Briefs

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I wanted to get this up here as well, following up on the profile we did earlier this week on the Rev. Kristin Stoneking who named to the Housing Element Steering Committee for the General Plan by Councilmember Don Saylor. This was a letter in yesterday’s Davis Enterprise:

Stoneking is anti-neighborhood

Councilman Don Saylor’s appointment of the Rev. Kristin Stoneking to the city’s 2013 General Plan Housing Element Steering Committee (Page 1, Jan. 18) merits attention from neighborhoods around Davis.

Stoneking and her Cal Aggie Christian Association board have managed the feat of totally alienating Elmwood Drive neighbors who initially were willing to support a reasonably sized C.A. House development project. Stoneking and the C.A. House relentlessly insisted on a density that 1) city planning staff identified as inconsistent with the neighborhood character, and 2) required an amendment to the General Plan. Their justification was purely financial: The project wouldn’t “pencil out” if they had to respect existing density and the surrounding single-family neighborhood.

Stoneking and her board operated like developers but insisted on and received special treatment because of their “mission” from Don Saylor, Steve Souza and Ruth Asmundson. During his election campaign, Saylor had sat in a neighbor’s living room on Elmwood and voiced explicit opposition to the C.A. House project.

His choice reflects a lack of respect for the General Plan and planning staff, and support for the cynical, project-by-project process that allowed the C.A. House to proceed. There no doubt will be a rush to defend this appointment, on this page and elsewhere, by cloaking the facts in familiar C.A. House rhetoric.

Other committee members, and citizens who pay attention over the next six years, will make up their own minds along the way. My view, from personal experience, is that Saylor has assured the committee at least one anti-neighborhood, non- collaborative, pro-density appointment.

Michael Harty

We’ll be continuing our profiling of several of the other members in future blog entries.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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8 thoughts on “Briefs”

  1. Anonymous

    From what I have read, housing infill projects is the preferred method of development in Davis. To make infill projects economically feesible the housing density must rise. Higher housing density also helps hold down the average price of the individual units, which is needed in Davis.

    Infill development has no chance if the immediate neighbors affected reject every idea, based on personal selfish intersts. Like it or not, infill development will result in change and the projects do require a reasonable rate of return.SAH

  2. Anonymous

    From what I have read, housing infill projects is the preferred method of development in Davis. To make infill projects economically feesible the housing density must rise. Higher housing density also helps hold down the average price of the individual units, which is needed in Davis.

    Infill development has no chance if the immediate neighbors affected reject every idea, based on personal selfish intersts. Like it or not, infill development will result in change and the projects do require a reasonable rate of return.SAH

  3. Anonymous

    From what I have read, housing infill projects is the preferred method of development in Davis. To make infill projects economically feesible the housing density must rise. Higher housing density also helps hold down the average price of the individual units, which is needed in Davis.

    Infill development has no chance if the immediate neighbors affected reject every idea, based on personal selfish intersts. Like it or not, infill development will result in change and the projects do require a reasonable rate of return.SAH

  4. Anonymous

    From what I have read, housing infill projects is the preferred method of development in Davis. To make infill projects economically feesible the housing density must rise. Higher housing density also helps hold down the average price of the individual units, which is needed in Davis.

    Infill development has no chance if the immediate neighbors affected reject every idea, based on personal selfish intersts. Like it or not, infill development will result in change and the projects do require a reasonable rate of return.SAH

  5. davisite

    The evaluation of infill projects needs to be patently even-handed and fair in order to at least temper, if not avoid, the kind of reaction that we see expressed in this letter to the editor. This appears to be especially true of infill projects that are associated with a “mission”, often tied to religious activites. My guess is that for political reasons, the city seems to be more inclined to “give them a pass”. In addition to this Cal Aggie Christian Assoc. project, there was the UCD Hillel expansion project a few years ago that generated, as I remember it,
    a similar scenario. A lawsuit was avoided in that case.

  6. davisite

    The evaluation of infill projects needs to be patently even-handed and fair in order to at least temper, if not avoid, the kind of reaction that we see expressed in this letter to the editor. This appears to be especially true of infill projects that are associated with a “mission”, often tied to religious activites. My guess is that for political reasons, the city seems to be more inclined to “give them a pass”. In addition to this Cal Aggie Christian Assoc. project, there was the UCD Hillel expansion project a few years ago that generated, as I remember it,
    a similar scenario. A lawsuit was avoided in that case.

  7. davisite

    The evaluation of infill projects needs to be patently even-handed and fair in order to at least temper, if not avoid, the kind of reaction that we see expressed in this letter to the editor. This appears to be especially true of infill projects that are associated with a “mission”, often tied to religious activites. My guess is that for political reasons, the city seems to be more inclined to “give them a pass”. In addition to this Cal Aggie Christian Assoc. project, there was the UCD Hillel expansion project a few years ago that generated, as I remember it,
    a similar scenario. A lawsuit was avoided in that case.

  8. davisite

    The evaluation of infill projects needs to be patently even-handed and fair in order to at least temper, if not avoid, the kind of reaction that we see expressed in this letter to the editor. This appears to be especially true of infill projects that are associated with a “mission”, often tied to religious activites. My guess is that for political reasons, the city seems to be more inclined to “give them a pass”. In addition to this Cal Aggie Christian Assoc. project, there was the UCD Hillel expansion project a few years ago that generated, as I remember it,
    a similar scenario. A lawsuit was avoided in that case.

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