Thursday Midday Briefs

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Congratulations Captain Black–Please Move to Davis

One of the most telling statistics I heard at a recent meeting is that fewer than 10 and possibly as few as five Davis police officers actually live in the City of Davis. That means that few officers have the experience of living with fellow Davis citizens, as a result at times they may lack understanding of the needs and concerns of their would-be neighbors. In turn this leads to a failure to help build community and foster trust between residents and the police.

When Chief-designate Landy Black becomes Davis Police Chief Landy Black, I strongly urge him to buy a home in Davis with his family, to live among the people for whom he is sworn to protect and serve and to be a part of this community, rather than an outside who merely comes in to work.

Flex Your Rights

I was rather surprised to get an email last night from Phil Rexroad. He is the brother of County Supervisor Matt Rexroad.

He wanted me to pass on the following website:

http://www.flexyourrights.org/

This site seems to be another good resource for people to understand their rights under the constitution. Too many people do not understand these rights (or simply don’t know them at all) and subject themselves to humiliating and depersonalizing police searches because of that lack of knowledge.

Sacramento Bee Editorial on Term Limit Reform

On Sunday, I wrote a blog entry that said that while I support ending term limits, I oppose the current proposal. This morning’s Sacramento Bee Editorial agrees with this point of view.

“Assembly Speaker Fabian Núñez, Sen. President Pro Tem Don Perata and Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger once seemed close to hatching a workable deal linking term limit reform and redistricting, but now they are bumbling it. Badly.

Instead of speaking directly to voters, and making a strong case for loosening the stranglehold of term limits, Núñez and Perata are sneaking around with a duplicitous, self-serving initiative that would change term limits but not necessarily improve them — but would extend their own time in office.

The machinations on this one have been outrageous, even by Capitol standards. For several months, Núñez, Perata and Schwarzenegger have pushed to reschedule California’s 2008 primary from June 5 to Feb. 5, arguing it would give California more clout in picking the president next year.

Now it turns out that, while spouting these arguments, these leaders and their surrogates were quietly putting together a ballot initiative aimed for the prospective February 2008 primary.”

As I’ve said before, I strongly oppose term limits. Everyone in this country who runs for office has term limits–they are called elections. I do not think that term limits have accomplished what those who envisioned them believed they would accomplish. Instead they have left us with inexperienced elected officials and well-experience unelected officials. Nevertheless this is a cynical and calculated move by those in power to consolidate their power and expand their allotted time in the leadership, while at the same time it does not solve the larger problems.

Homeless Awareness Event on UC Davis Campus

This message courtesy of Richard Cipian:

“This is Richard Cipian. I am writing at this time of our to get out the word of a Homelessness Awareness Day the Associated Students of UC Davis (ASUCD) are planning for this upcoming Feb, 27th, 2007- Tuesday at noon at the quad at the MU. We will be having oral testimonies from those who are homeless in the Davis community, advocates of the local homeless, poets, statements from politicians and The Spare Changer- a local non-profit and homeless newspaper journal on hand to educate folks about homelessness issues in the community. The whole goal of the event is to raise the attention and profile of homelessness in the Davis community and greater Yolo County and to inspire more action from the private sector on ways that we can better serve our poor community.

Homelessness at least in my opinion is a very political issue in Davis. A good chunk of the Davis community is charitable about homeless concerns but if given the knowledge of how to fine tune thier charity, we could end homelessness in Davis for those that want shelter. There is a small minority in Davis with stereotypes of the homeless as being criminals, drug addicts or just people who choose to be homeless that must be broken down some how. We are hoping that this event will do that or at least infuse the community of Davis with the truth regarding homelessness. If the influential business community would partner up with social service providers and activists we can really get close to eradicating homelessness in Davis. This is the first such homeless day we have ever had at UCD and the event should be a great event. We are also having a resource faire and donation drive.”

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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36 thoughts on “Thursday Midday Briefs”

  1. Davisite

    Homeless Awareness Event on UC Davis Campus Feb 27th at noon on quad at MU

    Great idea! I’m going to try and make it there. Homelessness is so rigidly fixed in sterotypes. Viewing with fresh eyes and listening with an open mind can be a real mind-expanding experience.

  2. Davisite

    Homeless Awareness Event on UC Davis Campus Feb 27th at noon on quad at MU

    Great idea! I’m going to try and make it there. Homelessness is so rigidly fixed in sterotypes. Viewing with fresh eyes and listening with an open mind can be a real mind-expanding experience.

  3. Davisite

    Homeless Awareness Event on UC Davis Campus Feb 27th at noon on quad at MU

    Great idea! I’m going to try and make it there. Homelessness is so rigidly fixed in sterotypes. Viewing with fresh eyes and listening with an open mind can be a real mind-expanding experience.

  4. Davisite

    Homeless Awareness Event on UC Davis Campus Feb 27th at noon on quad at MU

    Great idea! I’m going to try and make it there. Homelessness is so rigidly fixed in sterotypes. Viewing with fresh eyes and listening with an open mind can be a real mind-expanding experience.

  5. Anonymous

    Buy a house in Davis? That is a funny statement. Housing costs are so far out of sight of normal working people that it is ridiculous to ask middle class cops to buy homes in Davis. But Davis people designed it that way that is why they built the moat…I mean voted on the limit line.

    Davis =for rich white people only.

  6. Anonymous

    Buy a house in Davis? That is a funny statement. Housing costs are so far out of sight of normal working people that it is ridiculous to ask middle class cops to buy homes in Davis. But Davis people designed it that way that is why they built the moat…I mean voted on the limit line.

    Davis =for rich white people only.

  7. Anonymous

    Buy a house in Davis? That is a funny statement. Housing costs are so far out of sight of normal working people that it is ridiculous to ask middle class cops to buy homes in Davis. But Davis people designed it that way that is why they built the moat…I mean voted on the limit line.

    Davis =for rich white people only.

  8. Anonymous

    Buy a house in Davis? That is a funny statement. Housing costs are so far out of sight of normal working people that it is ridiculous to ask middle class cops to buy homes in Davis. But Davis people designed it that way that is why they built the moat…I mean voted on the limit line.

    Davis =for rich white people only.

  9. Anonymous

    Funny, I was just going to say the same thing, but someone beat me to it.

    With what out society pays police (as well as teachers) why would we expect them to live in Davis? Sure, some do, particularly those with a working spouse, but why should someone be asked to devote an outrageous portion of their income to living in a town when there are perfectly viable alternatives nearby? Lots of people in all kinds of jobs in Davis don’t live in town.

  10. Anonymous

    Funny, I was just going to say the same thing, but someone beat me to it.

    With what out society pays police (as well as teachers) why would we expect them to live in Davis? Sure, some do, particularly those with a working spouse, but why should someone be asked to devote an outrageous portion of their income to living in a town when there are perfectly viable alternatives nearby? Lots of people in all kinds of jobs in Davis don’t live in town.

  11. Anonymous

    Funny, I was just going to say the same thing, but someone beat me to it.

    With what out society pays police (as well as teachers) why would we expect them to live in Davis? Sure, some do, particularly those with a working spouse, but why should someone be asked to devote an outrageous portion of their income to living in a town when there are perfectly viable alternatives nearby? Lots of people in all kinds of jobs in Davis don’t live in town.

  12. Anonymous

    Funny, I was just going to say the same thing, but someone beat me to it.

    With what out society pays police (as well as teachers) why would we expect them to live in Davis? Sure, some do, particularly those with a working spouse, but why should someone be asked to devote an outrageous portion of their income to living in a town when there are perfectly viable alternatives nearby? Lots of people in all kinds of jobs in Davis don’t live in town.

  13. Anonymous

    The new police chief will be paid $138,000 per year and will be able to afford a very nice home in Davis if he chooses to do so.

    As for the rank and file officers, many of them could easily afford to live in Davis with salaries ranging from entry level officers making $55,000 to senior officers making up to $67,000. Sergeants make up to $78,000; Lieutenants make between $80,000 to $98,000; Captains make between $95,000 to $115,000 and the Assistant Chief makes approximately $120,000. All could afford to live and buy homes in Davis if they chose to do so.

    With generous benefit and retirement packages public safety employees both fire and police are by and large some of the most highly compensated public service employees in the state.

    Please do not lump teachers and other public servants into this highly paid category, as they are not in the same salary or benefit ballpark.

  14. Anonymous

    The new police chief will be paid $138,000 per year and will be able to afford a very nice home in Davis if he chooses to do so.

    As for the rank and file officers, many of them could easily afford to live in Davis with salaries ranging from entry level officers making $55,000 to senior officers making up to $67,000. Sergeants make up to $78,000; Lieutenants make between $80,000 to $98,000; Captains make between $95,000 to $115,000 and the Assistant Chief makes approximately $120,000. All could afford to live and buy homes in Davis if they chose to do so.

    With generous benefit and retirement packages public safety employees both fire and police are by and large some of the most highly compensated public service employees in the state.

    Please do not lump teachers and other public servants into this highly paid category, as they are not in the same salary or benefit ballpark.

  15. Anonymous

    The new police chief will be paid $138,000 per year and will be able to afford a very nice home in Davis if he chooses to do so.

    As for the rank and file officers, many of them could easily afford to live in Davis with salaries ranging from entry level officers making $55,000 to senior officers making up to $67,000. Sergeants make up to $78,000; Lieutenants make between $80,000 to $98,000; Captains make between $95,000 to $115,000 and the Assistant Chief makes approximately $120,000. All could afford to live and buy homes in Davis if they chose to do so.

    With generous benefit and retirement packages public safety employees both fire and police are by and large some of the most highly compensated public service employees in the state.

    Please do not lump teachers and other public servants into this highly paid category, as they are not in the same salary or benefit ballpark.

  16. Anonymous

    The new police chief will be paid $138,000 per year and will be able to afford a very nice home in Davis if he chooses to do so.

    As for the rank and file officers, many of them could easily afford to live in Davis with salaries ranging from entry level officers making $55,000 to senior officers making up to $67,000. Sergeants make up to $78,000; Lieutenants make between $80,000 to $98,000; Captains make between $95,000 to $115,000 and the Assistant Chief makes approximately $120,000. All could afford to live and buy homes in Davis if they chose to do so.

    With generous benefit and retirement packages public safety employees both fire and police are by and large some of the most highly compensated public service employees in the state.

    Please do not lump teachers and other public servants into this highly paid category, as they are not in the same salary or benefit ballpark.

  17. Rich Rifkin

    “Davis =for rich white people only.”

    Tell that to all of my non-white neighbors. In my Universtiy Farms neighborhood, near Sycamore Lane, most of the new homeowners are wealthy east Asians and south Asians. The older homeowners tend to be poorer (though not poor) and white, though not exclusively so. Some of the homes are rentals, and I’m not sure who owns them.

    One thing is certain about Davis: it is more demographically diverse now that it has ever been. As short a time ago as the early 1980s, there were far fewer people (by percentage) in the upper income strata than there are now. And there were fewer in the lower strata. It was also much whiter. Today, even the middle income people are much wealthier, as jobs for the city, state and university all pay much more, in real dollars, than they used to.

  18. Rich Rifkin

    “Davis =for rich white people only.”

    Tell that to all of my non-white neighbors. In my Universtiy Farms neighborhood, near Sycamore Lane, most of the new homeowners are wealthy east Asians and south Asians. The older homeowners tend to be poorer (though not poor) and white, though not exclusively so. Some of the homes are rentals, and I’m not sure who owns them.

    One thing is certain about Davis: it is more demographically diverse now that it has ever been. As short a time ago as the early 1980s, there were far fewer people (by percentage) in the upper income strata than there are now. And there were fewer in the lower strata. It was also much whiter. Today, even the middle income people are much wealthier, as jobs for the city, state and university all pay much more, in real dollars, than they used to.

  19. Rich Rifkin

    “Davis =for rich white people only.”

    Tell that to all of my non-white neighbors. In my Universtiy Farms neighborhood, near Sycamore Lane, most of the new homeowners are wealthy east Asians and south Asians. The older homeowners tend to be poorer (though not poor) and white, though not exclusively so. Some of the homes are rentals, and I’m not sure who owns them.

    One thing is certain about Davis: it is more demographically diverse now that it has ever been. As short a time ago as the early 1980s, there were far fewer people (by percentage) in the upper income strata than there are now. And there were fewer in the lower strata. It was also much whiter. Today, even the middle income people are much wealthier, as jobs for the city, state and university all pay much more, in real dollars, than they used to.

  20. Rich Rifkin

    “Davis =for rich white people only.”

    Tell that to all of my non-white neighbors. In my Universtiy Farms neighborhood, near Sycamore Lane, most of the new homeowners are wealthy east Asians and south Asians. The older homeowners tend to be poorer (though not poor) and white, though not exclusively so. Some of the homes are rentals, and I’m not sure who owns them.

    One thing is certain about Davis: it is more demographically diverse now that it has ever been. As short a time ago as the early 1980s, there were far fewer people (by percentage) in the upper income strata than there are now. And there were fewer in the lower strata. It was also much whiter. Today, even the middle income people are much wealthier, as jobs for the city, state and university all pay much more, in real dollars, than they used to.

  21. Rich Rifkin

    The fact that most cops, teachers and city employees cannot afford to buy a home in Davis is a problem. It is not exclusive of Davis, as many communities in California face this same issue.

    One idea that has been suggested is that of the homes in new developments which are designated for “middle income” buyers be set aside for these people, if they meet the family income requirements. If we are going to force developers to build such properties, I don’t see what would be wrong with favoring city workers, teachers, cops, firefighters, etc. for them.

  22. Rich Rifkin

    The fact that most cops, teachers and city employees cannot afford to buy a home in Davis is a problem. It is not exclusive of Davis, as many communities in California face this same issue.

    One idea that has been suggested is that of the homes in new developments which are designated for “middle income” buyers be set aside for these people, if they meet the family income requirements. If we are going to force developers to build such properties, I don’t see what would be wrong with favoring city workers, teachers, cops, firefighters, etc. for them.

  23. Rich Rifkin

    The fact that most cops, teachers and city employees cannot afford to buy a home in Davis is a problem. It is not exclusive of Davis, as many communities in California face this same issue.

    One idea that has been suggested is that of the homes in new developments which are designated for “middle income” buyers be set aside for these people, if they meet the family income requirements. If we are going to force developers to build such properties, I don’t see what would be wrong with favoring city workers, teachers, cops, firefighters, etc. for them.

  24. Rich Rifkin

    The fact that most cops, teachers and city employees cannot afford to buy a home in Davis is a problem. It is not exclusive of Davis, as many communities in California face this same issue.

    One idea that has been suggested is that of the homes in new developments which are designated for “middle income” buyers be set aside for these people, if they meet the family income requirements. If we are going to force developers to build such properties, I don’t see what would be wrong with favoring city workers, teachers, cops, firefighters, etc. for them.

  25. Anonymous

    I consider myself low income, but I managed to buy a home in Davis. Also, I imagine that Chief Black may have equity in a house in Seattle (an equally expensive place to live) and may just be able to move here much like other transplants from the Bay Area and Southern California.

    Even if he has to rent, the Chief should move to Davis and live in the community. He should park a police car in his driveway like the police officers used to do when I was growing up here. Or better yet, leave his car at the station and ride his bike to work!

  26. Anonymous

    I consider myself low income, but I managed to buy a home in Davis. Also, I imagine that Chief Black may have equity in a house in Seattle (an equally expensive place to live) and may just be able to move here much like other transplants from the Bay Area and Southern California.

    Even if he has to rent, the Chief should move to Davis and live in the community. He should park a police car in his driveway like the police officers used to do when I was growing up here. Or better yet, leave his car at the station and ride his bike to work!

  27. Anonymous

    I consider myself low income, but I managed to buy a home in Davis. Also, I imagine that Chief Black may have equity in a house in Seattle (an equally expensive place to live) and may just be able to move here much like other transplants from the Bay Area and Southern California.

    Even if he has to rent, the Chief should move to Davis and live in the community. He should park a police car in his driveway like the police officers used to do when I was growing up here. Or better yet, leave his car at the station and ride his bike to work!

  28. Anonymous

    I consider myself low income, but I managed to buy a home in Davis. Also, I imagine that Chief Black may have equity in a house in Seattle (an equally expensive place to live) and may just be able to move here much like other transplants from the Bay Area and Southern California.

    Even if he has to rent, the Chief should move to Davis and live in the community. He should park a police car in his driveway like the police officers used to do when I was growing up here. Or better yet, leave his car at the station and ride his bike to work!

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