Mass Protests and Arrests in Davis Over Food Workers Contract

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A rally held at the Memorial Union on the UC Davis campus in support of allowing the UCD Food Service Workers (AFSCME) to unionize merged with some other groups opposed to the Iraq War and U.S. Immigration Policy. The bulk of the rally was held to support workers rights to unionize and get affordable health insurance. UC Davis, is according to organizers, the only UC campus which contracts out the food service workers to a private multinational corporation, with high health insurance premiums.

The crowd was initially estimated by the UC Davis Police Chief Annette Spicuzza at 150, but even she admitted that was a very low number. I would guess upwards of 400 based on my count.

They held a rally at the MU for about half an hour. Then marched around the quad, down to Freeborn and held a brief rally there before heading down Howard to Russell and then down Russell to the corner of Russell and Anderson.

At that point, they marched into the intersection and chanted, beat their drums, and marched in circles for a good period of time.

The event was well organized. The police did a good job of blocking traffic, diverting it away from the protest and also did not engage with the protesters.

It was only when the larger group left the street to stand on the sidewalks, then a group of perhaps 24 to 30 people sat down in the middle of the intersection.


At this point, Lt. Dorothy Pearson gave the order to disperse. When they did not disperse, officers read the protesters their rights and arrested them, one-by-one leading them into a bus.

When this was done, the protesters peacefully dispersed and there appeared to be no incidents. It was well handled by both the police and the organizers to make a point. Although you can see from one of the photos above, the police were ready with riot gear (or two of them were) if the crowd got out of hand.

New Davis Police Chief Landy Black lauded the protest, said that is what this country is about, and said that those who were diverted and delayed in their vehicles were given some time to consider which side they were on.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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140 thoughts on “Mass Protests and Arrests in Davis Over Food Workers Contract”

  1. Anonymous

    Doug:

    Thanks for reporting this. BTW – Great pictures!

    The fact that workers have to “take it to the streets” with protests in order to form a union at UCD — a so-called progressive UC campus — and get good benefits is very telling.

    Vanderhoef and the UC Davis administration have always been at odds with staff, faculty, and now food service workers. I look forward to having a new chancellor when Vandie retires with his big ol’ retirement package.

  2. Anonymous

    Doug:

    Thanks for reporting this. BTW – Great pictures!

    The fact that workers have to “take it to the streets” with protests in order to form a union at UCD — a so-called progressive UC campus — and get good benefits is very telling.

    Vanderhoef and the UC Davis administration have always been at odds with staff, faculty, and now food service workers. I look forward to having a new chancellor when Vandie retires with his big ol’ retirement package.

  3. Anonymous

    Doug:

    Thanks for reporting this. BTW – Great pictures!

    The fact that workers have to “take it to the streets” with protests in order to form a union at UCD — a so-called progressive UC campus — and get good benefits is very telling.

    Vanderhoef and the UC Davis administration have always been at odds with staff, faculty, and now food service workers. I look forward to having a new chancellor when Vandie retires with his big ol’ retirement package.

  4. Anonymous

    Doug:

    Thanks for reporting this. BTW – Great pictures!

    The fact that workers have to “take it to the streets” with protests in order to form a union at UCD — a so-called progressive UC campus — and get good benefits is very telling.

    Vanderhoef and the UC Davis administration have always been at odds with staff, faculty, and now food service workers. I look forward to having a new chancellor when Vandie retires with his big ol’ retirement package.

  5. Anonymous

    Burt said….

    Hell no we won’t go. Hell no we won’t go. Hell no we won’t go. Hell no we won’t go. Oops. Sorry I kind of got caught up in the protest.

  6. Anonymous

    Burt said….

    Hell no we won’t go. Hell no we won’t go. Hell no we won’t go. Hell no we won’t go. Oops. Sorry I kind of got caught up in the protest.

  7. Anonymous

    Burt said….

    Hell no we won’t go. Hell no we won’t go. Hell no we won’t go. Hell no we won’t go. Oops. Sorry I kind of got caught up in the protest.

  8. Anonymous

    Burt said….

    Hell no we won’t go. Hell no we won’t go. Hell no we won’t go. Hell no we won’t go. Oops. Sorry I kind of got caught up in the protest.

  9. Rich Rifkin

    “A rally held at the Memorial Union on the UC Davis campus in support of allowing the UCD Food Service Workers (AFSCME) to unionize merged with some other groups opposed to the Iraq War and U.S. Immigration Policy. The bulk of the rally was held to support workers rights to unionize and get affordable health insurance.”

    I’d like to see a protest of all the kids (and their families) who would have to pay the bill for the higher wages and benefits of the unionized workers. I’d like to see them protest every time the UC executives give massive contracts to administrators and deans and retiring profs. I’d like to see a massive protest over the very high fees for kids who are going to the professional schools. I’d like to see a protest over the bills today’s undergrads must pay for Division I athletics, because earlier students foisted that bill on them.

    Every group that has demanded more and more money from the UC over the last 20-25 years has made a UC education impossibly expensive for middle class kids. Many poor students are eligible for generous financial aid. And, of course, rich kids’ families can pay. But there are too many kids from lower-middle and middle income families who cannot afford to pay for all of these benefits and salaries that others are demanding from them.

    It wasn’t that long ago that a UC education was very cheap. But since that time, everyone who makes his/her living from the University has asked for and received a huge increase in pay and benefits (in inflation adjusted dollars). The Chancellor, for example, makes 3 times as much as the Chancellor did 22 years ago, after adjusting for inflation. It’s time for the UC to get back to its original mission: to provide a high quality education to all top-flight California students at an affordable price. Its mission is not now nor ever should be to pay high salaries and benefits to its administrators, faculty or staff. That should only be a consideration after the students’ interests have been met.

  10. Rich Rifkin

    “A rally held at the Memorial Union on the UC Davis campus in support of allowing the UCD Food Service Workers (AFSCME) to unionize merged with some other groups opposed to the Iraq War and U.S. Immigration Policy. The bulk of the rally was held to support workers rights to unionize and get affordable health insurance.”

    I’d like to see a protest of all the kids (and their families) who would have to pay the bill for the higher wages and benefits of the unionized workers. I’d like to see them protest every time the UC executives give massive contracts to administrators and deans and retiring profs. I’d like to see a massive protest over the very high fees for kids who are going to the professional schools. I’d like to see a protest over the bills today’s undergrads must pay for Division I athletics, because earlier students foisted that bill on them.

    Every group that has demanded more and more money from the UC over the last 20-25 years has made a UC education impossibly expensive for middle class kids. Many poor students are eligible for generous financial aid. And, of course, rich kids’ families can pay. But there are too many kids from lower-middle and middle income families who cannot afford to pay for all of these benefits and salaries that others are demanding from them.

    It wasn’t that long ago that a UC education was very cheap. But since that time, everyone who makes his/her living from the University has asked for and received a huge increase in pay and benefits (in inflation adjusted dollars). The Chancellor, for example, makes 3 times as much as the Chancellor did 22 years ago, after adjusting for inflation. It’s time for the UC to get back to its original mission: to provide a high quality education to all top-flight California students at an affordable price. Its mission is not now nor ever should be to pay high salaries and benefits to its administrators, faculty or staff. That should only be a consideration after the students’ interests have been met.

  11. Rich Rifkin

    “A rally held at the Memorial Union on the UC Davis campus in support of allowing the UCD Food Service Workers (AFSCME) to unionize merged with some other groups opposed to the Iraq War and U.S. Immigration Policy. The bulk of the rally was held to support workers rights to unionize and get affordable health insurance.”

    I’d like to see a protest of all the kids (and their families) who would have to pay the bill for the higher wages and benefits of the unionized workers. I’d like to see them protest every time the UC executives give massive contracts to administrators and deans and retiring profs. I’d like to see a massive protest over the very high fees for kids who are going to the professional schools. I’d like to see a protest over the bills today’s undergrads must pay for Division I athletics, because earlier students foisted that bill on them.

    Every group that has demanded more and more money from the UC over the last 20-25 years has made a UC education impossibly expensive for middle class kids. Many poor students are eligible for generous financial aid. And, of course, rich kids’ families can pay. But there are too many kids from lower-middle and middle income families who cannot afford to pay for all of these benefits and salaries that others are demanding from them.

    It wasn’t that long ago that a UC education was very cheap. But since that time, everyone who makes his/her living from the University has asked for and received a huge increase in pay and benefits (in inflation adjusted dollars). The Chancellor, for example, makes 3 times as much as the Chancellor did 22 years ago, after adjusting for inflation. It’s time for the UC to get back to its original mission: to provide a high quality education to all top-flight California students at an affordable price. Its mission is not now nor ever should be to pay high salaries and benefits to its administrators, faculty or staff. That should only be a consideration after the students’ interests have been met.

  12. Rich Rifkin

    “A rally held at the Memorial Union on the UC Davis campus in support of allowing the UCD Food Service Workers (AFSCME) to unionize merged with some other groups opposed to the Iraq War and U.S. Immigration Policy. The bulk of the rally was held to support workers rights to unionize and get affordable health insurance.”

    I’d like to see a protest of all the kids (and their families) who would have to pay the bill for the higher wages and benefits of the unionized workers. I’d like to see them protest every time the UC executives give massive contracts to administrators and deans and retiring profs. I’d like to see a massive protest over the very high fees for kids who are going to the professional schools. I’d like to see a protest over the bills today’s undergrads must pay for Division I athletics, because earlier students foisted that bill on them.

    Every group that has demanded more and more money from the UC over the last 20-25 years has made a UC education impossibly expensive for middle class kids. Many poor students are eligible for generous financial aid. And, of course, rich kids’ families can pay. But there are too many kids from lower-middle and middle income families who cannot afford to pay for all of these benefits and salaries that others are demanding from them.

    It wasn’t that long ago that a UC education was very cheap. But since that time, everyone who makes his/her living from the University has asked for and received a huge increase in pay and benefits (in inflation adjusted dollars). The Chancellor, for example, makes 3 times as much as the Chancellor did 22 years ago, after adjusting for inflation. It’s time for the UC to get back to its original mission: to provide a high quality education to all top-flight California students at an affordable price. Its mission is not now nor ever should be to pay high salaries and benefits to its administrators, faculty or staff. That should only be a consideration after the students’ interests have been met.

  13. 無名 - wu ming

    i agree 100%, rich. and as a student who was at one of the earlier food service marches, the executive salary raises are well known and part of the grievances that the workers had with the UC. we’ll be going up against the same issue in our own contract negotiations (academic student employees) this coming summer and fall, where the administration is trying to freeze or roll back our benefits and pay while jacking their own pay up because “you’ve got to be able to attract quality people.”

    as if only executives are quality people in need of attracting.

    public education should be cheap if not free, with rigorous academic standards, and administrators paid a living wage, but not necessarily humongous contracts with benefits so that they can feel on par with their buddies in the corporate world.

    always good to see students getting active.

  14. 無名 - wu ming

    i agree 100%, rich. and as a student who was at one of the earlier food service marches, the executive salary raises are well known and part of the grievances that the workers had with the UC. we’ll be going up against the same issue in our own contract negotiations (academic student employees) this coming summer and fall, where the administration is trying to freeze or roll back our benefits and pay while jacking their own pay up because “you’ve got to be able to attract quality people.”

    as if only executives are quality people in need of attracting.

    public education should be cheap if not free, with rigorous academic standards, and administrators paid a living wage, but not necessarily humongous contracts with benefits so that they can feel on par with their buddies in the corporate world.

    always good to see students getting active.

  15. 無名 - wu ming

    i agree 100%, rich. and as a student who was at one of the earlier food service marches, the executive salary raises are well known and part of the grievances that the workers had with the UC. we’ll be going up against the same issue in our own contract negotiations (academic student employees) this coming summer and fall, where the administration is trying to freeze or roll back our benefits and pay while jacking their own pay up because “you’ve got to be able to attract quality people.”

    as if only executives are quality people in need of attracting.

    public education should be cheap if not free, with rigorous academic standards, and administrators paid a living wage, but not necessarily humongous contracts with benefits so that they can feel on par with their buddies in the corporate world.

    always good to see students getting active.

  16. 無名 - wu ming

    i agree 100%, rich. and as a student who was at one of the earlier food service marches, the executive salary raises are well known and part of the grievances that the workers had with the UC. we’ll be going up against the same issue in our own contract negotiations (academic student employees) this coming summer and fall, where the administration is trying to freeze or roll back our benefits and pay while jacking their own pay up because “you’ve got to be able to attract quality people.”

    as if only executives are quality people in need of attracting.

    public education should be cheap if not free, with rigorous academic standards, and administrators paid a living wage, but not necessarily humongous contracts with benefits so that they can feel on par with their buddies in the corporate world.

    always good to see students getting active.

  17. Don Shor

    So…in order to make the point that you favor unions, favor lower health premiums, are against the war, and favor immigration rights (or something), you go out and block traffic?
    This makes exactly what point, how, and to whom?

  18. Don Shor

    So…in order to make the point that you favor unions, favor lower health premiums, are against the war, and favor immigration rights (or something), you go out and block traffic?
    This makes exactly what point, how, and to whom?

  19. Don Shor

    So…in order to make the point that you favor unions, favor lower health premiums, are against the war, and favor immigration rights (or something), you go out and block traffic?
    This makes exactly what point, how, and to whom?

  20. Don Shor

    So…in order to make the point that you favor unions, favor lower health premiums, are against the war, and favor immigration rights (or something), you go out and block traffic?
    This makes exactly what point, how, and to whom?

  21. 無名 - wu ming

    ah, the peril of the too-quick answer. i agree with the tuiotion, rich, but not with protesting food service workers getting a decent wage and benefits. many of them are students, and many of those students are paying much of their own way through school, along with growing debt because of those perpetual hikes.

    and if you think financial aid is generous these days, you’ve got a pretty skewed picture of things. more often than not, what they offer you is loans, not aid, and even then it rarely covers the cost of going to school.

  22. 無名 - wu ming

    ah, the peril of the too-quick answer. i agree with the tuiotion, rich, but not with protesting food service workers getting a decent wage and benefits. many of them are students, and many of those students are paying much of their own way through school, along with growing debt because of those perpetual hikes.

    and if you think financial aid is generous these days, you’ve got a pretty skewed picture of things. more often than not, what they offer you is loans, not aid, and even then it rarely covers the cost of going to school.

  23. 無名 - wu ming

    ah, the peril of the too-quick answer. i agree with the tuiotion, rich, but not with protesting food service workers getting a decent wage and benefits. many of them are students, and many of those students are paying much of their own way through school, along with growing debt because of those perpetual hikes.

    and if you think financial aid is generous these days, you’ve got a pretty skewed picture of things. more often than not, what they offer you is loans, not aid, and even then it rarely covers the cost of going to school.

  24. 無名 - wu ming

    ah, the peril of the too-quick answer. i agree with the tuiotion, rich, but not with protesting food service workers getting a decent wage and benefits. many of them are students, and many of those students are paying much of their own way through school, along with growing debt because of those perpetual hikes.

    and if you think financial aid is generous these days, you’ve got a pretty skewed picture of things. more often than not, what they offer you is loans, not aid, and even then it rarely covers the cost of going to school.

  25. Don Shor

    Doug Paul Davis said…

    Got you thinking about this issue tonight Don? At least for a second?

    LOL…
    It would probably be more effective if they protested one issue at a time, and directed the protest at someone who could actually do something about it.
    I’m guessing most of the drivers passing by have no problem with workers’ right to unionize or with the general concept of affordable health insurance.
    How much are food service workers paid, and what percentage of their health premium do they pay? And why aren’t they unionized?

  26. Don Shor

    Doug Paul Davis said…

    Got you thinking about this issue tonight Don? At least for a second?

    LOL…
    It would probably be more effective if they protested one issue at a time, and directed the protest at someone who could actually do something about it.
    I’m guessing most of the drivers passing by have no problem with workers’ right to unionize or with the general concept of affordable health insurance.
    How much are food service workers paid, and what percentage of their health premium do they pay? And why aren’t they unionized?

  27. Don Shor

    Doug Paul Davis said…

    Got you thinking about this issue tonight Don? At least for a second?

    LOL…
    It would probably be more effective if they protested one issue at a time, and directed the protest at someone who could actually do something about it.
    I’m guessing most of the drivers passing by have no problem with workers’ right to unionize or with the general concept of affordable health insurance.
    How much are food service workers paid, and what percentage of their health premium do they pay? And why aren’t they unionized?

  28. Don Shor

    Doug Paul Davis said…

    Got you thinking about this issue tonight Don? At least for a second?

    LOL…
    It would probably be more effective if they protested one issue at a time, and directed the protest at someone who could actually do something about it.
    I’m guessing most of the drivers passing by have no problem with workers’ right to unionize or with the general concept of affordable health insurance.
    How much are food service workers paid, and what percentage of their health premium do they pay? And why aren’t they unionized?

  29. Doug Paul Davis

    The other thing is that the police were redirecting traffic at least a block away–so they redirected traffic as 8th street, at Sycamore and Russell, at Russell and Oak, and at Hutchinson on campus, so traffic was never really close, the only thing this really did was make the news.

  30. Doug Paul Davis

    The other thing is that the police were redirecting traffic at least a block away–so they redirected traffic as 8th street, at Sycamore and Russell, at Russell and Oak, and at Hutchinson on campus, so traffic was never really close, the only thing this really did was make the news.

  31. Doug Paul Davis

    The other thing is that the police were redirecting traffic at least a block away–so they redirected traffic as 8th street, at Sycamore and Russell, at Russell and Oak, and at Hutchinson on campus, so traffic was never really close, the only thing this really did was make the news.

  32. Doug Paul Davis

    The other thing is that the police were redirecting traffic at least a block away–so they redirected traffic as 8th street, at Sycamore and Russell, at Russell and Oak, and at Hutchinson on campus, so traffic was never really close, the only thing this really did was make the news.

  33. Davis BLUU

    I’m all FOR the protests that took place! Now that they’ve made the news, maybe the “powers that be” will actually take these issues seriously.

  34. Davis BLUU

    I’m all FOR the protests that took place! Now that they’ve made the news, maybe the “powers that be” will actually take these issues seriously.

  35. Davis BLUU

    I’m all FOR the protests that took place! Now that they’ve made the news, maybe the “powers that be” will actually take these issues seriously.

  36. Davis BLUU

    I’m all FOR the protests that took place! Now that they’ve made the news, maybe the “powers that be” will actually take these issues seriously.

  37. Anonymous

    “People who block roads endanger the public by blocking fire/life/sfety access for all.

    You deserve to be run over if you do it !”

    Uh, gee, don’t you think that’s just a little harsh? Arrested, sure. The protesters were warned, and made the choice to remain and be arrested. But run over?….I don’t think so.

    Are you the same person who recently wrote a letter to the Enterprise saying that you would be happy to hit cyclists running stop signs with your car if it wasn’t for the damage to your car?

    Whether I agree or disagree with the protesters, I am glad to see young people choose activism over apathy.

  38. Anonymous

    “People who block roads endanger the public by blocking fire/life/sfety access for all.

    You deserve to be run over if you do it !”

    Uh, gee, don’t you think that’s just a little harsh? Arrested, sure. The protesters were warned, and made the choice to remain and be arrested. But run over?….I don’t think so.

    Are you the same person who recently wrote a letter to the Enterprise saying that you would be happy to hit cyclists running stop signs with your car if it wasn’t for the damage to your car?

    Whether I agree or disagree with the protesters, I am glad to see young people choose activism over apathy.

  39. Anonymous

    “People who block roads endanger the public by blocking fire/life/sfety access for all.

    You deserve to be run over if you do it !”

    Uh, gee, don’t you think that’s just a little harsh? Arrested, sure. The protesters were warned, and made the choice to remain and be arrested. But run over?….I don’t think so.

    Are you the same person who recently wrote a letter to the Enterprise saying that you would be happy to hit cyclists running stop signs with your car if it wasn’t for the damage to your car?

    Whether I agree or disagree with the protesters, I am glad to see young people choose activism over apathy.

  40. Anonymous

    “People who block roads endanger the public by blocking fire/life/sfety access for all.

    You deserve to be run over if you do it !”

    Uh, gee, don’t you think that’s just a little harsh? Arrested, sure. The protesters were warned, and made the choice to remain and be arrested. But run over?….I don’t think so.

    Are you the same person who recently wrote a letter to the Enterprise saying that you would be happy to hit cyclists running stop signs with your car if it wasn’t for the damage to your car?

    Whether I agree or disagree with the protesters, I am glad to see young people choose activism over apathy.

  41. Karl

    Ah, making fun of the police, a favorite past time of anonymous commentators everywhere. Looking through those pictures, the police seem to have about the same weight range as society at large.

    But seriously, this was a nice write-up for those of us who couldn’t be there. I appreciated getting a reasonable perspective. Thanks

  42. Karl

    Ah, making fun of the police, a favorite past time of anonymous commentators everywhere. Looking through those pictures, the police seem to have about the same weight range as society at large.

    But seriously, this was a nice write-up for those of us who couldn’t be there. I appreciated getting a reasonable perspective. Thanks

  43. Karl

    Ah, making fun of the police, a favorite past time of anonymous commentators everywhere. Looking through those pictures, the police seem to have about the same weight range as society at large.

    But seriously, this was a nice write-up for those of us who couldn’t be there. I appreciated getting a reasonable perspective. Thanks

  44. Karl

    Ah, making fun of the police, a favorite past time of anonymous commentators everywhere. Looking through those pictures, the police seem to have about the same weight range as society at large.

    But seriously, this was a nice write-up for those of us who couldn’t be there. I appreciated getting a reasonable perspective. Thanks

  45. Anonymous

    Do the authors of this blog find the anonymous writer’s comments about weight to be funny? This blog is the cyber equivalent to graffiti on a bathroom wall.

  46. Anonymous

    Do the authors of this blog find the anonymous writer’s comments about weight to be funny? This blog is the cyber equivalent to graffiti on a bathroom wall.

  47. Anonymous

    Do the authors of this blog find the anonymous writer’s comments about weight to be funny? This blog is the cyber equivalent to graffiti on a bathroom wall.

  48. Anonymous

    Do the authors of this blog find the anonymous writer’s comments about weight to be funny? This blog is the cyber equivalent to graffiti on a bathroom wall.

  49. Vincente

    The authors of this blog don’t generally censor thoughts even when they disagree with them. Except for Rich Rifkin’s whose are generally in a class of their own. 😉

  50. Vincente

    The authors of this blog don’t generally censor thoughts even when they disagree with them. Except for Rich Rifkin’s whose are generally in a class of their own. 😉

  51. Vincente

    The authors of this blog don’t generally censor thoughts even when they disagree with them. Except for Rich Rifkin’s whose are generally in a class of their own. 😉

  52. Vincente

    The authors of this blog don’t generally censor thoughts even when they disagree with them. Except for Rich Rifkin’s whose are generally in a class of their own. 😉

  53. Don Shor

    I’ll try again:

    How much are food service workers paid, and what percentage of their health premium do they pay? And why aren’t they unionized?

  54. Don Shor

    I’ll try again:

    How much are food service workers paid, and what percentage of their health premium do they pay? And why aren’t they unionized?

  55. Don Shor

    I’ll try again:

    How much are food service workers paid, and what percentage of their health premium do they pay? And why aren’t they unionized?

  56. Don Shor

    I’ll try again:

    How much are food service workers paid, and what percentage of their health premium do they pay? And why aren’t they unionized?

  57. Don Shor

    Thanks, that is useful info.

    “In recent weeks, some employees of Sodexho have been organizing an effort to draw attention to their desire to become employees of the University of California and UC Davis. The campus recognizes the employees’ right to share their concerns. The campus also intends to maintain its relationship with Sodexho and to honor its current contract.

    Why does UC Davis want to maintain its contract with Sodexho?

    The campus wants to keep food service costs low for all customers, and to keep total room and board costs at UC Davis residence halls competitive. The campus estimates that if Sodexho career employees were to become employees of the campus, there would be at least $3.2 million a year in additional costs. These costs would be divided among both students and campus food service customers. Residence hall students would pay about $600 more per year — a cost increase that could move UC Davis from one of the least expensive to one of the most expensive UC campuses in total room and board.”

    That seems to me to be worth thinking about.
    Also, their career employees get a living wage, 30-hour+ employees get full benefits, and they have the right to unionize.

    What exactly were the protests about?

  58. Don Shor

    Thanks, that is useful info.

    “In recent weeks, some employees of Sodexho have been organizing an effort to draw attention to their desire to become employees of the University of California and UC Davis. The campus recognizes the employees’ right to share their concerns. The campus also intends to maintain its relationship with Sodexho and to honor its current contract.

    Why does UC Davis want to maintain its contract with Sodexho?

    The campus wants to keep food service costs low for all customers, and to keep total room and board costs at UC Davis residence halls competitive. The campus estimates that if Sodexho career employees were to become employees of the campus, there would be at least $3.2 million a year in additional costs. These costs would be divided among both students and campus food service customers. Residence hall students would pay about $600 more per year — a cost increase that could move UC Davis from one of the least expensive to one of the most expensive UC campuses in total room and board.”

    That seems to me to be worth thinking about.
    Also, their career employees get a living wage, 30-hour+ employees get full benefits, and they have the right to unionize.

    What exactly were the protests about?

  59. Don Shor

    Thanks, that is useful info.

    “In recent weeks, some employees of Sodexho have been organizing an effort to draw attention to their desire to become employees of the University of California and UC Davis. The campus recognizes the employees’ right to share their concerns. The campus also intends to maintain its relationship with Sodexho and to honor its current contract.

    Why does UC Davis want to maintain its contract with Sodexho?

    The campus wants to keep food service costs low for all customers, and to keep total room and board costs at UC Davis residence halls competitive. The campus estimates that if Sodexho career employees were to become employees of the campus, there would be at least $3.2 million a year in additional costs. These costs would be divided among both students and campus food service customers. Residence hall students would pay about $600 more per year — a cost increase that could move UC Davis from one of the least expensive to one of the most expensive UC campuses in total room and board.”

    That seems to me to be worth thinking about.
    Also, their career employees get a living wage, 30-hour+ employees get full benefits, and they have the right to unionize.

    What exactly were the protests about?

  60. Don Shor

    Thanks, that is useful info.

    “In recent weeks, some employees of Sodexho have been organizing an effort to draw attention to their desire to become employees of the University of California and UC Davis. The campus recognizes the employees’ right to share their concerns. The campus also intends to maintain its relationship with Sodexho and to honor its current contract.

    Why does UC Davis want to maintain its contract with Sodexho?

    The campus wants to keep food service costs low for all customers, and to keep total room and board costs at UC Davis residence halls competitive. The campus estimates that if Sodexho career employees were to become employees of the campus, there would be at least $3.2 million a year in additional costs. These costs would be divided among both students and campus food service customers. Residence hall students would pay about $600 more per year — a cost increase that could move UC Davis from one of the least expensive to one of the most expensive UC campuses in total room and board.”

    That seems to me to be worth thinking about.
    Also, their career employees get a living wage, 30-hour+ employees get full benefits, and they have the right to unionize.

    What exactly were the protests about?

  61. Doug Paul Davis

    That leads me to more questions:

    UC Davis is the only UC that doesn’t have in-house food service workers with union contracts. So what are they doing differently in terms of costs?

    The protest was about the right of workers to join a union and get health benefits.

    We know the university doesn’t skimp on its top end employees, they always seem to stick it to the lower end guys.

  62. Doug Paul Davis

    That leads me to more questions:

    UC Davis is the only UC that doesn’t have in-house food service workers with union contracts. So what are they doing differently in terms of costs?

    The protest was about the right of workers to join a union and get health benefits.

    We know the university doesn’t skimp on its top end employees, they always seem to stick it to the lower end guys.

  63. Doug Paul Davis

    That leads me to more questions:

    UC Davis is the only UC that doesn’t have in-house food service workers with union contracts. So what are they doing differently in terms of costs?

    The protest was about the right of workers to join a union and get health benefits.

    We know the university doesn’t skimp on its top end employees, they always seem to stick it to the lower end guys.

  64. Doug Paul Davis

    That leads me to more questions:

    UC Davis is the only UC that doesn’t have in-house food service workers with union contracts. So what are they doing differently in terms of costs?

    The protest was about the right of workers to join a union and get health benefits.

    We know the university doesn’t skimp on its top end employees, they always seem to stick it to the lower end guys.

  65. Don Shor

    The workers there have the right to form a union, or not. So that is not an issue. Has there been a petition (or whatever it’s called) to form a union? A vote?
    The 30-hour+ employees have full benefits. I assume part-time employees don’t have benefits. Is that the issue?

  66. Don Shor

    The workers there have the right to form a union, or not. So that is not an issue. Has there been a petition (or whatever it’s called) to form a union? A vote?
    The 30-hour+ employees have full benefits. I assume part-time employees don’t have benefits. Is that the issue?

  67. Don Shor

    The workers there have the right to form a union, or not. So that is not an issue. Has there been a petition (or whatever it’s called) to form a union? A vote?
    The 30-hour+ employees have full benefits. I assume part-time employees don’t have benefits. Is that the issue?

  68. Don Shor

    The workers there have the right to form a union, or not. So that is not an issue. Has there been a petition (or whatever it’s called) to form a union? A vote?
    The 30-hour+ employees have full benefits. I assume part-time employees don’t have benefits. Is that the issue?

  69. Vincente

    The major complaint from the paper is that they are making at least two dollars less than university employees would be for comparable work. That seems a worthy cause to me.

  70. Vincente

    The major complaint from the paper is that they are making at least two dollars less than university employees would be for comparable work. That seems a worthy cause to me.

  71. Vincente

    The major complaint from the paper is that they are making at least two dollars less than university employees would be for comparable work. That seems a worthy cause to me.

  72. Vincente

    The major complaint from the paper is that they are making at least two dollars less than university employees would be for comparable work. That seems a worthy cause to me.

  73. ucd bean

    The workers want to become University Employees so they can JOIN the already existing AFSCME chapter that all the shirts are coming from. That AFSCME Chapter covers I’m pretty sure all University employees below professors and a large amount of the tech and lab workers at Med Centers, and then on down to Janitors and food service workers if they are University Employees.

  74. ucd bean

    The workers want to become University Employees so they can JOIN the already existing AFSCME chapter that all the shirts are coming from. That AFSCME Chapter covers I’m pretty sure all University employees below professors and a large amount of the tech and lab workers at Med Centers, and then on down to Janitors and food service workers if they are University Employees.

  75. ucd bean

    The workers want to become University Employees so they can JOIN the already existing AFSCME chapter that all the shirts are coming from. That AFSCME Chapter covers I’m pretty sure all University employees below professors and a large amount of the tech and lab workers at Med Centers, and then on down to Janitors and food service workers if they are University Employees.

  76. ucd bean

    The workers want to become University Employees so they can JOIN the already existing AFSCME chapter that all the shirts are coming from. That AFSCME Chapter covers I’m pretty sure all University employees below professors and a large amount of the tech and lab workers at Med Centers, and then on down to Janitors and food service workers if they are University Employees.

  77. Anonymous

    ucd bean, you are completely incorrect that afscme covers all ucd employees below professor. You are spreading misinformation by that statement. There are several different unions that represent ucd staff, and many ucd staff are unrepresented. Do your homework first before spewing misinformation.

  78. Anonymous

    ucd bean, you are completely incorrect that afscme covers all ucd employees below professor. You are spreading misinformation by that statement. There are several different unions that represent ucd staff, and many ucd staff are unrepresented. Do your homework first before spewing misinformation.

  79. Anonymous

    ucd bean, you are completely incorrect that afscme covers all ucd employees below professor. You are spreading misinformation by that statement. There are several different unions that represent ucd staff, and many ucd staff are unrepresented. Do your homework first before spewing misinformation.

  80. Anonymous

    ucd bean, you are completely incorrect that afscme covers all ucd employees below professor. You are spreading misinformation by that statement. There are several different unions that represent ucd staff, and many ucd staff are unrepresented. Do your homework first before spewing misinformation.

  81. Don Shor

    From a Sodexho web page:

    Sodexho has collective bargaining agreements with nearly every major union in the U.S. and Canada-totaling nearly 300 contracts. These partnerships are strong in part because of our excellent track record of engaging in good faith negotiations in a timely manner when employees have voted to unionize. Approximately 13% of our workforce is unionized, which is on par with our industry.”

    Why don’t the workers at Sodexho at UC Davis just join an existing union to press their demands?

  82. Don Shor

    From a Sodexho web page:

    Sodexho has collective bargaining agreements with nearly every major union in the U.S. and Canada-totaling nearly 300 contracts. These partnerships are strong in part because of our excellent track record of engaging in good faith negotiations in a timely manner when employees have voted to unionize. Approximately 13% of our workforce is unionized, which is on par with our industry.”

    Why don’t the workers at Sodexho at UC Davis just join an existing union to press their demands?

  83. Don Shor

    From a Sodexho web page:

    Sodexho has collective bargaining agreements with nearly every major union in the U.S. and Canada-totaling nearly 300 contracts. These partnerships are strong in part because of our excellent track record of engaging in good faith negotiations in a timely manner when employees have voted to unionize. Approximately 13% of our workforce is unionized, which is on par with our industry.”

    Why don’t the workers at Sodexho at UC Davis just join an existing union to press their demands?

  84. Don Shor

    From a Sodexho web page:

    Sodexho has collective bargaining agreements with nearly every major union in the U.S. and Canada-totaling nearly 300 contracts. These partnerships are strong in part because of our excellent track record of engaging in good faith negotiations in a timely manner when employees have voted to unionize. Approximately 13% of our workforce is unionized, which is on par with our industry.”

    Why don’t the workers at Sodexho at UC Davis just join an existing union to press their demands?

  85. Anonymous

    I don’t understand this part: How can a business (Sodexho) run its business if its employees don’t report to them, which is what the food service workers are asking for, to be employees of UCD.

  86. Anonymous

    I don’t understand this part: How can a business (Sodexho) run its business if its employees don’t report to them, which is what the food service workers are asking for, to be employees of UCD.

  87. Anonymous

    I don’t understand this part: How can a business (Sodexho) run its business if its employees don’t report to them, which is what the food service workers are asking for, to be employees of UCD.

  88. Anonymous

    I don’t understand this part: How can a business (Sodexho) run its business if its employees don’t report to them, which is what the food service workers are asking for, to be employees of UCD.

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