Commentary: Council and Staff Try To Justify Weakening of Historic Civil Rights Ordinance

Share:
If you read the Davis Enterprise last night, you would be led to believe that the historic, anti-discrimination ordinance that passed in 1986 was no longer needed. This justification might make sense if they were removing the entire ordinance, but instead they are removing one portion of text dealing with an enforcement mechanism and then attempting to suture up that hole somewhat artificially.

When it was adopted in 1986, the ordinance offered protections not otherwise available at the time, said Assistant City Manager Kelly Stachowicz.

“According to the city attorney, most of those things are now covered by state and federal law,” she added.

The city now has several mechanisms in place to deal with charges of discrimination, including a police ombudsman hired in September, the city’s Mediation and Fair Housing Program and the Police Advisory Committee.

“The subcommittee believes there is an adequate web of resources available to individuals and the best roles for the current Human Relations Commission include listening, information intake and referral,” Souza and Asmundson wrote.

There are several components to this claim that need to be addressed.

First, most of these things are indeed covered by state and federal law. The problem is that unless the case of discrimination is egregious enough to warrant the Attorney General of California or the Justice Department/ FBI to intervene, the enforcement mechanism is a lawsuit in court. As we discussed last week, such a mode is expensive and impractical for most situations that arise. Moreover, as we also discussed, the only recourse available to individuals should not be the court system, this is a chief reason why the HRC was empowered in the first place even lacking the ability to subpoena people to testify.

Second the city may have several mechanisms, but most of them involve the police or housing. Those account for a very small percentage of the types of incidents that the HRC in the past has dealt with. So who is going to handle those type of complaints?

The word we are getting is that those complaints of discrimination would be rolled into the Police Ombudsman, Bob Aaronson’s duty. Or at least that is what Councilmember Stephen Souza is reportedly thinking at this time. This is not the first time he has suggested expanding the role of the ombudsman. The problem is that it is not altogether clear that the ombudsman is the proper authority to deal with a number of these kinds of disputes that used to be handled by the HRC. Moreover, the ombudsman is currently working well beyond his part time duties, expanding his role would likely necessitate the city hiring additional staff to do the duties that the HRC used to perform.

The Enterprise Article cites the report from the subcommittee:

“As a public body, the commission is limited to what it can discuss in open session,” Asmundson and Souza wrote. “It is also limited in information it can seek regarding personnel issues, information about police officers, and information it can require other jurisdictions to share. This makes it difficult for the commission to appropriately, thoroughly and fairly mediate/adjudicate individual cases.”

As Mr. Souza ought to know since he was on the HRC, police issues encompass only a very small portion of the types of complaints that the HRC dealt with in the past. Moreover, Souza’s report only dealt with again a very narrow issue base–police issues. The disputes that arose last year undoubtedly have led to this decision, but the subcommittee is thinking very narrowly when they justify the removal of the ordinance item based on a single-issue area that has now been dealt with through the hiring of the ombudsman.

“At a recent meeting, commissioners discussed the ordinance, and several said they felt uncomfortable in the role of mediator. Others said to dismantle an important city ordinance was inappropriate.”

I find the fact that several members of the commission were uncomfortable with the role of mediator appalling. In past HRCs, it was strongly encouraged that the members go through mediation training–and many did. It is part of the duties that they had and were listed in the description. It would be like a member of the BEDC or the Planning Commission uncomfortable with reading and analyzing zoning laws or development agreements. My response is ‘oh well, if you are uncomfortable, resign.’ As we found out last year, this body and these laws are bigger than the individuals currently holding the appointments.

There is a perception out there that bodies like the HRC are limited in terms of what they can do to effect change. Nothing is really further from the truth. In 2002 and early 2003, the HRC heard a number of incidents involving racism and bullying at the Davis High School. The HRC, helped organize a community meeting that turned out be a real eye-opener for the entire community. Following the Forum on Bullying and Racism hosted by the HRC, the Davis Enterprise reported:

Talk about racism at Davis High School became real for school district officials Monday night, as emotional students recounted experiences with violence, discrimination and taunting.

Davis Joint Unified School District Board of Education members, Superintendent David Murphy, teachers and Davis City Council members joined more than 100 community members and students at a public forum on racism.

The forum, organized by the Davis Human Relations Commission and held Monday at the Veterans’ Memorial Center, produced a long list of possible solutions and nearly five hours of testimony and discussion.

“I thought there was a problem. I had no idea of the depth and breadth of the problem and how deep it seems to be within … our schools, particularly the high school,” Joan Sallee, school board president, said after hearing the students’ stories. “And I’m grateful for this meeting.” (Davis Enterprise, February 25, 2003).

The result of this meeting was that numerous students came forward with heartfelt and emotional experiences and the school board and superintendent could no longer simply ignore the problem.

Emotional — at times tearful — students recounted vivid stories of discrimination and poor treatment on campus by their peers, administrators and staff. Some said they are uncomfortable talking to administrators about experiences. Others accused the school district of unfair punishments.

“There is no word in the English language like (the N-word),” Babajide Olupona, a DHS students and commission member, said, recalling years of discrimination and negative experiences in the schools and community. “No one really understands the impact of that word.”

Other students offered detailed accounts of discrimination, vandalism of their property and violence based on race, ethnicity, religion and status.

The result of that meeting was that the Superintendent Murphy worked with members of the HRC to create new programs and new positions to deal with the problem. One of the results of that work is the climate coordinator position, now held by Mel Lewis.

We see from this both the possibilities but the shortcomings of the a body such as the HRC. First, the HRC was able to organize a meeting to educate the community. Second, they were able to work with the Superintendent to create new programs.

But third, as many who read these pages realize, the problems that were identified then, still exist now. Why? There was a lack of follow-through after the crisis abated.

However, the HRC was able to facilitate with the school district new programs, new discipline code language, and a new position. This set the stage for what has happened this year, where all of these aspects have been tightened up due to greater levels of follow-through and commitment by the current school board.

Most importantly, there was key communication fostered and changes enacted without a lawsuit having to be filed. I do not see how the Ombudsman would be able to perform this function.

In October of 2003, four teenagers threw more than 120 eggs at five vehicles–mainly owned by minorities including a gay man.

Russell and several friends, concerned community members and fellow victims of hate crimes scratched out signs and banners to protest the Yolo County District Attorney’s Office’s willingness to drop hate crime charges against a teen-ager who is charged with vandalizing several cars and a home on Oct. 26, 2003.

One of the victims is Russell, a 27-year-old openly gay UC Davis lab assistant.

“This is silent affirmation to people who commit these type of crimes because they can look and see that nothing is going to happen to them if they get caught,” Russell said of the plea offer. “This allows this type of behavior to continue.”

Four youths reportedly shouted racist and bigoted remarks as they threw more than 120 eggs at five vehicles and one house early that October morning. One car was owned by Russell; another was owned by a black family. The house was owned by a black family.

Witnesses told police they saw four juveniles throw more than 120 eggs at the two cars. Russell’s vehicle suffered more than $4,000 in damage, he said. Liquid from the eggs seeped through into the engine, causing damage, and the paint was also ruined.

Russell was able to pick one of the juveniles out of a photo lineup and he was arrested for the crimes. However, the youth has refused to tell authorities the names of the other three suspects.

“This was devastating to me,” Russell said about the hate crime. “Then to have the crimes basically dismissed makes the whole experience exponentially worse.”

Raphael Moore, Russell’s attorney, said the proposed deal – announced at a pretrial hearing last week – might include dropping the hate crime charges against the juvenile. The 16-year-old could face limited probation and the possibility of having his record expunged in three years if the plea agreement is approved. (Davis Enterprise July 15, 2004).

As a result the HRC took up Mr. Russell’s cause. The result was that the HRC worked with the new police chief Jim Hyde, yes the same police chief and the same HRC chair that were at odds a year later. At this time however, the HRC arranged for public meetings where various individuals spoke about the problems of hate crimes. As the result of those meetings, Chief Hyde greatly improved and expanded the department’s enforcement of hate crimes legislation.

Even though, Mr. Russell’s case was never prosecuted as a hate crime and the juvenile was slapped on the wrist at most, it set in motion a series of changes that will ensure that such events do not occur in the future.

These are but two of the more recent and easily accessible examples of what the HRC has been able to do in the past. Both of these incidents show an effective use of this commission that can both investigate and use community resources to resolve disputes that do not have to go into the legal system as law suits and litigation.

The council now wishes to turn this commission primarily into a listening, intake and referral commission. My experience is that few will come before such a commission. In the past many came before the commission because it was the only body that would listen to their complaints where they believe they were getting a fair hearing. The council wishes for the most part to take this vetting which is often healthy and cathartic out of the public process.

In the end, the council is weakening an historic document to fix a small and limited problem that arose in 2005-06 when the dispute over the proper way in which to deal with a given set of complaints erupted more broadly than it should have. Instead of finding ways to resolve the situation, the council opted for the hatchet approach first purging the HRC, then rewriting its rules, and now changing a landmark civil rights document. This is compounding the problem that began with the inability of either the police chief or the council to recognize the existence of problems and complaints within the community. These actions may quell the public complaints at this time, but they also put a lid on problems rather than solve them, at some point they will erupt again, boiling to the surface. This current council will probably not be in power when they do and they will not have to deal with the mess that they have created.

Unfortunately this is a done deal, fait accompli. And it is a shame that Davis will once again take a dramatic step backwards in their protections against civil rights abuses.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

Share:

About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

Related posts

116 thoughts on “Commentary: Council and Staff Try To Justify Weakening of Historic Civil Rights Ordinance”

  1. davisite

    The national political narrative for 2008 is that WE need to return to the values that make us proud to be Americans. This is no less true for Davis and its 2008 Council election.

  2. davisite

    The national political narrative for 2008 is that WE need to return to the values that make us proud to be Americans. This is no less true for Davis and its 2008 Council election.

  3. davisite

    The national political narrative for 2008 is that WE need to return to the values that make us proud to be Americans. This is no less true for Davis and its 2008 Council election.

  4. davisite

    The national political narrative for 2008 is that WE need to return to the values that make us proud to be Americans. This is no less true for Davis and its 2008 Council election.

  5. Jen

    This is a disgrace! I am extremely disappointed in Asmundson and Souza for making such a suggestion.

    It is definitely time for a change on council.

  6. Jen

    This is a disgrace! I am extremely disappointed in Asmundson and Souza for making such a suggestion.

    It is definitely time for a change on council.

  7. Jen

    This is a disgrace! I am extremely disappointed in Asmundson and Souza for making such a suggestion.

    It is definitely time for a change on council.

  8. Jen

    This is a disgrace! I am extremely disappointed in Asmundson and Souza for making such a suggestion.

    It is definitely time for a change on council.

  9. Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald

    It’s unfortunate that the current HRC does not have any historical knowledge of the fact that the HRC helped bring about the City of Davis Mediation Services.

    When I read that a current commissioner said that they don’t feel comfortable in the role of mediation I wondered if they had read the mission of the Commission and the history.

  10. Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald

    It’s unfortunate that the current HRC does not have any historical knowledge of the fact that the HRC helped bring about the City of Davis Mediation Services.

    When I read that a current commissioner said that they don’t feel comfortable in the role of mediation I wondered if they had read the mission of the Commission and the history.

  11. Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald

    It’s unfortunate that the current HRC does not have any historical knowledge of the fact that the HRC helped bring about the City of Davis Mediation Services.

    When I read that a current commissioner said that they don’t feel comfortable in the role of mediation I wondered if they had read the mission of the Commission and the history.

  12. Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald

    It’s unfortunate that the current HRC does not have any historical knowledge of the fact that the HRC helped bring about the City of Davis Mediation Services.

    When I read that a current commissioner said that they don’t feel comfortable in the role of mediation I wondered if they had read the mission of the Commission and the history.

  13. Anonymous

    The real shame is that the last board had such bad leadership that the commission had to be torn apart. If someone with more grace and sense than mrs. greenwald had been in charge, the new board would not have had to take over.

  14. Anonymous

    The real shame is that the last board had such bad leadership that the commission had to be torn apart. If someone with more grace and sense than mrs. greenwald had been in charge, the new board would not have had to take over.

  15. Anonymous

    The real shame is that the last board had such bad leadership that the commission had to be torn apart. If someone with more grace and sense than mrs. greenwald had been in charge, the new board would not have had to take over.

  16. Anonymous

    The real shame is that the last board had such bad leadership that the commission had to be torn apart. If someone with more grace and sense than mrs. greenwald had been in charge, the new board would not have had to take over.

  17. darnell

    Anonymous 11:51AM

    What a cheap shot that was Anonymous 11:51AM. Really brave of you too!

    I don’t agree with everything the commission did but I know Cecilia worked harder than anyone doing what she thought would bring equality to all the people of Davis

  18. darnell

    Anonymous 11:51AM

    What a cheap shot that was Anonymous 11:51AM. Really brave of you too!

    I don’t agree with everything the commission did but I know Cecilia worked harder than anyone doing what she thought would bring equality to all the people of Davis

  19. darnell

    Anonymous 11:51AM

    What a cheap shot that was Anonymous 11:51AM. Really brave of you too!

    I don’t agree with everything the commission did but I know Cecilia worked harder than anyone doing what she thought would bring equality to all the people of Davis

  20. darnell

    Anonymous 11:51AM

    What a cheap shot that was Anonymous 11:51AM. Really brave of you too!

    I don’t agree with everything the commission did but I know Cecilia worked harder than anyone doing what she thought would bring equality to all the people of Davis

  21. Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald

    Anyone that was paying attention and logs on as “anonymous” knows that the last HRC board – – whether you agreed with us or not — was disbanded because there was a recommendation that the council did not like.

    If making recommendations that elected bodies do not like, is reason for being thrown off of a commission, then throw democracy to the wind. Discourse and dialogue are what makes our City of Davis unique. It is not cause for shutting down discussion.

    Let’s stick to the issue being discussed today and not try to sidetrack with petty personal attacks.

    The City of Davis was a leader in bringing about changes in civil rights and now the counicl majority is making changes that will take us back.

    This, is something that should concern the citizens of Davis and others who are concerned about civil rights as a whole.

    If you are not concerned then you are not paying attention.

  22. Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald

    Anyone that was paying attention and logs on as “anonymous” knows that the last HRC board – – whether you agreed with us or not — was disbanded because there was a recommendation that the council did not like.

    If making recommendations that elected bodies do not like, is reason for being thrown off of a commission, then throw democracy to the wind. Discourse and dialogue are what makes our City of Davis unique. It is not cause for shutting down discussion.

    Let’s stick to the issue being discussed today and not try to sidetrack with petty personal attacks.

    The City of Davis was a leader in bringing about changes in civil rights and now the counicl majority is making changes that will take us back.

    This, is something that should concern the citizens of Davis and others who are concerned about civil rights as a whole.

    If you are not concerned then you are not paying attention.

  23. Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald

    Anyone that was paying attention and logs on as “anonymous” knows that the last HRC board – – whether you agreed with us or not — was disbanded because there was a recommendation that the council did not like.

    If making recommendations that elected bodies do not like, is reason for being thrown off of a commission, then throw democracy to the wind. Discourse and dialogue are what makes our City of Davis unique. It is not cause for shutting down discussion.

    Let’s stick to the issue being discussed today and not try to sidetrack with petty personal attacks.

    The City of Davis was a leader in bringing about changes in civil rights and now the counicl majority is making changes that will take us back.

    This, is something that should concern the citizens of Davis and others who are concerned about civil rights as a whole.

    If you are not concerned then you are not paying attention.

  24. Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald

    Anyone that was paying attention and logs on as “anonymous” knows that the last HRC board – – whether you agreed with us or not — was disbanded because there was a recommendation that the council did not like.

    If making recommendations that elected bodies do not like, is reason for being thrown off of a commission, then throw democracy to the wind. Discourse and dialogue are what makes our City of Davis unique. It is not cause for shutting down discussion.

    Let’s stick to the issue being discussed today and not try to sidetrack with petty personal attacks.

    The City of Davis was a leader in bringing about changes in civil rights and now the counicl majority is making changes that will take us back.

    This, is something that should concern the citizens of Davis and others who are concerned about civil rights as a whole.

    If you are not concerned then you are not paying attention.

  25. Anonymous

    Burt said…

    Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald said…

    The City of Davis was a leader in bringing about changes in civil rights

    The previous anonymous, was a cheap shot at Cecilia, but as a person who has lived in Davis, Woodland, Winters & Dixon over the space of 35 years I can say for sure that the City of Davis has never been thought of as a leader in bringing about changes in civil rights.

  26. Anonymous

    Burt said…

    Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald said…

    The City of Davis was a leader in bringing about changes in civil rights

    The previous anonymous, was a cheap shot at Cecilia, but as a person who has lived in Davis, Woodland, Winters & Dixon over the space of 35 years I can say for sure that the City of Davis has never been thought of as a leader in bringing about changes in civil rights.

  27. Anonymous

    Burt said…

    Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald said…

    The City of Davis was a leader in bringing about changes in civil rights

    The previous anonymous, was a cheap shot at Cecilia, but as a person who has lived in Davis, Woodland, Winters & Dixon over the space of 35 years I can say for sure that the City of Davis has never been thought of as a leader in bringing about changes in civil rights.

  28. Anonymous

    Burt said…

    Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald said…

    The City of Davis was a leader in bringing about changes in civil rights

    The previous anonymous, was a cheap shot at Cecilia, but as a person who has lived in Davis, Woodland, Winters & Dixon over the space of 35 years I can say for sure that the City of Davis has never been thought of as a leader in bringing about changes in civil rights.

  29. brian in davis

    Curious, can one of our esteemed attorneys here clarify whether the ordinance was a “Civil Right” or is it more appropriately titled a “Civil Protection”? This is an honest question. I thought “Civil Rights” only applied to federal legislation(?).

    Clarification, please. If there is a legal distinction, then correct terminology should probably be used.

    Also curious: how many other cities have the equivalent of the HRC?

  30. brian in davis

    Curious, can one of our esteemed attorneys here clarify whether the ordinance was a “Civil Right” or is it more appropriately titled a “Civil Protection”? This is an honest question. I thought “Civil Rights” only applied to federal legislation(?).

    Clarification, please. If there is a legal distinction, then correct terminology should probably be used.

    Also curious: how many other cities have the equivalent of the HRC?

  31. brian in davis

    Curious, can one of our esteemed attorneys here clarify whether the ordinance was a “Civil Right” or is it more appropriately titled a “Civil Protection”? This is an honest question. I thought “Civil Rights” only applied to federal legislation(?).

    Clarification, please. If there is a legal distinction, then correct terminology should probably be used.

    Also curious: how many other cities have the equivalent of the HRC?

  32. brian in davis

    Curious, can one of our esteemed attorneys here clarify whether the ordinance was a “Civil Right” or is it more appropriately titled a “Civil Protection”? This is an honest question. I thought “Civil Rights” only applied to federal legislation(?).

    Clarification, please. If there is a legal distinction, then correct terminology should probably be used.

    Also curious: how many other cities have the equivalent of the HRC?

  33. sharla

    I don’t see that the new board took over anything. They meet and discuss nothing that matters to anyone else but themselves personally. Sympathy or empathy or statements of condemnation does little to help people in crisis in our community. Then, rather than working to fix what they recognize as improper limitations imposed on them by the current council, they sit around and blame past commissioners for their lack of response to community difficulties. Why aren’t they fighting this?

    While I agree that past commission members could have used some training in mediation or direction from the Council, changing the ordinance is a huge deal. Now that the DPD and the school district have avenues for resolution in place, the commission can use these tools as part of their strategy to more effectively address problems in the community. The tools don’t replace the commission.

  34. sharla

    I don’t see that the new board took over anything. They meet and discuss nothing that matters to anyone else but themselves personally. Sympathy or empathy or statements of condemnation does little to help people in crisis in our community. Then, rather than working to fix what they recognize as improper limitations imposed on them by the current council, they sit around and blame past commissioners for their lack of response to community difficulties. Why aren’t they fighting this?

    While I agree that past commission members could have used some training in mediation or direction from the Council, changing the ordinance is a huge deal. Now that the DPD and the school district have avenues for resolution in place, the commission can use these tools as part of their strategy to more effectively address problems in the community. The tools don’t replace the commission.

  35. sharla

    I don’t see that the new board took over anything. They meet and discuss nothing that matters to anyone else but themselves personally. Sympathy or empathy or statements of condemnation does little to help people in crisis in our community. Then, rather than working to fix what they recognize as improper limitations imposed on them by the current council, they sit around and blame past commissioners for their lack of response to community difficulties. Why aren’t they fighting this?

    While I agree that past commission members could have used some training in mediation or direction from the Council, changing the ordinance is a huge deal. Now that the DPD and the school district have avenues for resolution in place, the commission can use these tools as part of their strategy to more effectively address problems in the community. The tools don’t replace the commission.

  36. sharla

    I don’t see that the new board took over anything. They meet and discuss nothing that matters to anyone else but themselves personally. Sympathy or empathy or statements of condemnation does little to help people in crisis in our community. Then, rather than working to fix what they recognize as improper limitations imposed on them by the current council, they sit around and blame past commissioners for their lack of response to community difficulties. Why aren’t they fighting this?

    While I agree that past commission members could have used some training in mediation or direction from the Council, changing the ordinance is a huge deal. Now that the DPD and the school district have avenues for resolution in place, the commission can use these tools as part of their strategy to more effectively address problems in the community. The tools don’t replace the commission.

  37. Doug Paul Davis

    Brian:

    The official title of it was the Anti-Discrimination Ordinance.

    There is a group called: California Association of Human Relations Organizations. They used to have a website but it seems defunct now.

    I recall the number of Human Relations Commissions in California as being well over 50, but I no longer have access to their count.

  38. Doug Paul Davis

    Brian:

    The official title of it was the Anti-Discrimination Ordinance.

    There is a group called: California Association of Human Relations Organizations. They used to have a website but it seems defunct now.

    I recall the number of Human Relations Commissions in California as being well over 50, but I no longer have access to their count.

  39. Doug Paul Davis

    Brian:

    The official title of it was the Anti-Discrimination Ordinance.

    There is a group called: California Association of Human Relations Organizations. They used to have a website but it seems defunct now.

    I recall the number of Human Relations Commissions in California as being well over 50, but I no longer have access to their count.

  40. Doug Paul Davis

    Brian:

    The official title of it was the Anti-Discrimination Ordinance.

    There is a group called: California Association of Human Relations Organizations. They used to have a website but it seems defunct now.

    I recall the number of Human Relations Commissions in California as being well over 50, but I no longer have access to their count.

  41. sharla

    I just want to add one thing – without the efforts of Cecilia and others on the commission under Cecilia’s leadership, we wouldn’t have the current ombudsman/climate committee functions at the city/school district. She was entirely effective at improving things in the city. It has to be admitted that this is true.

  42. sharla

    I just want to add one thing – without the efforts of Cecilia and others on the commission under Cecilia’s leadership, we wouldn’t have the current ombudsman/climate committee functions at the city/school district. She was entirely effective at improving things in the city. It has to be admitted that this is true.

  43. sharla

    I just want to add one thing – without the efforts of Cecilia and others on the commission under Cecilia’s leadership, we wouldn’t have the current ombudsman/climate committee functions at the city/school district. She was entirely effective at improving things in the city. It has to be admitted that this is true.

  44. sharla

    I just want to add one thing – without the efforts of Cecilia and others on the commission under Cecilia’s leadership, we wouldn’t have the current ombudsman/climate committee functions at the city/school district. She was entirely effective at improving things in the city. It has to be admitted that this is true.

  45. Doug Paul Davis

    I did find a listing of cities and counties in California with HRCs:

    Cities with HRCs:

    1. Alameda
    2. Antelope Valley
    3. Berkeley
    4. Beverly Hills
    5. Burbank
    6. Carson
    7. Chula Vista
    8. Claremont
    9. Colton
    10. Compton
    11. Concord
    12. Costa Messa
    13. Culver City
    14. Davis
    15. El Cerrito
    16. Fremont
    17. Fresno
    18. Gardena
    19. Glendale
    20. Hayward
    21. Hearland
    22. Hemet
    23. Huntington Beach
    24. Inglewood
    25. Livermore
    26. Long Beach
    27. Los Angeles
    28. Modesto
    29. Monterrey Park
    30. Oakland
    31. Oxnard
    32. Palm Springs
    33. Palo Alto
    34. Pasadena
    35. Pinole
    36. Pittsburg
    37. Pleasanton
    38. Pomona
    39. Pomona Valley
    40. Rialto
    41. Richmond
    42. Riverside
    43. San Bernadino
    44. San Clemente
    45. San Diego
    46. San Fernando
    47. San Jose
    48. San Leandro
    49. San Luis Obispo
    50. Santa Ana
    51. Santa Clarita
    52. Seaside
    53. Torrance
    54. Union City
    55. Vallejo
    56. West Hollywood

    Counties:

    57. Alameda
    58. Contra Costa
    59. El Dorado
    60. Humboldt
    61. Kern
    62. Los Angeles
    63. Marin
    64. Mendocino
    65. Orange
    66. Sacramento–City and County
    67. San Francisco
    68. Santa Clara
    69. Sonoma
    70. San Barbara

  46. Doug Paul Davis

    I did find a listing of cities and counties in California with HRCs:

    Cities with HRCs:

    1. Alameda
    2. Antelope Valley
    3. Berkeley
    4. Beverly Hills
    5. Burbank
    6. Carson
    7. Chula Vista
    8. Claremont
    9. Colton
    10. Compton
    11. Concord
    12. Costa Messa
    13. Culver City
    14. Davis
    15. El Cerrito
    16. Fremont
    17. Fresno
    18. Gardena
    19. Glendale
    20. Hayward
    21. Hearland
    22. Hemet
    23. Huntington Beach
    24. Inglewood
    25. Livermore
    26. Long Beach
    27. Los Angeles
    28. Modesto
    29. Monterrey Park
    30. Oakland
    31. Oxnard
    32. Palm Springs
    33. Palo Alto
    34. Pasadena
    35. Pinole
    36. Pittsburg
    37. Pleasanton
    38. Pomona
    39. Pomona Valley
    40. Rialto
    41. Richmond
    42. Riverside
    43. San Bernadino
    44. San Clemente
    45. San Diego
    46. San Fernando
    47. San Jose
    48. San Leandro
    49. San Luis Obispo
    50. Santa Ana
    51. Santa Clarita
    52. Seaside
    53. Torrance
    54. Union City
    55. Vallejo
    56. West Hollywood

    Counties:

    57. Alameda
    58. Contra Costa
    59. El Dorado
    60. Humboldt
    61. Kern
    62. Los Angeles
    63. Marin
    64. Mendocino
    65. Orange
    66. Sacramento–City and County
    67. San Francisco
    68. Santa Clara
    69. Sonoma
    70. San Barbara

  47. Doug Paul Davis

    I did find a listing of cities and counties in California with HRCs:

    Cities with HRCs:

    1. Alameda
    2. Antelope Valley
    3. Berkeley
    4. Beverly Hills
    5. Burbank
    6. Carson
    7. Chula Vista
    8. Claremont
    9. Colton
    10. Compton
    11. Concord
    12. Costa Messa
    13. Culver City
    14. Davis
    15. El Cerrito
    16. Fremont
    17. Fresno
    18. Gardena
    19. Glendale
    20. Hayward
    21. Hearland
    22. Hemet
    23. Huntington Beach
    24. Inglewood
    25. Livermore
    26. Long Beach
    27. Los Angeles
    28. Modesto
    29. Monterrey Park
    30. Oakland
    31. Oxnard
    32. Palm Springs
    33. Palo Alto
    34. Pasadena
    35. Pinole
    36. Pittsburg
    37. Pleasanton
    38. Pomona
    39. Pomona Valley
    40. Rialto
    41. Richmond
    42. Riverside
    43. San Bernadino
    44. San Clemente
    45. San Diego
    46. San Fernando
    47. San Jose
    48. San Leandro
    49. San Luis Obispo
    50. Santa Ana
    51. Santa Clarita
    52. Seaside
    53. Torrance
    54. Union City
    55. Vallejo
    56. West Hollywood

    Counties:

    57. Alameda
    58. Contra Costa
    59. El Dorado
    60. Humboldt
    61. Kern
    62. Los Angeles
    63. Marin
    64. Mendocino
    65. Orange
    66. Sacramento–City and County
    67. San Francisco
    68. Santa Clara
    69. Sonoma
    70. San Barbara

  48. Doug Paul Davis

    I did find a listing of cities and counties in California with HRCs:

    Cities with HRCs:

    1. Alameda
    2. Antelope Valley
    3. Berkeley
    4. Beverly Hills
    5. Burbank
    6. Carson
    7. Chula Vista
    8. Claremont
    9. Colton
    10. Compton
    11. Concord
    12. Costa Messa
    13. Culver City
    14. Davis
    15. El Cerrito
    16. Fremont
    17. Fresno
    18. Gardena
    19. Glendale
    20. Hayward
    21. Hearland
    22. Hemet
    23. Huntington Beach
    24. Inglewood
    25. Livermore
    26. Long Beach
    27. Los Angeles
    28. Modesto
    29. Monterrey Park
    30. Oakland
    31. Oxnard
    32. Palm Springs
    33. Palo Alto
    34. Pasadena
    35. Pinole
    36. Pittsburg
    37. Pleasanton
    38. Pomona
    39. Pomona Valley
    40. Rialto
    41. Richmond
    42. Riverside
    43. San Bernadino
    44. San Clemente
    45. San Diego
    46. San Fernando
    47. San Jose
    48. San Leandro
    49. San Luis Obispo
    50. Santa Ana
    51. Santa Clarita
    52. Seaside
    53. Torrance
    54. Union City
    55. Vallejo
    56. West Hollywood

    Counties:

    57. Alameda
    58. Contra Costa
    59. El Dorado
    60. Humboldt
    61. Kern
    62. Los Angeles
    63. Marin
    64. Mendocino
    65. Orange
    66. Sacramento–City and County
    67. San Francisco
    68. Santa Clara
    69. Sonoma
    70. San Barbara

  49. Anonymous

    Steve and Ruth and whoever the third vote is will be judged not by the color of their skin but by the content of their characters.

    The characters
    Steve as Bull Conner
    Ruth as Lester Maddox
    Don as Richard Nixon

  50. Anonymous

    Steve and Ruth and whoever the third vote is will be judged not by the color of their skin but by the content of their characters.

    The characters
    Steve as Bull Conner
    Ruth as Lester Maddox
    Don as Richard Nixon

  51. Anonymous

    Steve and Ruth and whoever the third vote is will be judged not by the color of their skin but by the content of their characters.

    The characters
    Steve as Bull Conner
    Ruth as Lester Maddox
    Don as Richard Nixon

  52. Anonymous

    Steve and Ruth and whoever the third vote is will be judged not by the color of their skin but by the content of their characters.

    The characters
    Steve as Bull Conner
    Ruth as Lester Maddox
    Don as Richard Nixon

  53. Anonymous

    I was concerned about some of the work of the old HRC. Rather than discussing old events in Davis, let’s consider how the HRC would have handled the Duke rape allegations.

    Assume all of the same circumstances and assume the local DA would have made all of the same “mistakes”. I am quite certain that the Duke case would have gone down the same wrong paths in Yolo County as it did in Durham. Given all of that, what would the Davis HRC have done? If the Davis HRC had stepped back and considered the possibility of lies coming from the “victim” and allowed for Due Process then I have no issue. If on the other hand, the HRC would have been leading the voices for conviction – organizing marches, protesting at the Farmer’s Market etc then the HRC would have been out of line.

    HRC’s can do a lot of good, but the job of convicting people should remain in the court system where they base decisions on all of the information. When HRC’s get involved in such activity they tend to come to conclusions based on one side of the story.

    Another thing I noticed was that both the DA’s office and the Davis Police used the HRC to promote their own side of cases. That was a conflict of interest that should have been prevented. SAH

  54. Anonymous

    I was concerned about some of the work of the old HRC. Rather than discussing old events in Davis, let’s consider how the HRC would have handled the Duke rape allegations.

    Assume all of the same circumstances and assume the local DA would have made all of the same “mistakes”. I am quite certain that the Duke case would have gone down the same wrong paths in Yolo County as it did in Durham. Given all of that, what would the Davis HRC have done? If the Davis HRC had stepped back and considered the possibility of lies coming from the “victim” and allowed for Due Process then I have no issue. If on the other hand, the HRC would have been leading the voices for conviction – organizing marches, protesting at the Farmer’s Market etc then the HRC would have been out of line.

    HRC’s can do a lot of good, but the job of convicting people should remain in the court system where they base decisions on all of the information. When HRC’s get involved in such activity they tend to come to conclusions based on one side of the story.

    Another thing I noticed was that both the DA’s office and the Davis Police used the HRC to promote their own side of cases. That was a conflict of interest that should have been prevented. SAH

  55. Anonymous

    I was concerned about some of the work of the old HRC. Rather than discussing old events in Davis, let’s consider how the HRC would have handled the Duke rape allegations.

    Assume all of the same circumstances and assume the local DA would have made all of the same “mistakes”. I am quite certain that the Duke case would have gone down the same wrong paths in Yolo County as it did in Durham. Given all of that, what would the Davis HRC have done? If the Davis HRC had stepped back and considered the possibility of lies coming from the “victim” and allowed for Due Process then I have no issue. If on the other hand, the HRC would have been leading the voices for conviction – organizing marches, protesting at the Farmer’s Market etc then the HRC would have been out of line.

    HRC’s can do a lot of good, but the job of convicting people should remain in the court system where they base decisions on all of the information. When HRC’s get involved in such activity they tend to come to conclusions based on one side of the story.

    Another thing I noticed was that both the DA’s office and the Davis Police used the HRC to promote their own side of cases. That was a conflict of interest that should have been prevented. SAH

  56. Anonymous

    I was concerned about some of the work of the old HRC. Rather than discussing old events in Davis, let’s consider how the HRC would have handled the Duke rape allegations.

    Assume all of the same circumstances and assume the local DA would have made all of the same “mistakes”. I am quite certain that the Duke case would have gone down the same wrong paths in Yolo County as it did in Durham. Given all of that, what would the Davis HRC have done? If the Davis HRC had stepped back and considered the possibility of lies coming from the “victim” and allowed for Due Process then I have no issue. If on the other hand, the HRC would have been leading the voices for conviction – organizing marches, protesting at the Farmer’s Market etc then the HRC would have been out of line.

    HRC’s can do a lot of good, but the job of convicting people should remain in the court system where they base decisions on all of the information. When HRC’s get involved in such activity they tend to come to conclusions based on one side of the story.

    Another thing I noticed was that both the DA’s office and the Davis Police used the HRC to promote their own side of cases. That was a conflict of interest that should have been prevented. SAH

  57. Anonymous

    Burt said…

    Anonymous said…
    Let’s consider how the HRC would have handled the Duke Rape allegations.
    5:03 PM

    1. The Duke students would have been advised by their lawyer not to make public comments in front of the HRC.

    2. The Findings of the HRC can not be used in court, but the public comments on the record before the HRC of the students might be

    3. The HRC could not compel the students to testify before them.

  58. Anonymous

    Burt said…

    Anonymous said…
    Let’s consider how the HRC would have handled the Duke Rape allegations.
    5:03 PM

    1. The Duke students would have been advised by their lawyer not to make public comments in front of the HRC.

    2. The Findings of the HRC can not be used in court, but the public comments on the record before the HRC of the students might be

    3. The HRC could not compel the students to testify before them.

  59. Anonymous

    Burt said…

    Anonymous said…
    Let’s consider how the HRC would have handled the Duke Rape allegations.
    5:03 PM

    1. The Duke students would have been advised by their lawyer not to make public comments in front of the HRC.

    2. The Findings of the HRC can not be used in court, but the public comments on the record before the HRC of the students might be

    3. The HRC could not compel the students to testify before them.

  60. Anonymous

    Burt said…

    Anonymous said…
    Let’s consider how the HRC would have handled the Duke Rape allegations.
    5:03 PM

    1. The Duke students would have been advised by their lawyer not to make public comments in front of the HRC.

    2. The Findings of the HRC can not be used in court, but the public comments on the record before the HRC of the students might be

    3. The HRC could not compel the students to testify before them.

  61. Rich Rifkin

    “the best roles for the current Human Relations Commission include listening, information intake and referral”

    Agreed.

    “As a public body, the commission is limited to what it can discuss in open session. It is also limited in information it can seek regarding personnel issues, information about police officers, and information it can require other jurisdictions to share. This makes it difficult for the commission to appropriately, thoroughly and fairly mediate/adjudicate individual cases.”

    Agreed.

    “The forum, organized by the Davis Human Relations Commission and held Monday at the Veterans’ Memorial Center, produced a long list of possible solutions and nearly five hours of testimony and discussion.”

    A private group — call it the Davis Humanity Commission — could easily perform the mediation functions you think the HRC should be doing. I still don’t understand why people in town who share your perpective on these questions have not, since the old HRC was disbanded, organized such a group. (If they have, I haven’t heard of it, yet.)

    “it is a shame that Davis will once again take a dramatic step backwards in their protections against civil rights abuses.”

    Despite your lengthy essay, it is unclear that the old HRC ever “protected” anyone from civil rights abuses.

    If many people feel uncomfortable talking with the current HRC, then a private DHC could hear them out, plan forums, try to mediate disputes, expose allegedly poor prosecutorial practices (as in the case of the eggs on the gay guy’s car), or even police abuses, etc.

    Moreover, the DHC could control the selection of its membership.

  62. Rich Rifkin

    “the best roles for the current Human Relations Commission include listening, information intake and referral”

    Agreed.

    “As a public body, the commission is limited to what it can discuss in open session. It is also limited in information it can seek regarding personnel issues, information about police officers, and information it can require other jurisdictions to share. This makes it difficult for the commission to appropriately, thoroughly and fairly mediate/adjudicate individual cases.”

    Agreed.

    “The forum, organized by the Davis Human Relations Commission and held Monday at the Veterans’ Memorial Center, produced a long list of possible solutions and nearly five hours of testimony and discussion.”

    A private group — call it the Davis Humanity Commission — could easily perform the mediation functions you think the HRC should be doing. I still don’t understand why people in town who share your perpective on these questions have not, since the old HRC was disbanded, organized such a group. (If they have, I haven’t heard of it, yet.)

    “it is a shame that Davis will once again take a dramatic step backwards in their protections against civil rights abuses.”

    Despite your lengthy essay, it is unclear that the old HRC ever “protected” anyone from civil rights abuses.

    If many people feel uncomfortable talking with the current HRC, then a private DHC could hear them out, plan forums, try to mediate disputes, expose allegedly poor prosecutorial practices (as in the case of the eggs on the gay guy’s car), or even police abuses, etc.

    Moreover, the DHC could control the selection of its membership.

  63. Rich Rifkin

    “the best roles for the current Human Relations Commission include listening, information intake and referral”

    Agreed.

    “As a public body, the commission is limited to what it can discuss in open session. It is also limited in information it can seek regarding personnel issues, information about police officers, and information it can require other jurisdictions to share. This makes it difficult for the commission to appropriately, thoroughly and fairly mediate/adjudicate individual cases.”

    Agreed.

    “The forum, organized by the Davis Human Relations Commission and held Monday at the Veterans’ Memorial Center, produced a long list of possible solutions and nearly five hours of testimony and discussion.”

    A private group — call it the Davis Humanity Commission — could easily perform the mediation functions you think the HRC should be doing. I still don’t understand why people in town who share your perpective on these questions have not, since the old HRC was disbanded, organized such a group. (If they have, I haven’t heard of it, yet.)

    “it is a shame that Davis will once again take a dramatic step backwards in their protections against civil rights abuses.”

    Despite your lengthy essay, it is unclear that the old HRC ever “protected” anyone from civil rights abuses.

    If many people feel uncomfortable talking with the current HRC, then a private DHC could hear them out, plan forums, try to mediate disputes, expose allegedly poor prosecutorial practices (as in the case of the eggs on the gay guy’s car), or even police abuses, etc.

    Moreover, the DHC could control the selection of its membership.

  64. Rich Rifkin

    “the best roles for the current Human Relations Commission include listening, information intake and referral”

    Agreed.

    “As a public body, the commission is limited to what it can discuss in open session. It is also limited in information it can seek regarding personnel issues, information about police officers, and information it can require other jurisdictions to share. This makes it difficult for the commission to appropriately, thoroughly and fairly mediate/adjudicate individual cases.”

    Agreed.

    “The forum, organized by the Davis Human Relations Commission and held Monday at the Veterans’ Memorial Center, produced a long list of possible solutions and nearly five hours of testimony and discussion.”

    A private group — call it the Davis Humanity Commission — could easily perform the mediation functions you think the HRC should be doing. I still don’t understand why people in town who share your perpective on these questions have not, since the old HRC was disbanded, organized such a group. (If they have, I haven’t heard of it, yet.)

    “it is a shame that Davis will once again take a dramatic step backwards in their protections against civil rights abuses.”

    Despite your lengthy essay, it is unclear that the old HRC ever “protected” anyone from civil rights abuses.

    If many people feel uncomfortable talking with the current HRC, then a private DHC could hear them out, plan forums, try to mediate disputes, expose allegedly poor prosecutorial practices (as in the case of the eggs on the gay guy’s car), or even police abuses, etc.

    Moreover, the DHC could control the selection of its membership.

  65. Anonymous

    “Despite your lengthy essay, it is unclear that the old HRC ever “protected” anyone from civil rights abuses.”

    It seems pretty clear to us that were on the receiving end of the help. But of course you wouldn’t know anything about that.

  66. Anonymous

    “Despite your lengthy essay, it is unclear that the old HRC ever “protected” anyone from civil rights abuses.”

    It seems pretty clear to us that were on the receiving end of the help. But of course you wouldn’t know anything about that.

  67. Anonymous

    “Despite your lengthy essay, it is unclear that the old HRC ever “protected” anyone from civil rights abuses.”

    It seems pretty clear to us that were on the receiving end of the help. But of course you wouldn’t know anything about that.

  68. Anonymous

    “Despite your lengthy essay, it is unclear that the old HRC ever “protected” anyone from civil rights abuses.”

    It seems pretty clear to us that were on the receiving end of the help. But of course you wouldn’t know anything about that.

  69. Anonymous

    Why was the old HRC–upon which Ms. Greenwald apparently served,
    just judging from what I read in
    these comments, being new to Davis–disbanded?
    It would seem that there is a need for one, with some teeth, is needed in this People’s Republic for sure.
    Am sure if ever a Filipino got harassed by a Davis cop Ms. Asmundsen would be all over started an HRC with teeth. That’s the trouble with institutional discriminatory practices, it’s never opposed if it affects somebody else.

  70. Anonymous

    Why was the old HRC–upon which Ms. Greenwald apparently served,
    just judging from what I read in
    these comments, being new to Davis–disbanded?
    It would seem that there is a need for one, with some teeth, is needed in this People’s Republic for sure.
    Am sure if ever a Filipino got harassed by a Davis cop Ms. Asmundsen would be all over started an HRC with teeth. That’s the trouble with institutional discriminatory practices, it’s never opposed if it affects somebody else.

  71. Anonymous

    Why was the old HRC–upon which Ms. Greenwald apparently served,
    just judging from what I read in
    these comments, being new to Davis–disbanded?
    It would seem that there is a need for one, with some teeth, is needed in this People’s Republic for sure.
    Am sure if ever a Filipino got harassed by a Davis cop Ms. Asmundsen would be all over started an HRC with teeth. That’s the trouble with institutional discriminatory practices, it’s never opposed if it affects somebody else.

  72. Anonymous

    Why was the old HRC–upon which Ms. Greenwald apparently served,
    just judging from what I read in
    these comments, being new to Davis–disbanded?
    It would seem that there is a need for one, with some teeth, is needed in this People’s Republic for sure.
    Am sure if ever a Filipino got harassed by a Davis cop Ms. Asmundsen would be all over started an HRC with teeth. That’s the trouble with institutional discriminatory practices, it’s never opposed if it affects somebody else.

  73. 無名 - wu ming

    it’s a shame that something that wasn’t broken is being further weakened. i fail to see how this improves much of anything in this city,. it’s not like getting rid of the venues for airing grievances makes those greivances go away.

    sweep it under the rug, davis.

  74. 無名 - wu ming

    it’s a shame that something that wasn’t broken is being further weakened. i fail to see how this improves much of anything in this city,. it’s not like getting rid of the venues for airing grievances makes those greivances go away.

    sweep it under the rug, davis.

  75. 無名 - wu ming

    it’s a shame that something that wasn’t broken is being further weakened. i fail to see how this improves much of anything in this city,. it’s not like getting rid of the venues for airing grievances makes those greivances go away.

    sweep it under the rug, davis.

  76. 無名 - wu ming

    it’s a shame that something that wasn’t broken is being further weakened. i fail to see how this improves much of anything in this city,. it’s not like getting rid of the venues for airing grievances makes those greivances go away.

    sweep it under the rug, davis.

  77. Anonymous

    Anyone who thinks discrimination doesn’t exist should look at Rexroad and Chamberlain’s recent ‘No’ vote on Yolo Pride Day, then Rexroad’s following it up by making fun of the name change from Gay Pride to just Pride.

    You think the Davis City Council is a problem? Look north. Rexroad is a problem that must be dealt with.

  78. Anonymous

    Anyone who thinks discrimination doesn’t exist should look at Rexroad and Chamberlain’s recent ‘No’ vote on Yolo Pride Day, then Rexroad’s following it up by making fun of the name change from Gay Pride to just Pride.

    You think the Davis City Council is a problem? Look north. Rexroad is a problem that must be dealt with.

  79. Anonymous

    Anyone who thinks discrimination doesn’t exist should look at Rexroad and Chamberlain’s recent ‘No’ vote on Yolo Pride Day, then Rexroad’s following it up by making fun of the name change from Gay Pride to just Pride.

    You think the Davis City Council is a problem? Look north. Rexroad is a problem that must be dealt with.

  80. Anonymous

    Anyone who thinks discrimination doesn’t exist should look at Rexroad and Chamberlain’s recent ‘No’ vote on Yolo Pride Day, then Rexroad’s following it up by making fun of the name change from Gay Pride to just Pride.

    You think the Davis City Council is a problem? Look north. Rexroad is a problem that must be dealt with.

  81. Anonymous

    Straightforward in the way Bush is straightforward. No explanation, no deliberation, just ‘this is what I think and nothing will change my mind’.
    Straightforward and uncurious is not the way we need our County governed. Being a bully and making fun of the less fortunate or ‘oops, someone didn’t get the memo’ is not leadership. It is, at best, flippant, and at worst, downright cruel. He embodies everything that is wrong with politics, Republicanism, and individualism.
    He’s vindictive, conniving, and bought his seat with $500k in out-of-county money.
    Straightforward, but wrong and mean, is not a redeeming quality. You want to fight for civil rights, don’t fret over the parsing of the City ordinance. Start watching the charming man up north who has his eyes on bigger offices.
    Watch. Now you can since the County has its meetings on archived video.

  82. Anonymous

    Straightforward in the way Bush is straightforward. No explanation, no deliberation, just ‘this is what I think and nothing will change my mind’.
    Straightforward and uncurious is not the way we need our County governed. Being a bully and making fun of the less fortunate or ‘oops, someone didn’t get the memo’ is not leadership. It is, at best, flippant, and at worst, downright cruel. He embodies everything that is wrong with politics, Republicanism, and individualism.
    He’s vindictive, conniving, and bought his seat with $500k in out-of-county money.
    Straightforward, but wrong and mean, is not a redeeming quality. You want to fight for civil rights, don’t fret over the parsing of the City ordinance. Start watching the charming man up north who has his eyes on bigger offices.
    Watch. Now you can since the County has its meetings on archived video.

  83. Anonymous

    Straightforward in the way Bush is straightforward. No explanation, no deliberation, just ‘this is what I think and nothing will change my mind’.
    Straightforward and uncurious is not the way we need our County governed. Being a bully and making fun of the less fortunate or ‘oops, someone didn’t get the memo’ is not leadership. It is, at best, flippant, and at worst, downright cruel. He embodies everything that is wrong with politics, Republicanism, and individualism.
    He’s vindictive, conniving, and bought his seat with $500k in out-of-county money.
    Straightforward, but wrong and mean, is not a redeeming quality. You want to fight for civil rights, don’t fret over the parsing of the City ordinance. Start watching the charming man up north who has his eyes on bigger offices.
    Watch. Now you can since the County has its meetings on archived video.

  84. Anonymous

    Straightforward in the way Bush is straightforward. No explanation, no deliberation, just ‘this is what I think and nothing will change my mind’.
    Straightforward and uncurious is not the way we need our County governed. Being a bully and making fun of the less fortunate or ‘oops, someone didn’t get the memo’ is not leadership. It is, at best, flippant, and at worst, downright cruel. He embodies everything that is wrong with politics, Republicanism, and individualism.
    He’s vindictive, conniving, and bought his seat with $500k in out-of-county money.
    Straightforward, but wrong and mean, is not a redeeming quality. You want to fight for civil rights, don’t fret over the parsing of the City ordinance. Start watching the charming man up north who has his eyes on bigger offices.
    Watch. Now you can since the County has its meetings on archived video.

  85. Anonymous

    Yeah, totally. Check out Rexroad’s latest post where he likens running the County to a game of poker. He’s upset that someone read his posts on the needle exchange and then, god forbid, rebuts his arguments. No, better to not let people know what he’s thinking so they don’t thwart his ‘desires’. Disgusting, people. His ‘desires’, our lives.

  86. Anonymous

    Yeah, totally. Check out Rexroad’s latest post where he likens running the County to a game of poker. He’s upset that someone read his posts on the needle exchange and then, god forbid, rebuts his arguments. No, better to not let people know what he’s thinking so they don’t thwart his ‘desires’. Disgusting, people. His ‘desires’, our lives.

  87. Anonymous

    Yeah, totally. Check out Rexroad’s latest post where he likens running the County to a game of poker. He’s upset that someone read his posts on the needle exchange and then, god forbid, rebuts his arguments. No, better to not let people know what he’s thinking so they don’t thwart his ‘desires’. Disgusting, people. His ‘desires’, our lives.

  88. Anonymous

    Yeah, totally. Check out Rexroad’s latest post where he likens running the County to a game of poker. He’s upset that someone read his posts on the needle exchange and then, god forbid, rebuts his arguments. No, better to not let people know what he’s thinking so they don’t thwart his ‘desires’. Disgusting, people. His ‘desires’, our lives.

  89. Anonymous

    You could remove the name Rexroad and use the same type of politics and we would be talking about a Davis City Councilman by the name of Don Saylor. Oh, but he claims to be a Democrat. In any other city he would be registered differently – Republican, or ???

  90. Anonymous

    You could remove the name Rexroad and use the same type of politics and we would be talking about a Davis City Councilman by the name of Don Saylor. Oh, but he claims to be a Democrat. In any other city he would be registered differently – Republican, or ???

  91. Anonymous

    You could remove the name Rexroad and use the same type of politics and we would be talking about a Davis City Councilman by the name of Don Saylor. Oh, but he claims to be a Democrat. In any other city he would be registered differently – Republican, or ???

  92. Anonymous

    You could remove the name Rexroad and use the same type of politics and we would be talking about a Davis City Councilman by the name of Don Saylor. Oh, but he claims to be a Democrat. In any other city he would be registered differently – Republican, or ???

  93. Anonymous

    If the DPD are misbehaving, like in the “fender-bender” incident where, if memory serves, a Davis police officer arrested the “perp” in her home and took her to the precinct in her p.j.s, after a questionable, perhaps actionable “offense.” I mean if this is one incident or the tip of the iceberg, then there should be an impartial, beholden to no one except the general public, oversight commission, agency, group, or something besides the police overseeing themselves…

  94. Anonymous

    If the DPD are misbehaving, like in the “fender-bender” incident where, if memory serves, a Davis police officer arrested the “perp” in her home and took her to the precinct in her p.j.s, after a questionable, perhaps actionable “offense.” I mean if this is one incident or the tip of the iceberg, then there should be an impartial, beholden to no one except the general public, oversight commission, agency, group, or something besides the police overseeing themselves…

  95. Anonymous

    If the DPD are misbehaving, like in the “fender-bender” incident where, if memory serves, a Davis police officer arrested the “perp” in her home and took her to the precinct in her p.j.s, after a questionable, perhaps actionable “offense.” I mean if this is one incident or the tip of the iceberg, then there should be an impartial, beholden to no one except the general public, oversight commission, agency, group, or something besides the police overseeing themselves…

  96. Anonymous

    If the DPD are misbehaving, like in the “fender-bender” incident where, if memory serves, a Davis police officer arrested the “perp” in her home and took her to the precinct in her p.j.s, after a questionable, perhaps actionable “offense.” I mean if this is one incident or the tip of the iceberg, then there should be an impartial, beholden to no one except the general public, oversight commission, agency, group, or something besides the police overseeing themselves…

Leave a Reply

X Close

Newsletter Sign-Up

X Close

Monthly Subscriber Sign-Up

Enter the maximum amount you want to pay each month
$ USD
Sign up for