Midday Briefs

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Response to Letter to Sacramento Bee

Ruth Pagano of West Sacramento wrote into the Sacramento Bee complaining what she believes are about my blatant false representations of recent events in Davis.

An unfair blog on Davis PD

In the article “Political blog is the talk of Davis,” Jan. 14, John Lofland is quoted as saying about David Greenwald’s political blog on the city of Davis: “It was very entertaining . … He’s producing an alternative reading of everything that’s happened in Davis’ recent history.” For some, the blog may in fact be only viewed for entertainment purposes, but it is clear, at least for this observer, that Greenwald’s personal agenda and blatant false representation of what has “truly” occurred in Davis’ recent history is causing more harm than good.

The fact that Greenwald is upset over the unfounded complaints against Davis PD (yes, Davis PD has been cleared of any wrongdoing) is an outrage and should be publicly protested instead of being praised with almost a full page in the Sunday Metro section.

I wonder what Greenwald would write on his blog if he either required police assistance or if someone hit his car and ran.

– Ruth Pagano, West Sacramento

Her chief example is my being upset over “the unfounded complaints against Davis PD.” She goes on to further write–“yes, Davis PD has been cleared of any wrongdoing.”

There are plenty of areas where reasonable people could disagree with my views on various issues that pertain to Davis. That’s why we have elections and public discourse.

However, in this instance Ms. Pagano is patently wrong in her complaint. I assume she is referring to the Buzayan case, since that is the case I have written most about. She is correct that the city of Davis police department’s own internal affairs department cleared the officer of wrongdoing, however, a Federal Judge found enough credible evidence which refutes that opinion to hold the lawsuit over for trial. To suggest that the officer or his supervisors have been cleared in this case is patently misleading. The outside entity that has cleared the police officer of wrongdoing is the Davis Enterprise Columnist Bob Dunning and Editor Debbie Davis.

We shall see what happens in this court case, and the police officer will get his day in court to defend his conduct, however, from what I have seen, there is plenty of evidence to sustain findings of misconduct on the part of multiple agencies.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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36 thoughts on “Midday Briefs”

  1. Anonymous

    I suspect that the letter writer has a personal connection to the DPD and has a different viewpoint about what happened with the Buzayan case – one that was fully supported and defended by the local paper, members of the community and members of the legal/law enforcement community. The blog provides a different view, one supported or appreciated by different media, different members of the community, and different members of the legal community. The fact that both sides have an avenue to report on the issue should indeed be celebrated.

  2. Anonymous

    I suspect that the letter writer has a personal connection to the DPD and has a different viewpoint about what happened with the Buzayan case – one that was fully supported and defended by the local paper, members of the community and members of the legal/law enforcement community. The blog provides a different view, one supported or appreciated by different media, different members of the community, and different members of the legal community. The fact that both sides have an avenue to report on the issue should indeed be celebrated.

  3. Anonymous

    I suspect that the letter writer has a personal connection to the DPD and has a different viewpoint about what happened with the Buzayan case – one that was fully supported and defended by the local paper, members of the community and members of the legal/law enforcement community. The blog provides a different view, one supported or appreciated by different media, different members of the community, and different members of the legal community. The fact that both sides have an avenue to report on the issue should indeed be celebrated.

  4. Anonymous

    I suspect that the letter writer has a personal connection to the DPD and has a different viewpoint about what happened with the Buzayan case – one that was fully supported and defended by the local paper, members of the community and members of the legal/law enforcement community. The blog provides a different view, one supported or appreciated by different media, different members of the community, and different members of the legal community. The fact that both sides have an avenue to report on the issue should indeed be celebrated.

  5. Anonymous

    On several occassions, I suggested to Mr. Hyde that he should implement programs to improve the values of Officers within the DPD. To me, efforts to improve honesty and accountability within the department would benefit the entire community. Apparently, Mr. Hyde thought those suggestions were hateful and I am not sure why. I was unable to judge Mr. Hyde’s character, but I do know he lied (or at least significantly distorted the truth) as he explained why he left town. I am left wondering why Davis police officers have so much trouble with the concept of honesty?

    With regard to the DPD, this Blog simply raises questions and demands better performance. Is that too much to ask?SAH

  6. Anonymous

    On several occassions, I suggested to Mr. Hyde that he should implement programs to improve the values of Officers within the DPD. To me, efforts to improve honesty and accountability within the department would benefit the entire community. Apparently, Mr. Hyde thought those suggestions were hateful and I am not sure why. I was unable to judge Mr. Hyde’s character, but I do know he lied (or at least significantly distorted the truth) as he explained why he left town. I am left wondering why Davis police officers have so much trouble with the concept of honesty?

    With regard to the DPD, this Blog simply raises questions and demands better performance. Is that too much to ask?SAH

  7. Anonymous

    On several occassions, I suggested to Mr. Hyde that he should implement programs to improve the values of Officers within the DPD. To me, efforts to improve honesty and accountability within the department would benefit the entire community. Apparently, Mr. Hyde thought those suggestions were hateful and I am not sure why. I was unable to judge Mr. Hyde’s character, but I do know he lied (or at least significantly distorted the truth) as he explained why he left town. I am left wondering why Davis police officers have so much trouble with the concept of honesty?

    With regard to the DPD, this Blog simply raises questions and demands better performance. Is that too much to ask?SAH

  8. Anonymous

    On several occassions, I suggested to Mr. Hyde that he should implement programs to improve the values of Officers within the DPD. To me, efforts to improve honesty and accountability within the department would benefit the entire community. Apparently, Mr. Hyde thought those suggestions were hateful and I am not sure why. I was unable to judge Mr. Hyde’s character, but I do know he lied (or at least significantly distorted the truth) as he explained why he left town. I am left wondering why Davis police officers have so much trouble with the concept of honesty?

    With regard to the DPD, this Blog simply raises questions and demands better performance. Is that too much to ask?SAH

  9. Anonymous

    In criminal law, the burden of proof is that the allegation must be proved “beyond a reasonable doubt”. It was in this sense that the officer was “cleared of any wrongdoing”, or that there is a reasonable doubt that the officer acted illegaly.

    The fact that the civil lawsuit was allowed to be pursued only indicated that the judge believes there is enough evidence to merit a civil trial, where the burden of proof is much lower, a mere “preponderance of evidence”.

    In short, the fact that the civil case was allowed to proceed does not indicate _anything_.

  10. Anonymous

    In criminal law, the burden of proof is that the allegation must be proved “beyond a reasonable doubt”. It was in this sense that the officer was “cleared of any wrongdoing”, or that there is a reasonable doubt that the officer acted illegaly.

    The fact that the civil lawsuit was allowed to be pursued only indicated that the judge believes there is enough evidence to merit a civil trial, where the burden of proof is much lower, a mere “preponderance of evidence”.

    In short, the fact that the civil case was allowed to proceed does not indicate _anything_.

  11. Anonymous

    In criminal law, the burden of proof is that the allegation must be proved “beyond a reasonable doubt”. It was in this sense that the officer was “cleared of any wrongdoing”, or that there is a reasonable doubt that the officer acted illegaly.

    The fact that the civil lawsuit was allowed to be pursued only indicated that the judge believes there is enough evidence to merit a civil trial, where the burden of proof is much lower, a mere “preponderance of evidence”.

    In short, the fact that the civil case was allowed to proceed does not indicate _anything_.

  12. Anonymous

    In criminal law, the burden of proof is that the allegation must be proved “beyond a reasonable doubt”. It was in this sense that the officer was “cleared of any wrongdoing”, or that there is a reasonable doubt that the officer acted illegaly.

    The fact that the civil lawsuit was allowed to be pursued only indicated that the judge believes there is enough evidence to merit a civil trial, where the burden of proof is much lower, a mere “preponderance of evidence”.

    In short, the fact that the civil case was allowed to proceed does not indicate _anything_.

  13. Anonymous

    “In short, the fact that the civil case was allowed to proceed does not indicate _anything_. “

    Actually it does indicate something important – the City of Davis is one step closer to losing a lot of money because of poor police work.SAH

  14. Anonymous

    “In short, the fact that the civil case was allowed to proceed does not indicate _anything_. “

    Actually it does indicate something important – the City of Davis is one step closer to losing a lot of money because of poor police work.SAH

  15. Anonymous

    “In short, the fact that the civil case was allowed to proceed does not indicate _anything_. “

    Actually it does indicate something important – the City of Davis is one step closer to losing a lot of money because of poor police work.SAH

  16. Anonymous

    “In short, the fact that the civil case was allowed to proceed does not indicate _anything_. “

    Actually it does indicate something important – the City of Davis is one step closer to losing a lot of money because of poor police work.SAH

  17. davisite

    “…cleared of any wrongdoing”

    This is NOT how I remember the judge’s ruling. He dismissed the case against Helema, period. No judgement on the police officer’s actions were made. The defense decided to press on with the civil suit rather than come back to charge the officer directly with criminal conduct.

  18. davisite

    “…cleared of any wrongdoing”

    This is NOT how I remember the judge’s ruling. He dismissed the case against Helema, period. No judgement on the police officer’s actions were made. The defense decided to press on with the civil suit rather than come back to charge the officer directly with criminal conduct.

  19. davisite

    “…cleared of any wrongdoing”

    This is NOT how I remember the judge’s ruling. He dismissed the case against Helema, period. No judgement on the police officer’s actions were made. The defense decided to press on with the civil suit rather than come back to charge the officer directly with criminal conduct.

  20. davisite

    “…cleared of any wrongdoing”

    This is NOT how I remember the judge’s ruling. He dismissed the case against Helema, period. No judgement on the police officer’s actions were made. The defense decided to press on with the civil suit rather than come back to charge the officer directly with criminal conduct.

  21. Doug Paul Davis

    Davisite is correct here, there was never a ruling on the police officer’s behavior in the criminal case, because Halema was the defendant in that case, not Officer Ly. So to state that he was cleared of wrongdoing in that case is false, there was never a ruling of wrongdoing.

    That said, Judge Warriner, noted conservative judge, repeated implored the Deputy DA to explain to him why this case was even before him.

  22. Doug Paul Davis

    Davisite is correct here, there was never a ruling on the police officer’s behavior in the criminal case, because Halema was the defendant in that case, not Officer Ly. So to state that he was cleared of wrongdoing in that case is false, there was never a ruling of wrongdoing.

    That said, Judge Warriner, noted conservative judge, repeated implored the Deputy DA to explain to him why this case was even before him.

  23. Doug Paul Davis

    Davisite is correct here, there was never a ruling on the police officer’s behavior in the criminal case, because Halema was the defendant in that case, not Officer Ly. So to state that he was cleared of wrongdoing in that case is false, there was never a ruling of wrongdoing.

    That said, Judge Warriner, noted conservative judge, repeated implored the Deputy DA to explain to him why this case was even before him.

  24. Doug Paul Davis

    Davisite is correct here, there was never a ruling on the police officer’s behavior in the criminal case, because Halema was the defendant in that case, not Officer Ly. So to state that he was cleared of wrongdoing in that case is false, there was never a ruling of wrongdoing.

    That said, Judge Warriner, noted conservative judge, repeated implored the Deputy DA to explain to him why this case was even before him.

  25. Anonymous

    I agree with the writer of the letter; Doug Paul Davis is upset that his wife’s commission was disbanded and she relinquished of her role, which she had taken to an extreme that even the most progressive of Davis residents were worried with; Chief Hyde was a decent police chief and left the department and the citizens of Davis unfortunately too early; residential burglaries are on the rise in town, and no coincidence that when our PD is down officers and without a chief, and lowered morale due to the efforts of Cecilia, et al, the only people left the benefit of such a mess are thieves and those who seek to take advantage of law-enforcement weakened Davis!!!!

  26. Anonymous

    I agree with the writer of the letter; Doug Paul Davis is upset that his wife’s commission was disbanded and she relinquished of her role, which she had taken to an extreme that even the most progressive of Davis residents were worried with; Chief Hyde was a decent police chief and left the department and the citizens of Davis unfortunately too early; residential burglaries are on the rise in town, and no coincidence that when our PD is down officers and without a chief, and lowered morale due to the efforts of Cecilia, et al, the only people left the benefit of such a mess are thieves and those who seek to take advantage of law-enforcement weakened Davis!!!!

  27. Anonymous

    I agree with the writer of the letter; Doug Paul Davis is upset that his wife’s commission was disbanded and she relinquished of her role, which she had taken to an extreme that even the most progressive of Davis residents were worried with; Chief Hyde was a decent police chief and left the department and the citizens of Davis unfortunately too early; residential burglaries are on the rise in town, and no coincidence that when our PD is down officers and without a chief, and lowered morale due to the efforts of Cecilia, et al, the only people left the benefit of such a mess are thieves and those who seek to take advantage of law-enforcement weakened Davis!!!!

  28. Anonymous

    I agree with the writer of the letter; Doug Paul Davis is upset that his wife’s commission was disbanded and she relinquished of her role, which she had taken to an extreme that even the most progressive of Davis residents were worried with; Chief Hyde was a decent police chief and left the department and the citizens of Davis unfortunately too early; residential burglaries are on the rise in town, and no coincidence that when our PD is down officers and without a chief, and lowered morale due to the efforts of Cecilia, et al, the only people left the benefit of such a mess are thieves and those who seek to take advantage of law-enforcement weakened Davis!!!!

  29. Doug Paul Davis

    I have to disagree on several points with anonymous here.

    I certainly wasn’t happy with what happened with regards to my wife. But frankly I was more concerned with the process and the way people were treated in this process–particularly the treatment of people who brought complaints against the police department.

    Most of the progressives in this town remained behind Cecilia. I also believe that a lot of the “extreme” views that were purported to her were largely distortions.

    From my standpoint, I think there was a fundamental breakdown in the lines of communication. I think that had the City Council approach the HRC and Cecilia from the start, and been forthright and looked toward an alternative solution, they would have gladly worked with them. Instead what they did was largely go around and undermine the HRC and turned what could have been a joint project into a political dogfight and nobody won from that.

    I’ll also add that Hyde was in some ways a decent chief but he fatal flaws including his ability to work with people who were critical of himself and his department. But there were other things that would have led to his downfall even without the HRC, Cecilia, or the police issue. And in fact, those most likely led to his taking a higher paying position in another community.

    I’ll be interested to see what the crime rate looks like in town, I imagine it is probably rising as it is regionwide, statewide, and nationwide.

    All the more reason that the powers that be should have resolved this more effectively.

    There are a lot of problems in that department that have not been addressed and I have great fears that the next chief will be able to resolve them any better than Hyde. But these things have happened for over 20 years and they will continue to happen until someone with political leadership steps up and puts a stop to this kind of nonsense.

  30. Doug Paul Davis

    I have to disagree on several points with anonymous here.

    I certainly wasn’t happy with what happened with regards to my wife. But frankly I was more concerned with the process and the way people were treated in this process–particularly the treatment of people who brought complaints against the police department.

    Most of the progressives in this town remained behind Cecilia. I also believe that a lot of the “extreme” views that were purported to her were largely distortions.

    From my standpoint, I think there was a fundamental breakdown in the lines of communication. I think that had the City Council approach the HRC and Cecilia from the start, and been forthright and looked toward an alternative solution, they would have gladly worked with them. Instead what they did was largely go around and undermine the HRC and turned what could have been a joint project into a political dogfight and nobody won from that.

    I’ll also add that Hyde was in some ways a decent chief but he fatal flaws including his ability to work with people who were critical of himself and his department. But there were other things that would have led to his downfall even without the HRC, Cecilia, or the police issue. And in fact, those most likely led to his taking a higher paying position in another community.

    I’ll be interested to see what the crime rate looks like in town, I imagine it is probably rising as it is regionwide, statewide, and nationwide.

    All the more reason that the powers that be should have resolved this more effectively.

    There are a lot of problems in that department that have not been addressed and I have great fears that the next chief will be able to resolve them any better than Hyde. But these things have happened for over 20 years and they will continue to happen until someone with political leadership steps up and puts a stop to this kind of nonsense.

  31. Doug Paul Davis

    I have to disagree on several points with anonymous here.

    I certainly wasn’t happy with what happened with regards to my wife. But frankly I was more concerned with the process and the way people were treated in this process–particularly the treatment of people who brought complaints against the police department.

    Most of the progressives in this town remained behind Cecilia. I also believe that a lot of the “extreme” views that were purported to her were largely distortions.

    From my standpoint, I think there was a fundamental breakdown in the lines of communication. I think that had the City Council approach the HRC and Cecilia from the start, and been forthright and looked toward an alternative solution, they would have gladly worked with them. Instead what they did was largely go around and undermine the HRC and turned what could have been a joint project into a political dogfight and nobody won from that.

    I’ll also add that Hyde was in some ways a decent chief but he fatal flaws including his ability to work with people who were critical of himself and his department. But there were other things that would have led to his downfall even without the HRC, Cecilia, or the police issue. And in fact, those most likely led to his taking a higher paying position in another community.

    I’ll be interested to see what the crime rate looks like in town, I imagine it is probably rising as it is regionwide, statewide, and nationwide.

    All the more reason that the powers that be should have resolved this more effectively.

    There are a lot of problems in that department that have not been addressed and I have great fears that the next chief will be able to resolve them any better than Hyde. But these things have happened for over 20 years and they will continue to happen until someone with political leadership steps up and puts a stop to this kind of nonsense.

  32. Doug Paul Davis

    I have to disagree on several points with anonymous here.

    I certainly wasn’t happy with what happened with regards to my wife. But frankly I was more concerned with the process and the way people were treated in this process–particularly the treatment of people who brought complaints against the police department.

    Most of the progressives in this town remained behind Cecilia. I also believe that a lot of the “extreme” views that were purported to her were largely distortions.

    From my standpoint, I think there was a fundamental breakdown in the lines of communication. I think that had the City Council approach the HRC and Cecilia from the start, and been forthright and looked toward an alternative solution, they would have gladly worked with them. Instead what they did was largely go around and undermine the HRC and turned what could have been a joint project into a political dogfight and nobody won from that.

    I’ll also add that Hyde was in some ways a decent chief but he fatal flaws including his ability to work with people who were critical of himself and his department. But there were other things that would have led to his downfall even without the HRC, Cecilia, or the police issue. And in fact, those most likely led to his taking a higher paying position in another community.

    I’ll be interested to see what the crime rate looks like in town, I imagine it is probably rising as it is regionwide, statewide, and nationwide.

    All the more reason that the powers that be should have resolved this more effectively.

    There are a lot of problems in that department that have not been addressed and I have great fears that the next chief will be able to resolve them any better than Hyde. But these things have happened for over 20 years and they will continue to happen until someone with political leadership steps up and puts a stop to this kind of nonsense.

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