School’s Out for Valley Oak Students?

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I always encourage people to send me new ideas for stories, and I’m very thankful for this one. Frankly I have not paid much attention to the proposed closure of Valley Oak School. I assumed it was merely an issue of facilities rather than something much larger. However, the more I have read about it, the more concerned I get.

The most concerning aspect of this for me is that the school district is just opening a new elementary school, Korematsu. Korematsu had not even opened yet, when in June, a special task force recommended the closure of Valley Oak due to declining enrollment.

Right there, a red flag goes up for me. Because now you are opening a new school in the wealthy Mace Ranch neighborhood, while you are closing an old school in the part of Davis that is the most racially diverse and economically disadvantaged. Some have suggested that Valley Oak was the target because its population is the least organized and politically powerless. Let us examine that question.

The June 27, 2006 Davis Enterprise cites task force member Jan Bridge, a former school board trustee, who suggests that given declining enrollment there are inherent problems with opening the new Korematsu Elementary campus in Mace Ranch, while operating the eight existing elementary schools. So if that’s the case, why are you opening a new school?

School Board Member Gina Daleiden: “The minute Korematsu opens, it starts to bleed students from Valley Oak. That’s just a fact.” Korematsu is in the newer, more affluent Mace Ranch area, while Valley Oak is in Old East Davis, surrounded by smaller homes and several apartment complexes. “I don’t want to relegate our students with the fewest resources to a site with the fewest resources.”

On the other hand, Daleiden ignores the drawbacks of closing the school. The students once the school is closed would be dispersed into three neighboring schools. This would put a large hardship on those families. Presently, with the neighborhood school open, the kids are able to walk or bicycle to school with ease. Many of these families do not have access to reliable transportation which put new burdens on the students and their parents.

Moreover, Valley Oak has been a major success story, with a very diverse student population that outperforms many of the neighboring schools that the students would be sent to.

Unfortunately, this appears to be a case where the wealthy parents and families in Mace Ranch, where Korematsu lies are getting a new school at the expense of the poorer students who go to Valley Oak.

I want to make this clear–I am not advocating the closing of Korematsu. I agree with those who suggest it is a bad idea to pit school against school. I urge the school district to come up with creative solutions in order to keep both schools open.

However, I also agree with Mr. Tezcan who wrote a letter to the editor last night pointing out in many ways this is as much about socio-economic issues and race relations as it is a debate about facilities. Unfortunately, I am forced to agree. Politics is about the distribution of scarce resources by government. Who wins in the political battle? Generally, those who have the most resource, influence, and are best organized. Unfortunately that appears to be Korematsu over Valley Oak.

The most perplexing part of this for me is the reason cited for why Valley Oak. Task force member Bridge, again in the June Davis Enterprise article, suggests that there are 420 kids on the school site. So what is the problem? There are 175 students who are in the GATE program at Valley Oak, many of those students come from outside of the school’s attendance area. Reassigning the GATE program to another school and opening Korematsu would drop that figure to 225 according to task force chair Kirk Trost.

So let me get this straight, they are proposing closing a school that has a program that is so successful that kids from other parts of town attend?

Mr. Tezcan in a letter to me suggested that this might be a good issue for the Davis Human Relations Commission. I agree, too bad we do not have one anymore that can actually do something. I do not wish to continue beating a dead horse, (okay, yes I do), but already there are two issues that the Human Relations Commission should be dealing with, and both involve the school district.

A long time ago, in another town, I was heavily involved in school board issues. The commitment of parents to their neighborhood schools is tremendous. The advantages of smaller neighborhood schools over larger schools are many. I understand declining registration numbers. And I understand the need to best utilize our facilities in such a way that maximize our resources to create a strong learning environment. But part of doing that is giving people good safe neighborhood schools where their children can attend.

While closing down a school may (and I stress may) serve the needs of the school district, it certainly does not serve the needs of the students at Valley Oak Elementary School, students who appear to need as much help as possible in order to get a good and strong foundation for their future. Why would a school district pick on the weakest and most vulnerable segment of our population? That is beyond me.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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72 thoughts on “School’s Out for Valley Oak Students?”

  1. 無名 - wu ming

    as a former valley oak dragon, i was pretty shocked to see talk of closing it down.

    couldn’t they just move the portable classrooms somewhere else and go back to the pre-overcrowding enrollment numbers? it worked well enough for us back in the 80s, and they’d have a lot more space on the blacktop.

    this strikes me as not unlike grocery stores saying that the old sized stores are unviable these days, so we won’t open a store in stonegate; it begs the question of the shift in metrics that makes what once worked just fine for decades become suddenly unworkable today.

    smaller schools aren’t an evil. keeping korematsu and valley oak should be possible, especially in a town with the collective resources we’ve got, and for a community that bases much of its identity and self worth on the quality of its public schools.

  2. 無名 - wu ming

    as a former valley oak dragon, i was pretty shocked to see talk of closing it down.

    couldn’t they just move the portable classrooms somewhere else and go back to the pre-overcrowding enrollment numbers? it worked well enough for us back in the 80s, and they’d have a lot more space on the blacktop.

    this strikes me as not unlike grocery stores saying that the old sized stores are unviable these days, so we won’t open a store in stonegate; it begs the question of the shift in metrics that makes what once worked just fine for decades become suddenly unworkable today.

    smaller schools aren’t an evil. keeping korematsu and valley oak should be possible, especially in a town with the collective resources we’ve got, and for a community that bases much of its identity and self worth on the quality of its public schools.

  3. 無名 - wu ming

    as a former valley oak dragon, i was pretty shocked to see talk of closing it down.

    couldn’t they just move the portable classrooms somewhere else and go back to the pre-overcrowding enrollment numbers? it worked well enough for us back in the 80s, and they’d have a lot more space on the blacktop.

    this strikes me as not unlike grocery stores saying that the old sized stores are unviable these days, so we won’t open a store in stonegate; it begs the question of the shift in metrics that makes what once worked just fine for decades become suddenly unworkable today.

    smaller schools aren’t an evil. keeping korematsu and valley oak should be possible, especially in a town with the collective resources we’ve got, and for a community that bases much of its identity and self worth on the quality of its public schools.

  4. 無名 - wu ming

    as a former valley oak dragon, i was pretty shocked to see talk of closing it down.

    couldn’t they just move the portable classrooms somewhere else and go back to the pre-overcrowding enrollment numbers? it worked well enough for us back in the 80s, and they’d have a lot more space on the blacktop.

    this strikes me as not unlike grocery stores saying that the old sized stores are unviable these days, so we won’t open a store in stonegate; it begs the question of the shift in metrics that makes what once worked just fine for decades become suddenly unworkable today.

    smaller schools aren’t an evil. keeping korematsu and valley oak should be possible, especially in a town with the collective resources we’ve got, and for a community that bases much of its identity and self worth on the quality of its public schools.

  5. 無名 - wu ming

    additionally, the way that neighborhoods get shafted on decisions like this are one major reason why i support district elections for city council, instead of citywide ones.

  6. 無名 - wu ming

    additionally, the way that neighborhoods get shafted on decisions like this are one major reason why i support district elections for city council, instead of citywide ones.

  7. 無名 - wu ming

    additionally, the way that neighborhoods get shafted on decisions like this are one major reason why i support district elections for city council, instead of citywide ones.

  8. 無名 - wu ming

    additionally, the way that neighborhoods get shafted on decisions like this are one major reason why i support district elections for city council, instead of citywide ones.

  9. Doug Paul Davis

    Although this is a school board issue, this is the first time I’ve really seen a good strong reason for having district elections. When an issue strongly harms one part of the city over another, that is a strong reason for it. Still don’t know if I support it overall.

  10. Doug Paul Davis

    Although this is a school board issue, this is the first time I’ve really seen a good strong reason for having district elections. When an issue strongly harms one part of the city over another, that is a strong reason for it. Still don’t know if I support it overall.

  11. Doug Paul Davis

    Although this is a school board issue, this is the first time I’ve really seen a good strong reason for having district elections. When an issue strongly harms one part of the city over another, that is a strong reason for it. Still don’t know if I support it overall.

  12. Doug Paul Davis

    Although this is a school board issue, this is the first time I’ve really seen a good strong reason for having district elections. When an issue strongly harms one part of the city over another, that is a strong reason for it. Still don’t know if I support it overall.

  13. davisite

    It is instructive for all of us, even those who no longer have school-age children, to pay attention to our School Board representatives’ statements on the issues that come before them. We all know that our School Board is a political stepping-stone to our City Council. If available, I would like to hear more details about each of the school board member’s public statements explaining their vote.

  14. davisite

    It is instructive for all of us, even those who no longer have school-age children, to pay attention to our School Board representatives’ statements on the issues that come before them. We all know that our School Board is a political stepping-stone to our City Council. If available, I would like to hear more details about each of the school board member’s public statements explaining their vote.

  15. davisite

    It is instructive for all of us, even those who no longer have school-age children, to pay attention to our School Board representatives’ statements on the issues that come before them. We all know that our School Board is a political stepping-stone to our City Council. If available, I would like to hear more details about each of the school board member’s public statements explaining their vote.

  16. davisite

    It is instructive for all of us, even those who no longer have school-age children, to pay attention to our School Board representatives’ statements on the issues that come before them. We all know that our School Board is a political stepping-stone to our City Council. If available, I would like to hear more details about each of the school board member’s public statements explaining their vote.

  17. Rich Rifkin

    “I assumed it was merely an issue of facilities rather than something much larger. However, the more I have read about it, the more concerned I get.”

    Doug,

    You’re wrong. It is an issue of facilities. Of course for those who will be impacted, it is something larger. But there is no conspiracy here to ruin the lives of children and families who live in East Davis. Any implication otherwise is unfounded and unfair.

    “Right there, a red flag goes up for me. Because now you are opening a new school in the wealthy Mace Ranch neighborhood, while you are closing an old school in the part of Davis that is the most racially diverse and economically disadvantaged.”

    The wealth or poverty or race of the families in Mace Ranch had nothing to do with this decision. To imply it did is disingenuous and misguided.

    “Some have suggested that Valley Oak was the target because its population is the least organized and politically powerless.”

    I don’t know if the people of East Davis are “politically powerless.” However, until this Korematsu vs. Valley Oak conflict arose, it’s fair to say that the Mace Ranch folks were better organized. They had been rallying and lobbying for years to get Korematsu opened, despite the fact that there were too few elementary kids in Davis to justify that.

    “So if that’s the case, why are you opening a new school?”

    It was opened solely because the Mace Ranch families, who had been led to believe that they would have a neighborhood elementary school in place once their homes were built, lobbied and cajoled for years and years until they finally got their way.

    “Korematsu is in the newer, more affluent Mace Ranch area, while Valley Oak is in Old East Davis, surrounded by smaller homes and several apartment complexes.”

    Money is not the key factor. There are three factors: 1) the organization and lobbying efforts of the people of Mace Ranch for over 10 years; 2) the greater concentration of elementary school-aged kids; and 3) the quality of the facilities at the new campus.

    “Unfortunately, this appears to be a case where the wealthy parents and families in Mace Ranch, where Korematsu lies are getting a new school at the expense of the poorer students who go to Valley Oak.”

    It may “appear” that way. But it’s a bad and ignorant misreading of the facts.

    “I urge the school district to come up with creative solutions in order to keep both schools open.”

    I agree with that. Hopefully, that will happen.

    “However, I also agree with Mr. Tezcan who wrote a letter to the editor last night pointing out in many ways this is as much about socio-economic issues and race relations as it is a debate about facilities.”

    That kind of paranoid thinking, which assigns malicious motives to others in this community, when in fact they have nothing to do with the decision, is destructive to our democracy. It concerns me that you, as someone who is new to Davis and who likely will not be living here a decade from now, would malign the people of Davis, as such, when you know nothing about this situation. That is shameful of you.

    “Who wins in the political battle? Generally, those who have the most resource, influence, and are best organized.”

    Maybe if you had followed this issue, and were not predisposed to believe the worst about your fellow citizens, you would understand that the Mace Ranch people — many of whom, I’m sure, are not white or wealthy — are so well organized and have had success in arguing their case, because they have been motivated for over a decade to see their own elementary school open, which was promised to them from the beginning.

    By contrast, the East Davis neighborhood never had reason to organize to fight the opening of a Mace Ranch school, because it didn’t seemingly affect them. However, now that this idea to close Valley Oak is out there, the East Davis people will stand up as one, and we’ll see where things go. It’s not over yet. Valley Oak is not closed.

    “There are 175 students who are in the GATE program at Valley Oak, many of those students come from outside of the school’s attendance area.”

    Mr. Tezcan in a letter to me suggested that this might be a good issue for the Davis Human Relations Commission.”

    God forbid! The Human Relations Commission, set up originally to “bring the community together,” will now take on the task of calling the people of Mace Ranch a bunch of rich racists? It’s time the HRC did less, not more.

  18. Rich Rifkin

    “I assumed it was merely an issue of facilities rather than something much larger. However, the more I have read about it, the more concerned I get.”

    Doug,

    You’re wrong. It is an issue of facilities. Of course for those who will be impacted, it is something larger. But there is no conspiracy here to ruin the lives of children and families who live in East Davis. Any implication otherwise is unfounded and unfair.

    “Right there, a red flag goes up for me. Because now you are opening a new school in the wealthy Mace Ranch neighborhood, while you are closing an old school in the part of Davis that is the most racially diverse and economically disadvantaged.”

    The wealth or poverty or race of the families in Mace Ranch had nothing to do with this decision. To imply it did is disingenuous and misguided.

    “Some have suggested that Valley Oak was the target because its population is the least organized and politically powerless.”

    I don’t know if the people of East Davis are “politically powerless.” However, until this Korematsu vs. Valley Oak conflict arose, it’s fair to say that the Mace Ranch folks were better organized. They had been rallying and lobbying for years to get Korematsu opened, despite the fact that there were too few elementary kids in Davis to justify that.

    “So if that’s the case, why are you opening a new school?”

    It was opened solely because the Mace Ranch families, who had been led to believe that they would have a neighborhood elementary school in place once their homes were built, lobbied and cajoled for years and years until they finally got their way.

    “Korematsu is in the newer, more affluent Mace Ranch area, while Valley Oak is in Old East Davis, surrounded by smaller homes and several apartment complexes.”

    Money is not the key factor. There are three factors: 1) the organization and lobbying efforts of the people of Mace Ranch for over 10 years; 2) the greater concentration of elementary school-aged kids; and 3) the quality of the facilities at the new campus.

    “Unfortunately, this appears to be a case where the wealthy parents and families in Mace Ranch, where Korematsu lies are getting a new school at the expense of the poorer students who go to Valley Oak.”

    It may “appear” that way. But it’s a bad and ignorant misreading of the facts.

    “I urge the school district to come up with creative solutions in order to keep both schools open.”

    I agree with that. Hopefully, that will happen.

    “However, I also agree with Mr. Tezcan who wrote a letter to the editor last night pointing out in many ways this is as much about socio-economic issues and race relations as it is a debate about facilities.”

    That kind of paranoid thinking, which assigns malicious motives to others in this community, when in fact they have nothing to do with the decision, is destructive to our democracy. It concerns me that you, as someone who is new to Davis and who likely will not be living here a decade from now, would malign the people of Davis, as such, when you know nothing about this situation. That is shameful of you.

    “Who wins in the political battle? Generally, those who have the most resource, influence, and are best organized.”

    Maybe if you had followed this issue, and were not predisposed to believe the worst about your fellow citizens, you would understand that the Mace Ranch people — many of whom, I’m sure, are not white or wealthy — are so well organized and have had success in arguing their case, because they have been motivated for over a decade to see their own elementary school open, which was promised to them from the beginning.

    By contrast, the East Davis neighborhood never had reason to organize to fight the opening of a Mace Ranch school, because it didn’t seemingly affect them. However, now that this idea to close Valley Oak is out there, the East Davis people will stand up as one, and we’ll see where things go. It’s not over yet. Valley Oak is not closed.

    “There are 175 students who are in the GATE program at Valley Oak, many of those students come from outside of the school’s attendance area.”

    Mr. Tezcan in a letter to me suggested that this might be a good issue for the Davis Human Relations Commission.”

    God forbid! The Human Relations Commission, set up originally to “bring the community together,” will now take on the task of calling the people of Mace Ranch a bunch of rich racists? It’s time the HRC did less, not more.

  19. Rich Rifkin

    “I assumed it was merely an issue of facilities rather than something much larger. However, the more I have read about it, the more concerned I get.”

    Doug,

    You’re wrong. It is an issue of facilities. Of course for those who will be impacted, it is something larger. But there is no conspiracy here to ruin the lives of children and families who live in East Davis. Any implication otherwise is unfounded and unfair.

    “Right there, a red flag goes up for me. Because now you are opening a new school in the wealthy Mace Ranch neighborhood, while you are closing an old school in the part of Davis that is the most racially diverse and economically disadvantaged.”

    The wealth or poverty or race of the families in Mace Ranch had nothing to do with this decision. To imply it did is disingenuous and misguided.

    “Some have suggested that Valley Oak was the target because its population is the least organized and politically powerless.”

    I don’t know if the people of East Davis are “politically powerless.” However, until this Korematsu vs. Valley Oak conflict arose, it’s fair to say that the Mace Ranch folks were better organized. They had been rallying and lobbying for years to get Korematsu opened, despite the fact that there were too few elementary kids in Davis to justify that.

    “So if that’s the case, why are you opening a new school?”

    It was opened solely because the Mace Ranch families, who had been led to believe that they would have a neighborhood elementary school in place once their homes were built, lobbied and cajoled for years and years until they finally got their way.

    “Korematsu is in the newer, more affluent Mace Ranch area, while Valley Oak is in Old East Davis, surrounded by smaller homes and several apartment complexes.”

    Money is not the key factor. There are three factors: 1) the organization and lobbying efforts of the people of Mace Ranch for over 10 years; 2) the greater concentration of elementary school-aged kids; and 3) the quality of the facilities at the new campus.

    “Unfortunately, this appears to be a case where the wealthy parents and families in Mace Ranch, where Korematsu lies are getting a new school at the expense of the poorer students who go to Valley Oak.”

    It may “appear” that way. But it’s a bad and ignorant misreading of the facts.

    “I urge the school district to come up with creative solutions in order to keep both schools open.”

    I agree with that. Hopefully, that will happen.

    “However, I also agree with Mr. Tezcan who wrote a letter to the editor last night pointing out in many ways this is as much about socio-economic issues and race relations as it is a debate about facilities.”

    That kind of paranoid thinking, which assigns malicious motives to others in this community, when in fact they have nothing to do with the decision, is destructive to our democracy. It concerns me that you, as someone who is new to Davis and who likely will not be living here a decade from now, would malign the people of Davis, as such, when you know nothing about this situation. That is shameful of you.

    “Who wins in the political battle? Generally, those who have the most resource, influence, and are best organized.”

    Maybe if you had followed this issue, and were not predisposed to believe the worst about your fellow citizens, you would understand that the Mace Ranch people — many of whom, I’m sure, are not white or wealthy — are so well organized and have had success in arguing their case, because they have been motivated for over a decade to see their own elementary school open, which was promised to them from the beginning.

    By contrast, the East Davis neighborhood never had reason to organize to fight the opening of a Mace Ranch school, because it didn’t seemingly affect them. However, now that this idea to close Valley Oak is out there, the East Davis people will stand up as one, and we’ll see where things go. It’s not over yet. Valley Oak is not closed.

    “There are 175 students who are in the GATE program at Valley Oak, many of those students come from outside of the school’s attendance area.”

    Mr. Tezcan in a letter to me suggested that this might be a good issue for the Davis Human Relations Commission.”

    God forbid! The Human Relations Commission, set up originally to “bring the community together,” will now take on the task of calling the people of Mace Ranch a bunch of rich racists? It’s time the HRC did less, not more.

  20. Rich Rifkin

    “I assumed it was merely an issue of facilities rather than something much larger. However, the more I have read about it, the more concerned I get.”

    Doug,

    You’re wrong. It is an issue of facilities. Of course for those who will be impacted, it is something larger. But there is no conspiracy here to ruin the lives of children and families who live in East Davis. Any implication otherwise is unfounded and unfair.

    “Right there, a red flag goes up for me. Because now you are opening a new school in the wealthy Mace Ranch neighborhood, while you are closing an old school in the part of Davis that is the most racially diverse and economically disadvantaged.”

    The wealth or poverty or race of the families in Mace Ranch had nothing to do with this decision. To imply it did is disingenuous and misguided.

    “Some have suggested that Valley Oak was the target because its population is the least organized and politically powerless.”

    I don’t know if the people of East Davis are “politically powerless.” However, until this Korematsu vs. Valley Oak conflict arose, it’s fair to say that the Mace Ranch folks were better organized. They had been rallying and lobbying for years to get Korematsu opened, despite the fact that there were too few elementary kids in Davis to justify that.

    “So if that’s the case, why are you opening a new school?”

    It was opened solely because the Mace Ranch families, who had been led to believe that they would have a neighborhood elementary school in place once their homes were built, lobbied and cajoled for years and years until they finally got their way.

    “Korematsu is in the newer, more affluent Mace Ranch area, while Valley Oak is in Old East Davis, surrounded by smaller homes and several apartment complexes.”

    Money is not the key factor. There are three factors: 1) the organization and lobbying efforts of the people of Mace Ranch for over 10 years; 2) the greater concentration of elementary school-aged kids; and 3) the quality of the facilities at the new campus.

    “Unfortunately, this appears to be a case where the wealthy parents and families in Mace Ranch, where Korematsu lies are getting a new school at the expense of the poorer students who go to Valley Oak.”

    It may “appear” that way. But it’s a bad and ignorant misreading of the facts.

    “I urge the school district to come up with creative solutions in order to keep both schools open.”

    I agree with that. Hopefully, that will happen.

    “However, I also agree with Mr. Tezcan who wrote a letter to the editor last night pointing out in many ways this is as much about socio-economic issues and race relations as it is a debate about facilities.”

    That kind of paranoid thinking, which assigns malicious motives to others in this community, when in fact they have nothing to do with the decision, is destructive to our democracy. It concerns me that you, as someone who is new to Davis and who likely will not be living here a decade from now, would malign the people of Davis, as such, when you know nothing about this situation. That is shameful of you.

    “Who wins in the political battle? Generally, those who have the most resource, influence, and are best organized.”

    Maybe if you had followed this issue, and were not predisposed to believe the worst about your fellow citizens, you would understand that the Mace Ranch people — many of whom, I’m sure, are not white or wealthy — are so well organized and have had success in arguing their case, because they have been motivated for over a decade to see their own elementary school open, which was promised to them from the beginning.

    By contrast, the East Davis neighborhood never had reason to organize to fight the opening of a Mace Ranch school, because it didn’t seemingly affect them. However, now that this idea to close Valley Oak is out there, the East Davis people will stand up as one, and we’ll see where things go. It’s not over yet. Valley Oak is not closed.

    “There are 175 students who are in the GATE program at Valley Oak, many of those students come from outside of the school’s attendance area.”

    Mr. Tezcan in a letter to me suggested that this might be a good issue for the Davis Human Relations Commission.”

    God forbid! The Human Relations Commission, set up originally to “bring the community together,” will now take on the task of calling the people of Mace Ranch a bunch of rich racists? It’s time the HRC did less, not more.

  21. Rich Rifkin

    By the way, I have a creative solution to this whole problem, and I will suggest it in my Enterprise column in a few weeks. I’m still doing some background work on it.

  22. Rich Rifkin

    By the way, I have a creative solution to this whole problem, and I will suggest it in my Enterprise column in a few weeks. I’m still doing some background work on it.

  23. Rich Rifkin

    By the way, I have a creative solution to this whole problem, and I will suggest it in my Enterprise column in a few weeks. I’m still doing some background work on it.

  24. Rich Rifkin

    By the way, I have a creative solution to this whole problem, and I will suggest it in my Enterprise column in a few weeks. I’m still doing some background work on it.

  25. Anonymous

    Valley Oak is not the great school that some make it out to be. The GATE program overwhelms the school. Remove the GATE program from the test scores and then compare the results to other schools. My child suffered through 3 long years of bullying there before transfering to North Davis. North Davis elementary is surrounded by low income housing, but the elite are not allowed their own separate classrooms and program. I feel it was a much healthier environment for my child.

  26. Anonymous

    Valley Oak is not the great school that some make it out to be. The GATE program overwhelms the school. Remove the GATE program from the test scores and then compare the results to other schools. My child suffered through 3 long years of bullying there before transfering to North Davis. North Davis elementary is surrounded by low income housing, but the elite are not allowed their own separate classrooms and program. I feel it was a much healthier environment for my child.

  27. Anonymous

    Valley Oak is not the great school that some make it out to be. The GATE program overwhelms the school. Remove the GATE program from the test scores and then compare the results to other schools. My child suffered through 3 long years of bullying there before transfering to North Davis. North Davis elementary is surrounded by low income housing, but the elite are not allowed their own separate classrooms and program. I feel it was a much healthier environment for my child.

  28. Anonymous

    Valley Oak is not the great school that some make it out to be. The GATE program overwhelms the school. Remove the GATE program from the test scores and then compare the results to other schools. My child suffered through 3 long years of bullying there before transfering to North Davis. North Davis elementary is surrounded by low income housing, but the elite are not allowed their own separate classrooms and program. I feel it was a much healthier environment for my child.

  29. davisite

    On this one, I’m with you Rifkin.
    Too much heat and little light would probably be the result of getting the HRC involved in this one. Yes.. the parents of Valley Oak will now try to organize and bring their political strength to this issue. How the individual Board members respond to this challenge to Davis’ principles of community will be revealing.

  30. davisite

    On this one, I’m with you Rifkin.
    Too much heat and little light would probably be the result of getting the HRC involved in this one. Yes.. the parents of Valley Oak will now try to organize and bring their political strength to this issue. How the individual Board members respond to this challenge to Davis’ principles of community will be revealing.

  31. davisite

    On this one, I’m with you Rifkin.
    Too much heat and little light would probably be the result of getting the HRC involved in this one. Yes.. the parents of Valley Oak will now try to organize and bring their political strength to this issue. How the individual Board members respond to this challenge to Davis’ principles of community will be revealing.

  32. davisite

    On this one, I’m with you Rifkin.
    Too much heat and little light would probably be the result of getting the HRC involved in this one. Yes.. the parents of Valley Oak will now try to organize and bring their political strength to this issue. How the individual Board members respond to this challenge to Davis’ principles of community will be revealing.

  33. Doug Paul Davis

    I read my blog again–I’m really bothered by the insinuation by Rifkin that I was somehow attacking Mace Ranch residents as racist. Where exactly does that notion come from? As far as I can tell, Mace Ranch people organized to get their own school. I have no problem with that. They had nothing to do with whether or not Valley Oak closes. They did not make the decision to close it. So where does one get the sense that I am attacking the people of Mace Ranch?

  34. Doug Paul Davis

    I read my blog again–I’m really bothered by the insinuation by Rifkin that I was somehow attacking Mace Ranch residents as racist. Where exactly does that notion come from? As far as I can tell, Mace Ranch people organized to get their own school. I have no problem with that. They had nothing to do with whether or not Valley Oak closes. They did not make the decision to close it. So where does one get the sense that I am attacking the people of Mace Ranch?

  35. Doug Paul Davis

    I read my blog again–I’m really bothered by the insinuation by Rifkin that I was somehow attacking Mace Ranch residents as racist. Where exactly does that notion come from? As far as I can tell, Mace Ranch people organized to get their own school. I have no problem with that. They had nothing to do with whether or not Valley Oak closes. They did not make the decision to close it. So where does one get the sense that I am attacking the people of Mace Ranch?

  36. Doug Paul Davis

    I read my blog again–I’m really bothered by the insinuation by Rifkin that I was somehow attacking Mace Ranch residents as racist. Where exactly does that notion come from? As far as I can tell, Mace Ranch people organized to get their own school. I have no problem with that. They had nothing to do with whether or not Valley Oak closes. They did not make the decision to close it. So where does one get the sense that I am attacking the people of Mace Ranch?

  37. Doug Paul Davis

    (Accidentally copied some of my other notes that would make no sense)

    Rich:

    I think we are in more agreement than you think.

    But there are some obvious differences.

    First, it is an issue of facilities, that is true. But the question then becomes which facility do you close. That becomes a political question. And as you suggest the people in Mace Ranch organized and lobbied for neighborhood school. I don’t begrudge that.

    But the differential in the ability to organize is at least in part a function of socio-economic status. The effectiveness of that lobbying effort does as well.

    Who is more powerful the well organized people of Mace Ranch (who you acknowledge were better organized and have been fighting for years) or the working folks in East Davis?

    “Money is not the key factor. There are three factors: 1) the organization and lobbying efforts of the people of Mace Ranch for over 10 years; 2) the greater concentration of elementary school-aged kids; and 3) the quality of the facilities at the new campus.”

    I see these as related aspects.

    “It may “appear” that way. But it’s a bad and ignorant misreading of the facts.”

    Then you need to establish that.

    “as someone who is new to Davis”

    Living here for 10 years is new to Davis…

    “and who likely will not be living here a decade from now”

    Maybe or maybe not, but it’s a side issue that has nothing to do with my ability to evaluate this issue. I’ve spent a lot of time working on the issues of this community, if I didn’t care, I certainly would not.

    “would malign the people of Davis”

    I haven’t maligned anyone. I’ve suggested that there is a political reason why they went after the school with the lower socio-economic status at the same time they built a school that they apparently did not need in a wealthier neighborhood. I think that is a fair question.

    If there is an alternative explanation, I suggest you provide one.

    “Maybe if you had followed this issue, and were not predisposed to believe the worst about your fellow citizens, you would understand that the Mace Ranch people — many of whom, I’m sure, are not white or wealthy — are so well organized and have had success in arguing their case, because they have been motivated for over a decade to see their own elementary school open, which was promised to them from the beginning.”

    I’m not disparaging the people of Mace Ranch. As I suggested twice, I hope they keep Korematsu open. I’m concerned about the political process whereby Valley Oak was to be closed.

    “By contrast, the East Davis neighborhood never had reason to organize to fight the opening of a Mace Ranch school, because it didn’t seemingly affect them. However, now that this idea to close Valley Oak is out there, the East Davis people will stand up as one, and we’ll see where things go. It’s not over yet. Valley Oak is not closed.”

    This is the problem now. Are you aware of the first-mover advantage? It’s a game-theoretical problem that you might have learned in economics. Basically those who mobilize first gain a huge advantage–in this case, they just built the darn school, they aren’t closing a school they just built. And the people of East Davis did not see the threat until it was too late.

    So whose obligation should it have been to protect the interests of the people whose children attend Valley Oak?

    You are so focused on me attacking Mace Ranch, when in fact, they are not the target of this blog. Who am I going after? Do you even know?

  38. Doug Paul Davis

    (Accidentally copied some of my other notes that would make no sense)

    Rich:

    I think we are in more agreement than you think.

    But there are some obvious differences.

    First, it is an issue of facilities, that is true. But the question then becomes which facility do you close. That becomes a political question. And as you suggest the people in Mace Ranch organized and lobbied for neighborhood school. I don’t begrudge that.

    But the differential in the ability to organize is at least in part a function of socio-economic status. The effectiveness of that lobbying effort does as well.

    Who is more powerful the well organized people of Mace Ranch (who you acknowledge were better organized and have been fighting for years) or the working folks in East Davis?

    “Money is not the key factor. There are three factors: 1) the organization and lobbying efforts of the people of Mace Ranch for over 10 years; 2) the greater concentration of elementary school-aged kids; and 3) the quality of the facilities at the new campus.”

    I see these as related aspects.

    “It may “appear” that way. But it’s a bad and ignorant misreading of the facts.”

    Then you need to establish that.

    “as someone who is new to Davis”

    Living here for 10 years is new to Davis…

    “and who likely will not be living here a decade from now”

    Maybe or maybe not, but it’s a side issue that has nothing to do with my ability to evaluate this issue. I’ve spent a lot of time working on the issues of this community, if I didn’t care, I certainly would not.

    “would malign the people of Davis”

    I haven’t maligned anyone. I’ve suggested that there is a political reason why they went after the school with the lower socio-economic status at the same time they built a school that they apparently did not need in a wealthier neighborhood. I think that is a fair question.

    If there is an alternative explanation, I suggest you provide one.

    “Maybe if you had followed this issue, and were not predisposed to believe the worst about your fellow citizens, you would understand that the Mace Ranch people — many of whom, I’m sure, are not white or wealthy — are so well organized and have had success in arguing their case, because they have been motivated for over a decade to see their own elementary school open, which was promised to them from the beginning.”

    I’m not disparaging the people of Mace Ranch. As I suggested twice, I hope they keep Korematsu open. I’m concerned about the political process whereby Valley Oak was to be closed.

    “By contrast, the East Davis neighborhood never had reason to organize to fight the opening of a Mace Ranch school, because it didn’t seemingly affect them. However, now that this idea to close Valley Oak is out there, the East Davis people will stand up as one, and we’ll see where things go. It’s not over yet. Valley Oak is not closed.”

    This is the problem now. Are you aware of the first-mover advantage? It’s a game-theoretical problem that you might have learned in economics. Basically those who mobilize first gain a huge advantage–in this case, they just built the darn school, they aren’t closing a school they just built. And the people of East Davis did not see the threat until it was too late.

    So whose obligation should it have been to protect the interests of the people whose children attend Valley Oak?

    You are so focused on me attacking Mace Ranch, when in fact, they are not the target of this blog. Who am I going after? Do you even know?

  39. Doug Paul Davis

    (Accidentally copied some of my other notes that would make no sense)

    Rich:

    I think we are in more agreement than you think.

    But there are some obvious differences.

    First, it is an issue of facilities, that is true. But the question then becomes which facility do you close. That becomes a political question. And as you suggest the people in Mace Ranch organized and lobbied for neighborhood school. I don’t begrudge that.

    But the differential in the ability to organize is at least in part a function of socio-economic status. The effectiveness of that lobbying effort does as well.

    Who is more powerful the well organized people of Mace Ranch (who you acknowledge were better organized and have been fighting for years) or the working folks in East Davis?

    “Money is not the key factor. There are three factors: 1) the organization and lobbying efforts of the people of Mace Ranch for over 10 years; 2) the greater concentration of elementary school-aged kids; and 3) the quality of the facilities at the new campus.”

    I see these as related aspects.

    “It may “appear” that way. But it’s a bad and ignorant misreading of the facts.”

    Then you need to establish that.

    “as someone who is new to Davis”

    Living here for 10 years is new to Davis…

    “and who likely will not be living here a decade from now”

    Maybe or maybe not, but it’s a side issue that has nothing to do with my ability to evaluate this issue. I’ve spent a lot of time working on the issues of this community, if I didn’t care, I certainly would not.

    “would malign the people of Davis”

    I haven’t maligned anyone. I’ve suggested that there is a political reason why they went after the school with the lower socio-economic status at the same time they built a school that they apparently did not need in a wealthier neighborhood. I think that is a fair question.

    If there is an alternative explanation, I suggest you provide one.

    “Maybe if you had followed this issue, and were not predisposed to believe the worst about your fellow citizens, you would understand that the Mace Ranch people — many of whom, I’m sure, are not white or wealthy — are so well organized and have had success in arguing their case, because they have been motivated for over a decade to see their own elementary school open, which was promised to them from the beginning.”

    I’m not disparaging the people of Mace Ranch. As I suggested twice, I hope they keep Korematsu open. I’m concerned about the political process whereby Valley Oak was to be closed.

    “By contrast, the East Davis neighborhood never had reason to organize to fight the opening of a Mace Ranch school, because it didn’t seemingly affect them. However, now that this idea to close Valley Oak is out there, the East Davis people will stand up as one, and we’ll see where things go. It’s not over yet. Valley Oak is not closed.”

    This is the problem now. Are you aware of the first-mover advantage? It’s a game-theoretical problem that you might have learned in economics. Basically those who mobilize first gain a huge advantage–in this case, they just built the darn school, they aren’t closing a school they just built. And the people of East Davis did not see the threat until it was too late.

    So whose obligation should it have been to protect the interests of the people whose children attend Valley Oak?

    You are so focused on me attacking Mace Ranch, when in fact, they are not the target of this blog. Who am I going after? Do you even know?

  40. Doug Paul Davis

    (Accidentally copied some of my other notes that would make no sense)

    Rich:

    I think we are in more agreement than you think.

    But there are some obvious differences.

    First, it is an issue of facilities, that is true. But the question then becomes which facility do you close. That becomes a political question. And as you suggest the people in Mace Ranch organized and lobbied for neighborhood school. I don’t begrudge that.

    But the differential in the ability to organize is at least in part a function of socio-economic status. The effectiveness of that lobbying effort does as well.

    Who is more powerful the well organized people of Mace Ranch (who you acknowledge were better organized and have been fighting for years) or the working folks in East Davis?

    “Money is not the key factor. There are three factors: 1) the organization and lobbying efforts of the people of Mace Ranch for over 10 years; 2) the greater concentration of elementary school-aged kids; and 3) the quality of the facilities at the new campus.”

    I see these as related aspects.

    “It may “appear” that way. But it’s a bad and ignorant misreading of the facts.”

    Then you need to establish that.

    “as someone who is new to Davis”

    Living here for 10 years is new to Davis…

    “and who likely will not be living here a decade from now”

    Maybe or maybe not, but it’s a side issue that has nothing to do with my ability to evaluate this issue. I’ve spent a lot of time working on the issues of this community, if I didn’t care, I certainly would not.

    “would malign the people of Davis”

    I haven’t maligned anyone. I’ve suggested that there is a political reason why they went after the school with the lower socio-economic status at the same time they built a school that they apparently did not need in a wealthier neighborhood. I think that is a fair question.

    If there is an alternative explanation, I suggest you provide one.

    “Maybe if you had followed this issue, and were not predisposed to believe the worst about your fellow citizens, you would understand that the Mace Ranch people — many of whom, I’m sure, are not white or wealthy — are so well organized and have had success in arguing their case, because they have been motivated for over a decade to see their own elementary school open, which was promised to them from the beginning.”

    I’m not disparaging the people of Mace Ranch. As I suggested twice, I hope they keep Korematsu open. I’m concerned about the political process whereby Valley Oak was to be closed.

    “By contrast, the East Davis neighborhood never had reason to organize to fight the opening of a Mace Ranch school, because it didn’t seemingly affect them. However, now that this idea to close Valley Oak is out there, the East Davis people will stand up as one, and we’ll see where things go. It’s not over yet. Valley Oak is not closed.”

    This is the problem now. Are you aware of the first-mover advantage? It’s a game-theoretical problem that you might have learned in economics. Basically those who mobilize first gain a huge advantage–in this case, they just built the darn school, they aren’t closing a school they just built. And the people of East Davis did not see the threat until it was too late.

    So whose obligation should it have been to protect the interests of the people whose children attend Valley Oak?

    You are so focused on me attacking Mace Ranch, when in fact, they are not the target of this blog. Who am I going after? Do you even know?

  41. Rob

    Mace Ranch residents organized and lobbied for 10 years because they’ve been paying an additional 1/2% property tax to service Mello-Roos bonds — bonds that were supposed to be used to build that elementary school (and 2 parks) 10 years ago.

    Doug said, “Politics is about the distribution of scarce resources by government.” These resources aren’t general funds; they were paid by Mace Ranch residents, specifically intended for Mace Ranch facilities, but have been spent as general funds for 10 years by both the city and the school district. I have no opinion about whether a school should be closed or which one, but saying that Mace Ranch is somehow stealing resources is completely backwards.

    If you actually visit Mace Ranch you’ll see that the neighborhood is very, very ethnically and economically diverse; describing the Valley Oak residents as “working folks” to imply that Mace Ranchers are not is offensive in the extreme. Despite being treated by the rest of Davis as ugly stepchildren, Mace Ranch residents pay the most property taxes of any neighborhood in town and have the least to show for it.

    Our town’s “leaders” have once again scared people into thinking that one neighborhood’s gain is somehow at their expense, and unfortunately this blog is only perpetuating that nonsense.

  42. Rob

    Mace Ranch residents organized and lobbied for 10 years because they’ve been paying an additional 1/2% property tax to service Mello-Roos bonds — bonds that were supposed to be used to build that elementary school (and 2 parks) 10 years ago.

    Doug said, “Politics is about the distribution of scarce resources by government.” These resources aren’t general funds; they were paid by Mace Ranch residents, specifically intended for Mace Ranch facilities, but have been spent as general funds for 10 years by both the city and the school district. I have no opinion about whether a school should be closed or which one, but saying that Mace Ranch is somehow stealing resources is completely backwards.

    If you actually visit Mace Ranch you’ll see that the neighborhood is very, very ethnically and economically diverse; describing the Valley Oak residents as “working folks” to imply that Mace Ranchers are not is offensive in the extreme. Despite being treated by the rest of Davis as ugly stepchildren, Mace Ranch residents pay the most property taxes of any neighborhood in town and have the least to show for it.

    Our town’s “leaders” have once again scared people into thinking that one neighborhood’s gain is somehow at their expense, and unfortunately this blog is only perpetuating that nonsense.

  43. Rob

    Mace Ranch residents organized and lobbied for 10 years because they’ve been paying an additional 1/2% property tax to service Mello-Roos bonds — bonds that were supposed to be used to build that elementary school (and 2 parks) 10 years ago.

    Doug said, “Politics is about the distribution of scarce resources by government.” These resources aren’t general funds; they were paid by Mace Ranch residents, specifically intended for Mace Ranch facilities, but have been spent as general funds for 10 years by both the city and the school district. I have no opinion about whether a school should be closed or which one, but saying that Mace Ranch is somehow stealing resources is completely backwards.

    If you actually visit Mace Ranch you’ll see that the neighborhood is very, very ethnically and economically diverse; describing the Valley Oak residents as “working folks” to imply that Mace Ranchers are not is offensive in the extreme. Despite being treated by the rest of Davis as ugly stepchildren, Mace Ranch residents pay the most property taxes of any neighborhood in town and have the least to show for it.

    Our town’s “leaders” have once again scared people into thinking that one neighborhood’s gain is somehow at their expense, and unfortunately this blog is only perpetuating that nonsense.

  44. Rob

    Mace Ranch residents organized and lobbied for 10 years because they’ve been paying an additional 1/2% property tax to service Mello-Roos bonds — bonds that were supposed to be used to build that elementary school (and 2 parks) 10 years ago.

    Doug said, “Politics is about the distribution of scarce resources by government.” These resources aren’t general funds; they were paid by Mace Ranch residents, specifically intended for Mace Ranch facilities, but have been spent as general funds for 10 years by both the city and the school district. I have no opinion about whether a school should be closed or which one, but saying that Mace Ranch is somehow stealing resources is completely backwards.

    If you actually visit Mace Ranch you’ll see that the neighborhood is very, very ethnically and economically diverse; describing the Valley Oak residents as “working folks” to imply that Mace Ranchers are not is offensive in the extreme. Despite being treated by the rest of Davis as ugly stepchildren, Mace Ranch residents pay the most property taxes of any neighborhood in town and have the least to show for it.

    Our town’s “leaders” have once again scared people into thinking that one neighborhood’s gain is somehow at their expense, and unfortunately this blog is only perpetuating that nonsense.

  45. Doug Paul Davis

    Rob:

    “Our town’s “leaders” have once again scared people into thinking that one neighborhood’s gain is somehow at their expense, and unfortunately this blog is only perpetuating that nonsense.”

    This was certainly not the intent of this blog. In fact, I twice stated to the contrary, that I do not wish to pit school against school.

    However, I do appreciate the information about the extra in property taxes, that is useful information in forming a more balanced opinion.

  46. Doug Paul Davis

    Rob:

    “Our town’s “leaders” have once again scared people into thinking that one neighborhood’s gain is somehow at their expense, and unfortunately this blog is only perpetuating that nonsense.”

    This was certainly not the intent of this blog. In fact, I twice stated to the contrary, that I do not wish to pit school against school.

    However, I do appreciate the information about the extra in property taxes, that is useful information in forming a more balanced opinion.

  47. Doug Paul Davis

    Rob:

    “Our town’s “leaders” have once again scared people into thinking that one neighborhood’s gain is somehow at their expense, and unfortunately this blog is only perpetuating that nonsense.”

    This was certainly not the intent of this blog. In fact, I twice stated to the contrary, that I do not wish to pit school against school.

    However, I do appreciate the information about the extra in property taxes, that is useful information in forming a more balanced opinion.

  48. Doug Paul Davis

    Rob:

    “Our town’s “leaders” have once again scared people into thinking that one neighborhood’s gain is somehow at their expense, and unfortunately this blog is only perpetuating that nonsense.”

    This was certainly not the intent of this blog. In fact, I twice stated to the contrary, that I do not wish to pit school against school.

    However, I do appreciate the information about the extra in property taxes, that is useful information in forming a more balanced opinion.

  49. Don Shor

    At the time the new school was proposed and begun, enrollment throughout the district was high and increasing steadily every year. It was considered urgent to open a new elementary school ASAP. Interdistrict kids were being thrown out (I know; my kids were interdistrict transfer students at the time) due to existing or projected overcrowding at the local elementary and junior high schools.

    Enrollment has flattened, and they don’t have enough kids to fill both schools. There is a base level of cost for operating a school, according to the district. So they proposed closing the one with the oldest facilities. I can attest to the rundown condition of Valley Oak during the 1990’s, though there have been significant improvements over the last few years.

    Enrollment will go up again at some point. It seems to me there is some reasonable way to keep both schools open, if there could be a little creative thinking on the part of school board members. Don’t hold your breath waiting for district officials to suggest alternatives. Just keep the pressure on the elected officials. I don’t think east Davis folks are less or more powerful or organized than Mace Ranch residents, nor do their interests conflict in this issue.

    By the way, there’s nothing at all wrong with GATE. It was a godsend for my son, who was also special ed–at Valley Oak. GATE parents–now they’re a special breed.
    But that’s a whole ‘nother topic.

  50. Don Shor

    At the time the new school was proposed and begun, enrollment throughout the district was high and increasing steadily every year. It was considered urgent to open a new elementary school ASAP. Interdistrict kids were being thrown out (I know; my kids were interdistrict transfer students at the time) due to existing or projected overcrowding at the local elementary and junior high schools.

    Enrollment has flattened, and they don’t have enough kids to fill both schools. There is a base level of cost for operating a school, according to the district. So they proposed closing the one with the oldest facilities. I can attest to the rundown condition of Valley Oak during the 1990’s, though there have been significant improvements over the last few years.

    Enrollment will go up again at some point. It seems to me there is some reasonable way to keep both schools open, if there could be a little creative thinking on the part of school board members. Don’t hold your breath waiting for district officials to suggest alternatives. Just keep the pressure on the elected officials. I don’t think east Davis folks are less or more powerful or organized than Mace Ranch residents, nor do their interests conflict in this issue.

    By the way, there’s nothing at all wrong with GATE. It was a godsend for my son, who was also special ed–at Valley Oak. GATE parents–now they’re a special breed.
    But that’s a whole ‘nother topic.

  51. Don Shor

    At the time the new school was proposed and begun, enrollment throughout the district was high and increasing steadily every year. It was considered urgent to open a new elementary school ASAP. Interdistrict kids were being thrown out (I know; my kids were interdistrict transfer students at the time) due to existing or projected overcrowding at the local elementary and junior high schools.

    Enrollment has flattened, and they don’t have enough kids to fill both schools. There is a base level of cost for operating a school, according to the district. So they proposed closing the one with the oldest facilities. I can attest to the rundown condition of Valley Oak during the 1990’s, though there have been significant improvements over the last few years.

    Enrollment will go up again at some point. It seems to me there is some reasonable way to keep both schools open, if there could be a little creative thinking on the part of school board members. Don’t hold your breath waiting for district officials to suggest alternatives. Just keep the pressure on the elected officials. I don’t think east Davis folks are less or more powerful or organized than Mace Ranch residents, nor do their interests conflict in this issue.

    By the way, there’s nothing at all wrong with GATE. It was a godsend for my son, who was also special ed–at Valley Oak. GATE parents–now they’re a special breed.
    But that’s a whole ‘nother topic.

  52. Don Shor

    At the time the new school was proposed and begun, enrollment throughout the district was high and increasing steadily every year. It was considered urgent to open a new elementary school ASAP. Interdistrict kids were being thrown out (I know; my kids were interdistrict transfer students at the time) due to existing or projected overcrowding at the local elementary and junior high schools.

    Enrollment has flattened, and they don’t have enough kids to fill both schools. There is a base level of cost for operating a school, according to the district. So they proposed closing the one with the oldest facilities. I can attest to the rundown condition of Valley Oak during the 1990’s, though there have been significant improvements over the last few years.

    Enrollment will go up again at some point. It seems to me there is some reasonable way to keep both schools open, if there could be a little creative thinking on the part of school board members. Don’t hold your breath waiting for district officials to suggest alternatives. Just keep the pressure on the elected officials. I don’t think east Davis folks are less or more powerful or organized than Mace Ranch residents, nor do their interests conflict in this issue.

    By the way, there’s nothing at all wrong with GATE. It was a godsend for my son, who was also special ed–at Valley Oak. GATE parents–now they’re a special breed.
    But that’s a whole ‘nother topic.

  53. Rich Rifkin

    “So where does one get the sense that I am attacking the people of Mace Ranch?”

    I don’t know if you are “attacking” the people of Mace Ranch, though I believe you have mischaracterized them. You implied that they are ethnically homogenous and exclusively wealthy, when neither is the case.

    You also suggest sending them to the Human Relations Commission, where they certainly would be attacked and pitted against the “working class” people of East Davis. (I would bet that there are as many people who live in Mace Ranch and who work for a living as there are in East Davis or in any Davis neighborhood.)

    I’m really bothered by the insinuation by Rifkin that I was somehow attacking Mace Ranch residents as racist.”

    Race has nothing to do with this question. You are completely wrong to imply that the school board has favored one neighborhood or another because of the ethnic or racial make-up of either. It is destructive to our community for you to say that.

    I never said or implied that you said the people of Mace Ranch are racists. I said that if the people of Mace Ranch are sent before the HRC, that charge will be lobbed at them.

    As you know, I see the HRC as being a devisive force in Davis, and I think it has no good reason to continue its existence as a public body.

    “But the differential in the ability to organize is at least in part a function of socio-economic status.”

    This is such a bogus point that I’m shocked you are not embarrassed to state it. The people of East Davis did not organize around this issue in the past because it was never an issue to them. It had nothing to do with wealth or poverty.

    And it should be pointed out that the people of East Davis are not on the whole poor. Most of the people who live in the part of town that feeds Valley Oak are like most people in Davis, fairly well educated with decent household incomes.

    Maybe they have more children who come from lower-income households than other Davis neighborhoods. But it is in no way an impoverished ghetto, and in no sense is wealth a factor in why they never organized on this issue in the past.

    “Living here for 10 years is new to Davis…”

    Yes, it is. It is in no way a disqualifier, but it is a very short amount of time. You don’t even remember J. Tingus Men’s Wear, or Winger’s, or Quessenberry’s, or Frye’s, or Mr. Gee’s or the days of Bob Black.

    “I haven’t maligned anyone. I’ve suggested that there is a political reason why they went after the school with the lower socio-economic status at the same time they built a school that they apparently did not need in a wealthier neighborhood.”

    You have maligned someone. You’ve maligned the school board, and by extension our entire community, for implying that the decision to pick Korematsu over Valley Oak was one of race and income:

    “… you are opening a new school in the wealthy Mace Ranch neighborhood, while you are closing an old school in the part of Davis that is the most racially diverse and economically disadvantaged.”

    One thing that has not been said in this thread regards the original decision to build an elementary school in Mace Ranch: we were suffering severe overcrowding at all of our elementary schools back then. No one knew then that there was going to be a shortage of children by the time Korematsu was completed. It was naturally assumed that Korematsu (and in South Davis, Montgomery) would absorb the excess demand for classroom space.

    Korematsu was not built just because the people of Mace Ranch wanted it. All the people of Davis agreed years ago that we needed more elementary school and junior high classrooms. That is why Harper was built, as well.

    A decade ago, every existing elementary school was being overrun with temporary classrooms, most of which still are standing.

    As a youngster, I attended West Davis Elementary (now Chavez) and West Davis Intermediate (now Willett). What is so physically different about those schools, today, is that whereas we had huge grass fields and tremendous amounts of open space, those two schools — because of the building of so many more classrooms — are now comparitively paved over.

  54. Rich Rifkin

    “So where does one get the sense that I am attacking the people of Mace Ranch?”

    I don’t know if you are “attacking” the people of Mace Ranch, though I believe you have mischaracterized them. You implied that they are ethnically homogenous and exclusively wealthy, when neither is the case.

    You also suggest sending them to the Human Relations Commission, where they certainly would be attacked and pitted against the “working class” people of East Davis. (I would bet that there are as many people who live in Mace Ranch and who work for a living as there are in East Davis or in any Davis neighborhood.)

    I’m really bothered by the insinuation by Rifkin that I was somehow attacking Mace Ranch residents as racist.”

    Race has nothing to do with this question. You are completely wrong to imply that the school board has favored one neighborhood or another because of the ethnic or racial make-up of either. It is destructive to our community for you to say that.

    I never said or implied that you said the people of Mace Ranch are racists. I said that if the people of Mace Ranch are sent before the HRC, that charge will be lobbed at them.

    As you know, I see the HRC as being a devisive force in Davis, and I think it has no good reason to continue its existence as a public body.

    “But the differential in the ability to organize is at least in part a function of socio-economic status.”

    This is such a bogus point that I’m shocked you are not embarrassed to state it. The people of East Davis did not organize around this issue in the past because it was never an issue to them. It had nothing to do with wealth or poverty.

    And it should be pointed out that the people of East Davis are not on the whole poor. Most of the people who live in the part of town that feeds Valley Oak are like most people in Davis, fairly well educated with decent household incomes.

    Maybe they have more children who come from lower-income households than other Davis neighborhoods. But it is in no way an impoverished ghetto, and in no sense is wealth a factor in why they never organized on this issue in the past.

    “Living here for 10 years is new to Davis…”

    Yes, it is. It is in no way a disqualifier, but it is a very short amount of time. You don’t even remember J. Tingus Men’s Wear, or Winger’s, or Quessenberry’s, or Frye’s, or Mr. Gee’s or the days of Bob Black.

    “I haven’t maligned anyone. I’ve suggested that there is a political reason why they went after the school with the lower socio-economic status at the same time they built a school that they apparently did not need in a wealthier neighborhood.”

    You have maligned someone. You’ve maligned the school board, and by extension our entire community, for implying that the decision to pick Korematsu over Valley Oak was one of race and income:

    “… you are opening a new school in the wealthy Mace Ranch neighborhood, while you are closing an old school in the part of Davis that is the most racially diverse and economically disadvantaged.”

    One thing that has not been said in this thread regards the original decision to build an elementary school in Mace Ranch: we were suffering severe overcrowding at all of our elementary schools back then. No one knew then that there was going to be a shortage of children by the time Korematsu was completed. It was naturally assumed that Korematsu (and in South Davis, Montgomery) would absorb the excess demand for classroom space.

    Korematsu was not built just because the people of Mace Ranch wanted it. All the people of Davis agreed years ago that we needed more elementary school and junior high classrooms. That is why Harper was built, as well.

    A decade ago, every existing elementary school was being overrun with temporary classrooms, most of which still are standing.

    As a youngster, I attended West Davis Elementary (now Chavez) and West Davis Intermediate (now Willett). What is so physically different about those schools, today, is that whereas we had huge grass fields and tremendous amounts of open space, those two schools — because of the building of so many more classrooms — are now comparitively paved over.

  55. Rich Rifkin

    “So where does one get the sense that I am attacking the people of Mace Ranch?”

    I don’t know if you are “attacking” the people of Mace Ranch, though I believe you have mischaracterized them. You implied that they are ethnically homogenous and exclusively wealthy, when neither is the case.

    You also suggest sending them to the Human Relations Commission, where they certainly would be attacked and pitted against the “working class” people of East Davis. (I would bet that there are as many people who live in Mace Ranch and who work for a living as there are in East Davis or in any Davis neighborhood.)

    I’m really bothered by the insinuation by Rifkin that I was somehow attacking Mace Ranch residents as racist.”

    Race has nothing to do with this question. You are completely wrong to imply that the school board has favored one neighborhood or another because of the ethnic or racial make-up of either. It is destructive to our community for you to say that.

    I never said or implied that you said the people of Mace Ranch are racists. I said that if the people of Mace Ranch are sent before the HRC, that charge will be lobbed at them.

    As you know, I see the HRC as being a devisive force in Davis, and I think it has no good reason to continue its existence as a public body.

    “But the differential in the ability to organize is at least in part a function of socio-economic status.”

    This is such a bogus point that I’m shocked you are not embarrassed to state it. The people of East Davis did not organize around this issue in the past because it was never an issue to them. It had nothing to do with wealth or poverty.

    And it should be pointed out that the people of East Davis are not on the whole poor. Most of the people who live in the part of town that feeds Valley Oak are like most people in Davis, fairly well educated with decent household incomes.

    Maybe they have more children who come from lower-income households than other Davis neighborhoods. But it is in no way an impoverished ghetto, and in no sense is wealth a factor in why they never organized on this issue in the past.

    “Living here for 10 years is new to Davis…”

    Yes, it is. It is in no way a disqualifier, but it is a very short amount of time. You don’t even remember J. Tingus Men’s Wear, or Winger’s, or Quessenberry’s, or Frye’s, or Mr. Gee’s or the days of Bob Black.

    “I haven’t maligned anyone. I’ve suggested that there is a political reason why they went after the school with the lower socio-economic status at the same time they built a school that they apparently did not need in a wealthier neighborhood.”

    You have maligned someone. You’ve maligned the school board, and by extension our entire community, for implying that the decision to pick Korematsu over Valley Oak was one of race and income:

    “… you are opening a new school in the wealthy Mace Ranch neighborhood, while you are closing an old school in the part of Davis that is the most racially diverse and economically disadvantaged.”

    One thing that has not been said in this thread regards the original decision to build an elementary school in Mace Ranch: we were suffering severe overcrowding at all of our elementary schools back then. No one knew then that there was going to be a shortage of children by the time Korematsu was completed. It was naturally assumed that Korematsu (and in South Davis, Montgomery) would absorb the excess demand for classroom space.

    Korematsu was not built just because the people of Mace Ranch wanted it. All the people of Davis agreed years ago that we needed more elementary school and junior high classrooms. That is why Harper was built, as well.

    A decade ago, every existing elementary school was being overrun with temporary classrooms, most of which still are standing.

    As a youngster, I attended West Davis Elementary (now Chavez) and West Davis Intermediate (now Willett). What is so physically different about those schools, today, is that whereas we had huge grass fields and tremendous amounts of open space, those two schools — because of the building of so many more classrooms — are now comparitively paved over.

  56. Rich Rifkin

    “So where does one get the sense that I am attacking the people of Mace Ranch?”

    I don’t know if you are “attacking” the people of Mace Ranch, though I believe you have mischaracterized them. You implied that they are ethnically homogenous and exclusively wealthy, when neither is the case.

    You also suggest sending them to the Human Relations Commission, where they certainly would be attacked and pitted against the “working class” people of East Davis. (I would bet that there are as many people who live in Mace Ranch and who work for a living as there are in East Davis or in any Davis neighborhood.)

    I’m really bothered by the insinuation by Rifkin that I was somehow attacking Mace Ranch residents as racist.”

    Race has nothing to do with this question. You are completely wrong to imply that the school board has favored one neighborhood or another because of the ethnic or racial make-up of either. It is destructive to our community for you to say that.

    I never said or implied that you said the people of Mace Ranch are racists. I said that if the people of Mace Ranch are sent before the HRC, that charge will be lobbed at them.

    As you know, I see the HRC as being a devisive force in Davis, and I think it has no good reason to continue its existence as a public body.

    “But the differential in the ability to organize is at least in part a function of socio-economic status.”

    This is such a bogus point that I’m shocked you are not embarrassed to state it. The people of East Davis did not organize around this issue in the past because it was never an issue to them. It had nothing to do with wealth or poverty.

    And it should be pointed out that the people of East Davis are not on the whole poor. Most of the people who live in the part of town that feeds Valley Oak are like most people in Davis, fairly well educated with decent household incomes.

    Maybe they have more children who come from lower-income households than other Davis neighborhoods. But it is in no way an impoverished ghetto, and in no sense is wealth a factor in why they never organized on this issue in the past.

    “Living here for 10 years is new to Davis…”

    Yes, it is. It is in no way a disqualifier, but it is a very short amount of time. You don’t even remember J. Tingus Men’s Wear, or Winger’s, or Quessenberry’s, or Frye’s, or Mr. Gee’s or the days of Bob Black.

    “I haven’t maligned anyone. I’ve suggested that there is a political reason why they went after the school with the lower socio-economic status at the same time they built a school that they apparently did not need in a wealthier neighborhood.”

    You have maligned someone. You’ve maligned the school board, and by extension our entire community, for implying that the decision to pick Korematsu over Valley Oak was one of race and income:

    “… you are opening a new school in the wealthy Mace Ranch neighborhood, while you are closing an old school in the part of Davis that is the most racially diverse and economically disadvantaged.”

    One thing that has not been said in this thread regards the original decision to build an elementary school in Mace Ranch: we were suffering severe overcrowding at all of our elementary schools back then. No one knew then that there was going to be a shortage of children by the time Korematsu was completed. It was naturally assumed that Korematsu (and in South Davis, Montgomery) would absorb the excess demand for classroom space.

    Korematsu was not built just because the people of Mace Ranch wanted it. All the people of Davis agreed years ago that we needed more elementary school and junior high classrooms. That is why Harper was built, as well.

    A decade ago, every existing elementary school was being overrun with temporary classrooms, most of which still are standing.

    As a youngster, I attended West Davis Elementary (now Chavez) and West Davis Intermediate (now Willett). What is so physically different about those schools, today, is that whereas we had huge grass fields and tremendous amounts of open space, those two schools — because of the building of so many more classrooms — are now comparitively paved over.

  57. Baki

    Hi!

    I am not quite sure whether anyone accused Mace Ranch people of being rich racists. Yet the actual outcome of opening Korematsu on the demographic distribution of neighborhood schools will be to segregate the better to do from the less affluent in the short term. Please see the Census 2000 data below. http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/ThematicMapFramesetServlet?_bm=y&-_MapEvent=Pan&-errMsg=&-_useSS=N&-_dBy=140&-redoLog=false&-_zoomLevel=&-tm_name=DEC_2000_SF3_U_M00266&-tm_config=|b=50|l=en|t=403|zf=0.0|ms=thm_def|dw=0.127654448550011|dh=0.07576475132991932|dt=gov.census.aff.domain.map.EnglishMapExtent|if=gif|cx=-121.7447105|cy=38.482894|zl=4|pz=4|bo=|bl=|ft=350:349:335:389:388:332:331|fl=403:381:204:380:369:379:368|g=86000US95616|ds=DEC_2000_SF3_U|sb=50|tud=false|db=140|mn=26538|mx=120238|cc=1|cm=1|cn=5|cb=|um=Dollars|pr=0|th=DEC_2000_SF3_U_M00266|sf=N|sg=&-PANEL_ID=tm_result&-_pageY=&-_lang=en&-geo_id=86000US95616&-_pageX=&-_mapY=&-_mapX=&-_latitude=&-_pan=N&-ds_name=DEC_2000_SF3_U&-_longitude=&-_changeMap=Identify

    Whether this may lead to a “ghettoization” of the Valley Oak area remains to be seen.

    As for the taxes that Mace Ranch residents have been paying, they were for building new schools in the city to respond to the growth, not for building a school in their neighborhood (please read the fine print).

    I do agree, however, that the political leadership was poor and made promises it should not have made. Unlike the suggestion made in some comments here, the demographic estimates made in mid 1990s suggested that the city could actually not fill two new schools. Vern Weber himself admitted at a Task Force meeting that they were expecting a drop in enrollments but did not want to give up the opportunity of state funding for the elementary school in Mace Ranch. So they went ahead and built Montgomery and Korematsu, knowing one of these two schools was actually not necessary for the city as a whole. By building two schools, the Board Members were aware that they were actually closing a school implicitly, but they did not say so as it would not be very opportune to talk about closing an old school in the city center for building a new school in the suburbs when the Covell Village was on the table. One could wake up to the fact that a school in Covell Village may eventually lead to the closure of Birch Lane or North Davis.

    Now the Task Force has the difficult task of providing technical justification for a political decision made a decade ago but never announced. That is why the Valley Oak residents like myself feel very frustrated when presented with data that should have been discussed publicly in some great detail ten years ago which could have resulted in a decision not to build Korematsu in the first place. The Mace Ranch residents were promised something the city could not afford. Now the Valley Oak residents are paying the price.

    I apologize if my comments offended anyone. They were not meant to be.

    All the best,
    Baki

  58. Baki

    Hi!

    I am not quite sure whether anyone accused Mace Ranch people of being rich racists. Yet the actual outcome of opening Korematsu on the demographic distribution of neighborhood schools will be to segregate the better to do from the less affluent in the short term. Please see the Census 2000 data below. http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/ThematicMapFramesetServlet?_bm=y&-_MapEvent=Pan&-errMsg=&-_useSS=N&-_dBy=140&-redoLog=false&-_zoomLevel=&-tm_name=DEC_2000_SF3_U_M00266&-tm_config=|b=50|l=en|t=403|zf=0.0|ms=thm_def|dw=0.127654448550011|dh=0.07576475132991932|dt=gov.census.aff.domain.map.EnglishMapExtent|if=gif|cx=-121.7447105|cy=38.482894|zl=4|pz=4|bo=|bl=|ft=350:349:335:389:388:332:331|fl=403:381:204:380:369:379:368|g=86000US95616|ds=DEC_2000_SF3_U|sb=50|tud=false|db=140|mn=26538|mx=120238|cc=1|cm=1|cn=5|cb=|um=Dollars|pr=0|th=DEC_2000_SF3_U_M00266|sf=N|sg=&-PANEL_ID=tm_result&-_pageY=&-_lang=en&-geo_id=86000US95616&-_pageX=&-_mapY=&-_mapX=&-_latitude=&-_pan=N&-ds_name=DEC_2000_SF3_U&-_longitude=&-_changeMap=Identify

    Whether this may lead to a “ghettoization” of the Valley Oak area remains to be seen.

    As for the taxes that Mace Ranch residents have been paying, they were for building new schools in the city to respond to the growth, not for building a school in their neighborhood (please read the fine print).

    I do agree, however, that the political leadership was poor and made promises it should not have made. Unlike the suggestion made in some comments here, the demographic estimates made in mid 1990s suggested that the city could actually not fill two new schools. Vern Weber himself admitted at a Task Force meeting that they were expecting a drop in enrollments but did not want to give up the opportunity of state funding for the elementary school in Mace Ranch. So they went ahead and built Montgomery and Korematsu, knowing one of these two schools was actually not necessary for the city as a whole. By building two schools, the Board Members were aware that they were actually closing a school implicitly, but they did not say so as it would not be very opportune to talk about closing an old school in the city center for building a new school in the suburbs when the Covell Village was on the table. One could wake up to the fact that a school in Covell Village may eventually lead to the closure of Birch Lane or North Davis.

    Now the Task Force has the difficult task of providing technical justification for a political decision made a decade ago but never announced. That is why the Valley Oak residents like myself feel very frustrated when presented with data that should have been discussed publicly in some great detail ten years ago which could have resulted in a decision not to build Korematsu in the first place. The Mace Ranch residents were promised something the city could not afford. Now the Valley Oak residents are paying the price.

    I apologize if my comments offended anyone. They were not meant to be.

    All the best,
    Baki

  59. Baki

    Hi!

    I am not quite sure whether anyone accused Mace Ranch people of being rich racists. Yet the actual outcome of opening Korematsu on the demographic distribution of neighborhood schools will be to segregate the better to do from the less affluent in the short term. Please see the Census 2000 data below. http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/ThematicMapFramesetServlet?_bm=y&-_MapEvent=Pan&-errMsg=&-_useSS=N&-_dBy=140&-redoLog=false&-_zoomLevel=&-tm_name=DEC_2000_SF3_U_M00266&-tm_config=|b=50|l=en|t=403|zf=0.0|ms=thm_def|dw=0.127654448550011|dh=0.07576475132991932|dt=gov.census.aff.domain.map.EnglishMapExtent|if=gif|cx=-121.7447105|cy=38.482894|zl=4|pz=4|bo=|bl=|ft=350:349:335:389:388:332:331|fl=403:381:204:380:369:379:368|g=86000US95616|ds=DEC_2000_SF3_U|sb=50|tud=false|db=140|mn=26538|mx=120238|cc=1|cm=1|cn=5|cb=|um=Dollars|pr=0|th=DEC_2000_SF3_U_M00266|sf=N|sg=&-PANEL_ID=tm_result&-_pageY=&-_lang=en&-geo_id=86000US95616&-_pageX=&-_mapY=&-_mapX=&-_latitude=&-_pan=N&-ds_name=DEC_2000_SF3_U&-_longitude=&-_changeMap=Identify

    Whether this may lead to a “ghettoization” of the Valley Oak area remains to be seen.

    As for the taxes that Mace Ranch residents have been paying, they were for building new schools in the city to respond to the growth, not for building a school in their neighborhood (please read the fine print).

    I do agree, however, that the political leadership was poor and made promises it should not have made. Unlike the suggestion made in some comments here, the demographic estimates made in mid 1990s suggested that the city could actually not fill two new schools. Vern Weber himself admitted at a Task Force meeting that they were expecting a drop in enrollments but did not want to give up the opportunity of state funding for the elementary school in Mace Ranch. So they went ahead and built Montgomery and Korematsu, knowing one of these two schools was actually not necessary for the city as a whole. By building two schools, the Board Members were aware that they were actually closing a school implicitly, but they did not say so as it would not be very opportune to talk about closing an old school in the city center for building a new school in the suburbs when the Covell Village was on the table. One could wake up to the fact that a school in Covell Village may eventually lead to the closure of Birch Lane or North Davis.

    Now the Task Force has the difficult task of providing technical justification for a political decision made a decade ago but never announced. That is why the Valley Oak residents like myself feel very frustrated when presented with data that should have been discussed publicly in some great detail ten years ago which could have resulted in a decision not to build Korematsu in the first place. The Mace Ranch residents were promised something the city could not afford. Now the Valley Oak residents are paying the price.

    I apologize if my comments offended anyone. They were not meant to be.

    All the best,
    Baki

  60. Baki

    Hi!

    I am not quite sure whether anyone accused Mace Ranch people of being rich racists. Yet the actual outcome of opening Korematsu on the demographic distribution of neighborhood schools will be to segregate the better to do from the less affluent in the short term. Please see the Census 2000 data below. http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/ThematicMapFramesetServlet?_bm=y&-_MapEvent=Pan&-errMsg=&-_useSS=N&-_dBy=140&-redoLog=false&-_zoomLevel=&-tm_name=DEC_2000_SF3_U_M00266&-tm_config=|b=50|l=en|t=403|zf=0.0|ms=thm_def|dw=0.127654448550011|dh=0.07576475132991932|dt=gov.census.aff.domain.map.EnglishMapExtent|if=gif|cx=-121.7447105|cy=38.482894|zl=4|pz=4|bo=|bl=|ft=350:349:335:389:388:332:331|fl=403:381:204:380:369:379:368|g=86000US95616|ds=DEC_2000_SF3_U|sb=50|tud=false|db=140|mn=26538|mx=120238|cc=1|cm=1|cn=5|cb=|um=Dollars|pr=0|th=DEC_2000_SF3_U_M00266|sf=N|sg=&-PANEL_ID=tm_result&-_pageY=&-_lang=en&-geo_id=86000US95616&-_pageX=&-_mapY=&-_mapX=&-_latitude=&-_pan=N&-ds_name=DEC_2000_SF3_U&-_longitude=&-_changeMap=Identify

    Whether this may lead to a “ghettoization” of the Valley Oak area remains to be seen.

    As for the taxes that Mace Ranch residents have been paying, they were for building new schools in the city to respond to the growth, not for building a school in their neighborhood (please read the fine print).

    I do agree, however, that the political leadership was poor and made promises it should not have made. Unlike the suggestion made in some comments here, the demographic estimates made in mid 1990s suggested that the city could actually not fill two new schools. Vern Weber himself admitted at a Task Force meeting that they were expecting a drop in enrollments but did not want to give up the opportunity of state funding for the elementary school in Mace Ranch. So they went ahead and built Montgomery and Korematsu, knowing one of these two schools was actually not necessary for the city as a whole. By building two schools, the Board Members were aware that they were actually closing a school implicitly, but they did not say so as it would not be very opportune to talk about closing an old school in the city center for building a new school in the suburbs when the Covell Village was on the table. One could wake up to the fact that a school in Covell Village may eventually lead to the closure of Birch Lane or North Davis.

    Now the Task Force has the difficult task of providing technical justification for a political decision made a decade ago but never announced. That is why the Valley Oak residents like myself feel very frustrated when presented with data that should have been discussed publicly in some great detail ten years ago which could have resulted in a decision not to build Korematsu in the first place. The Mace Ranch residents were promised something the city could not afford. Now the Valley Oak residents are paying the price.

    I apologize if my comments offended anyone. They were not meant to be.

    All the best,
    Baki

  61. davisite

    Baki… What a welcome and sane comment in contrast to Rifkin’s “yelling”! I hope that you continue to contribute your comments to Peoples Vanguard of Davis.

  62. davisite

    Baki… What a welcome and sane comment in contrast to Rifkin’s “yelling”! I hope that you continue to contribute your comments to Peoples Vanguard of Davis.

  63. davisite

    Baki… What a welcome and sane comment in contrast to Rifkin’s “yelling”! I hope that you continue to contribute your comments to Peoples Vanguard of Davis.

  64. davisite

    Baki… What a welcome and sane comment in contrast to Rifkin’s “yelling”! I hope that you continue to contribute your comments to Peoples Vanguard of Davis.

  65. Anonymous

    I am a current Valley Oak parent. Mello-Roos bonds were to pay for school overcrowding caused by Mace Ranch development. Such as adding portables, new teacher salaries, etc. This in no way was a fund for a Mace Ranch neighborhood school, and this money SHOULD HAVE BEEN in the general fund. So many people should get their facts straight.

    Also many people do not realize that the main leaders of Valley Oak PTA are Mace Ranch parents. These so called leaders are downplaying the importance of school board meetings, and really don’t seem to be rallying the Valley Oak parents in support of saving Valley Oak. Why would they want to. If Valley Oak closes, then it’s easier to fully open Koramatsu. If this isn’t a conflict of interest, then I don’t know what is.

    Valley Oak is a wonderful school. I have 2 kids still there, and one already graduated. Bullying of a child for 3 years seems unlikely since there is an often times too strict zero tolerance policy. The parent of the bullied child should have taken the inititiative, because I’m sure the teachers/principal were unaware of this.

    SAVE VALLEY OAK!!!!!!

  66. Anonymous

    I am a current Valley Oak parent. Mello-Roos bonds were to pay for school overcrowding caused by Mace Ranch development. Such as adding portables, new teacher salaries, etc. This in no way was a fund for a Mace Ranch neighborhood school, and this money SHOULD HAVE BEEN in the general fund. So many people should get their facts straight.

    Also many people do not realize that the main leaders of Valley Oak PTA are Mace Ranch parents. These so called leaders are downplaying the importance of school board meetings, and really don’t seem to be rallying the Valley Oak parents in support of saving Valley Oak. Why would they want to. If Valley Oak closes, then it’s easier to fully open Koramatsu. If this isn’t a conflict of interest, then I don’t know what is.

    Valley Oak is a wonderful school. I have 2 kids still there, and one already graduated. Bullying of a child for 3 years seems unlikely since there is an often times too strict zero tolerance policy. The parent of the bullied child should have taken the inititiative, because I’m sure the teachers/principal were unaware of this.

    SAVE VALLEY OAK!!!!!!

  67. Anonymous

    I am a current Valley Oak parent. Mello-Roos bonds were to pay for school overcrowding caused by Mace Ranch development. Such as adding portables, new teacher salaries, etc. This in no way was a fund for a Mace Ranch neighborhood school, and this money SHOULD HAVE BEEN in the general fund. So many people should get their facts straight.

    Also many people do not realize that the main leaders of Valley Oak PTA are Mace Ranch parents. These so called leaders are downplaying the importance of school board meetings, and really don’t seem to be rallying the Valley Oak parents in support of saving Valley Oak. Why would they want to. If Valley Oak closes, then it’s easier to fully open Koramatsu. If this isn’t a conflict of interest, then I don’t know what is.

    Valley Oak is a wonderful school. I have 2 kids still there, and one already graduated. Bullying of a child for 3 years seems unlikely since there is an often times too strict zero tolerance policy. The parent of the bullied child should have taken the inititiative, because I’m sure the teachers/principal were unaware of this.

    SAVE VALLEY OAK!!!!!!

  68. Anonymous

    I am a current Valley Oak parent. Mello-Roos bonds were to pay for school overcrowding caused by Mace Ranch development. Such as adding portables, new teacher salaries, etc. This in no way was a fund for a Mace Ranch neighborhood school, and this money SHOULD HAVE BEEN in the general fund. So many people should get their facts straight.

    Also many people do not realize that the main leaders of Valley Oak PTA are Mace Ranch parents. These so called leaders are downplaying the importance of school board meetings, and really don’t seem to be rallying the Valley Oak parents in support of saving Valley Oak. Why would they want to. If Valley Oak closes, then it’s easier to fully open Koramatsu. If this isn’t a conflict of interest, then I don’t know what is.

    Valley Oak is a wonderful school. I have 2 kids still there, and one already graduated. Bullying of a child for 3 years seems unlikely since there is an often times too strict zero tolerance policy. The parent of the bullied child should have taken the inititiative, because I’m sure the teachers/principal were unaware of this.

    SAVE VALLEY OAK!!!!!!

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