Heystek fights for Social Justice

In politics, even when you agree with someone on the issues, you never quite know what you are going to get. It was that way with Lamar Heystek. I supported now Councilmember Lamar Heystek in the June election along with Stan Forbes as they were the candidates of the progressive left here in Davis and opponents of the status quo candidates Asmundson and Levy. The question I wondered at the time, is “what kind of councilmember would Heystek be–would he try to please everyone, would he merely vote the right way, or would be a candidate who would go to the mat for his principles and be a fighter for Democratic / Progressive issues?” Well folks, I’m very pleased to say we have a fighter on our side now. We now have someone on the city council that will go to mat for our issues. And yet, at the same time, he’s a gentleman. He doesn’t have to roll in the mud with his adversaries.

Yesterday, Councilmember Heystek had a brilliant letter to the editor in the Davis Enterprise. Here’s a key excerpt from the letter addressing the issue we’ve been talking about the last few days.

Less than two years ago, the Target Corp. spent at least $350,000 in its successful attempt to defeat Proposition 72, which would have ensured health care for millions of California’s workers. Now, Target is spending nearly as much on Measure K in Davis to prevail once again against the interests of working people.

When the Target proposal weaved its way through the city’s entitlement process, Target spokesman John Dewes had expressed no interest in pursuing any worker safeguards, including a labor peace agreement. Now, just hours before Tuesday’s election, why do working people suddenly become his cause célèbre?

I am disappointed that the exclusive group working on behalf of Mr. Dewes is interested in pursuing labor issues only insofar as it will win the election for Target. Should Measure K pass, the days after Nov. 7 will surely test their mettle when it comes to fixing the long-term integrity of Target’s labor practices. I invite them to express a full commitment to this issue by supporting legally tested safeguards such as a living-wage ordinance. It’s the right thing to do.

There are a few key issues that Heystek brings up. First, Target does NOT support the values of progressive Davis. Not only did they spend money to defeat a health care proposal, but they spent money consistently to support very conservative politicians seeking elective office. Some have suggested that they don’t want their tax money going out of city. Well, I don’t want my hard earned money going to line the campaign coffers of conservative politicians. I don’t want it used to defeat health care proposals for California workers.

Second, and most fundamentally, he points out the duplicity in the whole PLA agreement that Souza-Saylor are working on. Dewes and Target have no interest in unions. They’ve rejected all overtures for using unionized workers in their stores both in the future Davis store should K pass and nationally and globally. So why suddenly are they supporting a PLA with union construction workers?

Third, Heystek calls them to the task on their union support by inviting them to support a living wage proposal. That will be the true test of their support for the rights of workers. Heystek calls them to task for having an eleventh hour conversion on the eve of the election in an attempt to convince the public that they support the rights and values of Working Class America. The values of the progressive movement in terms of the rights of workers. This is as Saylor once described “malicious, cynical, and probably politically motivated.”

Fortunately for the progressive, the City of Davis now has a progressive champion willing to stand up and fight for our values, even when those values may be controversial. That is all we can ask.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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48 Comments

  1. davisite

    Having spent some time campaigning on the UCD campus for the No on Measure X and No on Measure K campaigns, I have found many of these young people full of political energy which has been muted by the prevailing sense of political hopelessness and impotency. Effective political leadership and courage is called for to mobilize these young people to get politically involved in shaping their social and economic futures. Councilman Heystek has the qualitites to offer that leadership and we expect great things of him.

  2. davisite

    Having spent some time campaigning on the UCD campus for the No on Measure X and No on Measure K campaigns, I have found many of these young people full of political energy which has been muted by the prevailing sense of political hopelessness and impotency. Effective political leadership and courage is called for to mobilize these young people to get politically involved in shaping their social and economic futures. Councilman Heystek has the qualitites to offer that leadership and we expect great things of him.

  3. davisite

    Having spent some time campaigning on the UCD campus for the No on Measure X and No on Measure K campaigns, I have found many of these young people full of political energy which has been muted by the prevailing sense of political hopelessness and impotency. Effective political leadership and courage is called for to mobilize these young people to get politically involved in shaping their social and economic futures. Councilman Heystek has the qualitites to offer that leadership and we expect great things of him.

  4. davisite

    Having spent some time campaigning on the UCD campus for the No on Measure X and No on Measure K campaigns, I have found many of these young people full of political energy which has been muted by the prevailing sense of political hopelessness and impotency. Effective political leadership and courage is called for to mobilize these young people to get politically involved in shaping their social and economic futures. Councilman Heystek has the qualitites to offer that leadership and we expect great things of him.

  5. 無名 - wu ming

    whil i agree with you that lamar is a solid political progressive, by what metric does stan forbes get considered a progressive, other than opposing development? the guy was a republican until just before the last city council race.

    i have been quite impressed with lamar continuing to push the age/union issues that he campaigned on. davis is in sore need of a little economic progressivism IMO, especially a living wage in this über-expensive city.

  6. 無名 - wu ming

    whil i agree with you that lamar is a solid political progressive, by what metric does stan forbes get considered a progressive, other than opposing development? the guy was a republican until just before the last city council race.

    i have been quite impressed with lamar continuing to push the age/union issues that he campaigned on. davis is in sore need of a little economic progressivism IMO, especially a living wage in this über-expensive city.

  7. 無名 - wu ming

    whil i agree with you that lamar is a solid political progressive, by what metric does stan forbes get considered a progressive, other than opposing development? the guy was a republican until just before the last city council race.

    i have been quite impressed with lamar continuing to push the age/union issues that he campaigned on. davis is in sore need of a little economic progressivism IMO, especially a living wage in this über-expensive city.

  8. 無名 - wu ming

    whil i agree with you that lamar is a solid political progressive, by what metric does stan forbes get considered a progressive, other than opposing development? the guy was a republican until just before the last city council race.

    i have been quite impressed with lamar continuing to push the age/union issues that he campaigned on. davis is in sore need of a little economic progressivism IMO, especially a living wage in this über-expensive city.

  9. Rich Rifkin

    Doug,

    You wrote last week about Matt Rexroad, saying that one of the reasons you oppose his candidacy for Supervisor is because you think Rexroad will likely be a candidate for higher office in the future.

    Giving some thought to Lamar Heystek, I wonder if he too aspires to higher office. Heystek is still very young. But in two years, Lois Wolk will be term-limited out of the Assembly. I wonder if Heystek is already thinking about succeeding Wolk?

    One thing is certain. Given the partisan make-up of Wolk’s district, her successor will be a Democrat. And that Democrat will probably come from Davis or Vacaville. I don’t know a thing about politics in Vacaville. But in Davis, I would guess that Heystek would stand a good chance of being one of the front runners if he chose to run.

    As you know, though, the Democrats of Davis are of two distinct stripes: the Wolk-Thomson-Saylor types; and the Greenwald-Harrington-Heystek-Yamada sort. (I don’t know if all of those people are registered Democrats, but you get the idea.)

    If Heystek were to run, and say Souza were also to run, then chances are that a Democrat from Woodland or Vacaville or West Sac or somewhere other than Davis would likely win the primary. But if Heystek gets out early, and no other Davis Dems challenge him, Lamar would stand a good chance to be our Assemblymember for the next 6 years.

  10. Rich Rifkin

    Doug,

    You wrote last week about Matt Rexroad, saying that one of the reasons you oppose his candidacy for Supervisor is because you think Rexroad will likely be a candidate for higher office in the future.

    Giving some thought to Lamar Heystek, I wonder if he too aspires to higher office. Heystek is still very young. But in two years, Lois Wolk will be term-limited out of the Assembly. I wonder if Heystek is already thinking about succeeding Wolk?

    One thing is certain. Given the partisan make-up of Wolk’s district, her successor will be a Democrat. And that Democrat will probably come from Davis or Vacaville. I don’t know a thing about politics in Vacaville. But in Davis, I would guess that Heystek would stand a good chance of being one of the front runners if he chose to run.

    As you know, though, the Democrats of Davis are of two distinct stripes: the Wolk-Thomson-Saylor types; and the Greenwald-Harrington-Heystek-Yamada sort. (I don’t know if all of those people are registered Democrats, but you get the idea.)

    If Heystek were to run, and say Souza were also to run, then chances are that a Democrat from Woodland or Vacaville or West Sac or somewhere other than Davis would likely win the primary. But if Heystek gets out early, and no other Davis Dems challenge him, Lamar would stand a good chance to be our Assemblymember for the next 6 years.

  11. Rich Rifkin

    Doug,

    You wrote last week about Matt Rexroad, saying that one of the reasons you oppose his candidacy for Supervisor is because you think Rexroad will likely be a candidate for higher office in the future.

    Giving some thought to Lamar Heystek, I wonder if he too aspires to higher office. Heystek is still very young. But in two years, Lois Wolk will be term-limited out of the Assembly. I wonder if Heystek is already thinking about succeeding Wolk?

    One thing is certain. Given the partisan make-up of Wolk’s district, her successor will be a Democrat. And that Democrat will probably come from Davis or Vacaville. I don’t know a thing about politics in Vacaville. But in Davis, I would guess that Heystek would stand a good chance of being one of the front runners if he chose to run.

    As you know, though, the Democrats of Davis are of two distinct stripes: the Wolk-Thomson-Saylor types; and the Greenwald-Harrington-Heystek-Yamada sort. (I don’t know if all of those people are registered Democrats, but you get the idea.)

    If Heystek were to run, and say Souza were also to run, then chances are that a Democrat from Woodland or Vacaville or West Sac or somewhere other than Davis would likely win the primary. But if Heystek gets out early, and no other Davis Dems challenge him, Lamar would stand a good chance to be our Assemblymember for the next 6 years.

  12. Rich Rifkin

    Doug,

    You wrote last week about Matt Rexroad, saying that one of the reasons you oppose his candidacy for Supervisor is because you think Rexroad will likely be a candidate for higher office in the future.

    Giving some thought to Lamar Heystek, I wonder if he too aspires to higher office. Heystek is still very young. But in two years, Lois Wolk will be term-limited out of the Assembly. I wonder if Heystek is already thinking about succeeding Wolk?

    One thing is certain. Given the partisan make-up of Wolk’s district, her successor will be a Democrat. And that Democrat will probably come from Davis or Vacaville. I don’t know a thing about politics in Vacaville. But in Davis, I would guess that Heystek would stand a good chance of being one of the front runners if he chose to run.

    As you know, though, the Democrats of Davis are of two distinct stripes: the Wolk-Thomson-Saylor types; and the Greenwald-Harrington-Heystek-Yamada sort. (I don’t know if all of those people are registered Democrats, but you get the idea.)

    If Heystek were to run, and say Souza were also to run, then chances are that a Democrat from Woodland or Vacaville or West Sac or somewhere other than Davis would likely win the primary. But if Heystek gets out early, and no other Davis Dems challenge him, Lamar would stand a good chance to be our Assemblymember for the next 6 years.

  13. Doug Paul Davis

    Rich:

    I was just talking to Lamar, I don’t see him even thinking about that right now. He needs to be councilman for 8 years, get a good paying job. Yamada is the one to watch. Maybe Saylor. Maybe Calbaldon. I think Souza has his eye on Yamada’s Supervisor Seat if she runs for Assembly.

  14. Doug Paul Davis

    Rich:

    I was just talking to Lamar, I don’t see him even thinking about that right now. He needs to be councilman for 8 years, get a good paying job. Yamada is the one to watch. Maybe Saylor. Maybe Calbaldon. I think Souza has his eye on Yamada’s Supervisor Seat if she runs for Assembly.

  15. Doug Paul Davis

    Rich:

    I was just talking to Lamar, I don’t see him even thinking about that right now. He needs to be councilman for 8 years, get a good paying job. Yamada is the one to watch. Maybe Saylor. Maybe Calbaldon. I think Souza has his eye on Yamada’s Supervisor Seat if she runs for Assembly.

  16. Doug Paul Davis

    Rich:

    I was just talking to Lamar, I don’t see him even thinking about that right now. He needs to be councilman for 8 years, get a good paying job. Yamada is the one to watch. Maybe Saylor. Maybe Calbaldon. I think Souza has his eye on Yamada’s Supervisor Seat if she runs for Assembly.

  17. davisite

    Saylor was annointed by the “deep
    pockets” in the Yolo Democratic political machine to follow Lois Wolk and Helen Thomsen up the political ladder. This backing does not come without a price, namely
    “screwing” the Davis voter,when required, in favor of the economic interests of these land owner and developer patrons. He’ll be out of Davis politics in two years if he can manage to retain the support of those who fill campaign war chests.

  18. davisite

    Saylor was annointed by the “deep
    pockets” in the Yolo Democratic political machine to follow Lois Wolk and Helen Thomsen up the political ladder. This backing does not come without a price, namely
    “screwing” the Davis voter,when required, in favor of the economic interests of these land owner and developer patrons. He’ll be out of Davis politics in two years if he can manage to retain the support of those who fill campaign war chests.

  19. davisite

    Saylor was annointed by the “deep
    pockets” in the Yolo Democratic political machine to follow Lois Wolk and Helen Thomsen up the political ladder. This backing does not come without a price, namely
    “screwing” the Davis voter,when required, in favor of the economic interests of these land owner and developer patrons. He’ll be out of Davis politics in two years if he can manage to retain the support of those who fill campaign war chests.

  20. davisite

    Saylor was annointed by the “deep
    pockets” in the Yolo Democratic political machine to follow Lois Wolk and Helen Thomsen up the political ladder. This backing does not come without a price, namely
    “screwing” the Davis voter,when required, in favor of the economic interests of these land owner and developer patrons. He’ll be out of Davis politics in two years if he can manage to retain the support of those who fill campaign war chests.

  21. Doug Paul Davis

    Davisite: That’s really where I see the need for this blog in the next two years–to educate the public and prevent people like Souza and Saylor from getting to higher office.

  22. Doug Paul Davis

    Davisite: That’s really where I see the need for this blog in the next two years–to educate the public and prevent people like Souza and Saylor from getting to higher office.

  23. Doug Paul Davis

    Davisite: That’s really where I see the need for this blog in the next two years–to educate the public and prevent people like Souza and Saylor from getting to higher office.

  24. Doug Paul Davis

    Davisite: That’s really where I see the need for this blog in the next two years–to educate the public and prevent people like Souza and Saylor from getting to higher office.

  25. Doug Paul Davis

    Wu ming:

    I did want to respond to you about Stan Forbes. Forbes was a Republican, he’s not a Republican anymore. What he is is an embodiment of what we saw around the country on Tuesday–a person who was a Republican but the Republican party left him.

    On the homefront, I think he has solid credential:

    Measure J which is the best defense we have against sprawl was one of his big contributions to our city

    He opposed and worked against Measure X

    He opposed Target

    And he was a very strong supporter of the HRC, its former Chair, and police reform.

    And he’s a fighter. Had he won, not only would we have the majority, but we would have a guy who would go toe-to-toe with Souza and Saylor and allow Sue to just worry about being Mayor. I was very disappointed that Stan did not win.

  26. Doug Paul Davis

    Wu ming:

    I did want to respond to you about Stan Forbes. Forbes was a Republican, he’s not a Republican anymore. What he is is an embodiment of what we saw around the country on Tuesday–a person who was a Republican but the Republican party left him.

    On the homefront, I think he has solid credential:

    Measure J which is the best defense we have against sprawl was one of his big contributions to our city

    He opposed and worked against Measure X

    He opposed Target

    And he was a very strong supporter of the HRC, its former Chair, and police reform.

    And he’s a fighter. Had he won, not only would we have the majority, but we would have a guy who would go toe-to-toe with Souza and Saylor and allow Sue to just worry about being Mayor. I was very disappointed that Stan did not win.

  27. Doug Paul Davis

    Wu ming:

    I did want to respond to you about Stan Forbes. Forbes was a Republican, he’s not a Republican anymore. What he is is an embodiment of what we saw around the country on Tuesday–a person who was a Republican but the Republican party left him.

    On the homefront, I think he has solid credential:

    Measure J which is the best defense we have against sprawl was one of his big contributions to our city

    He opposed and worked against Measure X

    He opposed Target

    And he was a very strong supporter of the HRC, its former Chair, and police reform.

    And he’s a fighter. Had he won, not only would we have the majority, but we would have a guy who would go toe-to-toe with Souza and Saylor and allow Sue to just worry about being Mayor. I was very disappointed that Stan did not win.

  28. Doug Paul Davis

    Wu ming:

    I did want to respond to you about Stan Forbes. Forbes was a Republican, he’s not a Republican anymore. What he is is an embodiment of what we saw around the country on Tuesday–a person who was a Republican but the Republican party left him.

    On the homefront, I think he has solid credential:

    Measure J which is the best defense we have against sprawl was one of his big contributions to our city

    He opposed and worked against Measure X

    He opposed Target

    And he was a very strong supporter of the HRC, its former Chair, and police reform.

    And he’s a fighter. Had he won, not only would we have the majority, but we would have a guy who would go toe-to-toe with Souza and Saylor and allow Sue to just worry about being Mayor. I was very disappointed that Stan did not win.

  29. davisite

    Yamada is an interesting case. She
    calls herself the “accidental supervisor”. Entering the political arena “sideways” from the position of Dave Rosenberg’s chief of staff meant that she did not have to climb the Yolo Democratic political ladder and was able to bypass the entrenched Democratic political leadership and “deep pockets” in Yolo politics. We can expect that Souza will be beholden to the entrenched political power of developers and land speculators in Yolo if he runs for Supervisor.

  30. davisite

    Yamada is an interesting case. She
    calls herself the “accidental supervisor”. Entering the political arena “sideways” from the position of Dave Rosenberg’s chief of staff meant that she did not have to climb the Yolo Democratic political ladder and was able to bypass the entrenched Democratic political leadership and “deep pockets” in Yolo politics. We can expect that Souza will be beholden to the entrenched political power of developers and land speculators in Yolo if he runs for Supervisor.

  31. davisite

    Yamada is an interesting case. She
    calls herself the “accidental supervisor”. Entering the political arena “sideways” from the position of Dave Rosenberg’s chief of staff meant that she did not have to climb the Yolo Democratic political ladder and was able to bypass the entrenched Democratic political leadership and “deep pockets” in Yolo politics. We can expect that Souza will be beholden to the entrenched political power of developers and land speculators in Yolo if he runs for Supervisor.

  32. davisite

    Yamada is an interesting case. She
    calls herself the “accidental supervisor”. Entering the political arena “sideways” from the position of Dave Rosenberg’s chief of staff meant that she did not have to climb the Yolo Democratic political ladder and was able to bypass the entrenched Democratic political leadership and “deep pockets” in Yolo politics. We can expect that Souza will be beholden to the entrenched political power of developers and land speculators in Yolo if he runs for Supervisor.

  33. Doug Paul Davis

    The Political Establishment I think assumed that Yamada was one of theirs when she worked for Rosenberg. Those of us who knew her, knew better. But if you look at her list of endorsements, it’s reads like a who’s who list of the establishment. Then again, she managed Puntillo’s City Council Campaign. Expect her to be pushed very hard for the Assembly seat. Someone told me Provenza may have eyes for the Supervisor seat, I’m not sure how credible that is.

  34. Doug Paul Davis

    The Political Establishment I think assumed that Yamada was one of theirs when she worked for Rosenberg. Those of us who knew her, knew better. But if you look at her list of endorsements, it’s reads like a who’s who list of the establishment. Then again, she managed Puntillo’s City Council Campaign. Expect her to be pushed very hard for the Assembly seat. Someone told me Provenza may have eyes for the Supervisor seat, I’m not sure how credible that is.

  35. Doug Paul Davis

    The Political Establishment I think assumed that Yamada was one of theirs when she worked for Rosenberg. Those of us who knew her, knew better. But if you look at her list of endorsements, it’s reads like a who’s who list of the establishment. Then again, she managed Puntillo’s City Council Campaign. Expect her to be pushed very hard for the Assembly seat. Someone told me Provenza may have eyes for the Supervisor seat, I’m not sure how credible that is.

  36. Doug Paul Davis

    The Political Establishment I think assumed that Yamada was one of theirs when she worked for Rosenberg. Those of us who knew her, knew better. But if you look at her list of endorsements, it’s reads like a who’s who list of the establishment. Then again, she managed Puntillo’s City Council Campaign. Expect her to be pushed very hard for the Assembly seat. Someone told me Provenza may have eyes for the Supervisor seat, I’m not sure how credible that is.

  37. davisite

    Thanks for the info on Yamada. I did not know that she managed Puntillo’s campaign but I would guess that it had to do with then Supervisor and now Judge Rosenberg having been her boss . As we all know, Rosenberg was Puntillo’s political guru and patron.

  38. davisite

    Thanks for the info on Yamada. I did not know that she managed Puntillo’s campaign but I would guess that it had to do with then Supervisor and now Judge Rosenberg having been her boss . As we all know, Rosenberg was Puntillo’s political guru and patron.

  39. davisite

    Thanks for the info on Yamada. I did not know that she managed Puntillo’s campaign but I would guess that it had to do with then Supervisor and now Judge Rosenberg having been her boss . As we all know, Rosenberg was Puntillo’s political guru and patron.

  40. davisite

    Thanks for the info on Yamada. I did not know that she managed Puntillo’s campaign but I would guess that it had to do with then Supervisor and now Judge Rosenberg having been her boss . As we all know, Rosenberg was Puntillo’s political guru and patron.

  41. davisite

    Provenza is our best hope for getting two of the three open seats in the next council election . This is the critical council that will be doing the General Plan update. Will Provenza sacrifice a run for Supervisor( if he is really considering this) in favor of making a profound difference for the future of the Davis?

  42. davisite

    Provenza is our best hope for getting two of the three open seats in the next council election . This is the critical council that will be doing the General Plan update. Will Provenza sacrifice a run for Supervisor( if he is really considering this) in favor of making a profound difference for the future of the Davis?

  43. davisite

    Provenza is our best hope for getting two of the three open seats in the next council election . This is the critical council that will be doing the General Plan update. Will Provenza sacrifice a run for Supervisor( if he is really considering this) in favor of making a profound difference for the future of the Davis?

  44. davisite

    Provenza is our best hope for getting two of the three open seats in the next council election . This is the critical council that will be doing the General Plan update. Will Provenza sacrifice a run for Supervisor( if he is really considering this) in favor of making a profound difference for the future of the Davis?

  45. Doug Paul Davis

    Needless to say, Yamada and Puntillo are no longer close.

    I probably should not have mentioned Provenza, because that was sheer rumor and I get in trouble when I spread rumors. Provenza would undoubtedly be an excellent council candidate, he’s a unifier that can bring people together but he’s also someone who at the core a supporter of the key causes.

  46. Doug Paul Davis

    Needless to say, Yamada and Puntillo are no longer close.

    I probably should not have mentioned Provenza, because that was sheer rumor and I get in trouble when I spread rumors. Provenza would undoubtedly be an excellent council candidate, he’s a unifier that can bring people together but he’s also someone who at the core a supporter of the key causes.

  47. Doug Paul Davis

    Needless to say, Yamada and Puntillo are no longer close.

    I probably should not have mentioned Provenza, because that was sheer rumor and I get in trouble when I spread rumors. Provenza would undoubtedly be an excellent council candidate, he’s a unifier that can bring people together but he’s also someone who at the core a supporter of the key causes.

  48. Doug Paul Davis

    Needless to say, Yamada and Puntillo are no longer close.

    I probably should not have mentioned Provenza, because that was sheer rumor and I get in trouble when I spread rumors. Provenza would undoubtedly be an excellent council candidate, he’s a unifier that can bring people together but he’s also someone who at the core a supporter of the key causes.

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