Update on the Suspension of DHS Student

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A few more details have become available on circumstances leading to the suspension of a Davis High School Student primarily for what was said while giving a speech on a civil rights incident that he personally experienced and spoke about at an assembly for Human Relations Week at the High School.

The teacher involved was indeed a math teacher, it was an AP Calculus class. Apparently the students had noted to her that she had hung a number of other posters including one from the girl’s water polo team. The boys water polo team asked if they could could hang a poster and she said yes if it was appropriate. Then the student involved asked if he could hang a poster and she said yes. She apparently approved this one of Malcolm X. At some point she must have had second thoughts about the poster because she literally tore it down. I saw it was pulled through the tacks rather than merely having the tacks removed.

The student asked for the poster and the teacher then talked in the front of the entire class about how this was a “terrorist” message and inappropriate. In meetings concerning this incident the teacher has mostly accepted this version of events. That happened in February.

The high school’s Human Relations Week happened and the student was asked to give a speech before the assembly. He gave the assembly organizers two speeches to choose from–they chose this topic. The organizers were two students who were in charge of Human Relations Week plus the administrator who approved the topic. The speech we posted a few days ago is the one he gave, which is only very slightly different from the one he submitted–and the substance was identical.

The student gave the speech and the teacher basically drew the attention to herself by leaving the assembly in tears.

Why was the student suspended? The student was basically given three reasons for the suspension. First, the claim was made that the student had deviated from the speech–that the student had essentially given an entirely different speech than the one submitted and that the student had self-censored in the submitted speech in order to engage in some sort of deception to get it approved. Having seen both speeches, I think this is a false charge. The degree of difference between both was almost non-existent and the speech read seemed innocuous. Most of the changes were innocuous and cosmetic.

Second, the student was cited for basically publicly humiliating a teacher–this despite the fact that the student never mentioned the name of the teacher and the teacher essentially outed herself through her own behavior. The teacher left the assembly in tears and did not return.

Third, the student was cited for disrupting an assembly–a charge that stemmed from the teacher bolting the assembly.

The teacher has basically told the student that the student cannot come back to class. That the teacher’s reputation has been tarnished by this incident. Meanwhile the student is missing AP Calculus and is signed up to take the AP exam this spring.

Looking at the discipline code it is not clear that the punishment–even if the student were guilty of these accusations should have been a three day suspension. In my opinion, this situation could have been better handled by the administration and certainly by the teacher involved–on a number of levels. Hopefully some kind of resolution can be struck to allow the student to continue to pursue their academic goals.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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172 thoughts on “Update on the Suspension of DHS Student”

  1. Anonymous

    It does not sound like the teacher knew the speech was coming. It would have been common courtesy to sit down with the teacher ahead of time and let her read the speech. The student and the three people who approved the speech should have warned the teacher about what was to be said. I hope both sides learn something from this. SAH

  2. Anonymous

    It does not sound like the teacher knew the speech was coming. It would have been common courtesy to sit down with the teacher ahead of time and let her read the speech. The student and the three people who approved the speech should have warned the teacher about what was to be said. I hope both sides learn something from this. SAH

  3. Anonymous

    It does not sound like the teacher knew the speech was coming. It would have been common courtesy to sit down with the teacher ahead of time and let her read the speech. The student and the three people who approved the speech should have warned the teacher about what was to be said. I hope both sides learn something from this. SAH

  4. Anonymous

    It does not sound like the teacher knew the speech was coming. It would have been common courtesy to sit down with the teacher ahead of time and let her read the speech. The student and the three people who approved the speech should have warned the teacher about what was to be said. I hope both sides learn something from this. SAH

  5. davisite

    Based upon your Update narrative, it is the DHS school adminstration that has been seriously “tarnished”. The ONLY solution is a public apology,along with rescinding the suspension, by the DHS school adminstration, “softened” by making it a valuable teaching opportunity in the value of tolerance and dialogue.

  6. davisite

    Based upon your Update narrative, it is the DHS school adminstration that has been seriously “tarnished”. The ONLY solution is a public apology,along with rescinding the suspension, by the DHS school adminstration, “softened” by making it a valuable teaching opportunity in the value of tolerance and dialogue.

  7. davisite

    Based upon your Update narrative, it is the DHS school adminstration that has been seriously “tarnished”. The ONLY solution is a public apology,along with rescinding the suspension, by the DHS school adminstration, “softened” by making it a valuable teaching opportunity in the value of tolerance and dialogue.

  8. davisite

    Based upon your Update narrative, it is the DHS school adminstration that has been seriously “tarnished”. The ONLY solution is a public apology,along with rescinding the suspension, by the DHS school adminstration, “softened” by making it a valuable teaching opportunity in the value of tolerance and dialogue.

  9. Christine Cipperly

    “It would have been common courtesy to sit down with the teacher ahead of time and let her read the speech.”

    I agree AND it would have been common courtesy and common sense for the teacher to have sat down with the student and discussed the poster instead of humiliating him in front of the entire class.

    This story is so bizarre that I would not believe it except that I had 5 children who attended Davis Senior High School. The experiences they had are the reason that our three youngest have all gone to private Catholic high schools.

  10. Christine Cipperly

    “It would have been common courtesy to sit down with the teacher ahead of time and let her read the speech.”

    I agree AND it would have been common courtesy and common sense for the teacher to have sat down with the student and discussed the poster instead of humiliating him in front of the entire class.

    This story is so bizarre that I would not believe it except that I had 5 children who attended Davis Senior High School. The experiences they had are the reason that our three youngest have all gone to private Catholic high schools.

  11. Christine Cipperly

    “It would have been common courtesy to sit down with the teacher ahead of time and let her read the speech.”

    I agree AND it would have been common courtesy and common sense for the teacher to have sat down with the student and discussed the poster instead of humiliating him in front of the entire class.

    This story is so bizarre that I would not believe it except that I had 5 children who attended Davis Senior High School. The experiences they had are the reason that our three youngest have all gone to private Catholic high schools.

  12. Christine Cipperly

    “It would have been common courtesy to sit down with the teacher ahead of time and let her read the speech.”

    I agree AND it would have been common courtesy and common sense for the teacher to have sat down with the student and discussed the poster instead of humiliating him in front of the entire class.

    This story is so bizarre that I would not believe it except that I had 5 children who attended Davis Senior High School. The experiences they had are the reason that our three youngest have all gone to private Catholic high schools.

  13. Don Shor

    The student then was asked to give a speech before an assembly, he sent the organizers two speeches, they picked the one that he gave and was told not to mention the teacher
    But he did mention the teacher.

    The following is the text of the speech that got the student suspended for three days. Remember this was approved. Judge for yourself…
    But it isn’t the text of the speech. It is the text the student gave you, as far as we can tell. We haven’t seen the text of the speech that was approved.

    The content of the poster was not at issue in the suspension. The student’s freedom of speech was not at issue. All the hyperbolic comments about dissent were totally off the mark here. When my child was challenged or disciplined by the school district, I fought like a papa lion on his behalf. But that didn’t blind me to the possibility that he may have erred.

    This whole episode really did not belong in the public square, and reflects poorly on the People’s Vanguard.

  14. Don Shor

    The student then was asked to give a speech before an assembly, he sent the organizers two speeches, they picked the one that he gave and was told not to mention the teacher
    But he did mention the teacher.

    The following is the text of the speech that got the student suspended for three days. Remember this was approved. Judge for yourself…
    But it isn’t the text of the speech. It is the text the student gave you, as far as we can tell. We haven’t seen the text of the speech that was approved.

    The content of the poster was not at issue in the suspension. The student’s freedom of speech was not at issue. All the hyperbolic comments about dissent were totally off the mark here. When my child was challenged or disciplined by the school district, I fought like a papa lion on his behalf. But that didn’t blind me to the possibility that he may have erred.

    This whole episode really did not belong in the public square, and reflects poorly on the People’s Vanguard.

  15. Don Shor

    The student then was asked to give a speech before an assembly, he sent the organizers two speeches, they picked the one that he gave and was told not to mention the teacher
    But he did mention the teacher.

    The following is the text of the speech that got the student suspended for three days. Remember this was approved. Judge for yourself…
    But it isn’t the text of the speech. It is the text the student gave you, as far as we can tell. We haven’t seen the text of the speech that was approved.

    The content of the poster was not at issue in the suspension. The student’s freedom of speech was not at issue. All the hyperbolic comments about dissent were totally off the mark here. When my child was challenged or disciplined by the school district, I fought like a papa lion on his behalf. But that didn’t blind me to the possibility that he may have erred.

    This whole episode really did not belong in the public square, and reflects poorly on the People’s Vanguard.

  16. Don Shor

    The student then was asked to give a speech before an assembly, he sent the organizers two speeches, they picked the one that he gave and was told not to mention the teacher
    But he did mention the teacher.

    The following is the text of the speech that got the student suspended for three days. Remember this was approved. Judge for yourself…
    But it isn’t the text of the speech. It is the text the student gave you, as far as we can tell. We haven’t seen the text of the speech that was approved.

    The content of the poster was not at issue in the suspension. The student’s freedom of speech was not at issue. All the hyperbolic comments about dissent were totally off the mark here. When my child was challenged or disciplined by the school district, I fought like a papa lion on his behalf. But that didn’t blind me to the possibility that he may have erred.

    This whole episode really did not belong in the public square, and reflects poorly on the People’s Vanguard.

  17. Doug Paul Davis

    Don:

    I very strongly disagree with you that this does not belong on the public square–this is the kind of incident that I formed the People’s Vanguard to be able to cover. This kind of incident gets to the core of what I see as the problem facing the city of Davis. And yes, this is primarily an issue about dissent. This teacher tore down the poster because she somehow believed the message was a terrorist message and then she overreacted when the student took umbrage at her conduct.

    I have seen both texts now and the changes in the two are almost strictly grammatical and cosmetic.

  18. Doug Paul Davis

    Don:

    I very strongly disagree with you that this does not belong on the public square–this is the kind of incident that I formed the People’s Vanguard to be able to cover. This kind of incident gets to the core of what I see as the problem facing the city of Davis. And yes, this is primarily an issue about dissent. This teacher tore down the poster because she somehow believed the message was a terrorist message and then she overreacted when the student took umbrage at her conduct.

    I have seen both texts now and the changes in the two are almost strictly grammatical and cosmetic.

  19. Doug Paul Davis

    Don:

    I very strongly disagree with you that this does not belong on the public square–this is the kind of incident that I formed the People’s Vanguard to be able to cover. This kind of incident gets to the core of what I see as the problem facing the city of Davis. And yes, this is primarily an issue about dissent. This teacher tore down the poster because she somehow believed the message was a terrorist message and then she overreacted when the student took umbrage at her conduct.

    I have seen both texts now and the changes in the two are almost strictly grammatical and cosmetic.

  20. Doug Paul Davis

    Don:

    I very strongly disagree with you that this does not belong on the public square–this is the kind of incident that I formed the People’s Vanguard to be able to cover. This kind of incident gets to the core of what I see as the problem facing the city of Davis. And yes, this is primarily an issue about dissent. This teacher tore down the poster because she somehow believed the message was a terrorist message and then she overreacted when the student took umbrage at her conduct.

    I have seen both texts now and the changes in the two are almost strictly grammatical and cosmetic.

  21. Doug Paul Davis

    I should also add it is also primarily about the overreaction of the administration to an incident that could have been handled much much better by ALL involved.

  22. Doug Paul Davis

    I should also add it is also primarily about the overreaction of the administration to an incident that could have been handled much much better by ALL involved.

  23. Doug Paul Davis

    I should also add it is also primarily about the overreaction of the administration to an incident that could have been handled much much better by ALL involved.

  24. Doug Paul Davis

    I should also add it is also primarily about the overreaction of the administration to an incident that could have been handled much much better by ALL involved.

  25. Barry Holden

    Don:

    I think you are being more than a bit sanctimonious here. I think this incident represents a very serious overreaction by the teacher and the student.

    My understanding from my high school student is that this teacher is very bizarre and speaks about inappropriate subjects during classtime. She then berated this kid publicly in class but left crying when he mildly rebuked her without even mentioning her name. Then the district enables her irresponsible behavior.

    I agree with Doug, this issue belongs in the public arena.

  26. Barry Holden

    Don:

    I think you are being more than a bit sanctimonious here. I think this incident represents a very serious overreaction by the teacher and the student.

    My understanding from my high school student is that this teacher is very bizarre and speaks about inappropriate subjects during classtime. She then berated this kid publicly in class but left crying when he mildly rebuked her without even mentioning her name. Then the district enables her irresponsible behavior.

    I agree with Doug, this issue belongs in the public arena.

  27. Barry Holden

    Don:

    I think you are being more than a bit sanctimonious here. I think this incident represents a very serious overreaction by the teacher and the student.

    My understanding from my high school student is that this teacher is very bizarre and speaks about inappropriate subjects during classtime. She then berated this kid publicly in class but left crying when he mildly rebuked her without even mentioning her name. Then the district enables her irresponsible behavior.

    I agree with Doug, this issue belongs in the public arena.

  28. Barry Holden

    Don:

    I think you are being more than a bit sanctimonious here. I think this incident represents a very serious overreaction by the teacher and the student.

    My understanding from my high school student is that this teacher is very bizarre and speaks about inappropriate subjects during classtime. She then berated this kid publicly in class but left crying when he mildly rebuked her without even mentioning her name. Then the district enables her irresponsible behavior.

    I agree with Doug, this issue belongs in the public arena.

  29. Barry Holden

    Oops meant to say:

    “I think this incident represents a very serious overreaction by the teacher and the ADMINISTRATION.”

    The student is not blameless here, but this does not warrant a suspension. Do you disagree?

  30. Barry Holden

    Oops meant to say:

    “I think this incident represents a very serious overreaction by the teacher and the ADMINISTRATION.”

    The student is not blameless here, but this does not warrant a suspension. Do you disagree?

  31. Barry Holden

    Oops meant to say:

    “I think this incident represents a very serious overreaction by the teacher and the ADMINISTRATION.”

    The student is not blameless here, but this does not warrant a suspension. Do you disagree?

  32. Barry Holden

    Oops meant to say:

    “I think this incident represents a very serious overreaction by the teacher and the ADMINISTRATION.”

    The student is not blameless here, but this does not warrant a suspension. Do you disagree?

  33. Anonymous

    It certainly should be in the town square until the kid gets back into class and the suspension is considered for being taken off the record.

    This teacher is ridiculous. If she is so offended she has no business being in the classroom. It seems she is acting like a child when she is the one who is technically the adult. If there is no other Calculus class available then she should suck it up and do the right thing.

    I taught for several years with a teacher in Fairfield who later went to work in Davis. She joked that the only discipline she had to do was threaten to take away the students sustained silent reading time if they didn’t get their behavior back together. It seems like this teacher works in fantasyland and better never leave Davis because she would be eaten alive almost anywhere else in the public schools of California.

    Grow up teacher. Your job is to forgive students when they err (assuming this student had erred)and get them on track to learn the material you are supposed to teach. Remember its hard to act like the adult sometimes when humility is called for despite our desire for revenge.

  34. Anonymous

    It certainly should be in the town square until the kid gets back into class and the suspension is considered for being taken off the record.

    This teacher is ridiculous. If she is so offended she has no business being in the classroom. It seems she is acting like a child when she is the one who is technically the adult. If there is no other Calculus class available then she should suck it up and do the right thing.

    I taught for several years with a teacher in Fairfield who later went to work in Davis. She joked that the only discipline she had to do was threaten to take away the students sustained silent reading time if they didn’t get their behavior back together. It seems like this teacher works in fantasyland and better never leave Davis because she would be eaten alive almost anywhere else in the public schools of California.

    Grow up teacher. Your job is to forgive students when they err (assuming this student had erred)and get them on track to learn the material you are supposed to teach. Remember its hard to act like the adult sometimes when humility is called for despite our desire for revenge.

  35. Anonymous

    It certainly should be in the town square until the kid gets back into class and the suspension is considered for being taken off the record.

    This teacher is ridiculous. If she is so offended she has no business being in the classroom. It seems she is acting like a child when she is the one who is technically the adult. If there is no other Calculus class available then she should suck it up and do the right thing.

    I taught for several years with a teacher in Fairfield who later went to work in Davis. She joked that the only discipline she had to do was threaten to take away the students sustained silent reading time if they didn’t get their behavior back together. It seems like this teacher works in fantasyland and better never leave Davis because she would be eaten alive almost anywhere else in the public schools of California.

    Grow up teacher. Your job is to forgive students when they err (assuming this student had erred)and get them on track to learn the material you are supposed to teach. Remember its hard to act like the adult sometimes when humility is called for despite our desire for revenge.

  36. Anonymous

    It certainly should be in the town square until the kid gets back into class and the suspension is considered for being taken off the record.

    This teacher is ridiculous. If she is so offended she has no business being in the classroom. It seems she is acting like a child when she is the one who is technically the adult. If there is no other Calculus class available then she should suck it up and do the right thing.

    I taught for several years with a teacher in Fairfield who later went to work in Davis. She joked that the only discipline she had to do was threaten to take away the students sustained silent reading time if they didn’t get their behavior back together. It seems like this teacher works in fantasyland and better never leave Davis because she would be eaten alive almost anywhere else in the public schools of California.

    Grow up teacher. Your job is to forgive students when they err (assuming this student had erred)and get them on track to learn the material you are supposed to teach. Remember its hard to act like the adult sometimes when humility is called for despite our desire for revenge.

  37. Anonymous

    Sharla said…

    I think it is true that the teacher’s reputation was “tarnished,” but not by the student’s actions. Rather it was her own actions that brought attention to herself – the speech before the class declaring that essentially Malcolm X engaged in terrorism by using very forceful language during a tumultuous time in U.S. history, then getting up in front of the assembly and bolting in front of everyone. When one uses a public platform to voice an opinion, then one should be prepared to defend that viewpoint.

    The teacher used her authority and class time to voice an opinion to essentially a captive audience – the students in the classroom. The student used an opportunity to answer the teacher and let her know that he disagreed. While there are other ways that the student could have done this that were less “public,” but I seem to enjoy that the student is willing to put himself out there shaking things up. But now he needs to take his lumps…just as the teacher needs to take hers.

    The suspension is inappropriate if the facts related are correct. This was a mistake. It has brought even more attention to the teacher’s actions, which seem immature. The school administration needs to fix this – quickly and, if is feels the need, quietly.

    Just a note – if the student had run out of the classroom humiliated and in tears, would the teacher have been disciplined? Extremely likely not.

    But we need to be careful about what we want to teach the student. This is a tremendous learning opportunity. We want the student to grow in strength, but not as a victim. This would be a good time to educate the DHS community about Malcolm X – who he was and what he did.

  38. Anonymous

    Sharla said…

    I think it is true that the teacher’s reputation was “tarnished,” but not by the student’s actions. Rather it was her own actions that brought attention to herself – the speech before the class declaring that essentially Malcolm X engaged in terrorism by using very forceful language during a tumultuous time in U.S. history, then getting up in front of the assembly and bolting in front of everyone. When one uses a public platform to voice an opinion, then one should be prepared to defend that viewpoint.

    The teacher used her authority and class time to voice an opinion to essentially a captive audience – the students in the classroom. The student used an opportunity to answer the teacher and let her know that he disagreed. While there are other ways that the student could have done this that were less “public,” but I seem to enjoy that the student is willing to put himself out there shaking things up. But now he needs to take his lumps…just as the teacher needs to take hers.

    The suspension is inappropriate if the facts related are correct. This was a mistake. It has brought even more attention to the teacher’s actions, which seem immature. The school administration needs to fix this – quickly and, if is feels the need, quietly.

    Just a note – if the student had run out of the classroom humiliated and in tears, would the teacher have been disciplined? Extremely likely not.

    But we need to be careful about what we want to teach the student. This is a tremendous learning opportunity. We want the student to grow in strength, but not as a victim. This would be a good time to educate the DHS community about Malcolm X – who he was and what he did.

  39. Anonymous

    Sharla said…

    I think it is true that the teacher’s reputation was “tarnished,” but not by the student’s actions. Rather it was her own actions that brought attention to herself – the speech before the class declaring that essentially Malcolm X engaged in terrorism by using very forceful language during a tumultuous time in U.S. history, then getting up in front of the assembly and bolting in front of everyone. When one uses a public platform to voice an opinion, then one should be prepared to defend that viewpoint.

    The teacher used her authority and class time to voice an opinion to essentially a captive audience – the students in the classroom. The student used an opportunity to answer the teacher and let her know that he disagreed. While there are other ways that the student could have done this that were less “public,” but I seem to enjoy that the student is willing to put himself out there shaking things up. But now he needs to take his lumps…just as the teacher needs to take hers.

    The suspension is inappropriate if the facts related are correct. This was a mistake. It has brought even more attention to the teacher’s actions, which seem immature. The school administration needs to fix this – quickly and, if is feels the need, quietly.

    Just a note – if the student had run out of the classroom humiliated and in tears, would the teacher have been disciplined? Extremely likely not.

    But we need to be careful about what we want to teach the student. This is a tremendous learning opportunity. We want the student to grow in strength, but not as a victim. This would be a good time to educate the DHS community about Malcolm X – who he was and what he did.

  40. Anonymous

    Sharla said…

    I think it is true that the teacher’s reputation was “tarnished,” but not by the student’s actions. Rather it was her own actions that brought attention to herself – the speech before the class declaring that essentially Malcolm X engaged in terrorism by using very forceful language during a tumultuous time in U.S. history, then getting up in front of the assembly and bolting in front of everyone. When one uses a public platform to voice an opinion, then one should be prepared to defend that viewpoint.

    The teacher used her authority and class time to voice an opinion to essentially a captive audience – the students in the classroom. The student used an opportunity to answer the teacher and let her know that he disagreed. While there are other ways that the student could have done this that were less “public,” but I seem to enjoy that the student is willing to put himself out there shaking things up. But now he needs to take his lumps…just as the teacher needs to take hers.

    The suspension is inappropriate if the facts related are correct. This was a mistake. It has brought even more attention to the teacher’s actions, which seem immature. The school administration needs to fix this – quickly and, if is feels the need, quietly.

    Just a note – if the student had run out of the classroom humiliated and in tears, would the teacher have been disciplined? Extremely likely not.

    But we need to be careful about what we want to teach the student. This is a tremendous learning opportunity. We want the student to grow in strength, but not as a victim. This would be a good time to educate the DHS community about Malcolm X – who he was and what he did.

  41. Anonymous

    This incident most certainly belongs in the public square, because this is a public school paid for with public funding.

    This incident needs the full light of accountability and transparency on it. The teacher and the administrators need to be held responsible for their poor judgement and terrible decisions.

    The general public needs to be aware of incidents like this to be able to work to make sure that their taxpayer dollars are not used to support such stupid decisions which affect not just this one student and not just a classroom of students, but an entire student body. The way this incident was handled by both the teacher and the high school administration is the talk of the school and therefore our community, because it is so patently stupid.

  42. Anonymous

    This incident most certainly belongs in the public square, because this is a public school paid for with public funding.

    This incident needs the full light of accountability and transparency on it. The teacher and the administrators need to be held responsible for their poor judgement and terrible decisions.

    The general public needs to be aware of incidents like this to be able to work to make sure that their taxpayer dollars are not used to support such stupid decisions which affect not just this one student and not just a classroom of students, but an entire student body. The way this incident was handled by both the teacher and the high school administration is the talk of the school and therefore our community, because it is so patently stupid.

  43. Anonymous

    This incident most certainly belongs in the public square, because this is a public school paid for with public funding.

    This incident needs the full light of accountability and transparency on it. The teacher and the administrators need to be held responsible for their poor judgement and terrible decisions.

    The general public needs to be aware of incidents like this to be able to work to make sure that their taxpayer dollars are not used to support such stupid decisions which affect not just this one student and not just a classroom of students, but an entire student body. The way this incident was handled by both the teacher and the high school administration is the talk of the school and therefore our community, because it is so patently stupid.

  44. Anonymous

    This incident most certainly belongs in the public square, because this is a public school paid for with public funding.

    This incident needs the full light of accountability and transparency on it. The teacher and the administrators need to be held responsible for their poor judgement and terrible decisions.

    The general public needs to be aware of incidents like this to be able to work to make sure that their taxpayer dollars are not used to support such stupid decisions which affect not just this one student and not just a classroom of students, but an entire student body. The way this incident was handled by both the teacher and the high school administration is the talk of the school and therefore our community, because it is so patently stupid.

  45. Rich Rifkin

    “The student is not blameless here, but this does not warrant a suspension.”

    Based on what David has reported here, I’m not sure what the student has done that is worthy of blame.

    I would say, though, that the poster you show is rather menacing. I didn’t realize that the words “BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY” were so prominently displayed.

    If the teacher at first approved the display of that poster in her classroom, that was her first mistake. If she then changed her mind, she should have, outside of class hours, taken it down, undamaged, and returned it to the student. She should have told him simply that she did not think it was appropriate for her classroom.

    What the teacher should not have done is make the message of the poster a point of discussion in her AP calculus class. That really is inappropriate, only made worse by the fact that she (according to D. Greenwald) vented her political views on the topic in such a way that singled out the student who brought the poster.

    I don’t know if those mistakes in judgment (assuming they happened as reported) are worthy of suspending a teacher, but I do think they show poor judgment on her behalf. The school administration ought to have rebuked her for that.

    It could be said that the child showed poor judgment in bringing that poster to his math class. After all, posters showing school sports teams seem decorative and celebratory. The Malcolm X poster is at least political and possibly offensive to some. It doesn’t belong in a math classroom. However, I don’t think a minor child’s judgment should be at issue here. Of course kids have bad judgment in these matters — they’re kids. It’s a part of growing up to learn these kinds of things. We should expect better judgment from a teacher.

    Finally — and I know some will think this is a misogynistic, but that is not my intention — I don’t understand an adult who cries in public over hearing this kind of speech by a student. I think the crying episode, if true, shows emotional imbalance and a degree of weakness of mind. If the woman had suffered a severely personal loss and cried, well, okay. But crying over this? She’s supposed to be an adult and a role model. Grow up! If she can’t control her emotions better than that, she probably is misplaced as a teacher.

  46. Rich Rifkin

    “The student is not blameless here, but this does not warrant a suspension.”

    Based on what David has reported here, I’m not sure what the student has done that is worthy of blame.

    I would say, though, that the poster you show is rather menacing. I didn’t realize that the words “BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY” were so prominently displayed.

    If the teacher at first approved the display of that poster in her classroom, that was her first mistake. If she then changed her mind, she should have, outside of class hours, taken it down, undamaged, and returned it to the student. She should have told him simply that she did not think it was appropriate for her classroom.

    What the teacher should not have done is make the message of the poster a point of discussion in her AP calculus class. That really is inappropriate, only made worse by the fact that she (according to D. Greenwald) vented her political views on the topic in such a way that singled out the student who brought the poster.

    I don’t know if those mistakes in judgment (assuming they happened as reported) are worthy of suspending a teacher, but I do think they show poor judgment on her behalf. The school administration ought to have rebuked her for that.

    It could be said that the child showed poor judgment in bringing that poster to his math class. After all, posters showing school sports teams seem decorative and celebratory. The Malcolm X poster is at least political and possibly offensive to some. It doesn’t belong in a math classroom. However, I don’t think a minor child’s judgment should be at issue here. Of course kids have bad judgment in these matters — they’re kids. It’s a part of growing up to learn these kinds of things. We should expect better judgment from a teacher.

    Finally — and I know some will think this is a misogynistic, but that is not my intention — I don’t understand an adult who cries in public over hearing this kind of speech by a student. I think the crying episode, if true, shows emotional imbalance and a degree of weakness of mind. If the woman had suffered a severely personal loss and cried, well, okay. But crying over this? She’s supposed to be an adult and a role model. Grow up! If she can’t control her emotions better than that, she probably is misplaced as a teacher.

  47. Rich Rifkin

    “The student is not blameless here, but this does not warrant a suspension.”

    Based on what David has reported here, I’m not sure what the student has done that is worthy of blame.

    I would say, though, that the poster you show is rather menacing. I didn’t realize that the words “BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY” were so prominently displayed.

    If the teacher at first approved the display of that poster in her classroom, that was her first mistake. If she then changed her mind, she should have, outside of class hours, taken it down, undamaged, and returned it to the student. She should have told him simply that she did not think it was appropriate for her classroom.

    What the teacher should not have done is make the message of the poster a point of discussion in her AP calculus class. That really is inappropriate, only made worse by the fact that she (according to D. Greenwald) vented her political views on the topic in such a way that singled out the student who brought the poster.

    I don’t know if those mistakes in judgment (assuming they happened as reported) are worthy of suspending a teacher, but I do think they show poor judgment on her behalf. The school administration ought to have rebuked her for that.

    It could be said that the child showed poor judgment in bringing that poster to his math class. After all, posters showing school sports teams seem decorative and celebratory. The Malcolm X poster is at least political and possibly offensive to some. It doesn’t belong in a math classroom. However, I don’t think a minor child’s judgment should be at issue here. Of course kids have bad judgment in these matters — they’re kids. It’s a part of growing up to learn these kinds of things. We should expect better judgment from a teacher.

    Finally — and I know some will think this is a misogynistic, but that is not my intention — I don’t understand an adult who cries in public over hearing this kind of speech by a student. I think the crying episode, if true, shows emotional imbalance and a degree of weakness of mind. If the woman had suffered a severely personal loss and cried, well, okay. But crying over this? She’s supposed to be an adult and a role model. Grow up! If she can’t control her emotions better than that, she probably is misplaced as a teacher.

  48. Rich Rifkin

    “The student is not blameless here, but this does not warrant a suspension.”

    Based on what David has reported here, I’m not sure what the student has done that is worthy of blame.

    I would say, though, that the poster you show is rather menacing. I didn’t realize that the words “BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY” were so prominently displayed.

    If the teacher at first approved the display of that poster in her classroom, that was her first mistake. If she then changed her mind, she should have, outside of class hours, taken it down, undamaged, and returned it to the student. She should have told him simply that she did not think it was appropriate for her classroom.

    What the teacher should not have done is make the message of the poster a point of discussion in her AP calculus class. That really is inappropriate, only made worse by the fact that she (according to D. Greenwald) vented her political views on the topic in such a way that singled out the student who brought the poster.

    I don’t know if those mistakes in judgment (assuming they happened as reported) are worthy of suspending a teacher, but I do think they show poor judgment on her behalf. The school administration ought to have rebuked her for that.

    It could be said that the child showed poor judgment in bringing that poster to his math class. After all, posters showing school sports teams seem decorative and celebratory. The Malcolm X poster is at least political and possibly offensive to some. It doesn’t belong in a math classroom. However, I don’t think a minor child’s judgment should be at issue here. Of course kids have bad judgment in these matters — they’re kids. It’s a part of growing up to learn these kinds of things. We should expect better judgment from a teacher.

    Finally — and I know some will think this is a misogynistic, but that is not my intention — I don’t understand an adult who cries in public over hearing this kind of speech by a student. I think the crying episode, if true, shows emotional imbalance and a degree of weakness of mind. If the woman had suffered a severely personal loss and cried, well, okay. But crying over this? She’s supposed to be an adult and a role model. Grow up! If she can’t control her emotions better than that, she probably is misplaced as a teacher.

  49. Anonymous

    “if true, shows emotional imbalance and a degree of weakness of mind.”

    That is a little strong – you could say something like “she obviously spends too much time looking at numbers” and leave it at that.SAH

  50. Anonymous

    “if true, shows emotional imbalance and a degree of weakness of mind.”

    That is a little strong – you could say something like “she obviously spends too much time looking at numbers” and leave it at that.SAH

  51. Anonymous

    “if true, shows emotional imbalance and a degree of weakness of mind.”

    That is a little strong – you could say something like “she obviously spends too much time looking at numbers” and leave it at that.SAH

  52. Anonymous

    “if true, shows emotional imbalance and a degree of weakness of mind.”

    That is a little strong – you could say something like “she obviously spends too much time looking at numbers” and leave it at that.SAH

  53. Anonymous

    How silly to say, “I didn’t realize that the words “BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY” were so prominently displayed.”

    You mean it would have been ok if the words were in a small font at the bottom of the poster? This is so, so ridiculous. Quite frankly it’s silly.

    This was a teaching opportunity and an opportunity to have some very good dialog with students. The teacher erred and the administration that has oversight of both students and teachers erred greatly.

    What we have here is an administration that can be seen as the “left-overs of former Superintendent David Murphy.” It’s time to clean house and hold administrators more accountable.

    As for the teacher, she probably needs more training in handling diverse issues or topics. Yes, she cried, but it was probably upon hearing how silly her actions were that she felt somewhat remorseful for making the “terrorist” comment. She only drew attention to herself by walking out.

    Let’s hope that this gets resolved amicably and that the student is allowed to finish his math class and the teacher is provided more training. This can still be a good time to have discussion between the students and the teacher if she and the administration step up to the plate.

  54. Anonymous

    How silly to say, “I didn’t realize that the words “BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY” were so prominently displayed.”

    You mean it would have been ok if the words were in a small font at the bottom of the poster? This is so, so ridiculous. Quite frankly it’s silly.

    This was a teaching opportunity and an opportunity to have some very good dialog with students. The teacher erred and the administration that has oversight of both students and teachers erred greatly.

    What we have here is an administration that can be seen as the “left-overs of former Superintendent David Murphy.” It’s time to clean house and hold administrators more accountable.

    As for the teacher, she probably needs more training in handling diverse issues or topics. Yes, she cried, but it was probably upon hearing how silly her actions were that she felt somewhat remorseful for making the “terrorist” comment. She only drew attention to herself by walking out.

    Let’s hope that this gets resolved amicably and that the student is allowed to finish his math class and the teacher is provided more training. This can still be a good time to have discussion between the students and the teacher if she and the administration step up to the plate.

  55. Anonymous

    How silly to say, “I didn’t realize that the words “BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY” were so prominently displayed.”

    You mean it would have been ok if the words were in a small font at the bottom of the poster? This is so, so ridiculous. Quite frankly it’s silly.

    This was a teaching opportunity and an opportunity to have some very good dialog with students. The teacher erred and the administration that has oversight of both students and teachers erred greatly.

    What we have here is an administration that can be seen as the “left-overs of former Superintendent David Murphy.” It’s time to clean house and hold administrators more accountable.

    As for the teacher, she probably needs more training in handling diverse issues or topics. Yes, she cried, but it was probably upon hearing how silly her actions were that she felt somewhat remorseful for making the “terrorist” comment. She only drew attention to herself by walking out.

    Let’s hope that this gets resolved amicably and that the student is allowed to finish his math class and the teacher is provided more training. This can still be a good time to have discussion between the students and the teacher if she and the administration step up to the plate.

  56. Anonymous

    How silly to say, “I didn’t realize that the words “BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY” were so prominently displayed.”

    You mean it would have been ok if the words were in a small font at the bottom of the poster? This is so, so ridiculous. Quite frankly it’s silly.

    This was a teaching opportunity and an opportunity to have some very good dialog with students. The teacher erred and the administration that has oversight of both students and teachers erred greatly.

    What we have here is an administration that can be seen as the “left-overs of former Superintendent David Murphy.” It’s time to clean house and hold administrators more accountable.

    As for the teacher, she probably needs more training in handling diverse issues or topics. Yes, she cried, but it was probably upon hearing how silly her actions were that she felt somewhat remorseful for making the “terrorist” comment. She only drew attention to herself by walking out.

    Let’s hope that this gets resolved amicably and that the student is allowed to finish his math class and the teacher is provided more training. This can still be a good time to have discussion between the students and the teacher if she and the administration step up to the plate.

  57. Anonymous

    Crying is not a sign of weakness. At times people cry out of frustration, anger, remorse, happiness, etc. Saying that crying is a sign of weakness sounds like something a “bully” in a sandbox would say.

  58. Anonymous

    Crying is not a sign of weakness. At times people cry out of frustration, anger, remorse, happiness, etc. Saying that crying is a sign of weakness sounds like something a “bully” in a sandbox would say.

  59. Anonymous

    Crying is not a sign of weakness. At times people cry out of frustration, anger, remorse, happiness, etc. Saying that crying is a sign of weakness sounds like something a “bully” in a sandbox would say.

  60. Anonymous

    Crying is not a sign of weakness. At times people cry out of frustration, anger, remorse, happiness, etc. Saying that crying is a sign of weakness sounds like something a “bully” in a sandbox would say.

  61. Anonymous

    The only thing the student was guilty of was having an opinion. He broke no rules and no laws. Heaven forbid that children should be thought to think for themselves. After all, we want Stepford Children in Davis don’t we?

  62. Anonymous

    The only thing the student was guilty of was having an opinion. He broke no rules and no laws. Heaven forbid that children should be thought to think for themselves. After all, we want Stepford Children in Davis don’t we?

  63. Anonymous

    The only thing the student was guilty of was having an opinion. He broke no rules and no laws. Heaven forbid that children should be thought to think for themselves. After all, we want Stepford Children in Davis don’t we?

  64. Anonymous

    The only thing the student was guilty of was having an opinion. He broke no rules and no laws. Heaven forbid that children should be thought to think for themselves. After all, we want Stepford Children in Davis don’t we?

  65. Rich Rifkin

    How silly to say, “I didn’t realize that the words “BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY” were so prominently displayed.”

    It’s not silly of me to have not realizeed that. I had never before seen the poster.

    This is so, so ridiculous. Quite frankly it’s silly.

    If every word in the poster was in an equal font and point, then the words “by any means necessary” would not have come across as menacingly as they seem to in this poster. (I only pointed that out because it makes the teacher’s reaction, though not her aleged actions, understandable.)

    I think the emphasis on “by any means necessary” changes the tone and to some extent the meaning of the statement.

    In the Vanguard’s reporting of the speech, all the words were equally emphasized:

    “We declare our right on this earth to be a human being, to be respected as a human being, to be given the rights of a human being in this society, on this earth, in this day, which we intend to bring into existence by any means necessary.”

    When I originally read the quote in this blog’s original piece, “by any means necessary” sounded far more innocuous. The fact that they were highlighted in a much larger point size was news to me.

    You mean it would have been ok if the words were in a small font at the bottom of the poster?

    No. I never said that. I don’t think the poster belongs as a decoration or otherwise in a math classroom. However, if every word in Malcolm X’s statement were equal in font and point, the statement itself would read differently.

  66. Rich Rifkin

    How silly to say, “I didn’t realize that the words “BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY” were so prominently displayed.”

    It’s not silly of me to have not realizeed that. I had never before seen the poster.

    This is so, so ridiculous. Quite frankly it’s silly.

    If every word in the poster was in an equal font and point, then the words “by any means necessary” would not have come across as menacingly as they seem to in this poster. (I only pointed that out because it makes the teacher’s reaction, though not her aleged actions, understandable.)

    I think the emphasis on “by any means necessary” changes the tone and to some extent the meaning of the statement.

    In the Vanguard’s reporting of the speech, all the words were equally emphasized:

    “We declare our right on this earth to be a human being, to be respected as a human being, to be given the rights of a human being in this society, on this earth, in this day, which we intend to bring into existence by any means necessary.”

    When I originally read the quote in this blog’s original piece, “by any means necessary” sounded far more innocuous. The fact that they were highlighted in a much larger point size was news to me.

    You mean it would have been ok if the words were in a small font at the bottom of the poster?

    No. I never said that. I don’t think the poster belongs as a decoration or otherwise in a math classroom. However, if every word in Malcolm X’s statement were equal in font and point, the statement itself would read differently.

  67. Rich Rifkin

    How silly to say, “I didn’t realize that the words “BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY” were so prominently displayed.”

    It’s not silly of me to have not realizeed that. I had never before seen the poster.

    This is so, so ridiculous. Quite frankly it’s silly.

    If every word in the poster was in an equal font and point, then the words “by any means necessary” would not have come across as menacingly as they seem to in this poster. (I only pointed that out because it makes the teacher’s reaction, though not her aleged actions, understandable.)

    I think the emphasis on “by any means necessary” changes the tone and to some extent the meaning of the statement.

    In the Vanguard’s reporting of the speech, all the words were equally emphasized:

    “We declare our right on this earth to be a human being, to be respected as a human being, to be given the rights of a human being in this society, on this earth, in this day, which we intend to bring into existence by any means necessary.”

    When I originally read the quote in this blog’s original piece, “by any means necessary” sounded far more innocuous. The fact that they were highlighted in a much larger point size was news to me.

    You mean it would have been ok if the words were in a small font at the bottom of the poster?

    No. I never said that. I don’t think the poster belongs as a decoration or otherwise in a math classroom. However, if every word in Malcolm X’s statement were equal in font and point, the statement itself would read differently.

  68. Rich Rifkin

    How silly to say, “I didn’t realize that the words “BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY” were so prominently displayed.”

    It’s not silly of me to have not realizeed that. I had never before seen the poster.

    This is so, so ridiculous. Quite frankly it’s silly.

    If every word in the poster was in an equal font and point, then the words “by any means necessary” would not have come across as menacingly as they seem to in this poster. (I only pointed that out because it makes the teacher’s reaction, though not her aleged actions, understandable.)

    I think the emphasis on “by any means necessary” changes the tone and to some extent the meaning of the statement.

    In the Vanguard’s reporting of the speech, all the words were equally emphasized:

    “We declare our right on this earth to be a human being, to be respected as a human being, to be given the rights of a human being in this society, on this earth, in this day, which we intend to bring into existence by any means necessary.”

    When I originally read the quote in this blog’s original piece, “by any means necessary” sounded far more innocuous. The fact that they were highlighted in a much larger point size was news to me.

    You mean it would have been ok if the words were in a small font at the bottom of the poster?

    No. I never said that. I don’t think the poster belongs as a decoration or otherwise in a math classroom. However, if every word in Malcolm X’s statement were equal in font and point, the statement itself would read differently.

  69. 無名 - wu ming

    the only person embarassing the teacher was the teacher herself. the student did nothing wrong, and should not have been disciplined. certainly there’s no excuse for kicking a student out of an AP class just because the teacher is ashamed for acting inappropriately.

    but then far too often our educational system treats schools as places to discipline the youth, instead of centers for teaching basic knowledge and critical thought. as if you’re always on the edge of a prison riot if a student shows anything elss than complete deference to the authority and ideas of the teacher.

    taken on its own, this is just an unfortunate case of overreaction on the part opf one teacher, but taken in context of the other incidents and decisions that doug laid out yesterday, it does not paint a flattering picture of the davis school system. and i say that as a graduate of said school system.

  70. 無名 - wu ming

    the only person embarassing the teacher was the teacher herself. the student did nothing wrong, and should not have been disciplined. certainly there’s no excuse for kicking a student out of an AP class just because the teacher is ashamed for acting inappropriately.

    but then far too often our educational system treats schools as places to discipline the youth, instead of centers for teaching basic knowledge and critical thought. as if you’re always on the edge of a prison riot if a student shows anything elss than complete deference to the authority and ideas of the teacher.

    taken on its own, this is just an unfortunate case of overreaction on the part opf one teacher, but taken in context of the other incidents and decisions that doug laid out yesterday, it does not paint a flattering picture of the davis school system. and i say that as a graduate of said school system.

  71. 無名 - wu ming

    the only person embarassing the teacher was the teacher herself. the student did nothing wrong, and should not have been disciplined. certainly there’s no excuse for kicking a student out of an AP class just because the teacher is ashamed for acting inappropriately.

    but then far too often our educational system treats schools as places to discipline the youth, instead of centers for teaching basic knowledge and critical thought. as if you’re always on the edge of a prison riot if a student shows anything elss than complete deference to the authority and ideas of the teacher.

    taken on its own, this is just an unfortunate case of overreaction on the part opf one teacher, but taken in context of the other incidents and decisions that doug laid out yesterday, it does not paint a flattering picture of the davis school system. and i say that as a graduate of said school system.

  72. 無名 - wu ming

    the only person embarassing the teacher was the teacher herself. the student did nothing wrong, and should not have been disciplined. certainly there’s no excuse for kicking a student out of an AP class just because the teacher is ashamed for acting inappropriately.

    but then far too often our educational system treats schools as places to discipline the youth, instead of centers for teaching basic knowledge and critical thought. as if you’re always on the edge of a prison riot if a student shows anything elss than complete deference to the authority and ideas of the teacher.

    taken on its own, this is just an unfortunate case of overreaction on the part opf one teacher, but taken in context of the other incidents and decisions that doug laid out yesterday, it does not paint a flattering picture of the davis school system. and i say that as a graduate of said school system.

  73. Rich Rifkin

    Crying is not a sign of weakness.

    Of course crying can be a sign of weakness. It may not be. But it certainly can be.

    At times people cry out of frustration, anger, remorse, happiness, etc.

    I understand that.

    But in this case, it seems weak-minded to me for an adult to start balling over this incident, if that in fact is what happened.

  74. Rich Rifkin

    Crying is not a sign of weakness.

    Of course crying can be a sign of weakness. It may not be. But it certainly can be.

    At times people cry out of frustration, anger, remorse, happiness, etc.

    I understand that.

    But in this case, it seems weak-minded to me for an adult to start balling over this incident, if that in fact is what happened.

  75. Rich Rifkin

    Crying is not a sign of weakness.

    Of course crying can be a sign of weakness. It may not be. But it certainly can be.

    At times people cry out of frustration, anger, remorse, happiness, etc.

    I understand that.

    But in this case, it seems weak-minded to me for an adult to start balling over this incident, if that in fact is what happened.

  76. Rich Rifkin

    Crying is not a sign of weakness.

    Of course crying can be a sign of weakness. It may not be. But it certainly can be.

    At times people cry out of frustration, anger, remorse, happiness, etc.

    I understand that.

    But in this case, it seems weak-minded to me for an adult to start balling over this incident, if that in fact is what happened.

  77. Anonymous

    Young, inexperienced teacher who then compounded her initial poor judgement by “losing it”. Teachers can be just a few chronological years older than their HS students and can be years behind in judgement and maturity. We can compassionately “cut her some slack”. This is not the case with the older, experienced professional DHS school administrators. The buck stops at their desks.

  78. Anonymous

    Young, inexperienced teacher who then compounded her initial poor judgement by “losing it”. Teachers can be just a few chronological years older than their HS students and can be years behind in judgement and maturity. We can compassionately “cut her some slack”. This is not the case with the older, experienced professional DHS school administrators. The buck stops at their desks.

  79. Anonymous

    Young, inexperienced teacher who then compounded her initial poor judgement by “losing it”. Teachers can be just a few chronological years older than their HS students and can be years behind in judgement and maturity. We can compassionately “cut her some slack”. This is not the case with the older, experienced professional DHS school administrators. The buck stops at their desks.

  80. Anonymous

    Young, inexperienced teacher who then compounded her initial poor judgement by “losing it”. Teachers can be just a few chronological years older than their HS students and can be years behind in judgement and maturity. We can compassionately “cut her some slack”. This is not the case with the older, experienced professional DHS school administrators. The buck stops at their desks.

  81. Anonymous

    When Adam Liston was expelled for having a shotgun in his car near school and before he was reinstated he was sent to King High but allowed to attend any classes that were unavailable at King High at Davis High.

    Shouldn’t this student be extended the same courtesy? If this is the only AP Calculus class shouldn’t he be allowed to attend?

    I guess keeping him out would prove that the pen is mightier than the sword and deserves a more dogmatic response.

    One other point, how does a teacher get to say you can’t come back to class? I’ve worked many years in public schools and never had this option. I’ve had things happen where it was decided that a student should be placed elsewhere but never have I had the authority to unilaterally make such a decision.

    Ron Glick

  82. Anonymous

    When Adam Liston was expelled for having a shotgun in his car near school and before he was reinstated he was sent to King High but allowed to attend any classes that were unavailable at King High at Davis High.

    Shouldn’t this student be extended the same courtesy? If this is the only AP Calculus class shouldn’t he be allowed to attend?

    I guess keeping him out would prove that the pen is mightier than the sword and deserves a more dogmatic response.

    One other point, how does a teacher get to say you can’t come back to class? I’ve worked many years in public schools and never had this option. I’ve had things happen where it was decided that a student should be placed elsewhere but never have I had the authority to unilaterally make such a decision.

    Ron Glick

  83. Anonymous

    When Adam Liston was expelled for having a shotgun in his car near school and before he was reinstated he was sent to King High but allowed to attend any classes that were unavailable at King High at Davis High.

    Shouldn’t this student be extended the same courtesy? If this is the only AP Calculus class shouldn’t he be allowed to attend?

    I guess keeping him out would prove that the pen is mightier than the sword and deserves a more dogmatic response.

    One other point, how does a teacher get to say you can’t come back to class? I’ve worked many years in public schools and never had this option. I’ve had things happen where it was decided that a student should be placed elsewhere but never have I had the authority to unilaterally make such a decision.

    Ron Glick

  84. Anonymous

    When Adam Liston was expelled for having a shotgun in his car near school and before he was reinstated he was sent to King High but allowed to attend any classes that were unavailable at King High at Davis High.

    Shouldn’t this student be extended the same courtesy? If this is the only AP Calculus class shouldn’t he be allowed to attend?

    I guess keeping him out would prove that the pen is mightier than the sword and deserves a more dogmatic response.

    One other point, how does a teacher get to say you can’t come back to class? I’ve worked many years in public schools and never had this option. I’ve had things happen where it was decided that a student should be placed elsewhere but never have I had the authority to unilaterally make such a decision.

    Ron Glick

  85. Richard

    The solution here is simple, go to court now, sue the district, and sue the individual teacher involved personally for violating her federal civil rights under 42 U.S.C. 1983.

    Nothing else is going to get this situation resolved.

    –Richard Estes

  86. Richard

    The solution here is simple, go to court now, sue the district, and sue the individual teacher involved personally for violating her federal civil rights under 42 U.S.C. 1983.

    Nothing else is going to get this situation resolved.

    –Richard Estes

  87. Richard

    The solution here is simple, go to court now, sue the district, and sue the individual teacher involved personally for violating her federal civil rights under 42 U.S.C. 1983.

    Nothing else is going to get this situation resolved.

    –Richard Estes

  88. Richard

    The solution here is simple, go to court now, sue the district, and sue the individual teacher involved personally for violating her federal civil rights under 42 U.S.C. 1983.

    Nothing else is going to get this situation resolved.

    –Richard Estes

  89. 無名 - wu ming

    um, rich, don’t you mean “bawling”? “balling” has a different connotation, IIRC. apologies for the nitpicking, but i found it amusing.

  90. 無名 - wu ming

    um, rich, don’t you mean “bawling”? “balling” has a different connotation, IIRC. apologies for the nitpicking, but i found it amusing.

  91. 無名 - wu ming

    um, rich, don’t you mean “bawling”? “balling” has a different connotation, IIRC. apologies for the nitpicking, but i found it amusing.

  92. 無名 - wu ming

    um, rich, don’t you mean “bawling”? “balling” has a different connotation, IIRC. apologies for the nitpicking, but i found it amusing.

  93. Anonymous

    “It could be said that the child showed poor judgment in bringing that poster to his math class. After all, posters showing school sports teams seem decorative and celebratory.”

    I spoke to kids in that class and they said he brought it for black history month which is “celebratory” enough to me.

  94. Anonymous

    “It could be said that the child showed poor judgment in bringing that poster to his math class. After all, posters showing school sports teams seem decorative and celebratory.”

    I spoke to kids in that class and they said he brought it for black history month which is “celebratory” enough to me.

  95. Anonymous

    “It could be said that the child showed poor judgment in bringing that poster to his math class. After all, posters showing school sports teams seem decorative and celebratory.”

    I spoke to kids in that class and they said he brought it for black history month which is “celebratory” enough to me.

  96. Anonymous

    “It could be said that the child showed poor judgment in bringing that poster to his math class. After all, posters showing school sports teams seem decorative and celebratory.”

    I spoke to kids in that class and they said he brought it for black history month which is “celebratory” enough to me.

  97. Anonymous

    I think this is outrageous. The school district should be cleaned out the school board needs some changes. Their have been too many problems with the school district this year first the situation at Harper Junior High School then the situation with the BSU at the DHS now this situation, this is outrageous!

  98. Anonymous

    I think this is outrageous. The school district should be cleaned out the school board needs some changes. Their have been too many problems with the school district this year first the situation at Harper Junior High School then the situation with the BSU at the DHS now this situation, this is outrageous!

  99. Anonymous

    I think this is outrageous. The school district should be cleaned out the school board needs some changes. Their have been too many problems with the school district this year first the situation at Harper Junior High School then the situation with the BSU at the DHS now this situation, this is outrageous!

  100. Anonymous

    I think this is outrageous. The school district should be cleaned out the school board needs some changes. Their have been too many problems with the school district this year first the situation at Harper Junior High School then the situation with the BSU at the DHS now this situation, this is outrageous!

  101. Rich Rifkin

    um, rich, don’t you mean “bawling”? “balling” has a different connotation, IIRC. apologies for the nitpicking, but i found it amusing.

    Wu Ming,

    Thank you. I stand corrected. I appreciate your pointing out my error.

  102. Rich Rifkin

    um, rich, don’t you mean “bawling”? “balling” has a different connotation, IIRC. apologies for the nitpicking, but i found it amusing.

    Wu Ming,

    Thank you. I stand corrected. I appreciate your pointing out my error.

  103. Rich Rifkin

    um, rich, don’t you mean “bawling”? “balling” has a different connotation, IIRC. apologies for the nitpicking, but i found it amusing.

    Wu Ming,

    Thank you. I stand corrected. I appreciate your pointing out my error.

  104. Rich Rifkin

    um, rich, don’t you mean “bawling”? “balling” has a different connotation, IIRC. apologies for the nitpicking, but i found it amusing.

    Wu Ming,

    Thank you. I stand corrected. I appreciate your pointing out my error.

  105. Anonymous

    I wonder if it would have been so “menacing” and the hysterical response so “understandable” if the uncowering face behind the quote was white rather than black and muslim.

  106. Anonymous

    I wonder if it would have been so “menacing” and the hysterical response so “understandable” if the uncowering face behind the quote was white rather than black and muslim.

  107. Anonymous

    I wonder if it would have been so “menacing” and the hysterical response so “understandable” if the uncowering face behind the quote was white rather than black and muslim.

  108. Anonymous

    I wonder if it would have been so “menacing” and the hysterical response so “understandable” if the uncowering face behind the quote was white rather than black and muslim.

  109. Rich Rifkin

    The solution here is simple, go to court now, sue the district, and sue the individual teacher involved personally for violating her federal civil rights under 42 U.S.C. 1983.

    The threat of a lawsuit is an important tool to get justice, when you believe that your rights have been violated. However, there are hopefully reasonable interim steps that don’t require such a threat or such an action.

    “Nothing else is going to get this situation resolved.”

    That depends on many things that you and I don’t know: the actual facts of this case; the flexibility of the school administrators; the possible role of mediation; and the possible input of the school board or the interim superintendent.

    I think it’s wise to not be such an absolutist on this case, so fast. Ambulance chasers will soon enough pounce — no need to prod them.

  110. Rich Rifkin

    The solution here is simple, go to court now, sue the district, and sue the individual teacher involved personally for violating her federal civil rights under 42 U.S.C. 1983.

    The threat of a lawsuit is an important tool to get justice, when you believe that your rights have been violated. However, there are hopefully reasonable interim steps that don’t require such a threat or such an action.

    “Nothing else is going to get this situation resolved.”

    That depends on many things that you and I don’t know: the actual facts of this case; the flexibility of the school administrators; the possible role of mediation; and the possible input of the school board or the interim superintendent.

    I think it’s wise to not be such an absolutist on this case, so fast. Ambulance chasers will soon enough pounce — no need to prod them.

  111. Rich Rifkin

    The solution here is simple, go to court now, sue the district, and sue the individual teacher involved personally for violating her federal civil rights under 42 U.S.C. 1983.

    The threat of a lawsuit is an important tool to get justice, when you believe that your rights have been violated. However, there are hopefully reasonable interim steps that don’t require such a threat or such an action.

    “Nothing else is going to get this situation resolved.”

    That depends on many things that you and I don’t know: the actual facts of this case; the flexibility of the school administrators; the possible role of mediation; and the possible input of the school board or the interim superintendent.

    I think it’s wise to not be such an absolutist on this case, so fast. Ambulance chasers will soon enough pounce — no need to prod them.

  112. Rich Rifkin

    The solution here is simple, go to court now, sue the district, and sue the individual teacher involved personally for violating her federal civil rights under 42 U.S.C. 1983.

    The threat of a lawsuit is an important tool to get justice, when you believe that your rights have been violated. However, there are hopefully reasonable interim steps that don’t require such a threat or such an action.

    “Nothing else is going to get this situation resolved.”

    That depends on many things that you and I don’t know: the actual facts of this case; the flexibility of the school administrators; the possible role of mediation; and the possible input of the school board or the interim superintendent.

    I think it’s wise to not be such an absolutist on this case, so fast. Ambulance chasers will soon enough pounce — no need to prod them.

  113. Rich Rifkin

    “I wonder if it would have been so “menacing” and the hysterical response so “understandable” if the uncowering face behind the quote was white rather than black and muslim.”

    That’s a good question. If it had been a picture of Martin Luther King, Jr., then it certainly would have been less menacing (to me). He represented non-violence. So black or white really has nothing to do with it.

    And if the picture had been of Hitler or Mussolini or Stalin, all white people, it would have been far more menacing.

    So, as your question implies, it does matter who is in the picture. But race is not a factor — it is the character of the man and the organization or attitude he represents. I don’t think of Malcolm X (prior to his renunciation of the Nation of Islam) as a violent person. However, I do view what the Nation then stood for (and what I understand some of its leaders today still do) as hateful.

  114. Rich Rifkin

    “I wonder if it would have been so “menacing” and the hysterical response so “understandable” if the uncowering face behind the quote was white rather than black and muslim.”

    That’s a good question. If it had been a picture of Martin Luther King, Jr., then it certainly would have been less menacing (to me). He represented non-violence. So black or white really has nothing to do with it.

    And if the picture had been of Hitler or Mussolini or Stalin, all white people, it would have been far more menacing.

    So, as your question implies, it does matter who is in the picture. But race is not a factor — it is the character of the man and the organization or attitude he represents. I don’t think of Malcolm X (prior to his renunciation of the Nation of Islam) as a violent person. However, I do view what the Nation then stood for (and what I understand some of its leaders today still do) as hateful.

  115. Rich Rifkin

    “I wonder if it would have been so “menacing” and the hysterical response so “understandable” if the uncowering face behind the quote was white rather than black and muslim.”

    That’s a good question. If it had been a picture of Martin Luther King, Jr., then it certainly would have been less menacing (to me). He represented non-violence. So black or white really has nothing to do with it.

    And if the picture had been of Hitler or Mussolini or Stalin, all white people, it would have been far more menacing.

    So, as your question implies, it does matter who is in the picture. But race is not a factor — it is the character of the man and the organization or attitude he represents. I don’t think of Malcolm X (prior to his renunciation of the Nation of Islam) as a violent person. However, I do view what the Nation then stood for (and what I understand some of its leaders today still do) as hateful.

  116. Rich Rifkin

    “I wonder if it would have been so “menacing” and the hysterical response so “understandable” if the uncowering face behind the quote was white rather than black and muslim.”

    That’s a good question. If it had been a picture of Martin Luther King, Jr., then it certainly would have been less menacing (to me). He represented non-violence. So black or white really has nothing to do with it.

    And if the picture had been of Hitler or Mussolini or Stalin, all white people, it would have been far more menacing.

    So, as your question implies, it does matter who is in the picture. But race is not a factor — it is the character of the man and the organization or attitude he represents. I don’t think of Malcolm X (prior to his renunciation of the Nation of Islam) as a violent person. However, I do view what the Nation then stood for (and what I understand some of its leaders today still do) as hateful.

  117. Anonymous

    I would love to see some of you who are so full of opinions become Teachers in Davis for about a month, especially at DHS. Between the kids and the parents most of you would run out of there never to come back again! High Teacher turnover in Davis???Hmmmm…I wonder why!?

  118. Anonymous

    I would love to see some of you who are so full of opinions become Teachers in Davis for about a month, especially at DHS. Between the kids and the parents most of you would run out of there never to come back again! High Teacher turnover in Davis???Hmmmm…I wonder why!?

  119. Anonymous

    I would love to see some of you who are so full of opinions become Teachers in Davis for about a month, especially at DHS. Between the kids and the parents most of you would run out of there never to come back again! High Teacher turnover in Davis???Hmmmm…I wonder why!?

  120. Anonymous

    I would love to see some of you who are so full of opinions become Teachers in Davis for about a month, especially at DHS. Between the kids and the parents most of you would run out of there never to come back again! High Teacher turnover in Davis???Hmmmm…I wonder why!?

  121. Dave Hart

    One of the anonymousites really did nail it pretty good here: “I taught for several years with a teacher in Fairfield who later went to work in Davis. She joked that the only discipline she had to do was threaten to take away the students sustained silent reading time if they didn’t get their behavior back together. It seems like this teacher works in fantasyland and better never leave Davis because she would be eaten alive almost anywhere else in the public schools of California.”

    My wife has taught 6th grade and is currently teaching third grade at an elementary in Fairfield. Every year she has students with parents in jail, students with significant to severe emotional and psychological dysfunction brought on by God only know what kind of home life. Gang activity is pervasive. She had a student not finish sixth grade one year because she was pregnant and delivered the child before school ended. Davis is a fantasyland but one that should have only good outcomes because of the comparative simplicity of our problems.

    Even under the difficult circumstances of Fairfield schools, teachers must still treat their students with respect. My wife gives every student a new chance every day to be a new person and that only happens by creating an environment of mutual respect and dignity. That does in fact imply a lot of forgiveness, practiced daily.

    The teacher at DHS had no problem “dissing” the student in front of his peers where she had the upper hand and he had no easy way to respond. When the student reclaimed his dignity in front of the student body, she couldn’t handle it. He meted out justice. The question might be framed here more accurately as: “Was the student’s behavior too much like vigilante justice?” That may be how some are seeing this and it is an interesting question to consider. If there were a forum (outside of court) that compelled both the teacher and the student to talk and negotiate some kind of truce, justice would have been served. It’s been stated that there were three meetings of this type with no resolution. In fact, the student’s initial injury has been compounded by his ejection from the class. A lawsuit is impersonal, takes a long time and hits us taxpayers but will have little lasting impact on DJUSD behavior. Justice delayed is justice denied. Vigilante justice may be the only kind that matters in this case.

  122. Dave Hart

    One of the anonymousites really did nail it pretty good here: “I taught for several years with a teacher in Fairfield who later went to work in Davis. She joked that the only discipline she had to do was threaten to take away the students sustained silent reading time if they didn’t get their behavior back together. It seems like this teacher works in fantasyland and better never leave Davis because she would be eaten alive almost anywhere else in the public schools of California.”

    My wife has taught 6th grade and is currently teaching third grade at an elementary in Fairfield. Every year she has students with parents in jail, students with significant to severe emotional and psychological dysfunction brought on by God only know what kind of home life. Gang activity is pervasive. She had a student not finish sixth grade one year because she was pregnant and delivered the child before school ended. Davis is a fantasyland but one that should have only good outcomes because of the comparative simplicity of our problems.

    Even under the difficult circumstances of Fairfield schools, teachers must still treat their students with respect. My wife gives every student a new chance every day to be a new person and that only happens by creating an environment of mutual respect and dignity. That does in fact imply a lot of forgiveness, practiced daily.

    The teacher at DHS had no problem “dissing” the student in front of his peers where she had the upper hand and he had no easy way to respond. When the student reclaimed his dignity in front of the student body, she couldn’t handle it. He meted out justice. The question might be framed here more accurately as: “Was the student’s behavior too much like vigilante justice?” That may be how some are seeing this and it is an interesting question to consider. If there were a forum (outside of court) that compelled both the teacher and the student to talk and negotiate some kind of truce, justice would have been served. It’s been stated that there were three meetings of this type with no resolution. In fact, the student’s initial injury has been compounded by his ejection from the class. A lawsuit is impersonal, takes a long time and hits us taxpayers but will have little lasting impact on DJUSD behavior. Justice delayed is justice denied. Vigilante justice may be the only kind that matters in this case.

  123. Dave Hart

    One of the anonymousites really did nail it pretty good here: “I taught for several years with a teacher in Fairfield who later went to work in Davis. She joked that the only discipline she had to do was threaten to take away the students sustained silent reading time if they didn’t get their behavior back together. It seems like this teacher works in fantasyland and better never leave Davis because she would be eaten alive almost anywhere else in the public schools of California.”

    My wife has taught 6th grade and is currently teaching third grade at an elementary in Fairfield. Every year she has students with parents in jail, students with significant to severe emotional and psychological dysfunction brought on by God only know what kind of home life. Gang activity is pervasive. She had a student not finish sixth grade one year because she was pregnant and delivered the child before school ended. Davis is a fantasyland but one that should have only good outcomes because of the comparative simplicity of our problems.

    Even under the difficult circumstances of Fairfield schools, teachers must still treat their students with respect. My wife gives every student a new chance every day to be a new person and that only happens by creating an environment of mutual respect and dignity. That does in fact imply a lot of forgiveness, practiced daily.

    The teacher at DHS had no problem “dissing” the student in front of his peers where she had the upper hand and he had no easy way to respond. When the student reclaimed his dignity in front of the student body, she couldn’t handle it. He meted out justice. The question might be framed here more accurately as: “Was the student’s behavior too much like vigilante justice?” That may be how some are seeing this and it is an interesting question to consider. If there were a forum (outside of court) that compelled both the teacher and the student to talk and negotiate some kind of truce, justice would have been served. It’s been stated that there were three meetings of this type with no resolution. In fact, the student’s initial injury has been compounded by his ejection from the class. A lawsuit is impersonal, takes a long time and hits us taxpayers but will have little lasting impact on DJUSD behavior. Justice delayed is justice denied. Vigilante justice may be the only kind that matters in this case.

  124. Dave Hart

    One of the anonymousites really did nail it pretty good here: “I taught for several years with a teacher in Fairfield who later went to work in Davis. She joked that the only discipline she had to do was threaten to take away the students sustained silent reading time if they didn’t get their behavior back together. It seems like this teacher works in fantasyland and better never leave Davis because she would be eaten alive almost anywhere else in the public schools of California.”

    My wife has taught 6th grade and is currently teaching third grade at an elementary in Fairfield. Every year she has students with parents in jail, students with significant to severe emotional and psychological dysfunction brought on by God only know what kind of home life. Gang activity is pervasive. She had a student not finish sixth grade one year because she was pregnant and delivered the child before school ended. Davis is a fantasyland but one that should have only good outcomes because of the comparative simplicity of our problems.

    Even under the difficult circumstances of Fairfield schools, teachers must still treat their students with respect. My wife gives every student a new chance every day to be a new person and that only happens by creating an environment of mutual respect and dignity. That does in fact imply a lot of forgiveness, practiced daily.

    The teacher at DHS had no problem “dissing” the student in front of his peers where she had the upper hand and he had no easy way to respond. When the student reclaimed his dignity in front of the student body, she couldn’t handle it. He meted out justice. The question might be framed here more accurately as: “Was the student’s behavior too much like vigilante justice?” That may be how some are seeing this and it is an interesting question to consider. If there were a forum (outside of court) that compelled both the teacher and the student to talk and negotiate some kind of truce, justice would have been served. It’s been stated that there were three meetings of this type with no resolution. In fact, the student’s initial injury has been compounded by his ejection from the class. A lawsuit is impersonal, takes a long time and hits us taxpayers but will have little lasting impact on DJUSD behavior. Justice delayed is justice denied. Vigilante justice may be the only kind that matters in this case.

  125. Anonymous

    I’m a Davis Resident and parent who relocated to Davis just for the Schools. I agree with many of the comments above and believe we need to make this “a tremendous learning opportunity.” I’m currently reading through 1st Amendment School cases and I’m going to meet with others tomorrow about this issue. You’d think that in a large student body assembly of over a thousand there would be someone with a video camera or tape recorder!? Does anyone know of any recording?

  126. Anonymous

    I’m a Davis Resident and parent who relocated to Davis just for the Schools. I agree with many of the comments above and believe we need to make this “a tremendous learning opportunity.” I’m currently reading through 1st Amendment School cases and I’m going to meet with others tomorrow about this issue. You’d think that in a large student body assembly of over a thousand there would be someone with a video camera or tape recorder!? Does anyone know of any recording?

  127. Anonymous

    I’m a Davis Resident and parent who relocated to Davis just for the Schools. I agree with many of the comments above and believe we need to make this “a tremendous learning opportunity.” I’m currently reading through 1st Amendment School cases and I’m going to meet with others tomorrow about this issue. You’d think that in a large student body assembly of over a thousand there would be someone with a video camera or tape recorder!? Does anyone know of any recording?

  128. Anonymous

    I’m a Davis Resident and parent who relocated to Davis just for the Schools. I agree with many of the comments above and believe we need to make this “a tremendous learning opportunity.” I’m currently reading through 1st Amendment School cases and I’m going to meet with others tomorrow about this issue. You’d think that in a large student body assembly of over a thousand there would be someone with a video camera or tape recorder!? Does anyone know of any recording?

  129. Dave Hart

    High teacher turnover in Davis has more to do with lower than average salaries, teachers with spouses at UCD who move on, etc. I would agree that there are parents in this town who think they know better than the teacher how to run a classroom…that alone might make a teacher wonder why they bother collecting a check here when there are so many better qualified parents. But that is not the issue with this case.

  130. Dave Hart

    High teacher turnover in Davis has more to do with lower than average salaries, teachers with spouses at UCD who move on, etc. I would agree that there are parents in this town who think they know better than the teacher how to run a classroom…that alone might make a teacher wonder why they bother collecting a check here when there are so many better qualified parents. But that is not the issue with this case.

  131. Dave Hart

    High teacher turnover in Davis has more to do with lower than average salaries, teachers with spouses at UCD who move on, etc. I would agree that there are parents in this town who think they know better than the teacher how to run a classroom…that alone might make a teacher wonder why they bother collecting a check here when there are so many better qualified parents. But that is not the issue with this case.

  132. Dave Hart

    High teacher turnover in Davis has more to do with lower than average salaries, teachers with spouses at UCD who move on, etc. I would agree that there are parents in this town who think they know better than the teacher how to run a classroom…that alone might make a teacher wonder why they bother collecting a check here when there are so many better qualified parents. But that is not the issue with this case.

  133. Anonymous

    Dear Anonymous 9:16

    I ran into one of my ex-students today walking on her way to her car. She is a second year undergrad here in Davis. She was in my ninth grade honors science class in 2001. She still lives in Fairfield and commutes to UCD because it is what she can afford. Neither of her parents ever went to college.

    We talked about her classmates and here are some of the ones she mentioned:

    Camille at Brown
    Linda and Cristina at Harvard
    Katy at Stanford
    Maggie at MIT
    Samantha at UC Santa Cruz

    Well the student I saw today was unusual in her cohort because her parents didn’t go to college but I can tell you that parents of these highly successful students could be quite aggressive in defense of their kids. I remember one time I had a kid who had all A’s on a progress report except for my B+. The parents were livid.

    So I do understand what it can be like to deal with over the top parents and let me tell you its much better than dealing with kids that have no parental involvement at all. Believe me I have plenty of experience with that type of student as well.

    High turn over in Davis for teachers? Is it higher than anywhere else? Something like 1/4 to 1/2 of all new teachers don’t last five years in this state. Its a tough job everywhere and I’m sure its tough in Davis too. I haven’t called for the teacher in the Malcolm X incident to resign or be sued. Maybe some others have done that but not me. Good Calculus teachers are hard to find and I would hope that this teacher will learn from this experience and get better at the interpersonal humanitarian aspect of her craft. Still there is an immediate need for the student to get back into class and maybe some people that work at the school need to eat a little humble pie.

    As for the school board if there was ever an example of the need for a more diverse faculty I can’t think of one. This is the kind of poor judgement you get when you focus on advanced degrees instead of cultural understanding, diversity and real world experience in hiring.

  134. Anonymous

    Dear Anonymous 9:16

    I ran into one of my ex-students today walking on her way to her car. She is a second year undergrad here in Davis. She was in my ninth grade honors science class in 2001. She still lives in Fairfield and commutes to UCD because it is what she can afford. Neither of her parents ever went to college.

    We talked about her classmates and here are some of the ones she mentioned:

    Camille at Brown
    Linda and Cristina at Harvard
    Katy at Stanford
    Maggie at MIT
    Samantha at UC Santa Cruz

    Well the student I saw today was unusual in her cohort because her parents didn’t go to college but I can tell you that parents of these highly successful students could be quite aggressive in defense of their kids. I remember one time I had a kid who had all A’s on a progress report except for my B+. The parents were livid.

    So I do understand what it can be like to deal with over the top parents and let me tell you its much better than dealing with kids that have no parental involvement at all. Believe me I have plenty of experience with that type of student as well.

    High turn over in Davis for teachers? Is it higher than anywhere else? Something like 1/4 to 1/2 of all new teachers don’t last five years in this state. Its a tough job everywhere and I’m sure its tough in Davis too. I haven’t called for the teacher in the Malcolm X incident to resign or be sued. Maybe some others have done that but not me. Good Calculus teachers are hard to find and I would hope that this teacher will learn from this experience and get better at the interpersonal humanitarian aspect of her craft. Still there is an immediate need for the student to get back into class and maybe some people that work at the school need to eat a little humble pie.

    As for the school board if there was ever an example of the need for a more diverse faculty I can’t think of one. This is the kind of poor judgement you get when you focus on advanced degrees instead of cultural understanding, diversity and real world experience in hiring.

  135. Anonymous

    Dear Anonymous 9:16

    I ran into one of my ex-students today walking on her way to her car. She is a second year undergrad here in Davis. She was in my ninth grade honors science class in 2001. She still lives in Fairfield and commutes to UCD because it is what she can afford. Neither of her parents ever went to college.

    We talked about her classmates and here are some of the ones she mentioned:

    Camille at Brown
    Linda and Cristina at Harvard
    Katy at Stanford
    Maggie at MIT
    Samantha at UC Santa Cruz

    Well the student I saw today was unusual in her cohort because her parents didn’t go to college but I can tell you that parents of these highly successful students could be quite aggressive in defense of their kids. I remember one time I had a kid who had all A’s on a progress report except for my B+. The parents were livid.

    So I do understand what it can be like to deal with over the top parents and let me tell you its much better than dealing with kids that have no parental involvement at all. Believe me I have plenty of experience with that type of student as well.

    High turn over in Davis for teachers? Is it higher than anywhere else? Something like 1/4 to 1/2 of all new teachers don’t last five years in this state. Its a tough job everywhere and I’m sure its tough in Davis too. I haven’t called for the teacher in the Malcolm X incident to resign or be sued. Maybe some others have done that but not me. Good Calculus teachers are hard to find and I would hope that this teacher will learn from this experience and get better at the interpersonal humanitarian aspect of her craft. Still there is an immediate need for the student to get back into class and maybe some people that work at the school need to eat a little humble pie.

    As for the school board if there was ever an example of the need for a more diverse faculty I can’t think of one. This is the kind of poor judgement you get when you focus on advanced degrees instead of cultural understanding, diversity and real world experience in hiring.

  136. Anonymous

    Dear Anonymous 9:16

    I ran into one of my ex-students today walking on her way to her car. She is a second year undergrad here in Davis. She was in my ninth grade honors science class in 2001. She still lives in Fairfield and commutes to UCD because it is what she can afford. Neither of her parents ever went to college.

    We talked about her classmates and here are some of the ones she mentioned:

    Camille at Brown
    Linda and Cristina at Harvard
    Katy at Stanford
    Maggie at MIT
    Samantha at UC Santa Cruz

    Well the student I saw today was unusual in her cohort because her parents didn’t go to college but I can tell you that parents of these highly successful students could be quite aggressive in defense of their kids. I remember one time I had a kid who had all A’s on a progress report except for my B+. The parents were livid.

    So I do understand what it can be like to deal with over the top parents and let me tell you its much better than dealing with kids that have no parental involvement at all. Believe me I have plenty of experience with that type of student as well.

    High turn over in Davis for teachers? Is it higher than anywhere else? Something like 1/4 to 1/2 of all new teachers don’t last five years in this state. Its a tough job everywhere and I’m sure its tough in Davis too. I haven’t called for the teacher in the Malcolm X incident to resign or be sued. Maybe some others have done that but not me. Good Calculus teachers are hard to find and I would hope that this teacher will learn from this experience and get better at the interpersonal humanitarian aspect of her craft. Still there is an immediate need for the student to get back into class and maybe some people that work at the school need to eat a little humble pie.

    As for the school board if there was ever an example of the need for a more diverse faculty I can’t think of one. This is the kind of poor judgement you get when you focus on advanced degrees instead of cultural understanding, diversity and real world experience in hiring.

  137. Rich Rifkin

    “She had a student not finish sixth grade one year because she was pregnant and delivered the child before school ended.”

    Very sad. Even worse if it was a rape. I would hope that some adult would have the sense to either encourage the girl to put her baby up for adoption; or to give it to an older responsible relative to raise.

  138. Rich Rifkin

    “She had a student not finish sixth grade one year because she was pregnant and delivered the child before school ended.”

    Very sad. Even worse if it was a rape. I would hope that some adult would have the sense to either encourage the girl to put her baby up for adoption; or to give it to an older responsible relative to raise.

  139. Rich Rifkin

    “She had a student not finish sixth grade one year because she was pregnant and delivered the child before school ended.”

    Very sad. Even worse if it was a rape. I would hope that some adult would have the sense to either encourage the girl to put her baby up for adoption; or to give it to an older responsible relative to raise.

  140. Rich Rifkin

    “She had a student not finish sixth grade one year because she was pregnant and delivered the child before school ended.”

    Very sad. Even worse if it was a rape. I would hope that some adult would have the sense to either encourage the girl to put her baby up for adoption; or to give it to an older responsible relative to raise.

  141. Anonymous

    I too taught in a school district with very low parent participation and then I taught in Davis. I can tell you that BOTH situations are difficult, so please don’t try to make it seem like a cakewalk to teach in Davis. The fact that one has to deal with difficult parents who most of the time pass their grand sense of entitlement onto their children in addition to low salaries has given a bad reputation to DJUSD in terms of recruiting young and minority teachers. I know, I tried to recruit fellow classmates in my credential program to Davis and the majority of the answers that I got was “NO WAY!”

  142. Anonymous

    I too taught in a school district with very low parent participation and then I taught in Davis. I can tell you that BOTH situations are difficult, so please don’t try to make it seem like a cakewalk to teach in Davis. The fact that one has to deal with difficult parents who most of the time pass their grand sense of entitlement onto their children in addition to low salaries has given a bad reputation to DJUSD in terms of recruiting young and minority teachers. I know, I tried to recruit fellow classmates in my credential program to Davis and the majority of the answers that I got was “NO WAY!”

  143. Anonymous

    I too taught in a school district with very low parent participation and then I taught in Davis. I can tell you that BOTH situations are difficult, so please don’t try to make it seem like a cakewalk to teach in Davis. The fact that one has to deal with difficult parents who most of the time pass their grand sense of entitlement onto their children in addition to low salaries has given a bad reputation to DJUSD in terms of recruiting young and minority teachers. I know, I tried to recruit fellow classmates in my credential program to Davis and the majority of the answers that I got was “NO WAY!”

  144. Anonymous

    I too taught in a school district with very low parent participation and then I taught in Davis. I can tell you that BOTH situations are difficult, so please don’t try to make it seem like a cakewalk to teach in Davis. The fact that one has to deal with difficult parents who most of the time pass their grand sense of entitlement onto their children in addition to low salaries has given a bad reputation to DJUSD in terms of recruiting young and minority teachers. I know, I tried to recruit fellow classmates in my credential program to Davis and the majority of the answers that I got was “NO WAY!”

  145. Richard

    Rich, I disagree.

    The District is not going to rescind this student’s suspension unless strong pressure is applied. School process failed Fischer, and it will fail this family as well.

    I would advise the hiring of an attorney immediately, with the intention of signalling that the family expects an immediate resolution in its favor, or legal action will be promptly pursued.

    Unfortunately, I think we are at the point where this District will only change after experiencing the pain of substantial legal costs and substantial judgments.

    –Richard Estes

  146. Richard

    Rich, I disagree.

    The District is not going to rescind this student’s suspension unless strong pressure is applied. School process failed Fischer, and it will fail this family as well.

    I would advise the hiring of an attorney immediately, with the intention of signalling that the family expects an immediate resolution in its favor, or legal action will be promptly pursued.

    Unfortunately, I think we are at the point where this District will only change after experiencing the pain of substantial legal costs and substantial judgments.

    –Richard Estes

  147. Richard

    Rich, I disagree.

    The District is not going to rescind this student’s suspension unless strong pressure is applied. School process failed Fischer, and it will fail this family as well.

    I would advise the hiring of an attorney immediately, with the intention of signalling that the family expects an immediate resolution in its favor, or legal action will be promptly pursued.

    Unfortunately, I think we are at the point where this District will only change after experiencing the pain of substantial legal costs and substantial judgments.

    –Richard Estes

  148. Richard

    Rich, I disagree.

    The District is not going to rescind this student’s suspension unless strong pressure is applied. School process failed Fischer, and it will fail this family as well.

    I would advise the hiring of an attorney immediately, with the intention of signalling that the family expects an immediate resolution in its favor, or legal action will be promptly pursued.

    Unfortunately, I think we are at the point where this District will only change after experiencing the pain of substantial legal costs and substantial judgments.

    –Richard Estes

  149. Anonymous

    I don’t agree, Richard. There are avenues to challenge the suspension that are better in the long run for the student. Lawsuits take a long time and this student will be graduated and off to college before it is resolved that way.

    This student is not going to want to repeatedly interrupt his college education to address this through a lawsuit. Especially when in the long run it will matter very little, other than be a rather annoying memory. Once he graduates from High School, all discipline stuff is purged from his file.

    Additionally, once a lawsuit is started, all dialogue ceases. This is exactly what doesn’t need to happen.

    Sharla Cheney Harrington

  150. Anonymous

    I don’t agree, Richard. There are avenues to challenge the suspension that are better in the long run for the student. Lawsuits take a long time and this student will be graduated and off to college before it is resolved that way.

    This student is not going to want to repeatedly interrupt his college education to address this through a lawsuit. Especially when in the long run it will matter very little, other than be a rather annoying memory. Once he graduates from High School, all discipline stuff is purged from his file.

    Additionally, once a lawsuit is started, all dialogue ceases. This is exactly what doesn’t need to happen.

    Sharla Cheney Harrington

  151. Anonymous

    I don’t agree, Richard. There are avenues to challenge the suspension that are better in the long run for the student. Lawsuits take a long time and this student will be graduated and off to college before it is resolved that way.

    This student is not going to want to repeatedly interrupt his college education to address this through a lawsuit. Especially when in the long run it will matter very little, other than be a rather annoying memory. Once he graduates from High School, all discipline stuff is purged from his file.

    Additionally, once a lawsuit is started, all dialogue ceases. This is exactly what doesn’t need to happen.

    Sharla Cheney Harrington

  152. Anonymous

    I don’t agree, Richard. There are avenues to challenge the suspension that are better in the long run for the student. Lawsuits take a long time and this student will be graduated and off to college before it is resolved that way.

    This student is not going to want to repeatedly interrupt his college education to address this through a lawsuit. Especially when in the long run it will matter very little, other than be a rather annoying memory. Once he graduates from High School, all discipline stuff is purged from his file.

    Additionally, once a lawsuit is started, all dialogue ceases. This is exactly what doesn’t need to happen.

    Sharla Cheney Harrington

  153. Richard

    Sharla: you still hire the attorney now.

    The attorney gets all the facts from the parents, the students and others, contacts the District, and determines if there are avenues for dialogue.

    If so, they talk, If not, time to get aggressive.

    My educated guess is that there is no room for dialogue, the District has adopted the predicable bunker mentality.

    But, the attorney can find out.

    Anyone who believes that you should try to work with the District on this one WITHOUT an attorney, and believes that there will be a positive outcome, is, in my view, extraordinarily naive.

    –Richard Estes

  154. Richard

    Sharla: you still hire the attorney now.

    The attorney gets all the facts from the parents, the students and others, contacts the District, and determines if there are avenues for dialogue.

    If so, they talk, If not, time to get aggressive.

    My educated guess is that there is no room for dialogue, the District has adopted the predicable bunker mentality.

    But, the attorney can find out.

    Anyone who believes that you should try to work with the District on this one WITHOUT an attorney, and believes that there will be a positive outcome, is, in my view, extraordinarily naive.

    –Richard Estes

  155. Richard

    Sharla: you still hire the attorney now.

    The attorney gets all the facts from the parents, the students and others, contacts the District, and determines if there are avenues for dialogue.

    If so, they talk, If not, time to get aggressive.

    My educated guess is that there is no room for dialogue, the District has adopted the predicable bunker mentality.

    But, the attorney can find out.

    Anyone who believes that you should try to work with the District on this one WITHOUT an attorney, and believes that there will be a positive outcome, is, in my view, extraordinarily naive.

    –Richard Estes

  156. Richard

    Sharla: you still hire the attorney now.

    The attorney gets all the facts from the parents, the students and others, contacts the District, and determines if there are avenues for dialogue.

    If so, they talk, If not, time to get aggressive.

    My educated guess is that there is no room for dialogue, the District has adopted the predicable bunker mentality.

    But, the attorney can find out.

    Anyone who believes that you should try to work with the District on this one WITHOUT an attorney, and believes that there will be a positive outcome, is, in my view, extraordinarily naive.

    –Richard Estes

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