Cabaldon and Yamada Square Off in First Debate

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The Northern Solano Democratic Club hosted a debate for the Democratic Nomination for the 8th Assembly District between Yolo County Supervisor Mariko Yamada and West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Cabaldon. It was very well-attended, with the conference room at the Courtyard Marriot in Fairfield near capacity.

The two candidates agreed in principle on far more issues than they disagreed. In fact, Cabaldon in his closing remarks said as much.

“As you can tell, Supervisor Yamada and I agree on 98, 99 percent of the policy issues that are challenging California. And that is because we are both good Democrats… We understand the priorities of our party, and I would expect, that we would see very similar voting patterns in the capital for both of us.”

Where they differed was in terms of emphasis and priorities. Cabaldon spoke at length on issues such as the environment, transportation, and education. Some of the key issues included developing the capital corridor transit system, protecting the delta and talking about delta smelt. He used West Sacramento as a model for the Democratic Party.

“We have proven you can be a strong advocate for the environment and still get good economic development in your community, that produces good clean green manufacturing jobs at a rate that is unmatched anywhere in our region.”

He also mentioned his sexual orientation:

“We have proven you can have a gay mayor and still have a socially cohesive powerful place that we believe in community in a place like West Sacramento.”

In contrast, Mariko Yamada stressed social issues and social services such as health care among other services. She spoke of her background as a social worker and creating a different approach to solving our problems.

“I come from a set of core values that are essential to our profession, those are service, social justice, the dignity and the worth of all people, the importance of human relationships, integrity, and competence and the desire to change life for the better. These values are, or I think should be, the core values of the Democratic Party.”

She added:

“I believe that, and we all share this, that something is wrong with the direction that our society has gone, our values have been subverted, both at the federal level and sometimes the state level, as a social worker and a Democrat, I expect to be an advocate for the poorest of the poor, but what we’re seeing now is an erosion of the effects of misplaced priorities of our nation and state, and I believe it is time for really all of us to stand up and question the values that are being carried forward at the highest levels of government and sometimes at the state level.”

Cabaldon spoke in favor of extending term limits, through the ballot initiative. Yamada, spoke out against term limits in principle, and in favor of granting the electorate the right to decide.

Both candidates were in strong support of single-payer, universal health care.

Yamada spoke first, passionately, in favor of health care reform.

“The social work profession has been on national record in favor of the single payer, universal health care system for some fifty years. I think we were called ‘communists’ then, but now we’re just regular people.”

Cabaldon also strongly favored single-payer universal health care, citing the support of Sheila Kuehl for his candidacy and her pressing the health care issue in legislation. Cabaldon is “hopeful” that health care will not be an issue for when he or Yamada are seated in the legislature.

Where they differ on this issue, is in their perception about the prospects for single-payer health care to pass in the near future. Yamada was somewhat less optimistic about the prospects of the Keuhl bill. “I am not very encouraged by what’s happening at that committee. I think there’s still way too many politics that have been infused into the dialogue. I am in absolute support of Kuehl’s bill…”

They differed on the question of reducing the majority required to pass a budget. Yamada supported keeping the current two-thirds requirement as a means to protect the minority and out of concern for being the minority in the future. Cabaldon supported reducing it to a simple-majority, out of the need to pass legislation now. “With a majority vote, you can hold us, the Democrats, accountable for the budgets that we propose as an expression of our values for California.”

The subject to turned to protecting and maintaining agricultural lands. Yamada talked about the Yolo County Supervisors and the general plan process. She also talked about balancing protection of agricultural land with providing enough housing to keep prices down.

“I think that it is always a balance approach, if we don’t have, no farms, no food. So we need to make sure that we are protecting agricultural land. I have taken firm positions on my board on development projects that I did not think were in alignment with our core values of preserving and protecting agriculture and open space. I think we have to base our land use decisions on smart growth principles.”

Cabaldon responded with a sharp criticism of current discussions for county development on city edges.

“Solano County and Yolo County are the state’s two premier counties in terms of growth management by doing one thing, saying growth is going to occur in existing cities.” He then pointedly added, “They are under assault today. The scenario where I’ve got some real concerns about what’s going on at Yolo County and the approval of thousands of housing units outside of the incorporated cities on farmland in our county. We can’t afford that, what might seem like a good, expedient, financial decision for government is a bad decision for the environment, for the health of our rural economy, and for public health. This is the number issue facing our whole region, is the assault in both counties on longstanding policy of city-centered growth that vitalizes our cities and protects our agricultural and rural places.”

Overall, there was far more difference in terms of emphasis and priorities than in terms of policy disagreement. Yamada in her closing comments again called for running a good, clean campaign. For the most part, both of the candidates adhered to that, there were few attacks. The most pointed criticism was probably offered by Cabaldon in his veiled yet pointed criticism of Board of Supervisor policy on land use. While Cabaldon effectively and subtlely was able to criticize the county on that issue, an issue of vulnerability to Yamada especially with her base in Davis, Yamada missed several opportunities to counter by criticizing Cabaldon’s development record in West Sacramento. More importantly, she failed to point out that several of Cabaldon’s key supporters have also supported development on city edges. This is an issue that has already drawn a lot of attention in Yolo County and it appears that it will continue in the Assembly District race.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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184 thoughts on “Cabaldon and Yamada Square Off in First Debate”

  1. Anonymous

    ….sounds like a debate between a candidate who comes across as authentic and one who has carefully crafted HIS campaign positions according to his professional consultants. No wonder Saylor and Calbadon are political bedfellows.

  2. Anonymous

    ….sounds like a debate between a candidate who comes across as authentic and one who has carefully crafted HIS campaign positions according to his professional consultants. No wonder Saylor and Calbadon are political bedfellows.

  3. Anonymous

    ….sounds like a debate between a candidate who comes across as authentic and one who has carefully crafted HIS campaign positions according to his professional consultants. No wonder Saylor and Calbadon are political bedfellows.

  4. Anonymous

    ….sounds like a debate between a candidate who comes across as authentic and one who has carefully crafted HIS campaign positions according to his professional consultants. No wonder Saylor and Calbadon are political bedfellows.

  5. MSW for Mariko

    Yamada knows that the answer to our social problems is to bring in professionals who know how to deal with struggling families and the personal circumstances that block poor people and minorities from achieving the American dream.

    There are enough people in the legislature who “know the game” and can determine their self-worth by the ability to raise money and get endorsements. But what does that ever mean to families struggling against an oppressive society or the ghettoization of our schools?

    Mariko’s education plan shows that she really knows where the education problem lies – at the home, and with the lack of self-will and interest among minority groups to improve their situation. She said in her handout at the event that she would put social workers into the classroom to bring students the services that they need.

    Cabaldon supports things like class size reduction because that’s what his buddies in the unions want – more teachers and bigger contracts. But we should be spending our limited dollars to get at the roots of failure, not just sugar-coating them with the same idiotic solutions and standardized, cookie cutter fixes.

    Teachers are great people for the most part, but they don’t have the training in social work and identifying the harder to solve family and personal problems that Mariko has. She knows better than the unions or Cabaldon how to really create important changes so that minorities and struggling families can get ahead – that’s why we should all be supporting her as a fresh change in the state legislature.

  6. MSW for Mariko

    Yamada knows that the answer to our social problems is to bring in professionals who know how to deal with struggling families and the personal circumstances that block poor people and minorities from achieving the American dream.

    There are enough people in the legislature who “know the game” and can determine their self-worth by the ability to raise money and get endorsements. But what does that ever mean to families struggling against an oppressive society or the ghettoization of our schools?

    Mariko’s education plan shows that she really knows where the education problem lies – at the home, and with the lack of self-will and interest among minority groups to improve their situation. She said in her handout at the event that she would put social workers into the classroom to bring students the services that they need.

    Cabaldon supports things like class size reduction because that’s what his buddies in the unions want – more teachers and bigger contracts. But we should be spending our limited dollars to get at the roots of failure, not just sugar-coating them with the same idiotic solutions and standardized, cookie cutter fixes.

    Teachers are great people for the most part, but they don’t have the training in social work and identifying the harder to solve family and personal problems that Mariko has. She knows better than the unions or Cabaldon how to really create important changes so that minorities and struggling families can get ahead – that’s why we should all be supporting her as a fresh change in the state legislature.

  7. MSW for Mariko

    Yamada knows that the answer to our social problems is to bring in professionals who know how to deal with struggling families and the personal circumstances that block poor people and minorities from achieving the American dream.

    There are enough people in the legislature who “know the game” and can determine their self-worth by the ability to raise money and get endorsements. But what does that ever mean to families struggling against an oppressive society or the ghettoization of our schools?

    Mariko’s education plan shows that she really knows where the education problem lies – at the home, and with the lack of self-will and interest among minority groups to improve their situation. She said in her handout at the event that she would put social workers into the classroom to bring students the services that they need.

    Cabaldon supports things like class size reduction because that’s what his buddies in the unions want – more teachers and bigger contracts. But we should be spending our limited dollars to get at the roots of failure, not just sugar-coating them with the same idiotic solutions and standardized, cookie cutter fixes.

    Teachers are great people for the most part, but they don’t have the training in social work and identifying the harder to solve family and personal problems that Mariko has. She knows better than the unions or Cabaldon how to really create important changes so that minorities and struggling families can get ahead – that’s why we should all be supporting her as a fresh change in the state legislature.

  8. MSW for Mariko

    Yamada knows that the answer to our social problems is to bring in professionals who know how to deal with struggling families and the personal circumstances that block poor people and minorities from achieving the American dream.

    There are enough people in the legislature who “know the game” and can determine their self-worth by the ability to raise money and get endorsements. But what does that ever mean to families struggling against an oppressive society or the ghettoization of our schools?

    Mariko’s education plan shows that she really knows where the education problem lies – at the home, and with the lack of self-will and interest among minority groups to improve their situation. She said in her handout at the event that she would put social workers into the classroom to bring students the services that they need.

    Cabaldon supports things like class size reduction because that’s what his buddies in the unions want – more teachers and bigger contracts. But we should be spending our limited dollars to get at the roots of failure, not just sugar-coating them with the same idiotic solutions and standardized, cookie cutter fixes.

    Teachers are great people for the most part, but they don’t have the training in social work and identifying the harder to solve family and personal problems that Mariko has. She knows better than the unions or Cabaldon how to really create important changes so that minorities and struggling families can get ahead – that’s why we should all be supporting her as a fresh change in the state legislature.

  9. Anonymous

    As someone who attended the debate, it was clear from the beginning who won… on all aspects of the debate. The better Cabaldon grassroots organization of over 30 Solano supporters for him with Mariko having 4 at best, to the better overall debate answers from Cabaldon, to the signing up of volunteers after the debate for his campaign to people who were persuaded from his answers. Cabaldon actually talked detailed points about issues like highway 12, delta, environment, and healthcare, with yamada only saying that she agrees with him.

    What concerns me is where yamada stands on the issues. When it comes to the developer/agricultural issue, she said she wants to develop to keep real estate low, but understands that protecting agricultural land is important too. And for highway 12, where so many people have been hurt or even killed in the district, it is the # 1 danger issue in the district. Christopher went in depth and stated what needs to be done, on a step by step plan, while Yamada said she has recently picked up the study on highway 12 and will read it eventually.

    Everything was contrasted between the two candidates from just watching their answers. Yamada’s intro was a prepared statement that was a little shaky, and her plan of tying everything back to social work had people’s head scratching.

    Winner? Cabaldon. not even close.

  10. Anonymous

    As someone who attended the debate, it was clear from the beginning who won… on all aspects of the debate. The better Cabaldon grassroots organization of over 30 Solano supporters for him with Mariko having 4 at best, to the better overall debate answers from Cabaldon, to the signing up of volunteers after the debate for his campaign to people who were persuaded from his answers. Cabaldon actually talked detailed points about issues like highway 12, delta, environment, and healthcare, with yamada only saying that she agrees with him.

    What concerns me is where yamada stands on the issues. When it comes to the developer/agricultural issue, she said she wants to develop to keep real estate low, but understands that protecting agricultural land is important too. And for highway 12, where so many people have been hurt or even killed in the district, it is the # 1 danger issue in the district. Christopher went in depth and stated what needs to be done, on a step by step plan, while Yamada said she has recently picked up the study on highway 12 and will read it eventually.

    Everything was contrasted between the two candidates from just watching their answers. Yamada’s intro was a prepared statement that was a little shaky, and her plan of tying everything back to social work had people’s head scratching.

    Winner? Cabaldon. not even close.

  11. Anonymous

    As someone who attended the debate, it was clear from the beginning who won… on all aspects of the debate. The better Cabaldon grassroots organization of over 30 Solano supporters for him with Mariko having 4 at best, to the better overall debate answers from Cabaldon, to the signing up of volunteers after the debate for his campaign to people who were persuaded from his answers. Cabaldon actually talked detailed points about issues like highway 12, delta, environment, and healthcare, with yamada only saying that she agrees with him.

    What concerns me is where yamada stands on the issues. When it comes to the developer/agricultural issue, she said she wants to develop to keep real estate low, but understands that protecting agricultural land is important too. And for highway 12, where so many people have been hurt or even killed in the district, it is the # 1 danger issue in the district. Christopher went in depth and stated what needs to be done, on a step by step plan, while Yamada said she has recently picked up the study on highway 12 and will read it eventually.

    Everything was contrasted between the two candidates from just watching their answers. Yamada’s intro was a prepared statement that was a little shaky, and her plan of tying everything back to social work had people’s head scratching.

    Winner? Cabaldon. not even close.

  12. Anonymous

    As someone who attended the debate, it was clear from the beginning who won… on all aspects of the debate. The better Cabaldon grassroots organization of over 30 Solano supporters for him with Mariko having 4 at best, to the better overall debate answers from Cabaldon, to the signing up of volunteers after the debate for his campaign to people who were persuaded from his answers. Cabaldon actually talked detailed points about issues like highway 12, delta, environment, and healthcare, with yamada only saying that she agrees with him.

    What concerns me is where yamada stands on the issues. When it comes to the developer/agricultural issue, she said she wants to develop to keep real estate low, but understands that protecting agricultural land is important too. And for highway 12, where so many people have been hurt or even killed in the district, it is the # 1 danger issue in the district. Christopher went in depth and stated what needs to be done, on a step by step plan, while Yamada said she has recently picked up the study on highway 12 and will read it eventually.

    Everything was contrasted between the two candidates from just watching their answers. Yamada’s intro was a prepared statement that was a little shaky, and her plan of tying everything back to social work had people’s head scratching.

    Winner? Cabaldon. not even close.

  13. Sitting at Mishkas

    I was there too, and Cabaldon sounded like a candidate who had years of experience in education, healthcare, environmental protection, and creating livable cities, while Yamada sounded like a candidate who’s every answer was about getting more social workers on the job.

    And that education plan is about the oddest suggestion I’ve heard in a while. I would bet my house that she changes that proposal as soon as the teachers association reads it.

    Same with her opposition to a majority vote for school bonds. That was a bad answer and I can hear the flip-flop coming.

    So, yes, Cabaldon came across as a candidate who knows what the people in Solano want in a representative, and he comes with the endorsements from dozens of local and state leaders that have a great reputation in the Democratic Party.

    Yamada was left saying that she wasn’t going to go negative, then saying that she doesn’t want to be identified with any of the pillars of the Democratic party, labor, women’s groups, or major endorsers. It was an odd closing at the least.

  14. Sitting at Mishkas

    I was there too, and Cabaldon sounded like a candidate who had years of experience in education, healthcare, environmental protection, and creating livable cities, while Yamada sounded like a candidate who’s every answer was about getting more social workers on the job.

    And that education plan is about the oddest suggestion I’ve heard in a while. I would bet my house that she changes that proposal as soon as the teachers association reads it.

    Same with her opposition to a majority vote for school bonds. That was a bad answer and I can hear the flip-flop coming.

    So, yes, Cabaldon came across as a candidate who knows what the people in Solano want in a representative, and he comes with the endorsements from dozens of local and state leaders that have a great reputation in the Democratic Party.

    Yamada was left saying that she wasn’t going to go negative, then saying that she doesn’t want to be identified with any of the pillars of the Democratic party, labor, women’s groups, or major endorsers. It was an odd closing at the least.

  15. Sitting at Mishkas

    I was there too, and Cabaldon sounded like a candidate who had years of experience in education, healthcare, environmental protection, and creating livable cities, while Yamada sounded like a candidate who’s every answer was about getting more social workers on the job.

    And that education plan is about the oddest suggestion I’ve heard in a while. I would bet my house that she changes that proposal as soon as the teachers association reads it.

    Same with her opposition to a majority vote for school bonds. That was a bad answer and I can hear the flip-flop coming.

    So, yes, Cabaldon came across as a candidate who knows what the people in Solano want in a representative, and he comes with the endorsements from dozens of local and state leaders that have a great reputation in the Democratic Party.

    Yamada was left saying that she wasn’t going to go negative, then saying that she doesn’t want to be identified with any of the pillars of the Democratic party, labor, women’s groups, or major endorsers. It was an odd closing at the least.

  16. Sitting at Mishkas

    I was there too, and Cabaldon sounded like a candidate who had years of experience in education, healthcare, environmental protection, and creating livable cities, while Yamada sounded like a candidate who’s every answer was about getting more social workers on the job.

    And that education plan is about the oddest suggestion I’ve heard in a while. I would bet my house that she changes that proposal as soon as the teachers association reads it.

    Same with her opposition to a majority vote for school bonds. That was a bad answer and I can hear the flip-flop coming.

    So, yes, Cabaldon came across as a candidate who knows what the people in Solano want in a representative, and he comes with the endorsements from dozens of local and state leaders that have a great reputation in the Democratic Party.

    Yamada was left saying that she wasn’t going to go negative, then saying that she doesn’t want to be identified with any of the pillars of the Democratic party, labor, women’s groups, or major endorsers. It was an odd closing at the least.

  17. Rich Rifkin

    “Mariko’s education plan shows that she really knows where the education problem lies – at the home, and with the lack of self-will and interest among minority groups to improve their situation.”

    I was not there, so I don’t know if Mariko said what MSW claims she said. However, I would be very surprised to hear any Democrat ever say that the problem is that minority groups lack the self-will to improve their situation.

    I do think that most of the problem for so-called underperforming schools can be attributed to the home life of children. Not just that some kids come from families where educational excellence is not their first priority, but that the families themselves are chaotic and unstable and unsupportive.

    Even if such situations are more common among certain groups than others, the problem — and I’m fairly sure that Mariko would agree with this, but perhaps MSW would not — is not with the minority group as a group, but with the individual parents who lack the skills and stability to properly raise their children. These situations — single mothers, absent fathers, no education, sometimes drugs, poverty, etc — are found within every ethnic group. And the result is very often seen in the poor performance in schools. That does not, in my opinion, excuse the deficiencies of some teachers or administrators. But it is a mistake to judge the performance of the schools without considering the context of the home life that kids are reared in.

  18. Rich Rifkin

    “Mariko’s education plan shows that she really knows where the education problem lies – at the home, and with the lack of self-will and interest among minority groups to improve their situation.”

    I was not there, so I don’t know if Mariko said what MSW claims she said. However, I would be very surprised to hear any Democrat ever say that the problem is that minority groups lack the self-will to improve their situation.

    I do think that most of the problem for so-called underperforming schools can be attributed to the home life of children. Not just that some kids come from families where educational excellence is not their first priority, but that the families themselves are chaotic and unstable and unsupportive.

    Even if such situations are more common among certain groups than others, the problem — and I’m fairly sure that Mariko would agree with this, but perhaps MSW would not — is not with the minority group as a group, but with the individual parents who lack the skills and stability to properly raise their children. These situations — single mothers, absent fathers, no education, sometimes drugs, poverty, etc — are found within every ethnic group. And the result is very often seen in the poor performance in schools. That does not, in my opinion, excuse the deficiencies of some teachers or administrators. But it is a mistake to judge the performance of the schools without considering the context of the home life that kids are reared in.

  19. Rich Rifkin

    “Mariko’s education plan shows that she really knows where the education problem lies – at the home, and with the lack of self-will and interest among minority groups to improve their situation.”

    I was not there, so I don’t know if Mariko said what MSW claims she said. However, I would be very surprised to hear any Democrat ever say that the problem is that minority groups lack the self-will to improve their situation.

    I do think that most of the problem for so-called underperforming schools can be attributed to the home life of children. Not just that some kids come from families where educational excellence is not their first priority, but that the families themselves are chaotic and unstable and unsupportive.

    Even if such situations are more common among certain groups than others, the problem — and I’m fairly sure that Mariko would agree with this, but perhaps MSW would not — is not with the minority group as a group, but with the individual parents who lack the skills and stability to properly raise their children. These situations — single mothers, absent fathers, no education, sometimes drugs, poverty, etc — are found within every ethnic group. And the result is very often seen in the poor performance in schools. That does not, in my opinion, excuse the deficiencies of some teachers or administrators. But it is a mistake to judge the performance of the schools without considering the context of the home life that kids are reared in.

  20. Rich Rifkin

    “Mariko’s education plan shows that she really knows where the education problem lies – at the home, and with the lack of self-will and interest among minority groups to improve their situation.”

    I was not there, so I don’t know if Mariko said what MSW claims she said. However, I would be very surprised to hear any Democrat ever say that the problem is that minority groups lack the self-will to improve their situation.

    I do think that most of the problem for so-called underperforming schools can be attributed to the home life of children. Not just that some kids come from families where educational excellence is not their first priority, but that the families themselves are chaotic and unstable and unsupportive.

    Even if such situations are more common among certain groups than others, the problem — and I’m fairly sure that Mariko would agree with this, but perhaps MSW would not — is not with the minority group as a group, but with the individual parents who lack the skills and stability to properly raise their children. These situations — single mothers, absent fathers, no education, sometimes drugs, poverty, etc — are found within every ethnic group. And the result is very often seen in the poor performance in schools. That does not, in my opinion, excuse the deficiencies of some teachers or administrators. But it is a mistake to judge the performance of the schools without considering the context of the home life that kids are reared in.

  21. Richard

    if the strategy to defeat Cabaldon is to reduce him down to a West Sacramento version of Don Saylor, a machine driven politician, that is not going to work

    like any politician, he has connections and relationships, but, over his career he has consistently been programmic and substantive, at times to a fault, and he is willing to take risks

    if he is vulnerable, it is his tendency to, ironically enough, given Mariko’s comments about social problems and professionals, to drain the emotional, human dimension out of politics, transforming political issues into technocratic, problem solving exercises

    as an aside, am I the only person who found Mariko’s continued support for the 2/3 rule to pass a budget rather odd? many of the progressive changes that she would like to see will be difficult, if not impossible, to attain as long as the 2/3 rule remains in effect, and her concern about the possibility of ending up in the minority seems to reflect a greater fear of the loss of existing programs than a desire to push aggressively for new ones

    guess it doesn’t matter, the 2/3 rule isn’t going anywhere anytime soon

    –Richard Estes

  22. Richard

    if the strategy to defeat Cabaldon is to reduce him down to a West Sacramento version of Don Saylor, a machine driven politician, that is not going to work

    like any politician, he has connections and relationships, but, over his career he has consistently been programmic and substantive, at times to a fault, and he is willing to take risks

    if he is vulnerable, it is his tendency to, ironically enough, given Mariko’s comments about social problems and professionals, to drain the emotional, human dimension out of politics, transforming political issues into technocratic, problem solving exercises

    as an aside, am I the only person who found Mariko’s continued support for the 2/3 rule to pass a budget rather odd? many of the progressive changes that she would like to see will be difficult, if not impossible, to attain as long as the 2/3 rule remains in effect, and her concern about the possibility of ending up in the minority seems to reflect a greater fear of the loss of existing programs than a desire to push aggressively for new ones

    guess it doesn’t matter, the 2/3 rule isn’t going anywhere anytime soon

    –Richard Estes

  23. Richard

    if the strategy to defeat Cabaldon is to reduce him down to a West Sacramento version of Don Saylor, a machine driven politician, that is not going to work

    like any politician, he has connections and relationships, but, over his career he has consistently been programmic and substantive, at times to a fault, and he is willing to take risks

    if he is vulnerable, it is his tendency to, ironically enough, given Mariko’s comments about social problems and professionals, to drain the emotional, human dimension out of politics, transforming political issues into technocratic, problem solving exercises

    as an aside, am I the only person who found Mariko’s continued support for the 2/3 rule to pass a budget rather odd? many of the progressive changes that she would like to see will be difficult, if not impossible, to attain as long as the 2/3 rule remains in effect, and her concern about the possibility of ending up in the minority seems to reflect a greater fear of the loss of existing programs than a desire to push aggressively for new ones

    guess it doesn’t matter, the 2/3 rule isn’t going anywhere anytime soon

    –Richard Estes

  24. Richard

    if the strategy to defeat Cabaldon is to reduce him down to a West Sacramento version of Don Saylor, a machine driven politician, that is not going to work

    like any politician, he has connections and relationships, but, over his career he has consistently been programmic and substantive, at times to a fault, and he is willing to take risks

    if he is vulnerable, it is his tendency to, ironically enough, given Mariko’s comments about social problems and professionals, to drain the emotional, human dimension out of politics, transforming political issues into technocratic, problem solving exercises

    as an aside, am I the only person who found Mariko’s continued support for the 2/3 rule to pass a budget rather odd? many of the progressive changes that she would like to see will be difficult, if not impossible, to attain as long as the 2/3 rule remains in effect, and her concern about the possibility of ending up in the minority seems to reflect a greater fear of the loss of existing programs than a desire to push aggressively for new ones

    guess it doesn’t matter, the 2/3 rule isn’t going anywhere anytime soon

    –Richard Estes

  25. Anonymous

    I was in attendance too and while Cabaldon did have supporters in attendance (staff and friends wearing buttons)…I cannot get over the fact that he is calling himself a “pro environmentalist.”

    Just take a drive through West Sacamento and look at the big box Wall Mart store and other development taking place right behind city hall.

    I don’t agree with Mariko on everything, but I certainly don’t want the 8th A.D. to look like West Sacramento sprawl. No thanks.

  26. Anonymous

    I was in attendance too and while Cabaldon did have supporters in attendance (staff and friends wearing buttons)…I cannot get over the fact that he is calling himself a “pro environmentalist.”

    Just take a drive through West Sacamento and look at the big box Wall Mart store and other development taking place right behind city hall.

    I don’t agree with Mariko on everything, but I certainly don’t want the 8th A.D. to look like West Sacramento sprawl. No thanks.

  27. Anonymous

    I was in attendance too and while Cabaldon did have supporters in attendance (staff and friends wearing buttons)…I cannot get over the fact that he is calling himself a “pro environmentalist.”

    Just take a drive through West Sacamento and look at the big box Wall Mart store and other development taking place right behind city hall.

    I don’t agree with Mariko on everything, but I certainly don’t want the 8th A.D. to look like West Sacramento sprawl. No thanks.

  28. Anonymous

    I was in attendance too and while Cabaldon did have supporters in attendance (staff and friends wearing buttons)…I cannot get over the fact that he is calling himself a “pro environmentalist.”

    Just take a drive through West Sacamento and look at the big box Wall Mart store and other development taking place right behind city hall.

    I don’t agree with Mariko on everything, but I certainly don’t want the 8th A.D. to look like West Sacramento sprawl. No thanks.

  29. fixsolanonow

    I was impresed by the quality of difference that was shown last night at the debate.

    What I did see and notice was how the Supervisor Yamada would tout some support for Kuehl’s health care, her support for education school bonds change to an easier majority, or how she’ll look at the issue of the highway they talked about, then Mayor Cabaldon would one up her every time.

    The Kuehl healthcare bill? he actually is supported by Kuehl because of his extensive support on her healthcare plan.

    The school bond initiative to change it from 66% to 55% that yamada supported was something the Mayor said at the debate was changed because his organization that he is president of was at the forefront of that change for education.

    And the highway issue? I don’t really know too much about it myself, but it seemed to be a big hit in the room. Yamada said she supports change, but no substance. The West Sacramento Mayor seemed to know all the facts, no matter how minute or detailed it was. It seemed like he knew it backwards and forwards.

    I was told by Yamada supporters before hand that she was the “grassroots” candidate, and Cabaldon was the “insider, machine” candidate. Not knowing too much about them except that, I think last night showed that Yamada isn’t even a “grassroots” candidate. It seemed like a majority of the people in the room were wearing the Mayors support stickers and was supported by the Dem activists that I know. From last night, it seemed that the Mayor was the “grassroots, Solano supported, progressive” candidate. Yamada seemed like the “I’m in it shift debate to social work in schools and prison” candidate.

  30. fixsolanonow

    I was impresed by the quality of difference that was shown last night at the debate.

    What I did see and notice was how the Supervisor Yamada would tout some support for Kuehl’s health care, her support for education school bonds change to an easier majority, or how she’ll look at the issue of the highway they talked about, then Mayor Cabaldon would one up her every time.

    The Kuehl healthcare bill? he actually is supported by Kuehl because of his extensive support on her healthcare plan.

    The school bond initiative to change it from 66% to 55% that yamada supported was something the Mayor said at the debate was changed because his organization that he is president of was at the forefront of that change for education.

    And the highway issue? I don’t really know too much about it myself, but it seemed to be a big hit in the room. Yamada said she supports change, but no substance. The West Sacramento Mayor seemed to know all the facts, no matter how minute or detailed it was. It seemed like he knew it backwards and forwards.

    I was told by Yamada supporters before hand that she was the “grassroots” candidate, and Cabaldon was the “insider, machine” candidate. Not knowing too much about them except that, I think last night showed that Yamada isn’t even a “grassroots” candidate. It seemed like a majority of the people in the room were wearing the Mayors support stickers and was supported by the Dem activists that I know. From last night, it seemed that the Mayor was the “grassroots, Solano supported, progressive” candidate. Yamada seemed like the “I’m in it shift debate to social work in schools and prison” candidate.

  31. fixsolanonow

    I was impresed by the quality of difference that was shown last night at the debate.

    What I did see and notice was how the Supervisor Yamada would tout some support for Kuehl’s health care, her support for education school bonds change to an easier majority, or how she’ll look at the issue of the highway they talked about, then Mayor Cabaldon would one up her every time.

    The Kuehl healthcare bill? he actually is supported by Kuehl because of his extensive support on her healthcare plan.

    The school bond initiative to change it from 66% to 55% that yamada supported was something the Mayor said at the debate was changed because his organization that he is president of was at the forefront of that change for education.

    And the highway issue? I don’t really know too much about it myself, but it seemed to be a big hit in the room. Yamada said she supports change, but no substance. The West Sacramento Mayor seemed to know all the facts, no matter how minute or detailed it was. It seemed like he knew it backwards and forwards.

    I was told by Yamada supporters before hand that she was the “grassroots” candidate, and Cabaldon was the “insider, machine” candidate. Not knowing too much about them except that, I think last night showed that Yamada isn’t even a “grassroots” candidate. It seemed like a majority of the people in the room were wearing the Mayors support stickers and was supported by the Dem activists that I know. From last night, it seemed that the Mayor was the “grassroots, Solano supported, progressive” candidate. Yamada seemed like the “I’m in it shift debate to social work in schools and prison” candidate.

  32. fixsolanonow

    I was impresed by the quality of difference that was shown last night at the debate.

    What I did see and notice was how the Supervisor Yamada would tout some support for Kuehl’s health care, her support for education school bonds change to an easier majority, or how she’ll look at the issue of the highway they talked about, then Mayor Cabaldon would one up her every time.

    The Kuehl healthcare bill? he actually is supported by Kuehl because of his extensive support on her healthcare plan.

    The school bond initiative to change it from 66% to 55% that yamada supported was something the Mayor said at the debate was changed because his organization that he is president of was at the forefront of that change for education.

    And the highway issue? I don’t really know too much about it myself, but it seemed to be a big hit in the room. Yamada said she supports change, but no substance. The West Sacramento Mayor seemed to know all the facts, no matter how minute or detailed it was. It seemed like he knew it backwards and forwards.

    I was told by Yamada supporters before hand that she was the “grassroots” candidate, and Cabaldon was the “insider, machine” candidate. Not knowing too much about them except that, I think last night showed that Yamada isn’t even a “grassroots” candidate. It seemed like a majority of the people in the room were wearing the Mayors support stickers and was supported by the Dem activists that I know. From last night, it seemed that the Mayor was the “grassroots, Solano supported, progressive” candidate. Yamada seemed like the “I’m in it shift debate to social work in schools and prison” candidate.

  33. Anonymous

    The Cabaldon campaign would love for you to believe their own PR. 30 Solano supporters? Cabaldon’s a Sacramento machine candidate carpetbagging the 8th AD. See the email to Sacramento Young Democrats below:

    —– Original Message —–
    From: chrischaffee2000
    To: scyd@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: Friday, June 08, 2007 3:27 PM
    Subject: [scyd] Christopher Cabaldon Debate Monday in Fairfield

    Dear Members,

    As announced on Tuesday at the General Membership Meeting,
    Christopher will be debating his opponent in Fairfield in the first
    debate for AD 8. This should be a very interesting evening and will
    allow those in attendance to see a real debate. It should be very
    educational and fun.

    I will be going along with 6 other SCYD members. I hope that as
    many of you as possible come out and show our support for Christopher.
    Below is the basic information. We are all carpooling to the event,
    so transportation should not be a problem. Please contact Robbie
    about your interest in attending.

    If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to call me.

    Chris Chaffee
    (916) 293-2932

    What: Support SCYD Endorsed candidate Mayor Christopher Cabaldon for
    Assembly at first debate
    When: Monday June 11th, 7:00 PM
    Where: Courtyard Marriott, 1350 Holiday Lane

    So far there are 7 SCYD members attending, so carpools can be arranged.

    Since this is the first time in the election for the two candidates to
    contrast from one another, the show of support for Christopher can set
    the tone for the election. Please email Robbie Abelon if you are
    interested in attending.

    Robbie@cabaldon.org

    Thank you,

    Robbie Abelon
    Campaign coordinator
    Cabaldon for Assembly
    http://www.cabaldon.org

  34. Anonymous

    The Cabaldon campaign would love for you to believe their own PR. 30 Solano supporters? Cabaldon’s a Sacramento machine candidate carpetbagging the 8th AD. See the email to Sacramento Young Democrats below:

    —– Original Message —–
    From: chrischaffee2000
    To: scyd@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: Friday, June 08, 2007 3:27 PM
    Subject: [scyd] Christopher Cabaldon Debate Monday in Fairfield

    Dear Members,

    As announced on Tuesday at the General Membership Meeting,
    Christopher will be debating his opponent in Fairfield in the first
    debate for AD 8. This should be a very interesting evening and will
    allow those in attendance to see a real debate. It should be very
    educational and fun.

    I will be going along with 6 other SCYD members. I hope that as
    many of you as possible come out and show our support for Christopher.
    Below is the basic information. We are all carpooling to the event,
    so transportation should not be a problem. Please contact Robbie
    about your interest in attending.

    If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to call me.

    Chris Chaffee
    (916) 293-2932

    What: Support SCYD Endorsed candidate Mayor Christopher Cabaldon for
    Assembly at first debate
    When: Monday June 11th, 7:00 PM
    Where: Courtyard Marriott, 1350 Holiday Lane

    So far there are 7 SCYD members attending, so carpools can be arranged.

    Since this is the first time in the election for the two candidates to
    contrast from one another, the show of support for Christopher can set
    the tone for the election. Please email Robbie Abelon if you are
    interested in attending.

    Robbie@cabaldon.org

    Thank you,

    Robbie Abelon
    Campaign coordinator
    Cabaldon for Assembly
    http://www.cabaldon.org

  35. Anonymous

    The Cabaldon campaign would love for you to believe their own PR. 30 Solano supporters? Cabaldon’s a Sacramento machine candidate carpetbagging the 8th AD. See the email to Sacramento Young Democrats below:

    —– Original Message —–
    From: chrischaffee2000
    To: scyd@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: Friday, June 08, 2007 3:27 PM
    Subject: [scyd] Christopher Cabaldon Debate Monday in Fairfield

    Dear Members,

    As announced on Tuesday at the General Membership Meeting,
    Christopher will be debating his opponent in Fairfield in the first
    debate for AD 8. This should be a very interesting evening and will
    allow those in attendance to see a real debate. It should be very
    educational and fun.

    I will be going along with 6 other SCYD members. I hope that as
    many of you as possible come out and show our support for Christopher.
    Below is the basic information. We are all carpooling to the event,
    so transportation should not be a problem. Please contact Robbie
    about your interest in attending.

    If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to call me.

    Chris Chaffee
    (916) 293-2932

    What: Support SCYD Endorsed candidate Mayor Christopher Cabaldon for
    Assembly at first debate
    When: Monday June 11th, 7:00 PM
    Where: Courtyard Marriott, 1350 Holiday Lane

    So far there are 7 SCYD members attending, so carpools can be arranged.

    Since this is the first time in the election for the two candidates to
    contrast from one another, the show of support for Christopher can set
    the tone for the election. Please email Robbie Abelon if you are
    interested in attending.

    Robbie@cabaldon.org

    Thank you,

    Robbie Abelon
    Campaign coordinator
    Cabaldon for Assembly
    http://www.cabaldon.org

  36. Anonymous

    The Cabaldon campaign would love for you to believe their own PR. 30 Solano supporters? Cabaldon’s a Sacramento machine candidate carpetbagging the 8th AD. See the email to Sacramento Young Democrats below:

    —– Original Message —–
    From: chrischaffee2000
    To: scyd@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: Friday, June 08, 2007 3:27 PM
    Subject: [scyd] Christopher Cabaldon Debate Monday in Fairfield

    Dear Members,

    As announced on Tuesday at the General Membership Meeting,
    Christopher will be debating his opponent in Fairfield in the first
    debate for AD 8. This should be a very interesting evening and will
    allow those in attendance to see a real debate. It should be very
    educational and fun.

    I will be going along with 6 other SCYD members. I hope that as
    many of you as possible come out and show our support for Christopher.
    Below is the basic information. We are all carpooling to the event,
    so transportation should not be a problem. Please contact Robbie
    about your interest in attending.

    If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to call me.

    Chris Chaffee
    (916) 293-2932

    What: Support SCYD Endorsed candidate Mayor Christopher Cabaldon for
    Assembly at first debate
    When: Monday June 11th, 7:00 PM
    Where: Courtyard Marriott, 1350 Holiday Lane

    So far there are 7 SCYD members attending, so carpools can be arranged.

    Since this is the first time in the election for the two candidates to
    contrast from one another, the show of support for Christopher can set
    the tone for the election. Please email Robbie Abelon if you are
    interested in attending.

    Robbie@cabaldon.org

    Thank you,

    Robbie Abelon
    Campaign coordinator
    Cabaldon for Assembly
    http://www.cabaldon.org

  37. Anonymous

    note for Anonymous at 11:38 AM:

    Doing infill development is not sprawl. Building lofts where there were dirty motels is not sprawl.

    Approving thousands of homes in farmland in Dunnigan Hills, when there isn’t the infrastructure to support a new town, and where there isn’t public transportation to the jobs in Sacramento or other areas, that’s sprawl.

    So, go ahead and be freaked out by someone putting an Ikea between the freeway and a gas station, and you can call that being an environmentalist. Or, you can wake up and realize that REAL sprawl is being approved by Mariko at the Yolo County Board of Supervisors.

    Maybe you’ll never see the thousands of new homes in the middle of nowhere, but you will see their impact on our freeways and their environmental footprint will be enormous.

  38. Anonymous

    note for Anonymous at 11:38 AM:

    Doing infill development is not sprawl. Building lofts where there were dirty motels is not sprawl.

    Approving thousands of homes in farmland in Dunnigan Hills, when there isn’t the infrastructure to support a new town, and where there isn’t public transportation to the jobs in Sacramento or other areas, that’s sprawl.

    So, go ahead and be freaked out by someone putting an Ikea between the freeway and a gas station, and you can call that being an environmentalist. Or, you can wake up and realize that REAL sprawl is being approved by Mariko at the Yolo County Board of Supervisors.

    Maybe you’ll never see the thousands of new homes in the middle of nowhere, but you will see their impact on our freeways and their environmental footprint will be enormous.

  39. Anonymous

    note for Anonymous at 11:38 AM:

    Doing infill development is not sprawl. Building lofts where there were dirty motels is not sprawl.

    Approving thousands of homes in farmland in Dunnigan Hills, when there isn’t the infrastructure to support a new town, and where there isn’t public transportation to the jobs in Sacramento or other areas, that’s sprawl.

    So, go ahead and be freaked out by someone putting an Ikea between the freeway and a gas station, and you can call that being an environmentalist. Or, you can wake up and realize that REAL sprawl is being approved by Mariko at the Yolo County Board of Supervisors.

    Maybe you’ll never see the thousands of new homes in the middle of nowhere, but you will see their impact on our freeways and their environmental footprint will be enormous.

  40. Anonymous

    note for Anonymous at 11:38 AM:

    Doing infill development is not sprawl. Building lofts where there were dirty motels is not sprawl.

    Approving thousands of homes in farmland in Dunnigan Hills, when there isn’t the infrastructure to support a new town, and where there isn’t public transportation to the jobs in Sacramento or other areas, that’s sprawl.

    So, go ahead and be freaked out by someone putting an Ikea between the freeway and a gas station, and you can call that being an environmentalist. Or, you can wake up and realize that REAL sprawl is being approved by Mariko at the Yolo County Board of Supervisors.

    Maybe you’ll never see the thousands of new homes in the middle of nowhere, but you will see their impact on our freeways and their environmental footprint will be enormous.

  41. Anonymous

    Smoke and Mirrors, my friend. Have you been to Southport? Ever wonder why such “infill” development in an area at-risk for flooding didn’t occur until the late 90’s? If the place is such prime land, why not be developed earlier? Why the need for a major property assesment ballot to build better levies?

    West Sacramento is no different than Natomas. Same developers, and same Developer politicians funding their ambition through the entitlement process.

  42. Anonymous

    Smoke and Mirrors, my friend. Have you been to Southport? Ever wonder why such “infill” development in an area at-risk for flooding didn’t occur until the late 90’s? If the place is such prime land, why not be developed earlier? Why the need for a major property assesment ballot to build better levies?

    West Sacramento is no different than Natomas. Same developers, and same Developer politicians funding their ambition through the entitlement process.

  43. Anonymous

    Smoke and Mirrors, my friend. Have you been to Southport? Ever wonder why such “infill” development in an area at-risk for flooding didn’t occur until the late 90’s? If the place is such prime land, why not be developed earlier? Why the need for a major property assesment ballot to build better levies?

    West Sacramento is no different than Natomas. Same developers, and same Developer politicians funding their ambition through the entitlement process.

  44. Anonymous

    Smoke and Mirrors, my friend. Have you been to Southport? Ever wonder why such “infill” development in an area at-risk for flooding didn’t occur until the late 90’s? If the place is such prime land, why not be developed earlier? Why the need for a major property assesment ballot to build better levies?

    West Sacramento is no different than Natomas. Same developers, and same Developer politicians funding their ambition through the entitlement process.

  45. Anonymous

    don’t know that it is appropriate to post people’s phone numbers and email addresses to a blog – no matter if they are the “opposition”

  46. Anonymous

    don’t know that it is appropriate to post people’s phone numbers and email addresses to a blog – no matter if they are the “opposition”

  47. Anonymous

    don’t know that it is appropriate to post people’s phone numbers and email addresses to a blog – no matter if they are the “opposition”

  48. Anonymous

    don’t know that it is appropriate to post people’s phone numbers and email addresses to a blog – no matter if they are the “opposition”

  49. Irony can be so Ironic

    For those looking for Irony, you need look no further than across the river.

    Tomorrow night Mariko is practicing what she calls “Checkbook Politics” by attending an event in Sacramento put together for and by developers. The host is none other than Steve Ayers – a developer who owns the Elks Building in Sacramento. Also been doing the apology tour lately after sexually harassing a number of high-profile women at the recent Cap to Cap conference in DC?

    So, when she said in her closing that she didn’t want to be the candidate of developers or the candidate of women’s groups, she really meant it!

  50. Irony can be so Ironic

    For those looking for Irony, you need look no further than across the river.

    Tomorrow night Mariko is practicing what she calls “Checkbook Politics” by attending an event in Sacramento put together for and by developers. The host is none other than Steve Ayers – a developer who owns the Elks Building in Sacramento. Also been doing the apology tour lately after sexually harassing a number of high-profile women at the recent Cap to Cap conference in DC?

    So, when she said in her closing that she didn’t want to be the candidate of developers or the candidate of women’s groups, she really meant it!

  51. Irony can be so Ironic

    For those looking for Irony, you need look no further than across the river.

    Tomorrow night Mariko is practicing what she calls “Checkbook Politics” by attending an event in Sacramento put together for and by developers. The host is none other than Steve Ayers – a developer who owns the Elks Building in Sacramento. Also been doing the apology tour lately after sexually harassing a number of high-profile women at the recent Cap to Cap conference in DC?

    So, when she said in her closing that she didn’t want to be the candidate of developers or the candidate of women’s groups, she really meant it!

  52. Irony can be so Ironic

    For those looking for Irony, you need look no further than across the river.

    Tomorrow night Mariko is practicing what she calls “Checkbook Politics” by attending an event in Sacramento put together for and by developers. The host is none other than Steve Ayers – a developer who owns the Elks Building in Sacramento. Also been doing the apology tour lately after sexually harassing a number of high-profile women at the recent Cap to Cap conference in DC?

    So, when she said in her closing that she didn’t want to be the candidate of developers or the candidate of women’s groups, she really meant it!

  53. Karl

    If you put out a relatively public email (to a wide distribution list) as a member of a public group, you can’t be surprised if someone republishes the email.

    That being said, I would advocate removing the poor guys email address so he doesn’t get spammed. I would hope, however, that readers of this blog have the maturity not to call up and harass some guy for engaging in entirely legitimate political activity, even if they happen to disagree. There are other ways to react. (Like forming a Yolo Young Dems… whatever happened to that, does anyone know?)

  54. Karl

    If you put out a relatively public email (to a wide distribution list) as a member of a public group, you can’t be surprised if someone republishes the email.

    That being said, I would advocate removing the poor guys email address so he doesn’t get spammed. I would hope, however, that readers of this blog have the maturity not to call up and harass some guy for engaging in entirely legitimate political activity, even if they happen to disagree. There are other ways to react. (Like forming a Yolo Young Dems… whatever happened to that, does anyone know?)

  55. Karl

    If you put out a relatively public email (to a wide distribution list) as a member of a public group, you can’t be surprised if someone republishes the email.

    That being said, I would advocate removing the poor guys email address so he doesn’t get spammed. I would hope, however, that readers of this blog have the maturity not to call up and harass some guy for engaging in entirely legitimate political activity, even if they happen to disagree. There are other ways to react. (Like forming a Yolo Young Dems… whatever happened to that, does anyone know?)

  56. Karl

    If you put out a relatively public email (to a wide distribution list) as a member of a public group, you can’t be surprised if someone republishes the email.

    That being said, I would advocate removing the poor guys email address so he doesn’t get spammed. I would hope, however, that readers of this blog have the maturity not to call up and harass some guy for engaging in entirely legitimate political activity, even if they happen to disagree. There are other ways to react. (Like forming a Yolo Young Dems… whatever happened to that, does anyone know?)

  57. sitting at Mishkas

    I would appreciate it if someone could substantiate the claim that Mariko is holding a fundraiser for Developers in Sacramento tomorrow. That’s not ironic, it’s sad.

    In her closing statement last night, Mariko said that she didn’t want to go negative, then went right into insinuating a bunch of negative stuff. Mainly that her opponent was practicing checkbook politics and going to be overrun by special interests.

    I don’t think she could have said that with a straight face if she was going to be going to Sacramento hunting for Developer checks just 48 hours later.

  58. sitting at Mishkas

    I would appreciate it if someone could substantiate the claim that Mariko is holding a fundraiser for Developers in Sacramento tomorrow. That’s not ironic, it’s sad.

    In her closing statement last night, Mariko said that she didn’t want to go negative, then went right into insinuating a bunch of negative stuff. Mainly that her opponent was practicing checkbook politics and going to be overrun by special interests.

    I don’t think she could have said that with a straight face if she was going to be going to Sacramento hunting for Developer checks just 48 hours later.

  59. sitting at Mishkas

    I would appreciate it if someone could substantiate the claim that Mariko is holding a fundraiser for Developers in Sacramento tomorrow. That’s not ironic, it’s sad.

    In her closing statement last night, Mariko said that she didn’t want to go negative, then went right into insinuating a bunch of negative stuff. Mainly that her opponent was practicing checkbook politics and going to be overrun by special interests.

    I don’t think she could have said that with a straight face if she was going to be going to Sacramento hunting for Developer checks just 48 hours later.

  60. sitting at Mishkas

    I would appreciate it if someone could substantiate the claim that Mariko is holding a fundraiser for Developers in Sacramento tomorrow. That’s not ironic, it’s sad.

    In her closing statement last night, Mariko said that she didn’t want to go negative, then went right into insinuating a bunch of negative stuff. Mainly that her opponent was practicing checkbook politics and going to be overrun by special interests.

    I don’t think she could have said that with a straight face if she was going to be going to Sacramento hunting for Developer checks just 48 hours later.

  61. Anonymous

    I downloaded the powerpoint – it proves the point that Southport, the dominant area of growth in West Sacramento during Cabaldon’s tenure is sprawl. No doubt about it.

  62. Anonymous

    I downloaded the powerpoint – it proves the point that Southport, the dominant area of growth in West Sacramento during Cabaldon’s tenure is sprawl. No doubt about it.

  63. Anonymous

    I downloaded the powerpoint – it proves the point that Southport, the dominant area of growth in West Sacramento during Cabaldon’s tenure is sprawl. No doubt about it.

  64. Anonymous

    I downloaded the powerpoint – it proves the point that Southport, the dominant area of growth in West Sacramento during Cabaldon’s tenure is sprawl. No doubt about it.

  65. Anonymous

    Karl-

    YCYD still exists! Phil’s campaign last year pretty much took most of the club – and in turn burnt us out – but we’re actively working to come back (hopefully) stronger than ever.

    We were actually given a plug by Supervisor Rexroad on his blog last week as a result of our facebook page (it landed in the things that he found odd, but I’ll take what I can get), we have a website – albeit a crappy one; and I’m in the process of producing a YouTube video…as soon as I can figure out how to edit out my tripple chins. A couple of us are even going to Dallas in July for the national conference.

    All that being said, however, YCYD won’t be endorsing any candidate until the filing deadline passes…it’s in our bylaws…

    And while we suspended our bylaws to endorse Assemblywoman Wolk this past January, I wouldn’t expect that to happen again…By and large, we’re all much more intersted in service to community and party building.

    Our first fundraiser in over 2 years is on June 21st from 7-10pm at the Odd Fellows; YD’s get in for 1/2 price and college students get in free…providing that they’re 21 (sorry David! Just trying to get the word out.)

    Feel free to shoot me an email with any questions.

    Rich Peterson
    President, YCYD
    president@ycyd.org
    http://www.ycyd.org

  66. Anonymous

    Karl-

    YCYD still exists! Phil’s campaign last year pretty much took most of the club – and in turn burnt us out – but we’re actively working to come back (hopefully) stronger than ever.

    We were actually given a plug by Supervisor Rexroad on his blog last week as a result of our facebook page (it landed in the things that he found odd, but I’ll take what I can get), we have a website – albeit a crappy one; and I’m in the process of producing a YouTube video…as soon as I can figure out how to edit out my tripple chins. A couple of us are even going to Dallas in July for the national conference.

    All that being said, however, YCYD won’t be endorsing any candidate until the filing deadline passes…it’s in our bylaws…

    And while we suspended our bylaws to endorse Assemblywoman Wolk this past January, I wouldn’t expect that to happen again…By and large, we’re all much more intersted in service to community and party building.

    Our first fundraiser in over 2 years is on June 21st from 7-10pm at the Odd Fellows; YD’s get in for 1/2 price and college students get in free…providing that they’re 21 (sorry David! Just trying to get the word out.)

    Feel free to shoot me an email with any questions.

    Rich Peterson
    President, YCYD
    president@ycyd.org
    http://www.ycyd.org

  67. Anonymous

    Karl-

    YCYD still exists! Phil’s campaign last year pretty much took most of the club – and in turn burnt us out – but we’re actively working to come back (hopefully) stronger than ever.

    We were actually given a plug by Supervisor Rexroad on his blog last week as a result of our facebook page (it landed in the things that he found odd, but I’ll take what I can get), we have a website – albeit a crappy one; and I’m in the process of producing a YouTube video…as soon as I can figure out how to edit out my tripple chins. A couple of us are even going to Dallas in July for the national conference.

    All that being said, however, YCYD won’t be endorsing any candidate until the filing deadline passes…it’s in our bylaws…

    And while we suspended our bylaws to endorse Assemblywoman Wolk this past January, I wouldn’t expect that to happen again…By and large, we’re all much more intersted in service to community and party building.

    Our first fundraiser in over 2 years is on June 21st from 7-10pm at the Odd Fellows; YD’s get in for 1/2 price and college students get in free…providing that they’re 21 (sorry David! Just trying to get the word out.)

    Feel free to shoot me an email with any questions.

    Rich Peterson
    President, YCYD
    president@ycyd.org
    http://www.ycyd.org

  68. Anonymous

    Karl-

    YCYD still exists! Phil’s campaign last year pretty much took most of the club – and in turn burnt us out – but we’re actively working to come back (hopefully) stronger than ever.

    We were actually given a plug by Supervisor Rexroad on his blog last week as a result of our facebook page (it landed in the things that he found odd, but I’ll take what I can get), we have a website – albeit a crappy one; and I’m in the process of producing a YouTube video…as soon as I can figure out how to edit out my tripple chins. A couple of us are even going to Dallas in July for the national conference.

    All that being said, however, YCYD won’t be endorsing any candidate until the filing deadline passes…it’s in our bylaws…

    And while we suspended our bylaws to endorse Assemblywoman Wolk this past January, I wouldn’t expect that to happen again…By and large, we’re all much more intersted in service to community and party building.

    Our first fundraiser in over 2 years is on June 21st from 7-10pm at the Odd Fellows; YD’s get in for 1/2 price and college students get in free…providing that they’re 21 (sorry David! Just trying to get the word out.)

    Feel free to shoot me an email with any questions.

    Rich Peterson
    President, YCYD
    president@ycyd.org
    http://www.ycyd.org

  69. Anonymous

    Saylor and Asmundson support Calbadon, birds of a feather..etc. We all KNOW Mariko and her level of personal integrity. That’s enough for me. All the rest is campaign political theater.

  70. Anonymous

    Saylor and Asmundson support Calbadon, birds of a feather..etc. We all KNOW Mariko and her level of personal integrity. That’s enough for me. All the rest is campaign political theater.

  71. Anonymous

    Saylor and Asmundson support Calbadon, birds of a feather..etc. We all KNOW Mariko and her level of personal integrity. That’s enough for me. All the rest is campaign political theater.

  72. Anonymous

    Saylor and Asmundson support Calbadon, birds of a feather..etc. We all KNOW Mariko and her level of personal integrity. That’s enough for me. All the rest is campaign political theater.

  73. Anonymous

    It is rather stunning to hear that Mariko Yamada would be supporting the legislature’s current 2/3 rule on budget matters. That rule has been used by the most rightwing elements of the Republican Assembly Caucus to hold up budgets year after year to get exactly what they want at the expense of progressive efforts to have budgets provide for education, health care, tax fairness and take care of the poor, the disabled as well as the old and the young who are the most vulnerable in our society.

    Cabaldon favors a simple majority of members to pass a budget which restores fairness to the legislative budget process and will speed budgets being approved on a timely basis.

  74. Anonymous

    It is rather stunning to hear that Mariko Yamada would be supporting the legislature’s current 2/3 rule on budget matters. That rule has been used by the most rightwing elements of the Republican Assembly Caucus to hold up budgets year after year to get exactly what they want at the expense of progressive efforts to have budgets provide for education, health care, tax fairness and take care of the poor, the disabled as well as the old and the young who are the most vulnerable in our society.

    Cabaldon favors a simple majority of members to pass a budget which restores fairness to the legislative budget process and will speed budgets being approved on a timely basis.

  75. Anonymous

    It is rather stunning to hear that Mariko Yamada would be supporting the legislature’s current 2/3 rule on budget matters. That rule has been used by the most rightwing elements of the Republican Assembly Caucus to hold up budgets year after year to get exactly what they want at the expense of progressive efforts to have budgets provide for education, health care, tax fairness and take care of the poor, the disabled as well as the old and the young who are the most vulnerable in our society.

    Cabaldon favors a simple majority of members to pass a budget which restores fairness to the legislative budget process and will speed budgets being approved on a timely basis.

  76. Anonymous

    It is rather stunning to hear that Mariko Yamada would be supporting the legislature’s current 2/3 rule on budget matters. That rule has been used by the most rightwing elements of the Republican Assembly Caucus to hold up budgets year after year to get exactly what they want at the expense of progressive efforts to have budgets provide for education, health care, tax fairness and take care of the poor, the disabled as well as the old and the young who are the most vulnerable in our society.

    Cabaldon favors a simple majority of members to pass a budget which restores fairness to the legislative budget process and will speed budgets being approved on a timely basis.

  77. Anonymous

    The 2/3 legislative requirement to pass a budget is essentially “tyranny by the minority.” To pass a budget requires those in the majority to get two votes for every one vote that opposes the budget. Therefore it is no longer a one person, one vote situation where every vote counts equally, but instead allows the minority power not afforded members in the majority. This is blatantly unfair and undemocratic and few legislatures in America have such a rule. Yamada betrays her “progressive liberal” image by supporting the status quo.

  78. Anonymous

    The 2/3 legislative requirement to pass a budget is essentially “tyranny by the minority.” To pass a budget requires those in the majority to get two votes for every one vote that opposes the budget. Therefore it is no longer a one person, one vote situation where every vote counts equally, but instead allows the minority power not afforded members in the majority. This is blatantly unfair and undemocratic and few legislatures in America have such a rule. Yamada betrays her “progressive liberal” image by supporting the status quo.

  79. Anonymous

    The 2/3 legislative requirement to pass a budget is essentially “tyranny by the minority.” To pass a budget requires those in the majority to get two votes for every one vote that opposes the budget. Therefore it is no longer a one person, one vote situation where every vote counts equally, but instead allows the minority power not afforded members in the majority. This is blatantly unfair and undemocratic and few legislatures in America have such a rule. Yamada betrays her “progressive liberal” image by supporting the status quo.

  80. Anonymous

    The 2/3 legislative requirement to pass a budget is essentially “tyranny by the minority.” To pass a budget requires those in the majority to get two votes for every one vote that opposes the budget. Therefore it is no longer a one person, one vote situation where every vote counts equally, but instead allows the minority power not afforded members in the majority. This is blatantly unfair and undemocratic and few legislatures in America have such a rule. Yamada betrays her “progressive liberal” image by supporting the status quo.

  81. News Watcher

    Watching the early morning news –

    Watching the news this morning (Wednesday, KXTV Channel 10 and KOVR Channel 13) and both stations that I’m watching are talking about WAL MART opening up in WEST SACRAMENTO TODAY.

    The Wal Mart in Cabaldon’s back yard. You know, the one next to the big box IKEA store…

    Just take a tour….it’s so beautiful…just what we want the 8th A.D. to resemble. Big box sprawl, environmentally friendly West Sac. No Thanks!

  82. News Watcher

    Watching the early morning news –

    Watching the news this morning (Wednesday, KXTV Channel 10 and KOVR Channel 13) and both stations that I’m watching are talking about WAL MART opening up in WEST SACRAMENTO TODAY.

    The Wal Mart in Cabaldon’s back yard. You know, the one next to the big box IKEA store…

    Just take a tour….it’s so beautiful…just what we want the 8th A.D. to resemble. Big box sprawl, environmentally friendly West Sac. No Thanks!

  83. News Watcher

    Watching the early morning news –

    Watching the news this morning (Wednesday, KXTV Channel 10 and KOVR Channel 13) and both stations that I’m watching are talking about WAL MART opening up in WEST SACRAMENTO TODAY.

    The Wal Mart in Cabaldon’s back yard. You know, the one next to the big box IKEA store…

    Just take a tour….it’s so beautiful…just what we want the 8th A.D. to resemble. Big box sprawl, environmentally friendly West Sac. No Thanks!

  84. News Watcher

    Watching the early morning news –

    Watching the news this morning (Wednesday, KXTV Channel 10 and KOVR Channel 13) and both stations that I’m watching are talking about WAL MART opening up in WEST SACRAMENTO TODAY.

    The Wal Mart in Cabaldon’s back yard. You know, the one next to the big box IKEA store…

    Just take a tour….it’s so beautiful…just what we want the 8th A.D. to resemble. Big box sprawl, environmentally friendly West Sac. No Thanks!

  85. davisite

    Well… it has begun. Mariko will be hard pressed to have her message heard above the din that all Calbadon’s cash will buy. We will see if the voters are taken in by such a slick operation.

  86. davisite

    Well… it has begun. Mariko will be hard pressed to have her message heard above the din that all Calbadon’s cash will buy. We will see if the voters are taken in by such a slick operation.

  87. davisite

    Well… it has begun. Mariko will be hard pressed to have her message heard above the din that all Calbadon’s cash will buy. We will see if the voters are taken in by such a slick operation.

  88. davisite

    Well… it has begun. Mariko will be hard pressed to have her message heard above the din that all Calbadon’s cash will buy. We will see if the voters are taken in by such a slick operation.

  89. Vincente

    Davisite:

    I have to disagree with you on this one a bit. Mariko running a strong campaign would have had no trouble raising money. But the key thing that she did was split her base by supporting and waffling on peripheral development and joint study sessions. As such, the very progressives in Davis that should be her base are split at best and in many cases have decided to support Cabaldon. That is entirely of her own doing. She did not do her homework for this debate according to what we have read here, Cabaldon was speaking in specifics while Mariko was speaking in generalities. It’s sad because, I oppose many of Cabaldon’s policies and certainly many of the local politicians that support him, and yet I find myself on the fence in this one because Mariko has been such a bad candidate and while it is obvious (at least now) that Cabaldon would have more money, she’s getting outworked and that is something frankly that is ENTIRELY in her own control. She has no one to blame for this other than herself.

  90. Vincente

    Davisite:

    I have to disagree with you on this one a bit. Mariko running a strong campaign would have had no trouble raising money. But the key thing that she did was split her base by supporting and waffling on peripheral development and joint study sessions. As such, the very progressives in Davis that should be her base are split at best and in many cases have decided to support Cabaldon. That is entirely of her own doing. She did not do her homework for this debate according to what we have read here, Cabaldon was speaking in specifics while Mariko was speaking in generalities. It’s sad because, I oppose many of Cabaldon’s policies and certainly many of the local politicians that support him, and yet I find myself on the fence in this one because Mariko has been such a bad candidate and while it is obvious (at least now) that Cabaldon would have more money, she’s getting outworked and that is something frankly that is ENTIRELY in her own control. She has no one to blame for this other than herself.

  91. Vincente

    Davisite:

    I have to disagree with you on this one a bit. Mariko running a strong campaign would have had no trouble raising money. But the key thing that she did was split her base by supporting and waffling on peripheral development and joint study sessions. As such, the very progressives in Davis that should be her base are split at best and in many cases have decided to support Cabaldon. That is entirely of her own doing. She did not do her homework for this debate according to what we have read here, Cabaldon was speaking in specifics while Mariko was speaking in generalities. It’s sad because, I oppose many of Cabaldon’s policies and certainly many of the local politicians that support him, and yet I find myself on the fence in this one because Mariko has been such a bad candidate and while it is obvious (at least now) that Cabaldon would have more money, she’s getting outworked and that is something frankly that is ENTIRELY in her own control. She has no one to blame for this other than herself.

  92. Vincente

    Davisite:

    I have to disagree with you on this one a bit. Mariko running a strong campaign would have had no trouble raising money. But the key thing that she did was split her base by supporting and waffling on peripheral development and joint study sessions. As such, the very progressives in Davis that should be her base are split at best and in many cases have decided to support Cabaldon. That is entirely of her own doing. She did not do her homework for this debate according to what we have read here, Cabaldon was speaking in specifics while Mariko was speaking in generalities. It’s sad because, I oppose many of Cabaldon’s policies and certainly many of the local politicians that support him, and yet I find myself on the fence in this one because Mariko has been such a bad candidate and while it is obvious (at least now) that Cabaldon would have more money, she’s getting outworked and that is something frankly that is ENTIRELY in her own control. She has no one to blame for this other than herself.

  93. davisite

    Vincente… key points are Mariko has a HISTORY so I KNOW where she stands on issues that I care about.
    We also KNOW that she is not a “machine” candidate and has little or no political IOUs that can be called in by developer patrons. How a candidate looks and sounds in “debates” is pure theater and I pay it no heed. As to content, I would prefer that candidates convince me of their authenticity as to the principles that they will bring to the decisions that they make when elected. THIS I can rely upon rather than detailed responses that have been carefully crafted by consultant’s polling and will change after election… remember when Helen Thomson was in favor of Steinberg’s bill concerning strip mall proliferation only to change her position after election?

  94. davisite

    Vincente… key points are Mariko has a HISTORY so I KNOW where she stands on issues that I care about.
    We also KNOW that she is not a “machine” candidate and has little or no political IOUs that can be called in by developer patrons. How a candidate looks and sounds in “debates” is pure theater and I pay it no heed. As to content, I would prefer that candidates convince me of their authenticity as to the principles that they will bring to the decisions that they make when elected. THIS I can rely upon rather than detailed responses that have been carefully crafted by consultant’s polling and will change after election… remember when Helen Thomson was in favor of Steinberg’s bill concerning strip mall proliferation only to change her position after election?

  95. davisite

    Vincente… key points are Mariko has a HISTORY so I KNOW where she stands on issues that I care about.
    We also KNOW that she is not a “machine” candidate and has little or no political IOUs that can be called in by developer patrons. How a candidate looks and sounds in “debates” is pure theater and I pay it no heed. As to content, I would prefer that candidates convince me of their authenticity as to the principles that they will bring to the decisions that they make when elected. THIS I can rely upon rather than detailed responses that have been carefully crafted by consultant’s polling and will change after election… remember when Helen Thomson was in favor of Steinberg’s bill concerning strip mall proliferation only to change her position after election?

  96. davisite

    Vincente… key points are Mariko has a HISTORY so I KNOW where she stands on issues that I care about.
    We also KNOW that she is not a “machine” candidate and has little or no political IOUs that can be called in by developer patrons. How a candidate looks and sounds in “debates” is pure theater and I pay it no heed. As to content, I would prefer that candidates convince me of their authenticity as to the principles that they will bring to the decisions that they make when elected. THIS I can rely upon rather than detailed responses that have been carefully crafted by consultant’s polling and will change after election… remember when Helen Thomson was in favor of Steinberg’s bill concerning strip mall proliferation only to change her position after election?

  97. Anonymous

    DPD: The winner was clearly Mariko Yamada.

    She’s in touch with voters. She’s in touch with issues regarding social services and the needs of constituents.

    She’s not a machine candidate.

    She needs a little help on some growth issues, but that can be worked out.

    I think that Cabaldon being the political “insider” would be more difficult to lobby and therefore would be less likely to listen to constituents.

    I met a lady who re-registered from Independent to Democrat (lives in West Sac) just to vote against Cabaldon.

    That, is a story to be told.

  98. Anonymous

    DPD: The winner was clearly Mariko Yamada.

    She’s in touch with voters. She’s in touch with issues regarding social services and the needs of constituents.

    She’s not a machine candidate.

    She needs a little help on some growth issues, but that can be worked out.

    I think that Cabaldon being the political “insider” would be more difficult to lobby and therefore would be less likely to listen to constituents.

    I met a lady who re-registered from Independent to Democrat (lives in West Sac) just to vote against Cabaldon.

    That, is a story to be told.

  99. Anonymous

    DPD: The winner was clearly Mariko Yamada.

    She’s in touch with voters. She’s in touch with issues regarding social services and the needs of constituents.

    She’s not a machine candidate.

    She needs a little help on some growth issues, but that can be worked out.

    I think that Cabaldon being the political “insider” would be more difficult to lobby and therefore would be less likely to listen to constituents.

    I met a lady who re-registered from Independent to Democrat (lives in West Sac) just to vote against Cabaldon.

    That, is a story to be told.

  100. Anonymous

    DPD: The winner was clearly Mariko Yamada.

    She’s in touch with voters. She’s in touch with issues regarding social services and the needs of constituents.

    She’s not a machine candidate.

    She needs a little help on some growth issues, but that can be worked out.

    I think that Cabaldon being the political “insider” would be more difficult to lobby and therefore would be less likely to listen to constituents.

    I met a lady who re-registered from Independent to Democrat (lives in West Sac) just to vote against Cabaldon.

    That, is a story to be told.

  101. Anonymous

    for DPD:

    In touch with voters, huh? Yamada didn’t even know the first thing about highway 12, an issue so important to Rio Vista and to Solano traffic, Solano environment, and an economic vain to both Yolo and Solano. Does being in touch with voters means not even taking a stand on being on the side of agriculture protection to save our farmlands in Solano or the side of real estate developers so her “daughter can get a cheaper home”? Does being in touch mean keeping the status quo on how to pass budgets in the Legislature and keep progressive programs (including SOCIAL WORK PROGRAMS) on the governor’s chopping block every year? Or does in-touch mean saying you’re the anti-developer candidate and yet you VOTED to support big sprawl for Dunnigan and Yolo county as Chair? AND what really gets me is this- WHEN YAMADA USES ABOUT HALF OF HER DEBATE CONCLUSION TO THE AUDIENCE SAYING SHE WANTS TO KEEP THE CAMPAIGN CLEAN, THEN TALKS TO ME AS A PRESUMED SWING VOTER (one of the minority in the room not wearing a cabaldon sticker) AFTER THE DEBATE AND DIRECTLY SAYS THAT CABALDON ISN’T RUNNING A CLEAN CAMPAIGN WITH OTHERS AROUND?

    If that is what “in touch with voters” means, then Yamada is in touch. In touch with the severe flip-flopping candidate within her, which one can only imagine what she’ll flip flop on while in the Legislature. Funny how the “Davis” candidate is only supported by one real Davis leader, heystek, as well as NO ONE who’s worked with her for years on the County Board of Supervisors. NONE.

    *Kev-Run

  102. Anonymous

    for DPD:

    In touch with voters, huh? Yamada didn’t even know the first thing about highway 12, an issue so important to Rio Vista and to Solano traffic, Solano environment, and an economic vain to both Yolo and Solano. Does being in touch with voters means not even taking a stand on being on the side of agriculture protection to save our farmlands in Solano or the side of real estate developers so her “daughter can get a cheaper home”? Does being in touch mean keeping the status quo on how to pass budgets in the Legislature and keep progressive programs (including SOCIAL WORK PROGRAMS) on the governor’s chopping block every year? Or does in-touch mean saying you’re the anti-developer candidate and yet you VOTED to support big sprawl for Dunnigan and Yolo county as Chair? AND what really gets me is this- WHEN YAMADA USES ABOUT HALF OF HER DEBATE CONCLUSION TO THE AUDIENCE SAYING SHE WANTS TO KEEP THE CAMPAIGN CLEAN, THEN TALKS TO ME AS A PRESUMED SWING VOTER (one of the minority in the room not wearing a cabaldon sticker) AFTER THE DEBATE AND DIRECTLY SAYS THAT CABALDON ISN’T RUNNING A CLEAN CAMPAIGN WITH OTHERS AROUND?

    If that is what “in touch with voters” means, then Yamada is in touch. In touch with the severe flip-flopping candidate within her, which one can only imagine what she’ll flip flop on while in the Legislature. Funny how the “Davis” candidate is only supported by one real Davis leader, heystek, as well as NO ONE who’s worked with her for years on the County Board of Supervisors. NONE.

    *Kev-Run

  103. Anonymous

    for DPD:

    In touch with voters, huh? Yamada didn’t even know the first thing about highway 12, an issue so important to Rio Vista and to Solano traffic, Solano environment, and an economic vain to both Yolo and Solano. Does being in touch with voters means not even taking a stand on being on the side of agriculture protection to save our farmlands in Solano or the side of real estate developers so her “daughter can get a cheaper home”? Does being in touch mean keeping the status quo on how to pass budgets in the Legislature and keep progressive programs (including SOCIAL WORK PROGRAMS) on the governor’s chopping block every year? Or does in-touch mean saying you’re the anti-developer candidate and yet you VOTED to support big sprawl for Dunnigan and Yolo county as Chair? AND what really gets me is this- WHEN YAMADA USES ABOUT HALF OF HER DEBATE CONCLUSION TO THE AUDIENCE SAYING SHE WANTS TO KEEP THE CAMPAIGN CLEAN, THEN TALKS TO ME AS A PRESUMED SWING VOTER (one of the minority in the room not wearing a cabaldon sticker) AFTER THE DEBATE AND DIRECTLY SAYS THAT CABALDON ISN’T RUNNING A CLEAN CAMPAIGN WITH OTHERS AROUND?

    If that is what “in touch with voters” means, then Yamada is in touch. In touch with the severe flip-flopping candidate within her, which one can only imagine what she’ll flip flop on while in the Legislature. Funny how the “Davis” candidate is only supported by one real Davis leader, heystek, as well as NO ONE who’s worked with her for years on the County Board of Supervisors. NONE.

    *Kev-Run

  104. Anonymous

    for DPD:

    In touch with voters, huh? Yamada didn’t even know the first thing about highway 12, an issue so important to Rio Vista and to Solano traffic, Solano environment, and an economic vain to both Yolo and Solano. Does being in touch with voters means not even taking a stand on being on the side of agriculture protection to save our farmlands in Solano or the side of real estate developers so her “daughter can get a cheaper home”? Does being in touch mean keeping the status quo on how to pass budgets in the Legislature and keep progressive programs (including SOCIAL WORK PROGRAMS) on the governor’s chopping block every year? Or does in-touch mean saying you’re the anti-developer candidate and yet you VOTED to support big sprawl for Dunnigan and Yolo county as Chair? AND what really gets me is this- WHEN YAMADA USES ABOUT HALF OF HER DEBATE CONCLUSION TO THE AUDIENCE SAYING SHE WANTS TO KEEP THE CAMPAIGN CLEAN, THEN TALKS TO ME AS A PRESUMED SWING VOTER (one of the minority in the room not wearing a cabaldon sticker) AFTER THE DEBATE AND DIRECTLY SAYS THAT CABALDON ISN’T RUNNING A CLEAN CAMPAIGN WITH OTHERS AROUND?

    If that is what “in touch with voters” means, then Yamada is in touch. In touch with the severe flip-flopping candidate within her, which one can only imagine what she’ll flip flop on while in the Legislature. Funny how the “Davis” candidate is only supported by one real Davis leader, heystek, as well as NO ONE who’s worked with her for years on the County Board of Supervisors. NONE.

    *Kev-Run

  105. Doug Paul Davis

    Why are you addressing that comment to me, I did not mention in touch with voters. In this article, I simply reported what was said and have made almost no editorial comment other than my brief conclusion to the article.

  106. Doug Paul Davis

    Why are you addressing that comment to me, I did not mention in touch with voters. In this article, I simply reported what was said and have made almost no editorial comment other than my brief conclusion to the article.

  107. Doug Paul Davis

    Why are you addressing that comment to me, I did not mention in touch with voters. In this article, I simply reported what was said and have made almost no editorial comment other than my brief conclusion to the article.

  108. Doug Paul Davis

    Why are you addressing that comment to me, I did not mention in touch with voters. In this article, I simply reported what was said and have made almost no editorial comment other than my brief conclusion to the article.

  109. davisite

    I think these anonymous postings(from the Cabaldon campaign?) gives us a good taste of the kind of campaign that Cabaldon is running…a ceaseless din of hyperbolic and aggressive campaign rhetoric .. a “steamroller” strategy so that the voter does not have the thnking “space” to seriously consider the candidates…

  110. davisite

    I think these anonymous postings(from the Cabaldon campaign?) gives us a good taste of the kind of campaign that Cabaldon is running…a ceaseless din of hyperbolic and aggressive campaign rhetoric .. a “steamroller” strategy so that the voter does not have the thnking “space” to seriously consider the candidates…

  111. davisite

    I think these anonymous postings(from the Cabaldon campaign?) gives us a good taste of the kind of campaign that Cabaldon is running…a ceaseless din of hyperbolic and aggressive campaign rhetoric .. a “steamroller” strategy so that the voter does not have the thnking “space” to seriously consider the candidates…

  112. davisite

    I think these anonymous postings(from the Cabaldon campaign?) gives us a good taste of the kind of campaign that Cabaldon is running…a ceaseless din of hyperbolic and aggressive campaign rhetoric .. a “steamroller” strategy so that the voter does not have the thnking “space” to seriously consider the candidates…

  113. concernedaboutyolo

    I drove out to Fairfield for the debate from Clarksburg. I do genuinely believe Cabaldon won the debate on the issues and details and crowd response, but Yamada’s answers weren’t too bad. And the candidates themselves (Yamada and Cabaldon) are not engaging in any of this mudslinging against each other that is going on in this blog. Maybe its the campaign staff and volunteers doing it for them on their behalf, or maybe without their knowledge. Yamada’s campaign, guy (Brian? i think?) seems nice and laid back, and seems to let things fall as they may, so I don’t think these attacks are coming from him, maybe from Yamada supporters on their own. As for Cabaldon’s campaign guy, he always seems to be looking like he’s hatching some scheme, always moving around whispering things to the elected officials and supporters in the room, or taking people outside the room to talk about something privately, so I can imagine his actions are what causes people to think Cabaldon’s campaign is the “machine” campaign. I’m all for people typing their opinions, but let’s keep it above belt and substantive.

    Here are my thoughts on the debate. The debate itself was informative and interesting. I think it was run smoothly, except for the candidates being confused on when to speak. There were definitely a ton of Cabaldon supporters there, but Yamada seemed fine and came with prepared written remarks for the forum and performed fine, except maybe her closing comments. Some people in the room wanted more details, but then again, do voters really care about what survey in 97 said about issue x? She got her points across fine. I do think Cabaldon won from the candidate answers and organization standpoint, but it is still too early to call for this race. Remember, the term limit intiative could pass, and all this could be for nothing.

  114. concernedaboutyolo

    I drove out to Fairfield for the debate from Clarksburg. I do genuinely believe Cabaldon won the debate on the issues and details and crowd response, but Yamada’s answers weren’t too bad. And the candidates themselves (Yamada and Cabaldon) are not engaging in any of this mudslinging against each other that is going on in this blog. Maybe its the campaign staff and volunteers doing it for them on their behalf, or maybe without their knowledge. Yamada’s campaign, guy (Brian? i think?) seems nice and laid back, and seems to let things fall as they may, so I don’t think these attacks are coming from him, maybe from Yamada supporters on their own. As for Cabaldon’s campaign guy, he always seems to be looking like he’s hatching some scheme, always moving around whispering things to the elected officials and supporters in the room, or taking people outside the room to talk about something privately, so I can imagine his actions are what causes people to think Cabaldon’s campaign is the “machine” campaign. I’m all for people typing their opinions, but let’s keep it above belt and substantive.

    Here are my thoughts on the debate. The debate itself was informative and interesting. I think it was run smoothly, except for the candidates being confused on when to speak. There were definitely a ton of Cabaldon supporters there, but Yamada seemed fine and came with prepared written remarks for the forum and performed fine, except maybe her closing comments. Some people in the room wanted more details, but then again, do voters really care about what survey in 97 said about issue x? She got her points across fine. I do think Cabaldon won from the candidate answers and organization standpoint, but it is still too early to call for this race. Remember, the term limit intiative could pass, and all this could be for nothing.

  115. concernedaboutyolo

    I drove out to Fairfield for the debate from Clarksburg. I do genuinely believe Cabaldon won the debate on the issues and details and crowd response, but Yamada’s answers weren’t too bad. And the candidates themselves (Yamada and Cabaldon) are not engaging in any of this mudslinging against each other that is going on in this blog. Maybe its the campaign staff and volunteers doing it for them on their behalf, or maybe without their knowledge. Yamada’s campaign, guy (Brian? i think?) seems nice and laid back, and seems to let things fall as they may, so I don’t think these attacks are coming from him, maybe from Yamada supporters on their own. As for Cabaldon’s campaign guy, he always seems to be looking like he’s hatching some scheme, always moving around whispering things to the elected officials and supporters in the room, or taking people outside the room to talk about something privately, so I can imagine his actions are what causes people to think Cabaldon’s campaign is the “machine” campaign. I’m all for people typing their opinions, but let’s keep it above belt and substantive.

    Here are my thoughts on the debate. The debate itself was informative and interesting. I think it was run smoothly, except for the candidates being confused on when to speak. There were definitely a ton of Cabaldon supporters there, but Yamada seemed fine and came with prepared written remarks for the forum and performed fine, except maybe her closing comments. Some people in the room wanted more details, but then again, do voters really care about what survey in 97 said about issue x? She got her points across fine. I do think Cabaldon won from the candidate answers and organization standpoint, but it is still too early to call for this race. Remember, the term limit intiative could pass, and all this could be for nothing.

  116. concernedaboutyolo

    I drove out to Fairfield for the debate from Clarksburg. I do genuinely believe Cabaldon won the debate on the issues and details and crowd response, but Yamada’s answers weren’t too bad. And the candidates themselves (Yamada and Cabaldon) are not engaging in any of this mudslinging against each other that is going on in this blog. Maybe its the campaign staff and volunteers doing it for them on their behalf, or maybe without their knowledge. Yamada’s campaign, guy (Brian? i think?) seems nice and laid back, and seems to let things fall as they may, so I don’t think these attacks are coming from him, maybe from Yamada supporters on their own. As for Cabaldon’s campaign guy, he always seems to be looking like he’s hatching some scheme, always moving around whispering things to the elected officials and supporters in the room, or taking people outside the room to talk about something privately, so I can imagine his actions are what causes people to think Cabaldon’s campaign is the “machine” campaign. I’m all for people typing their opinions, but let’s keep it above belt and substantive.

    Here are my thoughts on the debate. The debate itself was informative and interesting. I think it was run smoothly, except for the candidates being confused on when to speak. There were definitely a ton of Cabaldon supporters there, but Yamada seemed fine and came with prepared written remarks for the forum and performed fine, except maybe her closing comments. Some people in the room wanted more details, but then again, do voters really care about what survey in 97 said about issue x? She got her points across fine. I do think Cabaldon won from the candidate answers and organization standpoint, but it is still too early to call for this race. Remember, the term limit intiative could pass, and all this could be for nothing.

  117. concernedaboutyolo

    why not try to encourage more non-anonymous posting to weed out the blatant candidate spinning from both sides? just a friendly suggestion.

  118. concernedaboutyolo

    why not try to encourage more non-anonymous posting to weed out the blatant candidate spinning from both sides? just a friendly suggestion.

  119. concernedaboutyolo

    why not try to encourage more non-anonymous posting to weed out the blatant candidate spinning from both sides? just a friendly suggestion.

  120. concernedaboutyolo

    why not try to encourage more non-anonymous posting to weed out the blatant candidate spinning from both sides? just a friendly suggestion.

  121. Karl

    I want to take a moment to agree with Concerned, in that the debate on this blog is getting a little bit to into anonymous mudslinging.

    It is highly likely that any real mudslinging taking place here isn’t coming from the campaign, and it is only somewhat more plausible that it would be coming from volunteers. I think most folks working on a campaign realize that random malicious accusations generally only tarnish both sides of the campaign, and make their legitimate work more difficult.

    That being said, it is additionally true that accusing one or the other of the campaigns of being behind the anonymous posting only lowers the tone of the debate and obscures the substantive differences between the candidates behind this weird fog of suspicion.

    Put another way, the whole premise of arguing about who said what is pointless. “He-said she-said” stopped being interesting in middle school. There have been some good posts analyzing which candidate did better, making interesting observations in the process. Many of them are anonymous, and their analysis isn’t slightly damaged by their anonymity. Lets have more of that, in this post, and in the inevitable discussion which will follow this campaign.

  122. Karl

    I want to take a moment to agree with Concerned, in that the debate on this blog is getting a little bit to into anonymous mudslinging.

    It is highly likely that any real mudslinging taking place here isn’t coming from the campaign, and it is only somewhat more plausible that it would be coming from volunteers. I think most folks working on a campaign realize that random malicious accusations generally only tarnish both sides of the campaign, and make their legitimate work more difficult.

    That being said, it is additionally true that accusing one or the other of the campaigns of being behind the anonymous posting only lowers the tone of the debate and obscures the substantive differences between the candidates behind this weird fog of suspicion.

    Put another way, the whole premise of arguing about who said what is pointless. “He-said she-said” stopped being interesting in middle school. There have been some good posts analyzing which candidate did better, making interesting observations in the process. Many of them are anonymous, and their analysis isn’t slightly damaged by their anonymity. Lets have more of that, in this post, and in the inevitable discussion which will follow this campaign.

  123. Karl

    I want to take a moment to agree with Concerned, in that the debate on this blog is getting a little bit to into anonymous mudslinging.

    It is highly likely that any real mudslinging taking place here isn’t coming from the campaign, and it is only somewhat more plausible that it would be coming from volunteers. I think most folks working on a campaign realize that random malicious accusations generally only tarnish both sides of the campaign, and make their legitimate work more difficult.

    That being said, it is additionally true that accusing one or the other of the campaigns of being behind the anonymous posting only lowers the tone of the debate and obscures the substantive differences between the candidates behind this weird fog of suspicion.

    Put another way, the whole premise of arguing about who said what is pointless. “He-said she-said” stopped being interesting in middle school. There have been some good posts analyzing which candidate did better, making interesting observations in the process. Many of them are anonymous, and their analysis isn’t slightly damaged by their anonymity. Lets have more of that, in this post, and in the inevitable discussion which will follow this campaign.

  124. Karl

    I want to take a moment to agree with Concerned, in that the debate on this blog is getting a little bit to into anonymous mudslinging.

    It is highly likely that any real mudslinging taking place here isn’t coming from the campaign, and it is only somewhat more plausible that it would be coming from volunteers. I think most folks working on a campaign realize that random malicious accusations generally only tarnish both sides of the campaign, and make their legitimate work more difficult.

    That being said, it is additionally true that accusing one or the other of the campaigns of being behind the anonymous posting only lowers the tone of the debate and obscures the substantive differences between the candidates behind this weird fog of suspicion.

    Put another way, the whole premise of arguing about who said what is pointless. “He-said she-said” stopped being interesting in middle school. There have been some good posts analyzing which candidate did better, making interesting observations in the process. Many of them are anonymous, and their analysis isn’t slightly damaged by their anonymity. Lets have more of that, in this post, and in the inevitable discussion which will follow this campaign.

  125. Anonymous

    Davisite:

    You said today at 11:42 AM:

    “I think these anonymous postings(from the Cabaldon campaign?) gives us a good taste of the kind of campaign that Cabaldon is running…a ceaseless din of hyperbolic and aggressive campaign rhetoric .. a “steamroller” strategy so that the voter does not have the thinking “space” to seriously consider the candidates…”

    As a constituent and longtime supporter of Mariko Yamada’s I was happy, as were you when she announced her candidacy for the assembly earlier this year. Since then I have learned that Mariko has taken positions opposite to progressive views on several key issues.

    For example, on the environmental issue of urban sprawl, as chair of the Yolo Board of Supervisors, Mariko has championed during the past six months opening discussions about allowing peripheral development outside of a city’s border. This has specifically placed the county’s Pass Through Agreement with the City of Davis in jeopardy and has caused many constituents in her own district to doubt whether she can be counted on to fight urban sprawl and massive residential and commercial developments. Mariko claims these “joint study discussions” are just benign conversations to discuss housing for seniors, low-income workers, and the disabled and to seek additional revenue for cash strapped Yolo County. But anyone who is involved in the anti-sprawl movement in Yolo and Solano counties and has been attending the public meetings between county and city officials led by Mariko knows differently. Her proposals are a prelude to massive development debates and come at a time when Yolo County is updating its general plan for the next 20 years. During this time Mariko has actively solicited significant developer money to fund her campaign. Those developers are now gaining the political IOU’s you speak about. Both of these actions are contrary to her previous public image of being a “principled” steward of the land, unwilling to take developer dollars and a willingness to keep massive developments in check. If you doubt what I say has credibility check this out with your progressive friends in Davis.

    Also, Mariko’s support for the 2/3 vote requirement to pass a state budget is astounding considering that progressive budget items for education, health care, the environment and transportation are always on “the chopping block” year after year due to that rule.

    These policy positions have damaged her candidacy.

    My criticisms are not based on any personal support for Cabaldon or animus towards Mariko. Mariko’s positions have caused many to doubt her independence and judgment.

  126. Anonymous

    Davisite:

    You said today at 11:42 AM:

    “I think these anonymous postings(from the Cabaldon campaign?) gives us a good taste of the kind of campaign that Cabaldon is running…a ceaseless din of hyperbolic and aggressive campaign rhetoric .. a “steamroller” strategy so that the voter does not have the thinking “space” to seriously consider the candidates…”

    As a constituent and longtime supporter of Mariko Yamada’s I was happy, as were you when she announced her candidacy for the assembly earlier this year. Since then I have learned that Mariko has taken positions opposite to progressive views on several key issues.

    For example, on the environmental issue of urban sprawl, as chair of the Yolo Board of Supervisors, Mariko has championed during the past six months opening discussions about allowing peripheral development outside of a city’s border. This has specifically placed the county’s Pass Through Agreement with the City of Davis in jeopardy and has caused many constituents in her own district to doubt whether she can be counted on to fight urban sprawl and massive residential and commercial developments. Mariko claims these “joint study discussions” are just benign conversations to discuss housing for seniors, low-income workers, and the disabled and to seek additional revenue for cash strapped Yolo County. But anyone who is involved in the anti-sprawl movement in Yolo and Solano counties and has been attending the public meetings between county and city officials led by Mariko knows differently. Her proposals are a prelude to massive development debates and come at a time when Yolo County is updating its general plan for the next 20 years. During this time Mariko has actively solicited significant developer money to fund her campaign. Those developers are now gaining the political IOU’s you speak about. Both of these actions are contrary to her previous public image of being a “principled” steward of the land, unwilling to take developer dollars and a willingness to keep massive developments in check. If you doubt what I say has credibility check this out with your progressive friends in Davis.

    Also, Mariko’s support for the 2/3 vote requirement to pass a state budget is astounding considering that progressive budget items for education, health care, the environment and transportation are always on “the chopping block” year after year due to that rule.

    These policy positions have damaged her candidacy.

    My criticisms are not based on any personal support for Cabaldon or animus towards Mariko. Mariko’s positions have caused many to doubt her independence and judgment.

  127. Anonymous

    Davisite:

    You said today at 11:42 AM:

    “I think these anonymous postings(from the Cabaldon campaign?) gives us a good taste of the kind of campaign that Cabaldon is running…a ceaseless din of hyperbolic and aggressive campaign rhetoric .. a “steamroller” strategy so that the voter does not have the thinking “space” to seriously consider the candidates…”

    As a constituent and longtime supporter of Mariko Yamada’s I was happy, as were you when she announced her candidacy for the assembly earlier this year. Since then I have learned that Mariko has taken positions opposite to progressive views on several key issues.

    For example, on the environmental issue of urban sprawl, as chair of the Yolo Board of Supervisors, Mariko has championed during the past six months opening discussions about allowing peripheral development outside of a city’s border. This has specifically placed the county’s Pass Through Agreement with the City of Davis in jeopardy and has caused many constituents in her own district to doubt whether she can be counted on to fight urban sprawl and massive residential and commercial developments. Mariko claims these “joint study discussions” are just benign conversations to discuss housing for seniors, low-income workers, and the disabled and to seek additional revenue for cash strapped Yolo County. But anyone who is involved in the anti-sprawl movement in Yolo and Solano counties and has been attending the public meetings between county and city officials led by Mariko knows differently. Her proposals are a prelude to massive development debates and come at a time when Yolo County is updating its general plan for the next 20 years. During this time Mariko has actively solicited significant developer money to fund her campaign. Those developers are now gaining the political IOU’s you speak about. Both of these actions are contrary to her previous public image of being a “principled” steward of the land, unwilling to take developer dollars and a willingness to keep massive developments in check. If you doubt what I say has credibility check this out with your progressive friends in Davis.

    Also, Mariko’s support for the 2/3 vote requirement to pass a state budget is astounding considering that progressive budget items for education, health care, the environment and transportation are always on “the chopping block” year after year due to that rule.

    These policy positions have damaged her candidacy.

    My criticisms are not based on any personal support for Cabaldon or animus towards Mariko. Mariko’s positions have caused many to doubt her independence and judgment.

  128. Anonymous

    Davisite:

    You said today at 11:42 AM:

    “I think these anonymous postings(from the Cabaldon campaign?) gives us a good taste of the kind of campaign that Cabaldon is running…a ceaseless din of hyperbolic and aggressive campaign rhetoric .. a “steamroller” strategy so that the voter does not have the thinking “space” to seriously consider the candidates…”

    As a constituent and longtime supporter of Mariko Yamada’s I was happy, as were you when she announced her candidacy for the assembly earlier this year. Since then I have learned that Mariko has taken positions opposite to progressive views on several key issues.

    For example, on the environmental issue of urban sprawl, as chair of the Yolo Board of Supervisors, Mariko has championed during the past six months opening discussions about allowing peripheral development outside of a city’s border. This has specifically placed the county’s Pass Through Agreement with the City of Davis in jeopardy and has caused many constituents in her own district to doubt whether she can be counted on to fight urban sprawl and massive residential and commercial developments. Mariko claims these “joint study discussions” are just benign conversations to discuss housing for seniors, low-income workers, and the disabled and to seek additional revenue for cash strapped Yolo County. But anyone who is involved in the anti-sprawl movement in Yolo and Solano counties and has been attending the public meetings between county and city officials led by Mariko knows differently. Her proposals are a prelude to massive development debates and come at a time when Yolo County is updating its general plan for the next 20 years. During this time Mariko has actively solicited significant developer money to fund her campaign. Those developers are now gaining the political IOU’s you speak about. Both of these actions are contrary to her previous public image of being a “principled” steward of the land, unwilling to take developer dollars and a willingness to keep massive developments in check. If you doubt what I say has credibility check this out with your progressive friends in Davis.

    Also, Mariko’s support for the 2/3 vote requirement to pass a state budget is astounding considering that progressive budget items for education, health care, the environment and transportation are always on “the chopping block” year after year due to that rule.

    These policy positions have damaged her candidacy.

    My criticisms are not based on any personal support for Cabaldon or animus towards Mariko. Mariko’s positions have caused many to doubt her independence and judgment.

  129. Anonymous

    Davisite:

    Another comment:

    I choose to post anonymously for the same reasons you choose to post using a pseudonym. Finally, I wish both Cabaldon and Yamada well.

  130. Anonymous

    Davisite:

    Another comment:

    I choose to post anonymously for the same reasons you choose to post using a pseudonym. Finally, I wish both Cabaldon and Yamada well.

  131. Anonymous

    Davisite:

    Another comment:

    I choose to post anonymously for the same reasons you choose to post using a pseudonym. Finally, I wish both Cabaldon and Yamada well.

  132. Anonymous

    Davisite:

    Another comment:

    I choose to post anonymously for the same reasons you choose to post using a pseudonym. Finally, I wish both Cabaldon and Yamada well.

  133. davisite

    ” Mariko’s positions have caused many to doubt her independence and judgment.”

    Davis progressives,sadly, have a long history of “cutting off their nose to spite their face” in their absolutism. It has cost them dearly in Davis electoral politics. Mariko is the better choice-end of story.

  134. davisite

    ” Mariko’s positions have caused many to doubt her independence and judgment.”

    Davis progressives,sadly, have a long history of “cutting off their nose to spite their face” in their absolutism. It has cost them dearly in Davis electoral politics. Mariko is the better choice-end of story.

  135. davisite

    ” Mariko’s positions have caused many to doubt her independence and judgment.”

    Davis progressives,sadly, have a long history of “cutting off their nose to spite their face” in their absolutism. It has cost them dearly in Davis electoral politics. Mariko is the better choice-end of story.

  136. davisite

    ” Mariko’s positions have caused many to doubt her independence and judgment.”

    Davis progressives,sadly, have a long history of “cutting off their nose to spite their face” in their absolutism. It has cost them dearly in Davis electoral politics. Mariko is the better choice-end of story.

  137. 無名 - wu ming

    i agree with concernedinyolo, if everyone just chose a stable pseudonym it would make the discussions here much easier to follow. it doesn’t have to be your real name or give any clue to your meatspace existence, but it would give us all a way to sort out who is saying what in a given thread.

    having not seen the debate, i don’t really have an opinion on it, other than to strongly disagree with yamada’s reported support of the 2/3 budget rule, which should be junked along with prop. 13 IMO. i’ll probably vote for her in the primary, barring either cabaldon really impressing me or yamada eating a live kitten on TV.

  138. 無名 - wu ming

    i agree with concernedinyolo, if everyone just chose a stable pseudonym it would make the discussions here much easier to follow. it doesn’t have to be your real name or give any clue to your meatspace existence, but it would give us all a way to sort out who is saying what in a given thread.

    having not seen the debate, i don’t really have an opinion on it, other than to strongly disagree with yamada’s reported support of the 2/3 budget rule, which should be junked along with prop. 13 IMO. i’ll probably vote for her in the primary, barring either cabaldon really impressing me or yamada eating a live kitten on TV.

  139. 無名 - wu ming

    i agree with concernedinyolo, if everyone just chose a stable pseudonym it would make the discussions here much easier to follow. it doesn’t have to be your real name or give any clue to your meatspace existence, but it would give us all a way to sort out who is saying what in a given thread.

    having not seen the debate, i don’t really have an opinion on it, other than to strongly disagree with yamada’s reported support of the 2/3 budget rule, which should be junked along with prop. 13 IMO. i’ll probably vote for her in the primary, barring either cabaldon really impressing me or yamada eating a live kitten on TV.

  140. 無名 - wu ming

    i agree with concernedinyolo, if everyone just chose a stable pseudonym it would make the discussions here much easier to follow. it doesn’t have to be your real name or give any clue to your meatspace existence, but it would give us all a way to sort out who is saying what in a given thread.

    having not seen the debate, i don’t really have an opinion on it, other than to strongly disagree with yamada’s reported support of the 2/3 budget rule, which should be junked along with prop. 13 IMO. i’ll probably vote for her in the primary, barring either cabaldon really impressing me or yamada eating a live kitten on TV.

  141. progressive observer

    Davisite: you state: “Davis progressives, sadly, have a long history of “cutting off their nose to spite their face” in their absolutism. It has cost them dearly in Davis electoral politics. Mariko is the better choice-end of story.”

    Davisite: you have made up your mind, but it is not the end of the story.

    I concur in that several past city council elections “absolutism” has been evident, whereby progressive candidates who agree on the issues, but are disliked by a faction within the progressive community are then marginalized and weakened by not having a strong unified coalition needed to prevail at the ballot box. These factions within the progressive community have split the vote many times and that is very unfortunate. Progressives and liberal leftists seem to be plagued with practicing this type of politics, which of course is self-defeating. I agree the progressive coalition needs to guard against “absolutism” and marginalizing each other and instead should support each other with an alliance to win.

    But, there is a distinct difference this year among progressives regarding the current Assembly race verses previous city council elections. Unlike in past Davis council elections where disagreements among progressives were not about the issues but instead primarily about the personalities of candidates and their supporters the issue at hand in the Assembly race is solely about positions on land use taken by Mariko Yamada. There is no internal feuding among progressives on Yamada’s land use positions. Mariko Yamada is promoting “joint study areas” to be considered for development including key border lands adjacent to Davis which the progressive community is united against developing. The fundamental issue of land use goes to the core of the progressive movement. Mariko has taken a position that is anathema to progressives. She has touched the “third rail” of politics in the progressive movement, which is to keep growth strictly within the cities and allow the citizens within those cities to determine their own urban destiny. That is why there are Pass Through Agreements, which Mariko has stated “do not pencil out” and are “not working for the county anymore.” This is how urban sprawl has been controlled for the past quarter of a century. Many within the progressive community believe Mariko has misled them on this issue and this has caused anger and distrust of her. Some believe they have been betrayed by her and that is a hard thing to shake. Mariko’s position has in fact unified progressives by and large against her position. This has called into question Mariko’s political judgment and principles by many who would be inclined to otherwise support her. Whether they will all vote against her now is yet to be understood, but it does not bode well for her candidacy.

    Christopher Cabaldon is widely known as promoter of both urban renewal and growth in West Sacramento, but he has stated a respect for other communities such as Davis to control growth on its borders. Yes, that is only rhetoric on his part, but Mariko on the other hand, has not defended protecting a community’s borders including her own town of Davis. She has instead invited discussion of growth by the county, which is seen as urban sprawl growth and a violation of the Pass Through Agreement principle. She has even promoted the Covell Village site to be one of the areas to be “studied” disrespecting the majority of Davis citizens and her own constituents who overwhelmingly voted No on X, No on Covell Village in November 2005. Yamada’s position is contrary to the majority of her constituents and challenges a core tenet of progressives in Davis and Yolo County.

    Because of Mariko’s positions on land use, many in the progressive community have lost faith in her.

  142. progressive observer

    Davisite: you state: “Davis progressives, sadly, have a long history of “cutting off their nose to spite their face” in their absolutism. It has cost them dearly in Davis electoral politics. Mariko is the better choice-end of story.”

    Davisite: you have made up your mind, but it is not the end of the story.

    I concur in that several past city council elections “absolutism” has been evident, whereby progressive candidates who agree on the issues, but are disliked by a faction within the progressive community are then marginalized and weakened by not having a strong unified coalition needed to prevail at the ballot box. These factions within the progressive community have split the vote many times and that is very unfortunate. Progressives and liberal leftists seem to be plagued with practicing this type of politics, which of course is self-defeating. I agree the progressive coalition needs to guard against “absolutism” and marginalizing each other and instead should support each other with an alliance to win.

    But, there is a distinct difference this year among progressives regarding the current Assembly race verses previous city council elections. Unlike in past Davis council elections where disagreements among progressives were not about the issues but instead primarily about the personalities of candidates and their supporters the issue at hand in the Assembly race is solely about positions on land use taken by Mariko Yamada. There is no internal feuding among progressives on Yamada’s land use positions. Mariko Yamada is promoting “joint study areas” to be considered for development including key border lands adjacent to Davis which the progressive community is united against developing. The fundamental issue of land use goes to the core of the progressive movement. Mariko has taken a position that is anathema to progressives. She has touched the “third rail” of politics in the progressive movement, which is to keep growth strictly within the cities and allow the citizens within those cities to determine their own urban destiny. That is why there are Pass Through Agreements, which Mariko has stated “do not pencil out” and are “not working for the county anymore.” This is how urban sprawl has been controlled for the past quarter of a century. Many within the progressive community believe Mariko has misled them on this issue and this has caused anger and distrust of her. Some believe they have been betrayed by her and that is a hard thing to shake. Mariko’s position has in fact unified progressives by and large against her position. This has called into question Mariko’s political judgment and principles by many who would be inclined to otherwise support her. Whether they will all vote against her now is yet to be understood, but it does not bode well for her candidacy.

    Christopher Cabaldon is widely known as promoter of both urban renewal and growth in West Sacramento, but he has stated a respect for other communities such as Davis to control growth on its borders. Yes, that is only rhetoric on his part, but Mariko on the other hand, has not defended protecting a community’s borders including her own town of Davis. She has instead invited discussion of growth by the county, which is seen as urban sprawl growth and a violation of the Pass Through Agreement principle. She has even promoted the Covell Village site to be one of the areas to be “studied” disrespecting the majority of Davis citizens and her own constituents who overwhelmingly voted No on X, No on Covell Village in November 2005. Yamada’s position is contrary to the majority of her constituents and challenges a core tenet of progressives in Davis and Yolo County.

    Because of Mariko’s positions on land use, many in the progressive community have lost faith in her.

  143. progressive observer

    Davisite: you state: “Davis progressives, sadly, have a long history of “cutting off their nose to spite their face” in their absolutism. It has cost them dearly in Davis electoral politics. Mariko is the better choice-end of story.”

    Davisite: you have made up your mind, but it is not the end of the story.

    I concur in that several past city council elections “absolutism” has been evident, whereby progressive candidates who agree on the issues, but are disliked by a faction within the progressive community are then marginalized and weakened by not having a strong unified coalition needed to prevail at the ballot box. These factions within the progressive community have split the vote many times and that is very unfortunate. Progressives and liberal leftists seem to be plagued with practicing this type of politics, which of course is self-defeating. I agree the progressive coalition needs to guard against “absolutism” and marginalizing each other and instead should support each other with an alliance to win.

    But, there is a distinct difference this year among progressives regarding the current Assembly race verses previous city council elections. Unlike in past Davis council elections where disagreements among progressives were not about the issues but instead primarily about the personalities of candidates and their supporters the issue at hand in the Assembly race is solely about positions on land use taken by Mariko Yamada. There is no internal feuding among progressives on Yamada’s land use positions. Mariko Yamada is promoting “joint study areas” to be considered for development including key border lands adjacent to Davis which the progressive community is united against developing. The fundamental issue of land use goes to the core of the progressive movement. Mariko has taken a position that is anathema to progressives. She has touched the “third rail” of politics in the progressive movement, which is to keep growth strictly within the cities and allow the citizens within those cities to determine their own urban destiny. That is why there are Pass Through Agreements, which Mariko has stated “do not pencil out” and are “not working for the county anymore.” This is how urban sprawl has been controlled for the past quarter of a century. Many within the progressive community believe Mariko has misled them on this issue and this has caused anger and distrust of her. Some believe they have been betrayed by her and that is a hard thing to shake. Mariko’s position has in fact unified progressives by and large against her position. This has called into question Mariko’s political judgment and principles by many who would be inclined to otherwise support her. Whether they will all vote against her now is yet to be understood, but it does not bode well for her candidacy.

    Christopher Cabaldon is widely known as promoter of both urban renewal and growth in West Sacramento, but he has stated a respect for other communities such as Davis to control growth on its borders. Yes, that is only rhetoric on his part, but Mariko on the other hand, has not defended protecting a community’s borders including her own town of Davis. She has instead invited discussion of growth by the county, which is seen as urban sprawl growth and a violation of the Pass Through Agreement principle. She has even promoted the Covell Village site to be one of the areas to be “studied” disrespecting the majority of Davis citizens and her own constituents who overwhelmingly voted No on X, No on Covell Village in November 2005. Yamada’s position is contrary to the majority of her constituents and challenges a core tenet of progressives in Davis and Yolo County.

    Because of Mariko’s positions on land use, many in the progressive community have lost faith in her.

  144. progressive observer

    Davisite: you state: “Davis progressives, sadly, have a long history of “cutting off their nose to spite their face” in their absolutism. It has cost them dearly in Davis electoral politics. Mariko is the better choice-end of story.”

    Davisite: you have made up your mind, but it is not the end of the story.

    I concur in that several past city council elections “absolutism” has been evident, whereby progressive candidates who agree on the issues, but are disliked by a faction within the progressive community are then marginalized and weakened by not having a strong unified coalition needed to prevail at the ballot box. These factions within the progressive community have split the vote many times and that is very unfortunate. Progressives and liberal leftists seem to be plagued with practicing this type of politics, which of course is self-defeating. I agree the progressive coalition needs to guard against “absolutism” and marginalizing each other and instead should support each other with an alliance to win.

    But, there is a distinct difference this year among progressives regarding the current Assembly race verses previous city council elections. Unlike in past Davis council elections where disagreements among progressives were not about the issues but instead primarily about the personalities of candidates and their supporters the issue at hand in the Assembly race is solely about positions on land use taken by Mariko Yamada. There is no internal feuding among progressives on Yamada’s land use positions. Mariko Yamada is promoting “joint study areas” to be considered for development including key border lands adjacent to Davis which the progressive community is united against developing. The fundamental issue of land use goes to the core of the progressive movement. Mariko has taken a position that is anathema to progressives. She has touched the “third rail” of politics in the progressive movement, which is to keep growth strictly within the cities and allow the citizens within those cities to determine their own urban destiny. That is why there are Pass Through Agreements, which Mariko has stated “do not pencil out” and are “not working for the county anymore.” This is how urban sprawl has been controlled for the past quarter of a century. Many within the progressive community believe Mariko has misled them on this issue and this has caused anger and distrust of her. Some believe they have been betrayed by her and that is a hard thing to shake. Mariko’s position has in fact unified progressives by and large against her position. This has called into question Mariko’s political judgment and principles by many who would be inclined to otherwise support her. Whether they will all vote against her now is yet to be understood, but it does not bode well for her candidacy.

    Christopher Cabaldon is widely known as promoter of both urban renewal and growth in West Sacramento, but he has stated a respect for other communities such as Davis to control growth on its borders. Yes, that is only rhetoric on his part, but Mariko on the other hand, has not defended protecting a community’s borders including her own town of Davis. She has instead invited discussion of growth by the county, which is seen as urban sprawl growth and a violation of the Pass Through Agreement principle. She has even promoted the Covell Village site to be one of the areas to be “studied” disrespecting the majority of Davis citizens and her own constituents who overwhelmingly voted No on X, No on Covell Village in November 2005. Yamada’s position is contrary to the majority of her constituents and challenges a core tenet of progressives in Davis and Yolo County.

    Because of Mariko’s positions on land use, many in the progressive community have lost faith in her.

  145. davisite

    Yamada is running for Assembly where she will have NO political power vis a vis our Pass-Through agreement with the County. We need to worry more about the upcoming Council and Supervisor elections in that regard. Yamada has EARNED our support for higher office with actual ACTION at the local level not just campaign rhetoric for higher office. When Davis voters either support or reject their local reps run for higher office based upon their public record, only then will be have any real power to influence their decisions.

  146. davisite

    Yamada is running for Assembly where she will have NO political power vis a vis our Pass-Through agreement with the County. We need to worry more about the upcoming Council and Supervisor elections in that regard. Yamada has EARNED our support for higher office with actual ACTION at the local level not just campaign rhetoric for higher office. When Davis voters either support or reject their local reps run for higher office based upon their public record, only then will be have any real power to influence their decisions.

  147. davisite

    Yamada is running for Assembly where she will have NO political power vis a vis our Pass-Through agreement with the County. We need to worry more about the upcoming Council and Supervisor elections in that regard. Yamada has EARNED our support for higher office with actual ACTION at the local level not just campaign rhetoric for higher office. When Davis voters either support or reject their local reps run for higher office based upon their public record, only then will be have any real power to influence their decisions.

  148. davisite

    Yamada is running for Assembly where she will have NO political power vis a vis our Pass-Through agreement with the County. We need to worry more about the upcoming Council and Supervisor elections in that regard. Yamada has EARNED our support for higher office with actual ACTION at the local level not just campaign rhetoric for higher office. When Davis voters either support or reject their local reps run for higher office based upon their public record, only then will be have any real power to influence their decisions.

  149. Stonegate Dem

    wow davisite… that’s about the strangest and most convoluted thing I’ve seen on this blog.

    1) Mariko will be going to the assembly, where her non-progressive views on land use development will not matter.

    2) Therefore, with the exit of Yamada, we need to focus on getting a better, actual progressive on land use issues so we can undo what Yamada has been doing in Dunnigan, Covel and other development.

    3) We have seen what Mariko has done, and these “ACTIONS” (while not progressive) have “EARNED” our support. Of course, those actions were not progressive (point 1) and we are looking forward to her replacement (point 2).

    Good grief!

    On the other point brought up, I what SEIU and CTA will think of Mariko’s support for 2/3 voter majority to pass a budget. Under the current rules, the Republicans can hold up the budget because of state funding for abortions, funding for healthcare to kids of undocumented workers, stem cells or biomedical research. The 2/3 vote majority is a huge stick that they can use to beat up on progressive causes each year.

    I would take that weapon away from the Republicans, and I think that is the official policy stance of the Democratic Party and just about every Democrat in the legislature. Not cool for her to make this her “progressive” stance.

  150. Stonegate Dem

    wow davisite… that’s about the strangest and most convoluted thing I’ve seen on this blog.

    1) Mariko will be going to the assembly, where her non-progressive views on land use development will not matter.

    2) Therefore, with the exit of Yamada, we need to focus on getting a better, actual progressive on land use issues so we can undo what Yamada has been doing in Dunnigan, Covel and other development.

    3) We have seen what Mariko has done, and these “ACTIONS” (while not progressive) have “EARNED” our support. Of course, those actions were not progressive (point 1) and we are looking forward to her replacement (point 2).

    Good grief!

    On the other point brought up, I what SEIU and CTA will think of Mariko’s support for 2/3 voter majority to pass a budget. Under the current rules, the Republicans can hold up the budget because of state funding for abortions, funding for healthcare to kids of undocumented workers, stem cells or biomedical research. The 2/3 vote majority is a huge stick that they can use to beat up on progressive causes each year.

    I would take that weapon away from the Republicans, and I think that is the official policy stance of the Democratic Party and just about every Democrat in the legislature. Not cool for her to make this her “progressive” stance.

  151. Stonegate Dem

    wow davisite… that’s about the strangest and most convoluted thing I’ve seen on this blog.

    1) Mariko will be going to the assembly, where her non-progressive views on land use development will not matter.

    2) Therefore, with the exit of Yamada, we need to focus on getting a better, actual progressive on land use issues so we can undo what Yamada has been doing in Dunnigan, Covel and other development.

    3) We have seen what Mariko has done, and these “ACTIONS” (while not progressive) have “EARNED” our support. Of course, those actions were not progressive (point 1) and we are looking forward to her replacement (point 2).

    Good grief!

    On the other point brought up, I what SEIU and CTA will think of Mariko’s support for 2/3 voter majority to pass a budget. Under the current rules, the Republicans can hold up the budget because of state funding for abortions, funding for healthcare to kids of undocumented workers, stem cells or biomedical research. The 2/3 vote majority is a huge stick that they can use to beat up on progressive causes each year.

    I would take that weapon away from the Republicans, and I think that is the official policy stance of the Democratic Party and just about every Democrat in the legislature. Not cool for her to make this her “progressive” stance.

  152. Stonegate Dem

    wow davisite… that’s about the strangest and most convoluted thing I’ve seen on this blog.

    1) Mariko will be going to the assembly, where her non-progressive views on land use development will not matter.

    2) Therefore, with the exit of Yamada, we need to focus on getting a better, actual progressive on land use issues so we can undo what Yamada has been doing in Dunnigan, Covel and other development.

    3) We have seen what Mariko has done, and these “ACTIONS” (while not progressive) have “EARNED” our support. Of course, those actions were not progressive (point 1) and we are looking forward to her replacement (point 2).

    Good grief!

    On the other point brought up, I what SEIU and CTA will think of Mariko’s support for 2/3 voter majority to pass a budget. Under the current rules, the Republicans can hold up the budget because of state funding for abortions, funding for healthcare to kids of undocumented workers, stem cells or biomedical research. The 2/3 vote majority is a huge stick that they can use to beat up on progressive causes each year.

    I would take that weapon away from the Republicans, and I think that is the official policy stance of the Democratic Party and just about every Democrat in the legislature. Not cool for her to make this her “progressive” stance.

  153. davisite

    The character of the anti-Yamada postings, by self-identified, anonymous Davis progressives “smells” a lot like a Cabaldon dirty tricks unit with the task of infiltrating the Vanguard …anyone else catch a similar whiff?

  154. davisite

    The character of the anti-Yamada postings, by self-identified, anonymous Davis progressives “smells” a lot like a Cabaldon dirty tricks unit with the task of infiltrating the Vanguard …anyone else catch a similar whiff?

  155. davisite

    The character of the anti-Yamada postings, by self-identified, anonymous Davis progressives “smells” a lot like a Cabaldon dirty tricks unit with the task of infiltrating the Vanguard …anyone else catch a similar whiff?

  156. davisite

    The character of the anti-Yamada postings, by self-identified, anonymous Davis progressives “smells” a lot like a Cabaldon dirty tricks unit with the task of infiltrating the Vanguard …anyone else catch a similar whiff?

  157. Anonymous

    As was pointed out earlier, any attempt to read “grassroots” support into the many out-of-towners who were brought in to pose for Cabaldon is a mistake. It merely shows a greater willingness to add to pollution levels by putting extra cars on the highway. In terms of actual locals, the room was closer to 50-50.

  158. Anonymous

    As was pointed out earlier, any attempt to read “grassroots” support into the many out-of-towners who were brought in to pose for Cabaldon is a mistake. It merely shows a greater willingness to add to pollution levels by putting extra cars on the highway. In terms of actual locals, the room was closer to 50-50.

  159. Anonymous

    As was pointed out earlier, any attempt to read “grassroots” support into the many out-of-towners who were brought in to pose for Cabaldon is a mistake. It merely shows a greater willingness to add to pollution levels by putting extra cars on the highway. In terms of actual locals, the room was closer to 50-50.

  160. Anonymous

    As was pointed out earlier, any attempt to read “grassroots” support into the many out-of-towners who were brought in to pose for Cabaldon is a mistake. It merely shows a greater willingness to add to pollution levels by putting extra cars on the highway. In terms of actual locals, the room was closer to 50-50.

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