Food Service Worker Protest in Front of Vanderhoef’s Residence Revealing

Last night in front of Chancellor Larry Vanderhoef’s residence, a number of students gathered in support of Sodexho Food Service Worker’s campaign to become university employees with full university wages and benefits. So far, the Chancellor has failed to negotiate in good faith and at a meeting last week refused to allow union representatives to come and speak on behalf of the food service workers. Instead Vanderhoef and Vice Chancellor Dennis Shimek, met with two students and a food service worker–two of whom complained about disrespectful treatment and intimidation tactics.
As far as protests go, this one, planned at the last minute and held during finals week was not huge. Certainly not in comparison with some of the recent protests held on May 1 and May 23, 2007. Nevertheless, the twenty-five or so students who gathered on Tuesday evening in front of Chancellor Larry Vanderhoef’s residence served an important purpose. The Chancellor was holding his annual Luau and had invited many university folks and community leaders–most of whom ignored or were indifferent to the efforts of the protesters to pass out fliers. Some were downright hostile.

More interesting was perhaps the reaction of leaders in this community–some of whom have expressed open support for the food service workers. For instance, Assemblywoman Lois Wolk had sent a letter to the chancellor in March urging him to negotiate with the students in good faith. She was also supposed to be meeting with the Chancellor in hopes of pressuring him to resolve the meeting. Given that, it was surprising to see the Assemblywoman walk right past the protesters, along with her husband Bruce Wolk, and say nary a word.

Davis City Councilmember Don Saylor exchanged pleasantries with me, however, he did not attempt to talk to the students despite his earlier letter of support. Nor did Councilmember Ruth Asmundson. Nor did former Mayor and current Judge Dave Rosenberg. Nor did Congressman Mike Thompson’s representative Eli Faircloth.

There was but one exception to that list–County Supervisor Mariko Yamada. Ms. Yamada walked up to the protesters, offered words of support and hugs, and made the determination that she should not go in, in light of the protest. The students talked her into going inside, however, it was clear from the student’s reaction that her support was very meaningful to them. Nor was the fact that several other leaders in the community had walked right past them without a word lost upon them.

Vice Chancellor Dennis Shimek at one point intentionally and deliberately walked right through the marching picketers–and for really no apparent reason as he walked through some grass in some open space and then returned to the Chancellor’s residence. I caught up to him at the park, and told him that my mother had taught me never to walk through a picket line.

He asked me, “why is that?”

I responded, “it is the ultimate sign of disrespect.”

He said, “they were in the path, I had the right to walk there, so I did.”

He could have easily walked around them. He was attempting to intimidate them and bully them, just as he had up in his office during negotiations. This is a university employee’s disdain for students who were exercising their lawful right to assembly.

Finally, what perhaps disturbed me the most was the treatment of the protesters by the UC Davis police. There were at least six police officers there for a pretty small protest. But that’s understandable given the size of previous protests. What concerned me was that the police were taking pictures of the protesters.

These students were not breaking the law. This hearkened me back to a time before I was born when the FBI would routinely photograph and keep files on protesters for the purpose of intimidation and a whole lot more. These are the tactics used by the university police against their students? What are they going to do with the pictures?

The picture above is an officer taking a picture of me taking a picture of him. Now I don’t know exactly what the officer thought he was going to accomplish by taking of a picture of me. But he can tell his bosses, he got a shot of…

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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188 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    i love how people are quick to generalize what those “socialist and communist” people are and that they share those ideals. Also, how can that be a bad thing? How can believing that another world is possible be a bad thing? and why should we have to “vote” for a mainstream party.

    Get your shit straight!

    Anyways,

    My real comment is that this event is to show everyone that there are plenty of student organizers that will be here next year, so don’t think that this is going to die down over the summer. if anything, it’s the opposite and a time to get ready for FALL!

    =)

  2. Anonymous

    i love how people are quick to generalize what those “socialist and communist” people are and that they share those ideals. Also, how can that be a bad thing? How can believing that another world is possible be a bad thing? and why should we have to “vote” for a mainstream party.

    Get your shit straight!

    Anyways,

    My real comment is that this event is to show everyone that there are plenty of student organizers that will be here next year, so don’t think that this is going to die down over the summer. if anything, it’s the opposite and a time to get ready for FALL!

    =)

  3. Anonymous

    i love how people are quick to generalize what those “socialist and communist” people are and that they share those ideals. Also, how can that be a bad thing? How can believing that another world is possible be a bad thing? and why should we have to “vote” for a mainstream party.

    Get your shit straight!

    Anyways,

    My real comment is that this event is to show everyone that there are plenty of student organizers that will be here next year, so don’t think that this is going to die down over the summer. if anything, it’s the opposite and a time to get ready for FALL!

    =)

  4. Anonymous

    i love how people are quick to generalize what those “socialist and communist” people are and that they share those ideals. Also, how can that be a bad thing? How can believing that another world is possible be a bad thing? and why should we have to “vote” for a mainstream party.

    Get your shit straight!

    Anyways,

    My real comment is that this event is to show everyone that there are plenty of student organizers that will be here next year, so don’t think that this is going to die down over the summer. if anything, it’s the opposite and a time to get ready for FALL!

    =)

  5. Anonymous

    this isn’t a “socialist” or “communist” or whatever party issue, it is an issue of social justice and the lack thereof!!

    quit sidetracking the issue, it has nothing to do with worrying about parties, its about our fight for justice for workers!

  6. Anonymous

    this isn’t a “socialist” or “communist” or whatever party issue, it is an issue of social justice and the lack thereof!!

    quit sidetracking the issue, it has nothing to do with worrying about parties, its about our fight for justice for workers!

  7. Anonymous

    this isn’t a “socialist” or “communist” or whatever party issue, it is an issue of social justice and the lack thereof!!

    quit sidetracking the issue, it has nothing to do with worrying about parties, its about our fight for justice for workers!

  8. Anonymous

    this isn’t a “socialist” or “communist” or whatever party issue, it is an issue of social justice and the lack thereof!!

    quit sidetracking the issue, it has nothing to do with worrying about parties, its about our fight for justice for workers!

  9. Wyatt Weaver

    “Ya know what the funny thing is? Those socialists and communists will probably never even vote for a mainstream party.”

    This is a disturbing comment for a number of reasons.

    1. The Cold War is over, so who cares if they are communists and socialists

    2. The Sodexho workers are undoubtedly neither communists nor socialists

    3. Do we only support people who will vote for us?

    4. Are people who may not be politically in step with us not worth treating with simple dignity and respect?

    5. Anyone who would walk through a picket line is not someone who shares my values

    6. Anyone who would ignore protesters is not someone I will vote for

    IF YOU ARE FROM ONE OF THE CAMPAIGNS/ CANDIDATES/ OFFICE HOLDERS who did that, be aware that you have a lot of explaining to do to do SOME of your constituents who are not going to rubber stamp their ballot simply because you are (A) an incumbent and (B) a democrat (in name only)…

    Wyatt
    –a voter in Davis

  10. Wyatt Weaver

    “Ya know what the funny thing is? Those socialists and communists will probably never even vote for a mainstream party.”

    This is a disturbing comment for a number of reasons.

    1. The Cold War is over, so who cares if they are communists and socialists

    2. The Sodexho workers are undoubtedly neither communists nor socialists

    3. Do we only support people who will vote for us?

    4. Are people who may not be politically in step with us not worth treating with simple dignity and respect?

    5. Anyone who would walk through a picket line is not someone who shares my values

    6. Anyone who would ignore protesters is not someone I will vote for

    IF YOU ARE FROM ONE OF THE CAMPAIGNS/ CANDIDATES/ OFFICE HOLDERS who did that, be aware that you have a lot of explaining to do to do SOME of your constituents who are not going to rubber stamp their ballot simply because you are (A) an incumbent and (B) a democrat (in name only)…

    Wyatt
    –a voter in Davis

  11. Wyatt Weaver

    “Ya know what the funny thing is? Those socialists and communists will probably never even vote for a mainstream party.”

    This is a disturbing comment for a number of reasons.

    1. The Cold War is over, so who cares if they are communists and socialists

    2. The Sodexho workers are undoubtedly neither communists nor socialists

    3. Do we only support people who will vote for us?

    4. Are people who may not be politically in step with us not worth treating with simple dignity and respect?

    5. Anyone who would walk through a picket line is not someone who shares my values

    6. Anyone who would ignore protesters is not someone I will vote for

    IF YOU ARE FROM ONE OF THE CAMPAIGNS/ CANDIDATES/ OFFICE HOLDERS who did that, be aware that you have a lot of explaining to do to do SOME of your constituents who are not going to rubber stamp their ballot simply because you are (A) an incumbent and (B) a democrat (in name only)…

    Wyatt
    –a voter in Davis

  12. Wyatt Weaver

    “Ya know what the funny thing is? Those socialists and communists will probably never even vote for a mainstream party.”

    This is a disturbing comment for a number of reasons.

    1. The Cold War is over, so who cares if they are communists and socialists

    2. The Sodexho workers are undoubtedly neither communists nor socialists

    3. Do we only support people who will vote for us?

    4. Are people who may not be politically in step with us not worth treating with simple dignity and respect?

    5. Anyone who would walk through a picket line is not someone who shares my values

    6. Anyone who would ignore protesters is not someone I will vote for

    IF YOU ARE FROM ONE OF THE CAMPAIGNS/ CANDIDATES/ OFFICE HOLDERS who did that, be aware that you have a lot of explaining to do to do SOME of your constituents who are not going to rubber stamp their ballot simply because you are (A) an incumbent and (B) a democrat (in name only)…

    Wyatt
    –a voter in Davis

  13. Anonymous

    Picketing a person’s office or business functions is one thing. Picketing their home during a private party is another. That holds true no matter who the guests are.

    The line crossed was one of position and office versus that of personal life and home. Business interests, including those of protesters, should not be intruding upon a home life. It reminds me of the pro-life protesters that would cheerfully go door to door and inform the neighbors of a woman that the person had had an abortion. The ends justify the means, and your position is clearly morally right, allowing any behavior? That is a fairly common argument to validate reprehensible behaviour.

    The request is one that has been made to the Office of the President, not the Vanderhoef family. It is not in any way a fine line, but rather a large and clear division that was crossed by this action. It stepped from honest activism directed toward an institution to harassment of a family in their home.

  14. Anonymous

    Picketing a person’s office or business functions is one thing. Picketing their home during a private party is another. That holds true no matter who the guests are.

    The line crossed was one of position and office versus that of personal life and home. Business interests, including those of protesters, should not be intruding upon a home life. It reminds me of the pro-life protesters that would cheerfully go door to door and inform the neighbors of a woman that the person had had an abortion. The ends justify the means, and your position is clearly morally right, allowing any behavior? That is a fairly common argument to validate reprehensible behaviour.

    The request is one that has been made to the Office of the President, not the Vanderhoef family. It is not in any way a fine line, but rather a large and clear division that was crossed by this action. It stepped from honest activism directed toward an institution to harassment of a family in their home.

  15. Anonymous

    Picketing a person’s office or business functions is one thing. Picketing their home during a private party is another. That holds true no matter who the guests are.

    The line crossed was one of position and office versus that of personal life and home. Business interests, including those of protesters, should not be intruding upon a home life. It reminds me of the pro-life protesters that would cheerfully go door to door and inform the neighbors of a woman that the person had had an abortion. The ends justify the means, and your position is clearly morally right, allowing any behavior? That is a fairly common argument to validate reprehensible behaviour.

    The request is one that has been made to the Office of the President, not the Vanderhoef family. It is not in any way a fine line, but rather a large and clear division that was crossed by this action. It stepped from honest activism directed toward an institution to harassment of a family in their home.

  16. Anonymous

    Picketing a person’s office or business functions is one thing. Picketing their home during a private party is another. That holds true no matter who the guests are.

    The line crossed was one of position and office versus that of personal life and home. Business interests, including those of protesters, should not be intruding upon a home life. It reminds me of the pro-life protesters that would cheerfully go door to door and inform the neighbors of a woman that the person had had an abortion. The ends justify the means, and your position is clearly morally right, allowing any behavior? That is a fairly common argument to validate reprehensible behaviour.

    The request is one that has been made to the Office of the President, not the Vanderhoef family. It is not in any way a fine line, but rather a large and clear division that was crossed by this action. It stepped from honest activism directed toward an institution to harassment of a family in their home.

  17. Anonymous

    To add to the above if you are still fuzzy on basic seperation of work versus home, had the party been a university function held on campus, I’d support the picket.

  18. Richard

    Davis has always been a bastion of social issue liberalism sans labor unions. So, the conduct of the people who attended the event is not at all remarkable.

    –Richard Estes

  19. Anonymous

    To add to the above if you are still fuzzy on basic seperation of work versus home, had the party been a university function held on campus, I’d support the picket.

  20. Richard

    Davis has always been a bastion of social issue liberalism sans labor unions. So, the conduct of the people who attended the event is not at all remarkable.

    –Richard Estes

  21. Anonymous

    To add to the above if you are still fuzzy on basic seperation of work versus home, had the party been a university function held on campus, I’d support the picket.

  22. Richard

    Davis has always been a bastion of social issue liberalism sans labor unions. So, the conduct of the people who attended the event is not at all remarkable.

    –Richard Estes

  23. Anonymous

    To add to the above if you are still fuzzy on basic seperation of work versus home, had the party been a university function held on campus, I’d support the picket.

  24. Richard

    Davis has always been a bastion of social issue liberalism sans labor unions. So, the conduct of the people who attended the event is not at all remarkable.

    –Richard Estes

  25. Richard

    to anonymous: if I recall correctly, the UC pays for some, if not all, of the costs of Venderhoef’s home, precisely so that he can conduct public functions like the one picketed by the Sodexho workers

    so, the idea that the Sodexho workers were picketing something akin a personal backyard barbeque for the neighbors is ridiculous

    not surprisingly to see this perspective, though, apparently, it is the new propaganda line for administration supporters inside Mrak Hall, after the other ones, like maligning the Sodexho workers as threatening, belligerent protesters failed

    there is one thread that runs through the anonymous posts that support Vanderhoef and that is the embarassing efforts to curry favor with highly paid, privileged university administrators by expressing contempt towards low wage workers

    –Richard Estes

  26. Richard

    to anonymous: if I recall correctly, the UC pays for some, if not all, of the costs of Venderhoef’s home, precisely so that he can conduct public functions like the one picketed by the Sodexho workers

    so, the idea that the Sodexho workers were picketing something akin a personal backyard barbeque for the neighbors is ridiculous

    not surprisingly to see this perspective, though, apparently, it is the new propaganda line for administration supporters inside Mrak Hall, after the other ones, like maligning the Sodexho workers as threatening, belligerent protesters failed

    there is one thread that runs through the anonymous posts that support Vanderhoef and that is the embarassing efforts to curry favor with highly paid, privileged university administrators by expressing contempt towards low wage workers

    –Richard Estes

  27. Richard

    to anonymous: if I recall correctly, the UC pays for some, if not all, of the costs of Venderhoef’s home, precisely so that he can conduct public functions like the one picketed by the Sodexho workers

    so, the idea that the Sodexho workers were picketing something akin a personal backyard barbeque for the neighbors is ridiculous

    not surprisingly to see this perspective, though, apparently, it is the new propaganda line for administration supporters inside Mrak Hall, after the other ones, like maligning the Sodexho workers as threatening, belligerent protesters failed

    there is one thread that runs through the anonymous posts that support Vanderhoef and that is the embarassing efforts to curry favor with highly paid, privileged university administrators by expressing contempt towards low wage workers

    –Richard Estes

  28. Richard

    to anonymous: if I recall correctly, the UC pays for some, if not all, of the costs of Venderhoef’s home, precisely so that he can conduct public functions like the one picketed by the Sodexho workers

    so, the idea that the Sodexho workers were picketing something akin a personal backyard barbeque for the neighbors is ridiculous

    not surprisingly to see this perspective, though, apparently, it is the new propaganda line for administration supporters inside Mrak Hall, after the other ones, like maligning the Sodexho workers as threatening, belligerent protesters failed

    there is one thread that runs through the anonymous posts that support Vanderhoef and that is the embarassing efforts to curry favor with highly paid, privileged university administrators by expressing contempt towards low wage workers

    –Richard Estes

  29. Anonymous

    Anonymous:

    Two points in response. The law does not distinguish between the two types of actions. As long as the protesters were neither obstructing nor trespassing, they had the right assembly and free speech.

    Second point, is this a private home or a university home? That makes somewhat of a difference as well, at least to me.

  30. Anonymous

    Anonymous:

    Two points in response. The law does not distinguish between the two types of actions. As long as the protesters were neither obstructing nor trespassing, they had the right assembly and free speech.

    Second point, is this a private home or a university home? That makes somewhat of a difference as well, at least to me.

  31. Anonymous

    Anonymous:

    Two points in response. The law does not distinguish between the two types of actions. As long as the protesters were neither obstructing nor trespassing, they had the right assembly and free speech.

    Second point, is this a private home or a university home? That makes somewhat of a difference as well, at least to me.

  32. Anonymous

    Anonymous:

    Two points in response. The law does not distinguish between the two types of actions. As long as the protesters were neither obstructing nor trespassing, they had the right assembly and free speech.

    Second point, is this a private home or a university home? That makes somewhat of a difference as well, at least to me.

  33. Rich Rifkin

    “Picketing a person’s office or business functions is one thing. Picketing their home during a private party is another. That holds true no matter who the guests are.”

    While I basically agree with this sentiment, the Chancellor’s House is not exactly a private home.

    A part of it is set aside for the chancellor and his family. However, the vast majority is a public space, designed for hosting dignataries and social events, such as they had when the protestors showed up.

    Where this becomes more complex, however, is that the chancellor’s neighbors are normal families, and I assume they don’t want their street, College Park, disturbed by a protest group. To that extent, a protest there could be out of place.

    Also, my main complaint about this situation is the building itself. For those of you new to Davis, you don’t recall the lovely old (large!) house that used to be on that site. The profligate UC administration decided the old building was insufficient. So they tore it down and built the piece of crap that is there, now.

    Architecturally and aesthetically, it’s a horrible monstrosity — the same boobs who approved the nightmarish L&S building approved this very ugly structure. I just don’t understand why UC Davis has such poor standards when it comes to architecture. (Not all the new buildings on other UC campuses are so awful. I’ve seen some recent structures put up at UC San Diego, and they were pleasant.)

  34. Rich Rifkin

    “Picketing a person’s office or business functions is one thing. Picketing their home during a private party is another. That holds true no matter who the guests are.”

    While I basically agree with this sentiment, the Chancellor’s House is not exactly a private home.

    A part of it is set aside for the chancellor and his family. However, the vast majority is a public space, designed for hosting dignataries and social events, such as they had when the protestors showed up.

    Where this becomes more complex, however, is that the chancellor’s neighbors are normal families, and I assume they don’t want their street, College Park, disturbed by a protest group. To that extent, a protest there could be out of place.

    Also, my main complaint about this situation is the building itself. For those of you new to Davis, you don’t recall the lovely old (large!) house that used to be on that site. The profligate UC administration decided the old building was insufficient. So they tore it down and built the piece of crap that is there, now.

    Architecturally and aesthetically, it’s a horrible monstrosity — the same boobs who approved the nightmarish L&S building approved this very ugly structure. I just don’t understand why UC Davis has such poor standards when it comes to architecture. (Not all the new buildings on other UC campuses are so awful. I’ve seen some recent structures put up at UC San Diego, and they were pleasant.)

  35. Rich Rifkin

    “Picketing a person’s office or business functions is one thing. Picketing their home during a private party is another. That holds true no matter who the guests are.”

    While I basically agree with this sentiment, the Chancellor’s House is not exactly a private home.

    A part of it is set aside for the chancellor and his family. However, the vast majority is a public space, designed for hosting dignataries and social events, such as they had when the protestors showed up.

    Where this becomes more complex, however, is that the chancellor’s neighbors are normal families, and I assume they don’t want their street, College Park, disturbed by a protest group. To that extent, a protest there could be out of place.

    Also, my main complaint about this situation is the building itself. For those of you new to Davis, you don’t recall the lovely old (large!) house that used to be on that site. The profligate UC administration decided the old building was insufficient. So they tore it down and built the piece of crap that is there, now.

    Architecturally and aesthetically, it’s a horrible monstrosity — the same boobs who approved the nightmarish L&S building approved this very ugly structure. I just don’t understand why UC Davis has such poor standards when it comes to architecture. (Not all the new buildings on other UC campuses are so awful. I’ve seen some recent structures put up at UC San Diego, and they were pleasant.)

  36. Rich Rifkin

    “Picketing a person’s office or business functions is one thing. Picketing their home during a private party is another. That holds true no matter who the guests are.”

    While I basically agree with this sentiment, the Chancellor’s House is not exactly a private home.

    A part of it is set aside for the chancellor and his family. However, the vast majority is a public space, designed for hosting dignataries and social events, such as they had when the protestors showed up.

    Where this becomes more complex, however, is that the chancellor’s neighbors are normal families, and I assume they don’t want their street, College Park, disturbed by a protest group. To that extent, a protest there could be out of place.

    Also, my main complaint about this situation is the building itself. For those of you new to Davis, you don’t recall the lovely old (large!) house that used to be on that site. The profligate UC administration decided the old building was insufficient. So they tore it down and built the piece of crap that is there, now.

    Architecturally and aesthetically, it’s a horrible monstrosity — the same boobs who approved the nightmarish L&S building approved this very ugly structure. I just don’t understand why UC Davis has such poor standards when it comes to architecture. (Not all the new buildings on other UC campuses are so awful. I’ve seen some recent structures put up at UC San Diego, and they were pleasant.)

  37. Anonymous

    I’m not sure whether I agree with the protestors’ goals or not. Usually, I support labor. I don’t know enough about this issue though–I’ll have to read more about it. HOWEVER…I find it extremely disconcerting and odd that the police would take pictures of the students. It’s seems like something from a totalitarian state and is a very foolish action in light of previous police controversies in Davis.

  38. Anonymous

    I’m not sure whether I agree with the protestors’ goals or not. Usually, I support labor. I don’t know enough about this issue though–I’ll have to read more about it. HOWEVER…I find it extremely disconcerting and odd that the police would take pictures of the students. It’s seems like something from a totalitarian state and is a very foolish action in light of previous police controversies in Davis.

  39. Anonymous

    I’m not sure whether I agree with the protestors’ goals or not. Usually, I support labor. I don’t know enough about this issue though–I’ll have to read more about it. HOWEVER…I find it extremely disconcerting and odd that the police would take pictures of the students. It’s seems like something from a totalitarian state and is a very foolish action in light of previous police controversies in Davis.

  40. Anonymous

    I’m not sure whether I agree with the protestors’ goals or not. Usually, I support labor. I don’t know enough about this issue though–I’ll have to read more about it. HOWEVER…I find it extremely disconcerting and odd that the police would take pictures of the students. It’s seems like something from a totalitarian state and is a very foolish action in light of previous police controversies in Davis.

  41. Anonymous

    I too find the new Chancellor’s home to be an ungly monstrosity! It does resemble the prison watch tower also knows as the L&S building. We could not believe that UCD would fund such an ugly building. I guess we can’t be a UC that’s good at everything.

  42. Anonymous

    I too find the new Chancellor’s home to be an ungly monstrosity! It does resemble the prison watch tower also knows as the L&S building. We could not believe that UCD would fund such an ugly building. I guess we can’t be a UC that’s good at everything.

  43. Anonymous

    I too find the new Chancellor’s home to be an ungly monstrosity! It does resemble the prison watch tower also knows as the L&S building. We could not believe that UCD would fund such an ugly building. I guess we can’t be a UC that’s good at everything.

  44. Anonymous

    I too find the new Chancellor’s home to be an ungly monstrosity! It does resemble the prison watch tower also knows as the L&S building. We could not believe that UCD would fund such an ugly building. I guess we can’t be a UC that’s good at everything.

  45. Peaceful Protestor

    “If any man tells you he loves America, yet hates labor, he is a liar. If any man tells you he trusts America, yet fears labor, he is a fool.”

    “All that harms labor is treason to America.”

    Abraham Lincoln

    We live in America and have a right to assemble and speak freely. This is especially true when it comes to workers and students hold their chancellor accountable. Even if it’s outside of the home that is paid for by some of our $$$$$$$$.

  46. Peaceful Protestor

    “If any man tells you he loves America, yet hates labor, he is a liar. If any man tells you he trusts America, yet fears labor, he is a fool.”

    “All that harms labor is treason to America.”

    Abraham Lincoln

    We live in America and have a right to assemble and speak freely. This is especially true when it comes to workers and students hold their chancellor accountable. Even if it’s outside of the home that is paid for by some of our $$$$$$$$.

  47. Peaceful Protestor

    “If any man tells you he loves America, yet hates labor, he is a liar. If any man tells you he trusts America, yet fears labor, he is a fool.”

    “All that harms labor is treason to America.”

    Abraham Lincoln

    We live in America and have a right to assemble and speak freely. This is especially true when it comes to workers and students hold their chancellor accountable. Even if it’s outside of the home that is paid for by some of our $$$$$$$$.

  48. Peaceful Protestor

    “If any man tells you he loves America, yet hates labor, he is a liar. If any man tells you he trusts America, yet fears labor, he is a fool.”

    “All that harms labor is treason to America.”

    Abraham Lincoln

    We live in America and have a right to assemble and speak freely. This is especially true when it comes to workers and students hold their chancellor accountable. Even if it’s outside of the home that is paid for by some of our $$$$$$$$.

  49. Anonymous

    I was not saying that it is illegal, simply that it is ethically questionable and certainly a terrible means of persuasion.

    To convince a man to consider your request by picketing his home is simply a bad act, an act of personal spite. The best result is a feeling of personal intimidation. That is the only goal that I can see, as he’s certainly already aware of the situation. If the goal is so important and it happens to fall within the law, I suppose there is a vein of logic that any act is acceptable. I just don’t believe that the ends always justify the means, even if they are legal.

    The final point is utterly pragmatic. Personal intimidation is a poor way to convince somebody to join your cause.

  50. Anonymous

    I was not saying that it is illegal, simply that it is ethically questionable and certainly a terrible means of persuasion.

    To convince a man to consider your request by picketing his home is simply a bad act, an act of personal spite. The best result is a feeling of personal intimidation. That is the only goal that I can see, as he’s certainly already aware of the situation. If the goal is so important and it happens to fall within the law, I suppose there is a vein of logic that any act is acceptable. I just don’t believe that the ends always justify the means, even if they are legal.

    The final point is utterly pragmatic. Personal intimidation is a poor way to convince somebody to join your cause.

  51. Anonymous

    I was not saying that it is illegal, simply that it is ethically questionable and certainly a terrible means of persuasion.

    To convince a man to consider your request by picketing his home is simply a bad act, an act of personal spite. The best result is a feeling of personal intimidation. That is the only goal that I can see, as he’s certainly already aware of the situation. If the goal is so important and it happens to fall within the law, I suppose there is a vein of logic that any act is acceptable. I just don’t believe that the ends always justify the means, even if they are legal.

    The final point is utterly pragmatic. Personal intimidation is a poor way to convince somebody to join your cause.

  52. Anonymous

    I was not saying that it is illegal, simply that it is ethically questionable and certainly a terrible means of persuasion.

    To convince a man to consider your request by picketing his home is simply a bad act, an act of personal spite. The best result is a feeling of personal intimidation. That is the only goal that I can see, as he’s certainly already aware of the situation. If the goal is so important and it happens to fall within the law, I suppose there is a vein of logic that any act is acceptable. I just don’t believe that the ends always justify the means, even if they are legal.

    The final point is utterly pragmatic. Personal intimidation is a poor way to convince somebody to join your cause.

  53. Anonymous

    And again, I feel I must point out that the picketing on campus (or something in a public venue designed to draw media) is a wonderful thing. It is the picketing of the man’s home that is objectionable.

  54. Anonymous

    And again, I feel I must point out that the picketing on campus (or something in a public venue designed to draw media) is a wonderful thing. It is the picketing of the man’s home that is objectionable.

  55. Anonymous

    And again, I feel I must point out that the picketing on campus (or something in a public venue designed to draw media) is a wonderful thing. It is the picketing of the man’s home that is objectionable.

  56. Anonymous

    And again, I feel I must point out that the picketing on campus (or something in a public venue designed to draw media) is a wonderful thing. It is the picketing of the man’s home that is objectionable.

  57. Doug Paul Davis

    That’s fair enough, I simply disagree. And I may view it differently if he wasn’t having a very public event which included the marching band–I probably should have posted that picture as well.

  58. Doug Paul Davis

    That’s fair enough, I simply disagree. And I may view it differently if he wasn’t having a very public event which included the marching band–I probably should have posted that picture as well.

  59. Doug Paul Davis

    That’s fair enough, I simply disagree. And I may view it differently if he wasn’t having a very public event which included the marching band–I probably should have posted that picture as well.

  60. Doug Paul Davis

    That’s fair enough, I simply disagree. And I may view it differently if he wasn’t having a very public event which included the marching band–I probably should have posted that picture as well.

  61. Anonymous

    I can understand that people are uncomfortable crossing a picket line, where ever it is. So to arrive at a what is understood to be a social event and have to walk through the protesters to attend would be difficult for many. The protesters appearing at a social event and harrassing guests as they arrive could be viewed from merely being impolite all the way to really offensive, depending on the PERSONAL reaction of the guests.

    It would have been better if the protesters had positioned themselves across the street and maybe have one or two well-dressed people hand out information in front of the home to the arriving guests. The people arriving would see them and think about them and their cause, but not be forced to interact with the larger group.

  62. Anonymous

    I can understand that people are uncomfortable crossing a picket line, where ever it is. So to arrive at a what is understood to be a social event and have to walk through the protesters to attend would be difficult for many. The protesters appearing at a social event and harrassing guests as they arrive could be viewed from merely being impolite all the way to really offensive, depending on the PERSONAL reaction of the guests.

    It would have been better if the protesters had positioned themselves across the street and maybe have one or two well-dressed people hand out information in front of the home to the arriving guests. The people arriving would see them and think about them and their cause, but not be forced to interact with the larger group.

  63. Anonymous

    I can understand that people are uncomfortable crossing a picket line, where ever it is. So to arrive at a what is understood to be a social event and have to walk through the protesters to attend would be difficult for many. The protesters appearing at a social event and harrassing guests as they arrive could be viewed from merely being impolite all the way to really offensive, depending on the PERSONAL reaction of the guests.

    It would have been better if the protesters had positioned themselves across the street and maybe have one or two well-dressed people hand out information in front of the home to the arriving guests. The people arriving would see them and think about them and their cause, but not be forced to interact with the larger group.

  64. Anonymous

    I can understand that people are uncomfortable crossing a picket line, where ever it is. So to arrive at a what is understood to be a social event and have to walk through the protesters to attend would be difficult for many. The protesters appearing at a social event and harrassing guests as they arrive could be viewed from merely being impolite all the way to really offensive, depending on the PERSONAL reaction of the guests.

    It would have been better if the protesters had positioned themselves across the street and maybe have one or two well-dressed people hand out information in front of the home to the arriving guests. The people arriving would see them and think about them and their cause, but not be forced to interact with the larger group.

  65. truman

    The People of the State of California own the Chancellor’s house. This is no different than a governor’s mansion or the White House. All are acceptable locations to have peaceful public protests in front of as these facilities are used to conduct official business similar to the administration buildings and capitol buildings in which these officials also work from. Citizens who choose to protest or make their voices heard are within their rights to assemble and protest at this university owned and therefore publicly owned facility.

    From the pictures and reports posted on this site, it appears that the protestors were orderly and non-threatening, but probably loud with their chants of protest. Had the protestors been unruly or unlawful in their conduct they could have been arrested by the half dozen uniformed university police present. Since they were not arrested or threatened with arrest, I assume the protestors conducted themselves in an appropriate and lawful manner.

    Praise is in order to these students who are dedicated to helping the service workers attain union representation, a livable wage and health benefits.

    Praise is also in order to Yolo County Supervisor Mariko Yamada who spoke in solidarity with the student protestors before entering the event herself.

  66. truman

    The People of the State of California own the Chancellor’s house. This is no different than a governor’s mansion or the White House. All are acceptable locations to have peaceful public protests in front of as these facilities are used to conduct official business similar to the administration buildings and capitol buildings in which these officials also work from. Citizens who choose to protest or make their voices heard are within their rights to assemble and protest at this university owned and therefore publicly owned facility.

    From the pictures and reports posted on this site, it appears that the protestors were orderly and non-threatening, but probably loud with their chants of protest. Had the protestors been unruly or unlawful in their conduct they could have been arrested by the half dozen uniformed university police present. Since they were not arrested or threatened with arrest, I assume the protestors conducted themselves in an appropriate and lawful manner.

    Praise is in order to these students who are dedicated to helping the service workers attain union representation, a livable wage and health benefits.

    Praise is also in order to Yolo County Supervisor Mariko Yamada who spoke in solidarity with the student protestors before entering the event herself.

  67. truman

    The People of the State of California own the Chancellor’s house. This is no different than a governor’s mansion or the White House. All are acceptable locations to have peaceful public protests in front of as these facilities are used to conduct official business similar to the administration buildings and capitol buildings in which these officials also work from. Citizens who choose to protest or make their voices heard are within their rights to assemble and protest at this university owned and therefore publicly owned facility.

    From the pictures and reports posted on this site, it appears that the protestors were orderly and non-threatening, but probably loud with their chants of protest. Had the protestors been unruly or unlawful in their conduct they could have been arrested by the half dozen uniformed university police present. Since they were not arrested or threatened with arrest, I assume the protestors conducted themselves in an appropriate and lawful manner.

    Praise is in order to these students who are dedicated to helping the service workers attain union representation, a livable wage and health benefits.

    Praise is also in order to Yolo County Supervisor Mariko Yamada who spoke in solidarity with the student protestors before entering the event herself.

  68. truman

    The People of the State of California own the Chancellor’s house. This is no different than a governor’s mansion or the White House. All are acceptable locations to have peaceful public protests in front of as these facilities are used to conduct official business similar to the administration buildings and capitol buildings in which these officials also work from. Citizens who choose to protest or make their voices heard are within their rights to assemble and protest at this university owned and therefore publicly owned facility.

    From the pictures and reports posted on this site, it appears that the protestors were orderly and non-threatening, but probably loud with their chants of protest. Had the protestors been unruly or unlawful in their conduct they could have been arrested by the half dozen uniformed university police present. Since they were not arrested or threatened with arrest, I assume the protestors conducted themselves in an appropriate and lawful manner.

    Praise is in order to these students who are dedicated to helping the service workers attain union representation, a livable wage and health benefits.

    Praise is also in order to Yolo County Supervisor Mariko Yamada who spoke in solidarity with the student protestors before entering the event herself.

  69. dinho habeeb

    1. the event was a university event held at a university location with primarily university attendees. contracted out sodexho workers catered the event because it was a university function.

    2. the chancellor has not once met with worker leaders and the union even when he promised to. until he resolves it, the problems will be shared with the community as publically as possible.

    3. this is not a fight about logical argument, its a fight about power. if it were about logic and what makes sense, over 600 contracted out workers would be transitioning to university jobs right now.
    there is a saying that power concedes nothing, it must be taken. the chancellor has the power of his office and a police force to maintain status quo. we have people power and community power. he has isolated himself with a few mrak administrators and sided with sodexho over fairness, justice and the community.

    4. the uc police are whack. i heard they refused to explain any reasons why they were taking photos other than ‘in america we have that right to take photos’. apparently they didn’t mention if it was normal protocol or what the photos would be used for and as questions continued, they threatened immediately to cite organizers for disturbing the peace. the ucpd also has been exceptionally and possibly purposefully slow in returning confiscated personal belongings to protesters and it apparently took labor relations and vice chancellor shimek to step in. the interactions with the city police continue to be much more amicable and respectful.

    5. the intent of the campaign is not to rid the campus of sodexho. contracting out public services is most definitely questionable and arguably wrong as cruz reynoso has mentioned. however, the campaign simply is to get the same uc jobs that food service workers have at every other uc location. vanderhoef and his pals continue to take an ethical stand on ‘not breaking contracts’ but he knows he can change the contract and still maintain it and he knows that breaking the contract is not what the campaign is asking for. the campaign is simply asking for an ethical stand on fairness.

    6. the local politicians who were there are supporters. what level of support they are able to give varies from one to the next. what they all agree on, as does most everyone but larry and his cronies is this-
    contracted out workers at uc davis deserve to be uc workers!

    larry has no defence for his stand and should make the right choice so his neighbors, the campus, and the community can all rest in peace- uc jobs now!

  70. dinho habeeb

    1. the event was a university event held at a university location with primarily university attendees. contracted out sodexho workers catered the event because it was a university function.

    2. the chancellor has not once met with worker leaders and the union even when he promised to. until he resolves it, the problems will be shared with the community as publically as possible.

    3. this is not a fight about logical argument, its a fight about power. if it were about logic and what makes sense, over 600 contracted out workers would be transitioning to university jobs right now.
    there is a saying that power concedes nothing, it must be taken. the chancellor has the power of his office and a police force to maintain status quo. we have people power and community power. he has isolated himself with a few mrak administrators and sided with sodexho over fairness, justice and the community.

    4. the uc police are whack. i heard they refused to explain any reasons why they were taking photos other than ‘in america we have that right to take photos’. apparently they didn’t mention if it was normal protocol or what the photos would be used for and as questions continued, they threatened immediately to cite organizers for disturbing the peace. the ucpd also has been exceptionally and possibly purposefully slow in returning confiscated personal belongings to protesters and it apparently took labor relations and vice chancellor shimek to step in. the interactions with the city police continue to be much more amicable and respectful.

    5. the intent of the campaign is not to rid the campus of sodexho. contracting out public services is most definitely questionable and arguably wrong as cruz reynoso has mentioned. however, the campaign simply is to get the same uc jobs that food service workers have at every other uc location. vanderhoef and his pals continue to take an ethical stand on ‘not breaking contracts’ but he knows he can change the contract and still maintain it and he knows that breaking the contract is not what the campaign is asking for. the campaign is simply asking for an ethical stand on fairness.

    6. the local politicians who were there are supporters. what level of support they are able to give varies from one to the next. what they all agree on, as does most everyone but larry and his cronies is this-
    contracted out workers at uc davis deserve to be uc workers!

    larry has no defence for his stand and should make the right choice so his neighbors, the campus, and the community can all rest in peace- uc jobs now!

  71. dinho habeeb

    1. the event was a university event held at a university location with primarily university attendees. contracted out sodexho workers catered the event because it was a university function.

    2. the chancellor has not once met with worker leaders and the union even when he promised to. until he resolves it, the problems will be shared with the community as publically as possible.

    3. this is not a fight about logical argument, its a fight about power. if it were about logic and what makes sense, over 600 contracted out workers would be transitioning to university jobs right now.
    there is a saying that power concedes nothing, it must be taken. the chancellor has the power of his office and a police force to maintain status quo. we have people power and community power. he has isolated himself with a few mrak administrators and sided with sodexho over fairness, justice and the community.

    4. the uc police are whack. i heard they refused to explain any reasons why they were taking photos other than ‘in america we have that right to take photos’. apparently they didn’t mention if it was normal protocol or what the photos would be used for and as questions continued, they threatened immediately to cite organizers for disturbing the peace. the ucpd also has been exceptionally and possibly purposefully slow in returning confiscated personal belongings to protesters and it apparently took labor relations and vice chancellor shimek to step in. the interactions with the city police continue to be much more amicable and respectful.

    5. the intent of the campaign is not to rid the campus of sodexho. contracting out public services is most definitely questionable and arguably wrong as cruz reynoso has mentioned. however, the campaign simply is to get the same uc jobs that food service workers have at every other uc location. vanderhoef and his pals continue to take an ethical stand on ‘not breaking contracts’ but he knows he can change the contract and still maintain it and he knows that breaking the contract is not what the campaign is asking for. the campaign is simply asking for an ethical stand on fairness.

    6. the local politicians who were there are supporters. what level of support they are able to give varies from one to the next. what they all agree on, as does most everyone but larry and his cronies is this-
    contracted out workers at uc davis deserve to be uc workers!

    larry has no defence for his stand and should make the right choice so his neighbors, the campus, and the community can all rest in peace- uc jobs now!

  72. dinho habeeb

    1. the event was a university event held at a university location with primarily university attendees. contracted out sodexho workers catered the event because it was a university function.

    2. the chancellor has not once met with worker leaders and the union even when he promised to. until he resolves it, the problems will be shared with the community as publically as possible.

    3. this is not a fight about logical argument, its a fight about power. if it were about logic and what makes sense, over 600 contracted out workers would be transitioning to university jobs right now.
    there is a saying that power concedes nothing, it must be taken. the chancellor has the power of his office and a police force to maintain status quo. we have people power and community power. he has isolated himself with a few mrak administrators and sided with sodexho over fairness, justice and the community.

    4. the uc police are whack. i heard they refused to explain any reasons why they were taking photos other than ‘in america we have that right to take photos’. apparently they didn’t mention if it was normal protocol or what the photos would be used for and as questions continued, they threatened immediately to cite organizers for disturbing the peace. the ucpd also has been exceptionally and possibly purposefully slow in returning confiscated personal belongings to protesters and it apparently took labor relations and vice chancellor shimek to step in. the interactions with the city police continue to be much more amicable and respectful.

    5. the intent of the campaign is not to rid the campus of sodexho. contracting out public services is most definitely questionable and arguably wrong as cruz reynoso has mentioned. however, the campaign simply is to get the same uc jobs that food service workers have at every other uc location. vanderhoef and his pals continue to take an ethical stand on ‘not breaking contracts’ but he knows he can change the contract and still maintain it and he knows that breaking the contract is not what the campaign is asking for. the campaign is simply asking for an ethical stand on fairness.

    6. the local politicians who were there are supporters. what level of support they are able to give varies from one to the next. what they all agree on, as does most everyone but larry and his cronies is this-
    contracted out workers at uc davis deserve to be uc workers!

    larry has no defence for his stand and should make the right choice so his neighbors, the campus, and the community can all rest in peace- uc jobs now!

  73. 無名 - wu ming

    the fact that the party was catered by sodexho food service workers certainly puts the protestations upthread that this was “private” in a different light, thanks dinho for that point.

    a university function in a public building using sodexho workers seems like fair game to me. nice to see yamada acting reasonably, as usual. she was quite personable at several of the other protests as well. the workers really are quite friendly, for all the brouhaha and overkill police presence.

    and while i generally concur with rich that the death star is a monstrosity of a building, it does have some rather interesting grey-on-grey ambiance in the winter, with the grey rain falling on the grey concrete. i suspect it’d be a great place to defend in a seige, though. let those anthro students from young hall try and take it.

  74. 無名 - wu ming

    the fact that the party was catered by sodexho food service workers certainly puts the protestations upthread that this was “private” in a different light, thanks dinho for that point.

    a university function in a public building using sodexho workers seems like fair game to me. nice to see yamada acting reasonably, as usual. she was quite personable at several of the other protests as well. the workers really are quite friendly, for all the brouhaha and overkill police presence.

    and while i generally concur with rich that the death star is a monstrosity of a building, it does have some rather interesting grey-on-grey ambiance in the winter, with the grey rain falling on the grey concrete. i suspect it’d be a great place to defend in a seige, though. let those anthro students from young hall try and take it.

  75. 無名 - wu ming

    the fact that the party was catered by sodexho food service workers certainly puts the protestations upthread that this was “private” in a different light, thanks dinho for that point.

    a university function in a public building using sodexho workers seems like fair game to me. nice to see yamada acting reasonably, as usual. she was quite personable at several of the other protests as well. the workers really are quite friendly, for all the brouhaha and overkill police presence.

    and while i generally concur with rich that the death star is a monstrosity of a building, it does have some rather interesting grey-on-grey ambiance in the winter, with the grey rain falling on the grey concrete. i suspect it’d be a great place to defend in a seige, though. let those anthro students from young hall try and take it.

  76. 無名 - wu ming

    the fact that the party was catered by sodexho food service workers certainly puts the protestations upthread that this was “private” in a different light, thanks dinho for that point.

    a university function in a public building using sodexho workers seems like fair game to me. nice to see yamada acting reasonably, as usual. she was quite personable at several of the other protests as well. the workers really are quite friendly, for all the brouhaha and overkill police presence.

    and while i generally concur with rich that the death star is a monstrosity of a building, it does have some rather interesting grey-on-grey ambiance in the winter, with the grey rain falling on the grey concrete. i suspect it’d be a great place to defend in a seige, though. let those anthro students from young hall try and take it.

  77. Doug Paul Davis

    I need to address a couple of the points made above.

    First, I have already had a conversation with the scene commander. I have a call in to the chief who was busy today. I hope to talk to her tomorrow. I did not witness threats from the police personally. They did not threaten me. I would like to talk to the poster above, if he/ she could drop me an email it would be appreciated.

    Second, I disagree in terms of the elected officials–a lot of these people try to play both sides of the fence, but their true colors showed yesterday. It is unfortunate, but I suspect that is closer to their true feelings. Whatever you get out of these folks should be a bonus and they should not be counted on. This comes from years of experience with local political leaders.

  78. Doug Paul Davis

    I need to address a couple of the points made above.

    First, I have already had a conversation with the scene commander. I have a call in to the chief who was busy today. I hope to talk to her tomorrow. I did not witness threats from the police personally. They did not threaten me. I would like to talk to the poster above, if he/ she could drop me an email it would be appreciated.

    Second, I disagree in terms of the elected officials–a lot of these people try to play both sides of the fence, but their true colors showed yesterday. It is unfortunate, but I suspect that is closer to their true feelings. Whatever you get out of these folks should be a bonus and they should not be counted on. This comes from years of experience with local political leaders.

  79. Doug Paul Davis

    I need to address a couple of the points made above.

    First, I have already had a conversation with the scene commander. I have a call in to the chief who was busy today. I hope to talk to her tomorrow. I did not witness threats from the police personally. They did not threaten me. I would like to talk to the poster above, if he/ she could drop me an email it would be appreciated.

    Second, I disagree in terms of the elected officials–a lot of these people try to play both sides of the fence, but their true colors showed yesterday. It is unfortunate, but I suspect that is closer to their true feelings. Whatever you get out of these folks should be a bonus and they should not be counted on. This comes from years of experience with local political leaders.

  80. Doug Paul Davis

    I need to address a couple of the points made above.

    First, I have already had a conversation with the scene commander. I have a call in to the chief who was busy today. I hope to talk to her tomorrow. I did not witness threats from the police personally. They did not threaten me. I would like to talk to the poster above, if he/ she could drop me an email it would be appreciated.

    Second, I disagree in terms of the elected officials–a lot of these people try to play both sides of the fence, but their true colors showed yesterday. It is unfortunate, but I suspect that is closer to their true feelings. Whatever you get out of these folks should be a bonus and they should not be counted on. This comes from years of experience with local political leaders.

  81. Richard

    to anonymous: I always find it humorous when people who are essentially unsympathetic to the underlying purpose of a protest then purport to give advice as to how it should be conducted

    –Richard Estes

  82. Richard

    to anonymous: I always find it humorous when people who are essentially unsympathetic to the underlying purpose of a protest then purport to give advice as to how it should be conducted

    –Richard Estes

  83. Richard

    to anonymous: I always find it humorous when people who are essentially unsympathetic to the underlying purpose of a protest then purport to give advice as to how it should be conducted

    –Richard Estes

  84. Richard

    to anonymous: I always find it humorous when people who are essentially unsympathetic to the underlying purpose of a protest then purport to give advice as to how it should be conducted

    –Richard Estes

  85. Rich Rifkin

    …while i generally concur with rich that the death star is a monstrosity of a building…”

    There is a lot of ugliness about that L&S building. However, no face of it is worse — it could be the second worst facade in the history of architecture — than its lecture hall which faces the bookstore. It is a rectangular box made of unadorned, badly poured concrete. It’s completely flat and without soul. Most poured in place freeway overcrossings have better craftsmanship.

    As far as the ultimate nadir in architecture, nothing will ever defeat the Salk Institute in La Jolla, near the UCSD campus. Like L&S, it is made of unadorned poured-in-place concrete. However, what distinguishes it from other horribly ugly buildings is that Salk is also downright scary in person. It looks like a nightmare scene from a Jean-Luc Godard film.

    Here’s a picture of Salk.

  86. Rich Rifkin

    …while i generally concur with rich that the death star is a monstrosity of a building…”

    There is a lot of ugliness about that L&S building. However, no face of it is worse — it could be the second worst facade in the history of architecture — than its lecture hall which faces the bookstore. It is a rectangular box made of unadorned, badly poured concrete. It’s completely flat and without soul. Most poured in place freeway overcrossings have better craftsmanship.

    As far as the ultimate nadir in architecture, nothing will ever defeat the Salk Institute in La Jolla, near the UCSD campus. Like L&S, it is made of unadorned poured-in-place concrete. However, what distinguishes it from other horribly ugly buildings is that Salk is also downright scary in person. It looks like a nightmare scene from a Jean-Luc Godard film.

    Here’s a picture of Salk.

  87. Rich Rifkin

    …while i generally concur with rich that the death star is a monstrosity of a building…”

    There is a lot of ugliness about that L&S building. However, no face of it is worse — it could be the second worst facade in the history of architecture — than its lecture hall which faces the bookstore. It is a rectangular box made of unadorned, badly poured concrete. It’s completely flat and without soul. Most poured in place freeway overcrossings have better craftsmanship.

    As far as the ultimate nadir in architecture, nothing will ever defeat the Salk Institute in La Jolla, near the UCSD campus. Like L&S, it is made of unadorned poured-in-place concrete. However, what distinguishes it from other horribly ugly buildings is that Salk is also downright scary in person. It looks like a nightmare scene from a Jean-Luc Godard film.

    Here’s a picture of Salk.

  88. Rich Rifkin

    …while i generally concur with rich that the death star is a monstrosity of a building…”

    There is a lot of ugliness about that L&S building. However, no face of it is worse — it could be the second worst facade in the history of architecture — than its lecture hall which faces the bookstore. It is a rectangular box made of unadorned, badly poured concrete. It’s completely flat and without soul. Most poured in place freeway overcrossings have better craftsmanship.

    As far as the ultimate nadir in architecture, nothing will ever defeat the Salk Institute in La Jolla, near the UCSD campus. Like L&S, it is made of unadorned poured-in-place concrete. However, what distinguishes it from other horribly ugly buildings is that Salk is also downright scary in person. It looks like a nightmare scene from a Jean-Luc Godard film.

    Here’s a picture of Salk.

  89. Anonymous

    Just to be clear about Dr. Vanderhoef’s living arrangement. The house is owned by the University – the Chancellor pays nothing. The house is free, the maintenance is free, the staff is free and there are additional funds to host parties. UCD is a public university and the Chancellor’s house is public property. The reason for the housing perk is that the social events Vanderhoef hosts at the house are considered part of the job. Therefore, the house is fair game for protests.

  90. Anonymous

    Just to be clear about Dr. Vanderhoef’s living arrangement. The house is owned by the University – the Chancellor pays nothing. The house is free, the maintenance is free, the staff is free and there are additional funds to host parties. UCD is a public university and the Chancellor’s house is public property. The reason for the housing perk is that the social events Vanderhoef hosts at the house are considered part of the job. Therefore, the house is fair game for protests.

  91. Anonymous

    Just to be clear about Dr. Vanderhoef’s living arrangement. The house is owned by the University – the Chancellor pays nothing. The house is free, the maintenance is free, the staff is free and there are additional funds to host parties. UCD is a public university and the Chancellor’s house is public property. The reason for the housing perk is that the social events Vanderhoef hosts at the house are considered part of the job. Therefore, the house is fair game for protests.

  92. Anonymous

    Just to be clear about Dr. Vanderhoef’s living arrangement. The house is owned by the University – the Chancellor pays nothing. The house is free, the maintenance is free, the staff is free and there are additional funds to host parties. UCD is a public university and the Chancellor’s house is public property. The reason for the housing perk is that the social events Vanderhoef hosts at the house are considered part of the job. Therefore, the house is fair game for protests.

  93. Anonymous

    Richard – Who said I was unsympathetic to their cause? I believe that communication is a choice and a right. The protesters have a right to protest and communicate about their cause. However, the arriving guests have a right to communicate or not if that is their choice. Just because I can imagine their discomfort, doesn’t mean that I do not support Sodexho workers. I personally would have difficulty crossing the picket line to attend. If that is the result that they wanted to achieve, then where they positioned themselves was correct. If the protest was an informational picket line, then it should have been done in a way that would make it easier for people to receive or hear the information and then bring that information into the event. The people who were upset were not going to lean on the chancellor inside the event to deal with the issue.

    I do think that these people, the workers, are very courageous in sticking with it. Eventually, the University will need to deal with their concerns. It’s similar to the Nurses that showed up again and again wherever the Governor appeared. He finally had to pay attention.

  94. Anonymous

    Richard – Who said I was unsympathetic to their cause? I believe that communication is a choice and a right. The protesters have a right to protest and communicate about their cause. However, the arriving guests have a right to communicate or not if that is their choice. Just because I can imagine their discomfort, doesn’t mean that I do not support Sodexho workers. I personally would have difficulty crossing the picket line to attend. If that is the result that they wanted to achieve, then where they positioned themselves was correct. If the protest was an informational picket line, then it should have been done in a way that would make it easier for people to receive or hear the information and then bring that information into the event. The people who were upset were not going to lean on the chancellor inside the event to deal with the issue.

    I do think that these people, the workers, are very courageous in sticking with it. Eventually, the University will need to deal with their concerns. It’s similar to the Nurses that showed up again and again wherever the Governor appeared. He finally had to pay attention.

  95. Anonymous

    Richard – Who said I was unsympathetic to their cause? I believe that communication is a choice and a right. The protesters have a right to protest and communicate about their cause. However, the arriving guests have a right to communicate or not if that is their choice. Just because I can imagine their discomfort, doesn’t mean that I do not support Sodexho workers. I personally would have difficulty crossing the picket line to attend. If that is the result that they wanted to achieve, then where they positioned themselves was correct. If the protest was an informational picket line, then it should have been done in a way that would make it easier for people to receive or hear the information and then bring that information into the event. The people who were upset were not going to lean on the chancellor inside the event to deal with the issue.

    I do think that these people, the workers, are very courageous in sticking with it. Eventually, the University will need to deal with their concerns. It’s similar to the Nurses that showed up again and again wherever the Governor appeared. He finally had to pay attention.

  96. Anonymous

    Richard – Who said I was unsympathetic to their cause? I believe that communication is a choice and a right. The protesters have a right to protest and communicate about their cause. However, the arriving guests have a right to communicate or not if that is their choice. Just because I can imagine their discomfort, doesn’t mean that I do not support Sodexho workers. I personally would have difficulty crossing the picket line to attend. If that is the result that they wanted to achieve, then where they positioned themselves was correct. If the protest was an informational picket line, then it should have been done in a way that would make it easier for people to receive or hear the information and then bring that information into the event. The people who were upset were not going to lean on the chancellor inside the event to deal with the issue.

    I do think that these people, the workers, are very courageous in sticking with it. Eventually, the University will need to deal with their concerns. It’s similar to the Nurses that showed up again and again wherever the Governor appeared. He finally had to pay attention.

  97. Mike

    In the past, I had some degree of sympathy for the food service workers plight- after their entirely inappropriate protest at the Chancellor’s residence- all gone… Whatever Sodexho and the University feel is an appropriate response- more power to them.

  98. Mike

    In the past, I had some degree of sympathy for the food service workers plight- after their entirely inappropriate protest at the Chancellor’s residence- all gone… Whatever Sodexho and the University feel is an appropriate response- more power to them.

  99. Mike

    In the past, I had some degree of sympathy for the food service workers plight- after their entirely inappropriate protest at the Chancellor’s residence- all gone… Whatever Sodexho and the University feel is an appropriate response- more power to them.

  100. Mike

    In the past, I had some degree of sympathy for the food service workers plight- after their entirely inappropriate protest at the Chancellor’s residence- all gone… Whatever Sodexho and the University feel is an appropriate response- more power to them.

  101. Vincente

    Sorry Mike but there was nothing inappropriate about the protest there. There is the constitution, the fact that it was a university event and the fact that the property is university property. Hence the fact that it was UC Police on College Park not DPD. If you are basing your opinion on that protest, then you really were not a supporter of their goals to begin with. Too bad. I hope you are never in the situation where you have to rely on others to organize on your behalf.

  102. Vincente

    Sorry Mike but there was nothing inappropriate about the protest there. There is the constitution, the fact that it was a university event and the fact that the property is university property. Hence the fact that it was UC Police on College Park not DPD. If you are basing your opinion on that protest, then you really were not a supporter of their goals to begin with. Too bad. I hope you are never in the situation where you have to rely on others to organize on your behalf.

  103. Vincente

    Sorry Mike but there was nothing inappropriate about the protest there. There is the constitution, the fact that it was a university event and the fact that the property is university property. Hence the fact that it was UC Police on College Park not DPD. If you are basing your opinion on that protest, then you really were not a supporter of their goals to begin with. Too bad. I hope you are never in the situation where you have to rely on others to organize on your behalf.

  104. Vincente

    Sorry Mike but there was nothing inappropriate about the protest there. There is the constitution, the fact that it was a university event and the fact that the property is university property. Hence the fact that it was UC Police on College Park not DPD. If you are basing your opinion on that protest, then you really were not a supporter of their goals to begin with. Too bad. I hope you are never in the situation where you have to rely on others to organize on your behalf.

  105. Richard

    mike, definitely, and anonymous, probably, are known in Internet parlance as “concern trolls”

    mike, contrary to his statement, has never had any interest in the Sodexho workers, which most of you probably figured out, because, why would someone suddenly jump ship and lose any empathy for poorly paid, contracted out workers just because they protested the Chancellor at a public event at his house?

    no one would, of course, and his concern for the Chancellor, his alarm about such public attention being focused upon him, is another indication of the improbability that he ever cared about the Sodexho workers, especially when such a minimal inconvenience is contrasted with the much more onerous situation that the Sodexho workers face every day

    anonymous is a closer call, because in my experience, some crafty people that oppose your endeavor, whether it is about labor rights or civil rights, do so from the standpoint of a purported friend

    if you would just protest differently, they say

    if you would just stop being so public and confrontational, they say

    if you would just make your demands more reasonable, they say

    of course, if you do what they say, you completely disempower yourself, and get nothing

    so, anonymous said that he/she could get down with the Sodexho workers, if they would have just stood on the other side of the street from Vanderhoef’s house

    but, predictably, the protest would have been much less effective that way if the Sodexho workers had been silly enough to impose their own draw their own protest zone cordon around themselves when they are otherwise free to walk the streets of Davis

    one also suspects that, if the Sodexho workers had done what he/she said, anonymous would then have some new issue, some new problem with them, because that’s how it works, you can never satisfy them, because they are against you

    as I said, maybe that’s not what is happening with anonymous here, but it is a very common phenomenon

    –Richard Estes

  106. Richard

    mike, definitely, and anonymous, probably, are known in Internet parlance as “concern trolls”

    mike, contrary to his statement, has never had any interest in the Sodexho workers, which most of you probably figured out, because, why would someone suddenly jump ship and lose any empathy for poorly paid, contracted out workers just because they protested the Chancellor at a public event at his house?

    no one would, of course, and his concern for the Chancellor, his alarm about such public attention being focused upon him, is another indication of the improbability that he ever cared about the Sodexho workers, especially when such a minimal inconvenience is contrasted with the much more onerous situation that the Sodexho workers face every day

    anonymous is a closer call, because in my experience, some crafty people that oppose your endeavor, whether it is about labor rights or civil rights, do so from the standpoint of a purported friend

    if you would just protest differently, they say

    if you would just stop being so public and confrontational, they say

    if you would just make your demands more reasonable, they say

    of course, if you do what they say, you completely disempower yourself, and get nothing

    so, anonymous said that he/she could get down with the Sodexho workers, if they would have just stood on the other side of the street from Vanderhoef’s house

    but, predictably, the protest would have been much less effective that way if the Sodexho workers had been silly enough to impose their own draw their own protest zone cordon around themselves when they are otherwise free to walk the streets of Davis

    one also suspects that, if the Sodexho workers had done what he/she said, anonymous would then have some new issue, some new problem with them, because that’s how it works, you can never satisfy them, because they are against you

    as I said, maybe that’s not what is happening with anonymous here, but it is a very common phenomenon

    –Richard Estes

  107. Richard

    mike, definitely, and anonymous, probably, are known in Internet parlance as “concern trolls”

    mike, contrary to his statement, has never had any interest in the Sodexho workers, which most of you probably figured out, because, why would someone suddenly jump ship and lose any empathy for poorly paid, contracted out workers just because they protested the Chancellor at a public event at his house?

    no one would, of course, and his concern for the Chancellor, his alarm about such public attention being focused upon him, is another indication of the improbability that he ever cared about the Sodexho workers, especially when such a minimal inconvenience is contrasted with the much more onerous situation that the Sodexho workers face every day

    anonymous is a closer call, because in my experience, some crafty people that oppose your endeavor, whether it is about labor rights or civil rights, do so from the standpoint of a purported friend

    if you would just protest differently, they say

    if you would just stop being so public and confrontational, they say

    if you would just make your demands more reasonable, they say

    of course, if you do what they say, you completely disempower yourself, and get nothing

    so, anonymous said that he/she could get down with the Sodexho workers, if they would have just stood on the other side of the street from Vanderhoef’s house

    but, predictably, the protest would have been much less effective that way if the Sodexho workers had been silly enough to impose their own draw their own protest zone cordon around themselves when they are otherwise free to walk the streets of Davis

    one also suspects that, if the Sodexho workers had done what he/she said, anonymous would then have some new issue, some new problem with them, because that’s how it works, you can never satisfy them, because they are against you

    as I said, maybe that’s not what is happening with anonymous here, but it is a very common phenomenon

    –Richard Estes

  108. Richard

    mike, definitely, and anonymous, probably, are known in Internet parlance as “concern trolls”

    mike, contrary to his statement, has never had any interest in the Sodexho workers, which most of you probably figured out, because, why would someone suddenly jump ship and lose any empathy for poorly paid, contracted out workers just because they protested the Chancellor at a public event at his house?

    no one would, of course, and his concern for the Chancellor, his alarm about such public attention being focused upon him, is another indication of the improbability that he ever cared about the Sodexho workers, especially when such a minimal inconvenience is contrasted with the much more onerous situation that the Sodexho workers face every day

    anonymous is a closer call, because in my experience, some crafty people that oppose your endeavor, whether it is about labor rights or civil rights, do so from the standpoint of a purported friend

    if you would just protest differently, they say

    if you would just stop being so public and confrontational, they say

    if you would just make your demands more reasonable, they say

    of course, if you do what they say, you completely disempower yourself, and get nothing

    so, anonymous said that he/she could get down with the Sodexho workers, if they would have just stood on the other side of the street from Vanderhoef’s house

    but, predictably, the protest would have been much less effective that way if the Sodexho workers had been silly enough to impose their own draw their own protest zone cordon around themselves when they are otherwise free to walk the streets of Davis

    one also suspects that, if the Sodexho workers had done what he/she said, anonymous would then have some new issue, some new problem with them, because that’s how it works, you can never satisfy them, because they are against you

    as I said, maybe that’s not what is happening with anonymous here, but it is a very common phenomenon

    –Richard Estes

  109. Anonymous

    I have a question: Has anyone asked Sodhexo to step up their payment and benefits to their workers? Won’t it cost students if the university takes on the food workers and raises their salaries and benefits? I haven’t seen this angle explored.

  110. Anonymous

    I have a question: Has anyone asked Sodhexo to step up their payment and benefits to their workers? Won’t it cost students if the university takes on the food workers and raises their salaries and benefits? I haven’t seen this angle explored.

  111. Anonymous

    I have a question: Has anyone asked Sodhexo to step up their payment and benefits to their workers? Won’t it cost students if the university takes on the food workers and raises their salaries and benefits? I haven’t seen this angle explored.

  112. Anonymous

    I have a question: Has anyone asked Sodhexo to step up their payment and benefits to their workers? Won’t it cost students if the university takes on the food workers and raises their salaries and benefits? I haven’t seen this angle explored.

  113. Mike

    heheh- I have never been called a “concern troll” before.

    As to being a supporter of their position, I have posted before on this topic and I certainly am no supporter of their protest, but was sympathetic to the their needs. As I have said in previous posts, this requires spreadsheets, not silly little signs. They need to identify a funding source, it really isnt the University’s problem, it is their own. Further, they really have to step up and quit pretending this won’t impact students- there is a signficant increase in costs which will impact the students if this happens, and if the students out there waving the signs really are willing to put their money where their mouths are (highly unlikely) then why not?

    So, back to the point. Any sympathy I had for these people is gone as they have used a completely inapporpriate form of protest to call attention to their economic demands. My position has shifted from “sure, why not if the details can be worked out” to “let the University and Sodexho deal with them”…

    I doubt am alone on this. The people out in front of the Chancellors house only have themselves to blame when nothing ever comes of all this… they blew it.

  114. Mike

    heheh- I have never been called a “concern troll” before.

    As to being a supporter of their position, I have posted before on this topic and I certainly am no supporter of their protest, but was sympathetic to the their needs. As I have said in previous posts, this requires spreadsheets, not silly little signs. They need to identify a funding source, it really isnt the University’s problem, it is their own. Further, they really have to step up and quit pretending this won’t impact students- there is a signficant increase in costs which will impact the students if this happens, and if the students out there waving the signs really are willing to put their money where their mouths are (highly unlikely) then why not?

    So, back to the point. Any sympathy I had for these people is gone as they have used a completely inapporpriate form of protest to call attention to their economic demands. My position has shifted from “sure, why not if the details can be worked out” to “let the University and Sodexho deal with them”…

    I doubt am alone on this. The people out in front of the Chancellors house only have themselves to blame when nothing ever comes of all this… they blew it.

  115. Mike

    heheh- I have never been called a “concern troll” before.

    As to being a supporter of their position, I have posted before on this topic and I certainly am no supporter of their protest, but was sympathetic to the their needs. As I have said in previous posts, this requires spreadsheets, not silly little signs. They need to identify a funding source, it really isnt the University’s problem, it is their own. Further, they really have to step up and quit pretending this won’t impact students- there is a signficant increase in costs which will impact the students if this happens, and if the students out there waving the signs really are willing to put their money where their mouths are (highly unlikely) then why not?

    So, back to the point. Any sympathy I had for these people is gone as they have used a completely inapporpriate form of protest to call attention to their economic demands. My position has shifted from “sure, why not if the details can be worked out” to “let the University and Sodexho deal with them”…

    I doubt am alone on this. The people out in front of the Chancellors house only have themselves to blame when nothing ever comes of all this… they blew it.

  116. Mike

    heheh- I have never been called a “concern troll” before.

    As to being a supporter of their position, I have posted before on this topic and I certainly am no supporter of their protest, but was sympathetic to the their needs. As I have said in previous posts, this requires spreadsheets, not silly little signs. They need to identify a funding source, it really isnt the University’s problem, it is their own. Further, they really have to step up and quit pretending this won’t impact students- there is a signficant increase in costs which will impact the students if this happens, and if the students out there waving the signs really are willing to put their money where their mouths are (highly unlikely) then why not?

    So, back to the point. Any sympathy I had for these people is gone as they have used a completely inapporpriate form of protest to call attention to their economic demands. My position has shifted from “sure, why not if the details can be worked out” to “let the University and Sodexho deal with them”…

    I doubt am alone on this. The people out in front of the Chancellors house only have themselves to blame when nothing ever comes of all this… they blew it.

  117. Mike Shepley

    Ya know…it kinda takes me back when…
    then again it don’t(sic)…
    of course los federales will say, ya nevah know who might be the next son of SLA or daughter of Unabom, eh? Gotta keep book…
    …on EVERYONE.
    …but look, what I meant to say is this little protest soiree is a long way from the one I remember back in front of the Cancellor’s Rez one night in 72. 2000 or so head of angry kid shouting “hell no we won’t go” or some such in the dark. Ken Levy, if anyone remembers the name, clambering up on a car to yell something and make a joke about how the cops were getting lost trying to follow this mob, just before it, we, headed on off somewhere else (train tracks?)
    A crowd that size in a place advertised with a 20,000 pop had some fear factor I suppose. I wonder what really happened to all those the then Cointelpro made book on?
    Never give up. The minute you do you get raygun and shrub, etc.

  118. Mike Shepley

    Ya know…it kinda takes me back when…
    then again it don’t(sic)…
    of course los federales will say, ya nevah know who might be the next son of SLA or daughter of Unabom, eh? Gotta keep book…
    …on EVERYONE.
    …but look, what I meant to say is this little protest soiree is a long way from the one I remember back in front of the Cancellor’s Rez one night in 72. 2000 or so head of angry kid shouting “hell no we won’t go” or some such in the dark. Ken Levy, if anyone remembers the name, clambering up on a car to yell something and make a joke about how the cops were getting lost trying to follow this mob, just before it, we, headed on off somewhere else (train tracks?)
    A crowd that size in a place advertised with a 20,000 pop had some fear factor I suppose. I wonder what really happened to all those the then Cointelpro made book on?
    Never give up. The minute you do you get raygun and shrub, etc.

  119. Mike Shepley

    Ya know…it kinda takes me back when…
    then again it don’t(sic)…
    of course los federales will say, ya nevah know who might be the next son of SLA or daughter of Unabom, eh? Gotta keep book…
    …on EVERYONE.
    …but look, what I meant to say is this little protest soiree is a long way from the one I remember back in front of the Cancellor’s Rez one night in 72. 2000 or so head of angry kid shouting “hell no we won’t go” or some such in the dark. Ken Levy, if anyone remembers the name, clambering up on a car to yell something and make a joke about how the cops were getting lost trying to follow this mob, just before it, we, headed on off somewhere else (train tracks?)
    A crowd that size in a place advertised with a 20,000 pop had some fear factor I suppose. I wonder what really happened to all those the then Cointelpro made book on?
    Never give up. The minute you do you get raygun and shrub, etc.

  120. Mike Shepley

    Ya know…it kinda takes me back when…
    then again it don’t(sic)…
    of course los federales will say, ya nevah know who might be the next son of SLA or daughter of Unabom, eh? Gotta keep book…
    …on EVERYONE.
    …but look, what I meant to say is this little protest soiree is a long way from the one I remember back in front of the Cancellor’s Rez one night in 72. 2000 or so head of angry kid shouting “hell no we won’t go” or some such in the dark. Ken Levy, if anyone remembers the name, clambering up on a car to yell something and make a joke about how the cops were getting lost trying to follow this mob, just before it, we, headed on off somewhere else (train tracks?)
    A crowd that size in a place advertised with a 20,000 pop had some fear factor I suppose. I wonder what really happened to all those the then Cointelpro made book on?
    Never give up. The minute you do you get raygun and shrub, etc.

  121. Doug Paul Davis

    “I have a question: Has anyone asked Sodhexo to step up their payment and benefits to their workers?”

    The only way that would work is if the University agreed to pay Sodexho more, so the university is still the party to negotiate with regardless of how that arrangement is finally reached.

    “Won’t it cost students if the university takes on the food workers and raises their salaries and benefits? I haven’t seen this angle explored.”

    This angle has been explored on here in a previous article in the response from the university. And the answer is that is what the university is claiming–that costs will be passed along to the students. Does it have to be that way? Not necessarily.

  122. Doug Paul Davis

    “I have a question: Has anyone asked Sodhexo to step up their payment and benefits to their workers?”

    The only way that would work is if the University agreed to pay Sodexho more, so the university is still the party to negotiate with regardless of how that arrangement is finally reached.

    “Won’t it cost students if the university takes on the food workers and raises their salaries and benefits? I haven’t seen this angle explored.”

    This angle has been explored on here in a previous article in the response from the university. And the answer is that is what the university is claiming–that costs will be passed along to the students. Does it have to be that way? Not necessarily.

  123. Doug Paul Davis

    “I have a question: Has anyone asked Sodhexo to step up their payment and benefits to their workers?”

    The only way that would work is if the University agreed to pay Sodexho more, so the university is still the party to negotiate with regardless of how that arrangement is finally reached.

    “Won’t it cost students if the university takes on the food workers and raises their salaries and benefits? I haven’t seen this angle explored.”

    This angle has been explored on here in a previous article in the response from the university. And the answer is that is what the university is claiming–that costs will be passed along to the students. Does it have to be that way? Not necessarily.

  124. Doug Paul Davis

    “I have a question: Has anyone asked Sodhexo to step up their payment and benefits to their workers?”

    The only way that would work is if the University agreed to pay Sodexho more, so the university is still the party to negotiate with regardless of how that arrangement is finally reached.

    “Won’t it cost students if the university takes on the food workers and raises their salaries and benefits? I haven’t seen this angle explored.”

    This angle has been explored on here in a previous article in the response from the university. And the answer is that is what the university is claiming–that costs will be passed along to the students. Does it have to be that way? Not necessarily.

  125. Richard

    good to see that Mike confirmed my analysis straight down the line

    he is pro-administration, as I predicted, and he is putting out the administration line, it is a question of spreadsheets, of identifying funding sources . . .

    but, of course, this is all completely wrong, and one only needs to talk to the Sodexho workers to understand it very readily

    the problem isn’t spreadsheets, it is the dogged refusal of the administration to acknowledge their union representation

    because, as long as you can avoid speaking to the selected union representatives of the workers, you can avoid the necessity of engaging in a good faith dialogue on these issues while people like Mike paradoxically keep saying that the workers have an obligation to identify funding sources

    along these lines, careful readers have do doubt noticed that Mike has avoided every saying that the university administration should recognize the union so as to commence a good faith dialogue and negotiation

    why? because he doesn’t support it

    as I’ve said before, they will talk about anything, ANYTHING to avoid dealing with the issue at hand, recognition of the union for Sodexho workers

    –Richard Estes

  126. Richard

    good to see that Mike confirmed my analysis straight down the line

    he is pro-administration, as I predicted, and he is putting out the administration line, it is a question of spreadsheets, of identifying funding sources . . .

    but, of course, this is all completely wrong, and one only needs to talk to the Sodexho workers to understand it very readily

    the problem isn’t spreadsheets, it is the dogged refusal of the administration to acknowledge their union representation

    because, as long as you can avoid speaking to the selected union representatives of the workers, you can avoid the necessity of engaging in a good faith dialogue on these issues while people like Mike paradoxically keep saying that the workers have an obligation to identify funding sources

    along these lines, careful readers have do doubt noticed that Mike has avoided every saying that the university administration should recognize the union so as to commence a good faith dialogue and negotiation

    why? because he doesn’t support it

    as I’ve said before, they will talk about anything, ANYTHING to avoid dealing with the issue at hand, recognition of the union for Sodexho workers

    –Richard Estes

  127. Richard

    good to see that Mike confirmed my analysis straight down the line

    he is pro-administration, as I predicted, and he is putting out the administration line, it is a question of spreadsheets, of identifying funding sources . . .

    but, of course, this is all completely wrong, and one only needs to talk to the Sodexho workers to understand it very readily

    the problem isn’t spreadsheets, it is the dogged refusal of the administration to acknowledge their union representation

    because, as long as you can avoid speaking to the selected union representatives of the workers, you can avoid the necessity of engaging in a good faith dialogue on these issues while people like Mike paradoxically keep saying that the workers have an obligation to identify funding sources

    along these lines, careful readers have do doubt noticed that Mike has avoided every saying that the university administration should recognize the union so as to commence a good faith dialogue and negotiation

    why? because he doesn’t support it

    as I’ve said before, they will talk about anything, ANYTHING to avoid dealing with the issue at hand, recognition of the union for Sodexho workers

    –Richard Estes

  128. Richard

    good to see that Mike confirmed my analysis straight down the line

    he is pro-administration, as I predicted, and he is putting out the administration line, it is a question of spreadsheets, of identifying funding sources . . .

    but, of course, this is all completely wrong, and one only needs to talk to the Sodexho workers to understand it very readily

    the problem isn’t spreadsheets, it is the dogged refusal of the administration to acknowledge their union representation

    because, as long as you can avoid speaking to the selected union representatives of the workers, you can avoid the necessity of engaging in a good faith dialogue on these issues while people like Mike paradoxically keep saying that the workers have an obligation to identify funding sources

    along these lines, careful readers have do doubt noticed that Mike has avoided every saying that the university administration should recognize the union so as to commence a good faith dialogue and negotiation

    why? because he doesn’t support it

    as I’ve said before, they will talk about anything, ANYTHING to avoid dealing with the issue at hand, recognition of the union for Sodexho workers

    –Richard Estes

  129. Anonymous

    “And the answer is that is what the university is claiming–that costs will be passed along to the students. Does it have to be that way? Not necessarily.”

    One way or another the costs will be passed along to the students and the taxpayers. But the budget is Byzantine enough that it doesn’t have to be a direct increase to the dorm residents.

  130. Anonymous

    “And the answer is that is what the university is claiming–that costs will be passed along to the students. Does it have to be that way? Not necessarily.”

    One way or another the costs will be passed along to the students and the taxpayers. But the budget is Byzantine enough that it doesn’t have to be a direct increase to the dorm residents.

  131. Anonymous

    “And the answer is that is what the university is claiming–that costs will be passed along to the students. Does it have to be that way? Not necessarily.”

    One way or another the costs will be passed along to the students and the taxpayers. But the budget is Byzantine enough that it doesn’t have to be a direct increase to the dorm residents.

  132. Anonymous

    “And the answer is that is what the university is claiming–that costs will be passed along to the students. Does it have to be that way? Not necessarily.”

    One way or another the costs will be passed along to the students and the taxpayers. But the budget is Byzantine enough that it doesn’t have to be a direct increase to the dorm residents.

  133. Mike

    Richard-
    I am a little mystified as to why the University should ever meet with the Union “representatives”? They don’t work for the University, they work for Sodexho. It makes zero sense. It would be like having a meeting in your front yard with the workers from Davis Waste Removal, they want higher wages and want you to pay them directly, they say they would be happier…

  134. Mike

    Richard-
    I am a little mystified as to why the University should ever meet with the Union “representatives”? They don’t work for the University, they work for Sodexho. It makes zero sense. It would be like having a meeting in your front yard with the workers from Davis Waste Removal, they want higher wages and want you to pay them directly, they say they would be happier…

  135. Mike

    Richard-
    I am a little mystified as to why the University should ever meet with the Union “representatives”? They don’t work for the University, they work for Sodexho. It makes zero sense. It would be like having a meeting in your front yard with the workers from Davis Waste Removal, they want higher wages and want you to pay them directly, they say they would be happier…

  136. Mike

    Richard-
    I am a little mystified as to why the University should ever meet with the Union “representatives”? They don’t work for the University, they work for Sodexho. It makes zero sense. It would be like having a meeting in your front yard with the workers from Davis Waste Removal, they want higher wages and want you to pay them directly, they say they would be happier…

  137. Richard

    I think the situation is pretty straightforward. The workers want out of Sodexho, and they want the UCD adminstration to communicate with them, and their union representatives, as to how to make that happen. Not difficult, unless, of course, UCD administration backs Sodexho.

    –Richard Estes

  138. Richard

    I think the situation is pretty straightforward. The workers want out of Sodexho, and they want the UCD adminstration to communicate with them, and their union representatives, as to how to make that happen. Not difficult, unless, of course, UCD administration backs Sodexho.

    –Richard Estes

  139. Richard

    I think the situation is pretty straightforward. The workers want out of Sodexho, and they want the UCD adminstration to communicate with them, and their union representatives, as to how to make that happen. Not difficult, unless, of course, UCD administration backs Sodexho.

    –Richard Estes

  140. Richard

    I think the situation is pretty straightforward. The workers want out of Sodexho, and they want the UCD adminstration to communicate with them, and their union representatives, as to how to make that happen. Not difficult, unless, of course, UCD administration backs Sodexho.

    –Richard Estes

  141. dinho habeeb

    the threat of disturbing the peace directly followed the questions about photographing us. they didn’t say ‘if you continue asking questions, you will be cited for disturbing the peace because of your megaphones.’
    they did not combine the two thoughts into one statement, but it was very easy to know what they meant though…

  142. dinho habeeb

    the threat of disturbing the peace directly followed the questions about photographing us. they didn’t say ‘if you continue asking questions, you will be cited for disturbing the peace because of your megaphones.’
    they did not combine the two thoughts into one statement, but it was very easy to know what they meant though…

  143. dinho habeeb

    the threat of disturbing the peace directly followed the questions about photographing us. they didn’t say ‘if you continue asking questions, you will be cited for disturbing the peace because of your megaphones.’
    they did not combine the two thoughts into one statement, but it was very easy to know what they meant though…

  144. dinho habeeb

    the threat of disturbing the peace directly followed the questions about photographing us. they didn’t say ‘if you continue asking questions, you will be cited for disturbing the peace because of your megaphones.’
    they did not combine the two thoughts into one statement, but it was very easy to know what they meant though…

  145. Anonymous

    Rifkin wrote about the UCD
    “death star”:
    “the same boobs who approved the nightmarish L&S building approved this very ugly structure [Vanderhoef’s “home”]. I just don’t understand why UC Davis has such poor standards when it comes to architecture.”

    Narcissistically designed
    and approved is why.
    –Brian Kenyon

  146. Anonymous

    Rifkin wrote about the UCD
    “death star”:
    “the same boobs who approved the nightmarish L&S building approved this very ugly structure [Vanderhoef’s “home”]. I just don’t understand why UC Davis has such poor standards when it comes to architecture.”

    Narcissistically designed
    and approved is why.
    –Brian Kenyon

  147. Anonymous

    Rifkin wrote about the UCD
    “death star”:
    “the same boobs who approved the nightmarish L&S building approved this very ugly structure [Vanderhoef’s “home”]. I just don’t understand why UC Davis has such poor standards when it comes to architecture.”

    Narcissistically designed
    and approved is why.
    –Brian Kenyon

  148. Anonymous

    Rifkin wrote about the UCD
    “death star”:
    “the same boobs who approved the nightmarish L&S building approved this very ugly structure [Vanderhoef’s “home”]. I just don’t understand why UC Davis has such poor standards when it comes to architecture.”

    Narcissistically designed
    and approved is why.
    –Brian Kenyon

  149. Anonymous

    無名 – wu ming:
    Unlike the designers of the Davis
    Food Co-op renovation, and the UCD “Death Star” who’ve won many an award for “design excellence,” my appellation (based on careful observation of how the lack of imagination is physically manifested) sadly, receives no award, save the notice of curious readers such as you.
    –Brian Kenyon

  150. Anonymous

    無名 – wu ming:
    Unlike the designers of the Davis
    Food Co-op renovation, and the UCD “Death Star” who’ve won many an award for “design excellence,” my appellation (based on careful observation of how the lack of imagination is physically manifested) sadly, receives no award, save the notice of curious readers such as you.
    –Brian Kenyon

  151. Anonymous

    無名 – wu ming:
    Unlike the designers of the Davis
    Food Co-op renovation, and the UCD “Death Star” who’ve won many an award for “design excellence,” my appellation (based on careful observation of how the lack of imagination is physically manifested) sadly, receives no award, save the notice of curious readers such as you.
    –Brian Kenyon

  152. Anonymous

    無名 – wu ming:
    Unlike the designers of the Davis
    Food Co-op renovation, and the UCD “Death Star” who’ve won many an award for “design excellence,” my appellation (based on careful observation of how the lack of imagination is physically manifested) sadly, receives no award, save the notice of curious readers such as you.
    –Brian Kenyon

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