistic standards of credibility while no one else does. You know, while letting people like Bob Dunning make up things about people, and then, when he’s called on it, allowing him to subject the people who sought a correction to ridicule. That’s about the fastest way to bankrupcty you can imagine.

    –Richard Estes

  59. Richard

    In about another decade or so, there will be no print publication of any material. And that includes books, mail, and currency.

    Yes, I see this trend, but I doubt that it will be this extreme. Note that CDs did not eliminate vinyl records, it just moved them both upmarket (to elite genres and collectors) and downmarket (to bands that either couldn’t afford CD recording technology or disliked what it did to the quality of sound). The broad middle of consumers went with CDs for reasons of functionality.

    There will still be print for particular segments of the populace. University publishers have created a niche for themselves publishing books rejected by mainstream commercial publishers and that, amazing enough, will ensure their survival as the mainstream publishers die. Community and socially oriented bookstores will survive, the big box ones won’t.

    Newspapers will remain, but they will no longer serve the gatekeeper function so prized by today’s owners, publishers and reporters. They will have to much more transparent in regard to their sources and public comment than they have been to date. Ideally, they would get rid of the barrier between the reporter and the reader, basically, the editor, because, rightly or wrongly, editors are blamed for all kinds of bias and reporting inadequacies.

    Of course, there will be fewer of them, but they will persist. Unless, of course, like the Enterprise and McClatchy, they keep lecturing everyone about how they possess journalistic standards of credibility while no one else does. You know, while letting people like Bob Dunning make up things about people, and then, when he’s called on it, allowing him to subject the people who sought a correction to ridicule. That’s about the fastest way to bankrupcty you can imagine.

    –Richard Estes

  60. Richard

    In about another decade or so, there will be no print publication of any material. And that includes books, mail, and currency.

    Yes, I see this trend, but I doubt that it will be this extreme. Note that CDs did not eliminate vinyl records, it just moved them both upmarket (to elite genres and collectors) and downmarket (to bands that either couldn’t afford CD recording technology or disliked what it did to the quality of sound). The broad middle of consumers went with CDs for reasons of functionality.

    There will still be print for particular segments of the populace. University publishers have created a niche for themselves publishing books rejected by mainstream commercial publishers and that, amazing enough, will ensure their survival as the mainstream publishers die. Community and socially oriented bookstores will survive, the big box ones won’t.

    Newspapers will remain, but they will no longer serve the gatekeeper function so prized by today’s owners, publishers and reporters. They will have to much more transparent in regard to their sources and public comment than they have been to date. Ideally, they would get rid of the barrier between the reporter and the reader, basically, the editor, because, rightly or wrongly, editors are blamed for all kinds of bias and reporting inadequacies.

    Of course, there will be fewer of them, but they will persist. Unless, of course, like the Enterprise and McClatchy, they keep lecturing everyone about how they possess journalistic standards of credibility while no one else does. You know, while letting people like Bob Dunning make up things about people, and then, when he’s called on it, allowing him to subject the people who sought a correction to ridicule. That’s about the fastest way to bankrupcty you can imagine.

    –Richard Estes

  61. Anonymous

    The Enterprise sales staff have not learned how to sell advertising in the 21st century…. I did as Anonymous 9:27 AM suggested.. Split subscription with a neighbor. You take the online access version, and neighbor takes delivery.

  62. Anonymous

    The Enterprise sales staff have not learned how to sell advertising in the 21st century…. I did as Anonymous 9:27 AM suggested.. Split subscription with a neighbor. You take the online access version, and neighbor takes delivery.

  63. Anonymous

    The Enterprise sales staff have not learned how to sell advertising in the 21st century…. I did as Anonymous 9:27 AM suggested.. Split subscription with a neighbor. You take the online access version, and neighbor takes delivery.

  64. Anonymous

    The Enterprise sales staff have not learned how to sell advertising in the 21st century…. I did as Anonymous 9:27 AM suggested.. Split subscription with a neighbor. You take the online access version, and neighbor takes delivery.

  65. use less paper

    I had the same experience as Mr. Rexroad. There are many advertisements that are inserted into the delivered paper, that are not shown on-line. Some are quite valuable, so I prefer to know about the sales. Perhaps the Enterprise should post them advertisements on-line, then it should be able to receive comparable advertising rates.

  66. use less paper

    I had the same experience as Mr. Rexroad. There are many advertisements that are inserted into the delivered paper, that are not shown on-line. Some are quite valuable, so I prefer to know about the sales. Perhaps the Enterprise should post them advertisements on-line, then it should be able to receive comparable advertising rates.

  67. use less paper

    I had the same experience as Mr. Rexroad. There are many advertisements that are inserted into the delivered paper, that are not shown on-line. Some are quite valuable, so I prefer to know about the sales. Perhaps the Enterprise should post them advertisements on-line, then it should be able to receive comparable advertising rates.

  68. use less paper

    I had the same experience as Mr. Rexroad. There are many advertisements that are inserted into the delivered paper, that are not shown on-line. Some are quite valuable, so I prefer to know about the sales. Perhaps the Enterprise should post them advertisements on-line, then it should be able to receive comparable advertising rates.

  69. Anonymous

    Sounds like David Greenwald is still envious of the Davis Enterprise and wishes for it’s demise. I have not taken the Enterprise in many years. But I do know that after the fictitous dpd is gone, the Enterprise will still be circulating

  70. Anonymous

    Sounds like David Greenwald is still envious of the Davis Enterprise and wishes for it’s demise. I have not taken the Enterprise in many years. But I do know that after the fictitous dpd is gone, the Enterprise will still be circulating

  71. Anonymous

    Sounds like David Greenwald is still envious of the Davis Enterprise and wishes for it’s demise. I have not taken the Enterprise in many years. But I do know that after the fictitous dpd is gone, the Enterprise will still be circulating

  72. Anonymous

    Sounds like David Greenwald is still envious of the Davis Enterprise and wishes for it’s demise. I have not taken the Enterprise in many years. But I do know that after the fictitous dpd is gone, the Enterprise will still be circulating

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