Commentary: Why I believe We Need More Officers

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On Tuesday night, it was late into the evening, rapidly approaching the midnight hour. I stepped up the microphone to speak at public comment immediately after Davis Police Sergeant Rod Rifredi. I can only imagine what was going through the minds of the many police officers that were in attendance that night. However and perhaps surprisingly to the DPD officials who were there, I spoke of the need to hire six new police officers in the near future. In fact, I told the council that I “agreed with the DPOA and Mr. Rifredi.”

As this blog has progressed, I have spoken less and less during public comment. For one thing, I feel I can speak better through the blog. For another, I sometimes get the distinct impression I make things more likely to fail than pass. But this was different, this issue. The issue of police staffing and public safety perhaps make my perspective more rather than less important. I am fully aware of the past and the perceptions in the community and most particularly in the police department about me.

On the other hand, I think some of those perceptions are wrong. Few in Davis are aware than in San Luis Obispo I was a close ally of the police chief. But last year the issue of police oversight for whatever reason became so polarizing that it became the defining moment for many about me, whom people had never met for the most part and knew even less about my background and most of my beliefs.

I flash forward to the current discussion at hand, but I believe that the past is paramount to understanding the future. Why was I so moved to advocate for adequate staffing of police officers? I believe such staffing is part and parcel toward fostering improved trust between the department and the community. For many, the police are strangers in this community, many of whom do not live here and merely move through town, driving around in their cars. Some of that has changed with the hiring of Landy Black as police chief. But I believe we need to move closer toward a model of community policing, where the police are part of the community in which they serve. The only way that can happen is that we have enough officers on duty to put some on foot patrol. To put some into various communities where they can work with the neighborhoods and the citizens.

This is also a political issue and it begins with city budget problems. I could see a sense of frustration on the faces of the officers as they recited past promises that a new officer each year would be hired and complained that this commitment fell by the wayside. I saw the frustration as the city council spoke of budget constraints and lack of resources, even as they have in the past put into place budgetary considerations that have served to hamstring the budget and put such changes out of reach.

A serious crisis looms for the city that has made financial commitments that will induce structural budget problems. The policy of five year employment leading to lifetime pensions is not sustainable. The rapidly escalating salaries of top end officials adds to this problem.

Councilmember Stephen Souza spoke in terms of three main areas for expenditure and played parks and recreation off police and fire in a budgetary tug-of-war.

However at the same time, he presented us with a false dichotomy. The city is prepared to spend hundreds of millions on the combination of a wastewater treatment plant that will be simultaneously upgraded with a new water supply delivery system.

When confronted on this issue Councilmember Souza suggested that money came from a different fund than public safety money. While technically correct, in practice it comes from the same place–the city resident. The money comes from them whether it takes the form of a rate increase or the form of a new tax.

The city is increasingly going to rely on taxation as a means to raise revenue because they have not controlled their spending in recent years. What that means is that the public is in the unenviable task of choosing between parks, police, fire, or water. Unfortunately, the decision on parks has already been chosen. The voters voted for Measure G last year.

Now I am not against parks, no one is. But we have to ask ourselves if that was the most pressing need that needed to be addressed with a tax increase or reauthorization. The problem is that the citizens chose between parks or less parks on their ballot. But the real choice down the line is a prioritization between parks, public safety, and water. And the public never had this laid out to them last year. They only had a simply choice. But at some point, as we face a parcel tax increase schools and one for the library (both of which are desperately needed and I wholly support), we have to lay all and not just some of the options on the table. Because at some point, the public is going to revolt over taxes. They are going to revolt over paying more and more to city government when a lot of the current spending has been squandered. And at the end of the day, they are never going to choose which things are priorities and which or not. They will simply be faced with a terrible dilemma–do I increase my taxes even more or do I cut vital city financed services.

Unfortunately, what our city council is doing forestalling that decision date. They are punting. They are putting the ball into the hands of a future council to make the tough decision as three of them are facing reelection in less than a year, and two of them–Souza and Saylor–have never met a program or budgetary increase that they do not support. But at some point, it will come to the point where it is too much to take and we really will face a crisis.

In the meantime, we need more police officers on the street. We need to insure the safety of the community and help to restore the vital trust between the police and certain communities, and that begins by our city giving the police the tools that they need to do the job they were hired and we trust them to do.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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100 thoughts on “Commentary: Why I believe We Need More Officers”

  1. Anonymous

    “the issue of police oversight for whatever reason became so polarizing”

    For whatever reason? How can you distance yourself from that polarizing when you, your wife and CAROLE (who most people know was either your project, or the project of someone you work closely with) did so much to wedge this town apart, and ultimately, drive a good chief and some officers out of town?

    Surely that was a contributing factor in the understaffing the department is facing now.

  2. Anonymous

    “the issue of police oversight for whatever reason became so polarizing”

    For whatever reason? How can you distance yourself from that polarizing when you, your wife and CAROLE (who most people know was either your project, or the project of someone you work closely with) did so much to wedge this town apart, and ultimately, drive a good chief and some officers out of town?

    Surely that was a contributing factor in the understaffing the department is facing now.

  3. Anonymous

    “the issue of police oversight for whatever reason became so polarizing”

    For whatever reason? How can you distance yourself from that polarizing when you, your wife and CAROLE (who most people know was either your project, or the project of someone you work closely with) did so much to wedge this town apart, and ultimately, drive a good chief and some officers out of town?

    Surely that was a contributing factor in the understaffing the department is facing now.

  4. Anonymous

    “the issue of police oversight for whatever reason became so polarizing”

    For whatever reason? How can you distance yourself from that polarizing when you, your wife and CAROLE (who most people know was either your project, or the project of someone you work closely with) did so much to wedge this town apart, and ultimately, drive a good chief and some officers out of town?

    Surely that was a contributing factor in the understaffing the department is facing now.

  5. Richard

    anonymous is wrong: I lived in Davis for many years, and CAROLE and the Buzayan case has nothing to do with understaffing the police department, as the chief and officers have been informing the council and the city manager for years about it, as well as about inadequate technology and resources

    it should be noted, however, that the police unions, by pushing for safety retirement benefits, 3% at 50, I believe (something like that, anyway), have put cities like Davis in a major bind, because the cost of that benefit is enormous, and will do nothing but further hamstring the ability of cities in the future

    so, from a public safety standpoint, more officers are needed, from an officer standpoint, to some extent, whether it was conscious or not, they choose enriched retirement benefits over improved staffing, because the ability of cities like Davis to tax their citizens is not unlimited

    –Richard Estes

  6. Richard

    anonymous is wrong: I lived in Davis for many years, and CAROLE and the Buzayan case has nothing to do with understaffing the police department, as the chief and officers have been informing the council and the city manager for years about it, as well as about inadequate technology and resources

    it should be noted, however, that the police unions, by pushing for safety retirement benefits, 3% at 50, I believe (something like that, anyway), have put cities like Davis in a major bind, because the cost of that benefit is enormous, and will do nothing but further hamstring the ability of cities in the future

    so, from a public safety standpoint, more officers are needed, from an officer standpoint, to some extent, whether it was conscious or not, they choose enriched retirement benefits over improved staffing, because the ability of cities like Davis to tax their citizens is not unlimited

    –Richard Estes

  7. Richard

    anonymous is wrong: I lived in Davis for many years, and CAROLE and the Buzayan case has nothing to do with understaffing the police department, as the chief and officers have been informing the council and the city manager for years about it, as well as about inadequate technology and resources

    it should be noted, however, that the police unions, by pushing for safety retirement benefits, 3% at 50, I believe (something like that, anyway), have put cities like Davis in a major bind, because the cost of that benefit is enormous, and will do nothing but further hamstring the ability of cities in the future

    so, from a public safety standpoint, more officers are needed, from an officer standpoint, to some extent, whether it was conscious or not, they choose enriched retirement benefits over improved staffing, because the ability of cities like Davis to tax their citizens is not unlimited

    –Richard Estes

  8. Richard

    anonymous is wrong: I lived in Davis for many years, and CAROLE and the Buzayan case has nothing to do with understaffing the police department, as the chief and officers have been informing the council and the city manager for years about it, as well as about inadequate technology and resources

    it should be noted, however, that the police unions, by pushing for safety retirement benefits, 3% at 50, I believe (something like that, anyway), have put cities like Davis in a major bind, because the cost of that benefit is enormous, and will do nothing but further hamstring the ability of cities in the future

    so, from a public safety standpoint, more officers are needed, from an officer standpoint, to some extent, whether it was conscious or not, they choose enriched retirement benefits over improved staffing, because the ability of cities like Davis to tax their citizens is not unlimited

    –Richard Estes

  9. Anonymous

    Agree with much you say, however I also believe that the city mentality is to increase, increase increase without looking at HOW things are done and how they could be done more efficiently…..they seem so protective of the staff and ‘way we do things’ that process improvement is an unknown entitity. I believe we have enough examples to know throwing money at something won’t necessarily make it better. If anyone has dealt with the planning process, it is frustrating, sloooow and inefficient, to name just one example.

  10. Anonymous

    Agree with much you say, however I also believe that the city mentality is to increase, increase increase without looking at HOW things are done and how they could be done more efficiently…..they seem so protective of the staff and ‘way we do things’ that process improvement is an unknown entitity. I believe we have enough examples to know throwing money at something won’t necessarily make it better. If anyone has dealt with the planning process, it is frustrating, sloooow and inefficient, to name just one example.

  11. Anonymous

    Agree with much you say, however I also believe that the city mentality is to increase, increase increase without looking at HOW things are done and how they could be done more efficiently…..they seem so protective of the staff and ‘way we do things’ that process improvement is an unknown entitity. I believe we have enough examples to know throwing money at something won’t necessarily make it better. If anyone has dealt with the planning process, it is frustrating, sloooow and inefficient, to name just one example.

  12. Anonymous

    Agree with much you say, however I also believe that the city mentality is to increase, increase increase without looking at HOW things are done and how they could be done more efficiently…..they seem so protective of the staff and ‘way we do things’ that process improvement is an unknown entitity. I believe we have enough examples to know throwing money at something won’t necessarily make it better. If anyone has dealt with the planning process, it is frustrating, sloooow and inefficient, to name just one example.

  13. Anonymous

    I think Chief Hyde–who was working 50% of the time as Chief and being paid full time by the City of Davis while his PhD, Stephen Souza, Don Saylor, and the DA’s office did far more to wedge the city than Cecilia or David ever did.

  14. Anonymous

    I think Chief Hyde–who was working 50% of the time as Chief and being paid full time by the City of Davis while his PhD, Stephen Souza, Don Saylor, and the DA’s office did far more to wedge the city than Cecilia or David ever did.

  15. Anonymous

    I think Chief Hyde–who was working 50% of the time as Chief and being paid full time by the City of Davis while his PhD, Stephen Souza, Don Saylor, and the DA’s office did far more to wedge the city than Cecilia or David ever did.

  16. Anonymous

    I think Chief Hyde–who was working 50% of the time as Chief and being paid full time by the City of Davis while his PhD, Stephen Souza, Don Saylor, and the DA’s office did far more to wedge the city than Cecilia or David ever did.

  17. Anonymous

    7:41AM anonymous’ narrative is a classic example of the idealogue’s credo: hold to your position and
    and don’t confuse me with the facts. It is transparently unconvincing to any but fellow zealots.

  18. Anonymous

    7:41AM anonymous’ narrative is a classic example of the idealogue’s credo: hold to your position and
    and don’t confuse me with the facts. It is transparently unconvincing to any but fellow zealots.

  19. Anonymous

    7:41AM anonymous’ narrative is a classic example of the idealogue’s credo: hold to your position and
    and don’t confuse me with the facts. It is transparently unconvincing to any but fellow zealots.

  20. Anonymous

    7:41AM anonymous’ narrative is a classic example of the idealogue’s credo: hold to your position and
    and don’t confuse me with the facts. It is transparently unconvincing to any but fellow zealots.

  21. Doug Paul Davis

    I have a very different perspective about what happened last year than anonymous 7:41. However, I also do not want to get into on this thread because frankly that is not the issue we are dealing with.

    What we are dealing with here are budget problems and budget priorities. Neither of these have anything to do with what happened last year. The staffing problems now are not a result of that, they are a result of the lack of money that the city has to create new police positions. What I am talking about and what the council was talking about is creating new positions.

    How does what happened last year have anything to do with whether or not the police can have six new officer positions created? Answer: nothing. The only reason to bring that up at this point is to stir the pot. Again, I have to wonder exactly who has a desire to create a wedge, because it is certainly not me. I’d like to very much work with the police to help finding space in the budget to fill their staffing needs.

  22. Doug Paul Davis

    I have a very different perspective about what happened last year than anonymous 7:41. However, I also do not want to get into on this thread because frankly that is not the issue we are dealing with.

    What we are dealing with here are budget problems and budget priorities. Neither of these have anything to do with what happened last year. The staffing problems now are not a result of that, they are a result of the lack of money that the city has to create new police positions. What I am talking about and what the council was talking about is creating new positions.

    How does what happened last year have anything to do with whether or not the police can have six new officer positions created? Answer: nothing. The only reason to bring that up at this point is to stir the pot. Again, I have to wonder exactly who has a desire to create a wedge, because it is certainly not me. I’d like to very much work with the police to help finding space in the budget to fill their staffing needs.

  23. Doug Paul Davis

    I have a very different perspective about what happened last year than anonymous 7:41. However, I also do not want to get into on this thread because frankly that is not the issue we are dealing with.

    What we are dealing with here are budget problems and budget priorities. Neither of these have anything to do with what happened last year. The staffing problems now are not a result of that, they are a result of the lack of money that the city has to create new police positions. What I am talking about and what the council was talking about is creating new positions.

    How does what happened last year have anything to do with whether or not the police can have six new officer positions created? Answer: nothing. The only reason to bring that up at this point is to stir the pot. Again, I have to wonder exactly who has a desire to create a wedge, because it is certainly not me. I’d like to very much work with the police to help finding space in the budget to fill their staffing needs.

  24. Doug Paul Davis

    I have a very different perspective about what happened last year than anonymous 7:41. However, I also do not want to get into on this thread because frankly that is not the issue we are dealing with.

    What we are dealing with here are budget problems and budget priorities. Neither of these have anything to do with what happened last year. The staffing problems now are not a result of that, they are a result of the lack of money that the city has to create new police positions. What I am talking about and what the council was talking about is creating new positions.

    How does what happened last year have anything to do with whether or not the police can have six new officer positions created? Answer: nothing. The only reason to bring that up at this point is to stir the pot. Again, I have to wonder exactly who has a desire to create a wedge, because it is certainly not me. I’d like to very much work with the police to help finding space in the budget to fill their staffing needs.

  25. Anonymous

    i will like to comment on the davis pokice officer. officer rod refreied is not a nice offocer due to the experience our family experience by not durning any crime. AFTER picking up police repoert to try to fiqure out why our family was being harrassed? none. yes color plays a major role in this community and to have walking officers will only make them play a more major role of minornity in this community. walking in the rain, in the hot summer, windy wheather. NO just that may have waken up on the otherside of the bed like mostly they all do, Other officer laughinghing in the dept because they have to walk ? really I personally don’t think this will solve the problem because this problem start within the dept not the community. MS. ANDERSON

  26. Anonymous

    i will like to comment on the davis pokice officer. officer rod refreied is not a nice offocer due to the experience our family experience by not durning any crime. AFTER picking up police repoert to try to fiqure out why our family was being harrassed? none. yes color plays a major role in this community and to have walking officers will only make them play a more major role of minornity in this community. walking in the rain, in the hot summer, windy wheather. NO just that may have waken up on the otherside of the bed like mostly they all do, Other officer laughinghing in the dept because they have to walk ? really I personally don’t think this will solve the problem because this problem start within the dept not the community. MS. ANDERSON

  27. Anonymous

    i will like to comment on the davis pokice officer. officer rod refreied is not a nice offocer due to the experience our family experience by not durning any crime. AFTER picking up police repoert to try to fiqure out why our family was being harrassed? none. yes color plays a major role in this community and to have walking officers will only make them play a more major role of minornity in this community. walking in the rain, in the hot summer, windy wheather. NO just that may have waken up on the otherside of the bed like mostly they all do, Other officer laughinghing in the dept because they have to walk ? really I personally don’t think this will solve the problem because this problem start within the dept not the community. MS. ANDERSON

  28. Anonymous

    i will like to comment on the davis pokice officer. officer rod refreied is not a nice offocer due to the experience our family experience by not durning any crime. AFTER picking up police repoert to try to fiqure out why our family was being harrassed? none. yes color plays a major role in this community and to have walking officers will only make them play a more major role of minornity in this community. walking in the rain, in the hot summer, windy wheather. NO just that may have waken up on the otherside of the bed like mostly they all do, Other officer laughinghing in the dept because they have to walk ? really I personally don’t think this will solve the problem because this problem start within the dept not the community. MS. ANDERSON

  29. Anonymous

    SORRY ABOUT THE SPELLING WHICH TRYING TO TYPE FAST AND IN A HURRY POLICE AS WELL AS OFFICERS AS WELL AS LAUGHING FROM OTHER OFFICERS OF THE DEPT. iT WAS BROUGHT TO OUR ATTENTION WHICH IS NOT SHOCKING AT ALL THE N WORD WAS USED IN THE DEPT. IF YOUR SKIN IS NOT DARK AND YOU HAVE NO KIND OF POWER SUCH AS PROTECTION TO DEFEND THE ACTION THAT THE POLICE DEPT HAVE TAKEN AGAINST YOU IN THIS COMMUNITY DUE TO COLOR. then bascially it will be hard to understand the aniverserity of VANGUARD THERE WAS A COMMENT NAME 3 REASON WHY THEN YOU WILL ATTEND 1 PROBABALY BECAUSE YOU ARE NOT A MINORITY [2] PROBABLY BECAUSE YOU HAVE NOT EXPERIENCE THE DAVIS POLICE ACTIVITY RELATED TO MINORITY [3] MAYBE BEACAUSE MINORITY ARE FINALLY HAVING SUPPORT FROM A GROUP OF COMMUNITY WHO FEEL THE HURT THE MINORITY EXPERIENCE, AS WELL AS MAY HAVE SOME MINORITY THEY KNOWN THIS ACTION TO HAPPEN TO. [4] WHY THERE ARE NOT ANYMORE hrc BOARD MEMBER FOR THE REASON THE hrc TRIED TO follow up on the behavior of the law who suppose to serve and protect. And this is the only way of the commucation to express the action of the behavior of our police dept. I can go on and on just remember everyone cannot tell the same lie of all colors. happy aniversity and this shows a sign of communcation for those who don’t are afraid to speak. MS. ANDERSON BUT SIGNING IN ANONOYMOUS TO SHOW OTHERS DON’T BE AFRAID NAME IS CORRECT RATING TO MINORITY AS WELL AS MYSELF ASRE NUMER 1. AGAIN HOPE THIS HAVE ANSWER YOUR QUESTIONS AND WILL ANSWER MORE. MS. ANDERSON SIGNING OUT.

  30. Anonymous

    SORRY ABOUT THE SPELLING WHICH TRYING TO TYPE FAST AND IN A HURRY POLICE AS WELL AS OFFICERS AS WELL AS LAUGHING FROM OTHER OFFICERS OF THE DEPT. iT WAS BROUGHT TO OUR ATTENTION WHICH IS NOT SHOCKING AT ALL THE N WORD WAS USED IN THE DEPT. IF YOUR SKIN IS NOT DARK AND YOU HAVE NO KIND OF POWER SUCH AS PROTECTION TO DEFEND THE ACTION THAT THE POLICE DEPT HAVE TAKEN AGAINST YOU IN THIS COMMUNITY DUE TO COLOR. then bascially it will be hard to understand the aniverserity of VANGUARD THERE WAS A COMMENT NAME 3 REASON WHY THEN YOU WILL ATTEND 1 PROBABALY BECAUSE YOU ARE NOT A MINORITY [2] PROBABLY BECAUSE YOU HAVE NOT EXPERIENCE THE DAVIS POLICE ACTIVITY RELATED TO MINORITY [3] MAYBE BEACAUSE MINORITY ARE FINALLY HAVING SUPPORT FROM A GROUP OF COMMUNITY WHO FEEL THE HURT THE MINORITY EXPERIENCE, AS WELL AS MAY HAVE SOME MINORITY THEY KNOWN THIS ACTION TO HAPPEN TO. [4] WHY THERE ARE NOT ANYMORE hrc BOARD MEMBER FOR THE REASON THE hrc TRIED TO follow up on the behavior of the law who suppose to serve and protect. And this is the only way of the commucation to express the action of the behavior of our police dept. I can go on and on just remember everyone cannot tell the same lie of all colors. happy aniversity and this shows a sign of communcation for those who don’t are afraid to speak. MS. ANDERSON BUT SIGNING IN ANONOYMOUS TO SHOW OTHERS DON’T BE AFRAID NAME IS CORRECT RATING TO MINORITY AS WELL AS MYSELF ASRE NUMER 1. AGAIN HOPE THIS HAVE ANSWER YOUR QUESTIONS AND WILL ANSWER MORE. MS. ANDERSON SIGNING OUT.

  31. Anonymous

    SORRY ABOUT THE SPELLING WHICH TRYING TO TYPE FAST AND IN A HURRY POLICE AS WELL AS OFFICERS AS WELL AS LAUGHING FROM OTHER OFFICERS OF THE DEPT. iT WAS BROUGHT TO OUR ATTENTION WHICH IS NOT SHOCKING AT ALL THE N WORD WAS USED IN THE DEPT. IF YOUR SKIN IS NOT DARK AND YOU HAVE NO KIND OF POWER SUCH AS PROTECTION TO DEFEND THE ACTION THAT THE POLICE DEPT HAVE TAKEN AGAINST YOU IN THIS COMMUNITY DUE TO COLOR. then bascially it will be hard to understand the aniverserity of VANGUARD THERE WAS A COMMENT NAME 3 REASON WHY THEN YOU WILL ATTEND 1 PROBABALY BECAUSE YOU ARE NOT A MINORITY [2] PROBABLY BECAUSE YOU HAVE NOT EXPERIENCE THE DAVIS POLICE ACTIVITY RELATED TO MINORITY [3] MAYBE BEACAUSE MINORITY ARE FINALLY HAVING SUPPORT FROM A GROUP OF COMMUNITY WHO FEEL THE HURT THE MINORITY EXPERIENCE, AS WELL AS MAY HAVE SOME MINORITY THEY KNOWN THIS ACTION TO HAPPEN TO. [4] WHY THERE ARE NOT ANYMORE hrc BOARD MEMBER FOR THE REASON THE hrc TRIED TO follow up on the behavior of the law who suppose to serve and protect. And this is the only way of the commucation to express the action of the behavior of our police dept. I can go on and on just remember everyone cannot tell the same lie of all colors. happy aniversity and this shows a sign of communcation for those who don’t are afraid to speak. MS. ANDERSON BUT SIGNING IN ANONOYMOUS TO SHOW OTHERS DON’T BE AFRAID NAME IS CORRECT RATING TO MINORITY AS WELL AS MYSELF ASRE NUMER 1. AGAIN HOPE THIS HAVE ANSWER YOUR QUESTIONS AND WILL ANSWER MORE. MS. ANDERSON SIGNING OUT.

  32. Anonymous

    SORRY ABOUT THE SPELLING WHICH TRYING TO TYPE FAST AND IN A HURRY POLICE AS WELL AS OFFICERS AS WELL AS LAUGHING FROM OTHER OFFICERS OF THE DEPT. iT WAS BROUGHT TO OUR ATTENTION WHICH IS NOT SHOCKING AT ALL THE N WORD WAS USED IN THE DEPT. IF YOUR SKIN IS NOT DARK AND YOU HAVE NO KIND OF POWER SUCH AS PROTECTION TO DEFEND THE ACTION THAT THE POLICE DEPT HAVE TAKEN AGAINST YOU IN THIS COMMUNITY DUE TO COLOR. then bascially it will be hard to understand the aniverserity of VANGUARD THERE WAS A COMMENT NAME 3 REASON WHY THEN YOU WILL ATTEND 1 PROBABALY BECAUSE YOU ARE NOT A MINORITY [2] PROBABLY BECAUSE YOU HAVE NOT EXPERIENCE THE DAVIS POLICE ACTIVITY RELATED TO MINORITY [3] MAYBE BEACAUSE MINORITY ARE FINALLY HAVING SUPPORT FROM A GROUP OF COMMUNITY WHO FEEL THE HURT THE MINORITY EXPERIENCE, AS WELL AS MAY HAVE SOME MINORITY THEY KNOWN THIS ACTION TO HAPPEN TO. [4] WHY THERE ARE NOT ANYMORE hrc BOARD MEMBER FOR THE REASON THE hrc TRIED TO follow up on the behavior of the law who suppose to serve and protect. And this is the only way of the commucation to express the action of the behavior of our police dept. I can go on and on just remember everyone cannot tell the same lie of all colors. happy aniversity and this shows a sign of communcation for those who don’t are afraid to speak. MS. ANDERSON BUT SIGNING IN ANONOYMOUS TO SHOW OTHERS DON’T BE AFRAID NAME IS CORRECT RATING TO MINORITY AS WELL AS MYSELF ASRE NUMER 1. AGAIN HOPE THIS HAVE ANSWER YOUR QUESTIONS AND WILL ANSWER MORE. MS. ANDERSON SIGNING OUT.

  33. 無名 - wu ming

    i totally agree on the police staffing issue, although i’m less sure that davis faces a revenue crisis. this city has grown exceptionally affluent over the past two decades; for most residents, it is not a question of their ability to pay higher taxes and fees, as much as their political willingness to do so. i understand why you’re concerned with the possibility of being forced to choose politically between worthy public services while the pension issue goes virtually undiscussed, but i’m not convinced that the city is anywhere near tapping out its ability to pay for effective local government (and i include the new water facilities in that).

    additionally, i think this discussion overlooks a major source of funding pressure for local government, which is the statewide revenue shortfalls and the decision (because of the 2/3 tax hike vote and the 2/3 budget vote rules, which allows anti-public service republicans to frustrate any attempts to raise revenue to pay for the state’s public services) to make up statewide shortfalls by raiding local and city government coffers. until that dynamic is dealt with, davis and everywhere else will have trouble paying for their own mandates and services.

    and it’ll get worse if the state goes into housing bubble-related recession and the shortfalls get bigger. the next decade could be a headache.

  34. 無名 - wu ming

    i totally agree on the police staffing issue, although i’m less sure that davis faces a revenue crisis. this city has grown exceptionally affluent over the past two decades; for most residents, it is not a question of their ability to pay higher taxes and fees, as much as their political willingness to do so. i understand why you’re concerned with the possibility of being forced to choose politically between worthy public services while the pension issue goes virtually undiscussed, but i’m not convinced that the city is anywhere near tapping out its ability to pay for effective local government (and i include the new water facilities in that).

    additionally, i think this discussion overlooks a major source of funding pressure for local government, which is the statewide revenue shortfalls and the decision (because of the 2/3 tax hike vote and the 2/3 budget vote rules, which allows anti-public service republicans to frustrate any attempts to raise revenue to pay for the state’s public services) to make up statewide shortfalls by raiding local and city government coffers. until that dynamic is dealt with, davis and everywhere else will have trouble paying for their own mandates and services.

    and it’ll get worse if the state goes into housing bubble-related recession and the shortfalls get bigger. the next decade could be a headache.

  35. 無名 - wu ming

    i totally agree on the police staffing issue, although i’m less sure that davis faces a revenue crisis. this city has grown exceptionally affluent over the past two decades; for most residents, it is not a question of their ability to pay higher taxes and fees, as much as their political willingness to do so. i understand why you’re concerned with the possibility of being forced to choose politically between worthy public services while the pension issue goes virtually undiscussed, but i’m not convinced that the city is anywhere near tapping out its ability to pay for effective local government (and i include the new water facilities in that).

    additionally, i think this discussion overlooks a major source of funding pressure for local government, which is the statewide revenue shortfalls and the decision (because of the 2/3 tax hike vote and the 2/3 budget vote rules, which allows anti-public service republicans to frustrate any attempts to raise revenue to pay for the state’s public services) to make up statewide shortfalls by raiding local and city government coffers. until that dynamic is dealt with, davis and everywhere else will have trouble paying for their own mandates and services.

    and it’ll get worse if the state goes into housing bubble-related recession and the shortfalls get bigger. the next decade could be a headache.

  36. 無名 - wu ming

    i totally agree on the police staffing issue, although i’m less sure that davis faces a revenue crisis. this city has grown exceptionally affluent over the past two decades; for most residents, it is not a question of their ability to pay higher taxes and fees, as much as their political willingness to do so. i understand why you’re concerned with the possibility of being forced to choose politically between worthy public services while the pension issue goes virtually undiscussed, but i’m not convinced that the city is anywhere near tapping out its ability to pay for effective local government (and i include the new water facilities in that).

    additionally, i think this discussion overlooks a major source of funding pressure for local government, which is the statewide revenue shortfalls and the decision (because of the 2/3 tax hike vote and the 2/3 budget vote rules, which allows anti-public service republicans to frustrate any attempts to raise revenue to pay for the state’s public services) to make up statewide shortfalls by raiding local and city government coffers. until that dynamic is dealt with, davis and everywhere else will have trouble paying for their own mandates and services.

    and it’ll get worse if the state goes into housing bubble-related recession and the shortfalls get bigger. the next decade could be a headache.

  37. sharla

    Stay on track please.

    Ms. Anderson:

    Are you saying that having more police officers will increase police harassment of minorities in Davis, so we should maintain staffing levels at the current level?

    What about DPD’s suggestion that having more police officers will allow the ability to place officers into certain communities or on foot patrols (get them out of their cars and not just responding to one call after another) and actually get to know the community?

  38. sharla

    Stay on track please.

    Ms. Anderson:

    Are you saying that having more police officers will increase police harassment of minorities in Davis, so we should maintain staffing levels at the current level?

    What about DPD’s suggestion that having more police officers will allow the ability to place officers into certain communities or on foot patrols (get them out of their cars and not just responding to one call after another) and actually get to know the community?

  39. sharla

    Stay on track please.

    Ms. Anderson:

    Are you saying that having more police officers will increase police harassment of minorities in Davis, so we should maintain staffing levels at the current level?

    What about DPD’s suggestion that having more police officers will allow the ability to place officers into certain communities or on foot patrols (get them out of their cars and not just responding to one call after another) and actually get to know the community?

  40. sharla

    Stay on track please.

    Ms. Anderson:

    Are you saying that having more police officers will increase police harassment of minorities in Davis, so we should maintain staffing levels at the current level?

    What about DPD’s suggestion that having more police officers will allow the ability to place officers into certain communities or on foot patrols (get them out of their cars and not just responding to one call after another) and actually get to know the community?

  41. Anonymous

    DPD Commentary:
    I can only imagine what was going through the minds of the many police officers that were in attendance that night. However and perhaps surprisingly to the DPD officials who were there, I spoke of the need to hire six new police officers in the near future.

    As this blog has progressed, I have spoken less and less during public comment. For one thing, I feel I can speak better through the blog. For another, I sometimes get the distinct impression I make things more likely to fail than pass.

    On the other hand, I think some of those perceptions are wrong.

    DPD, In your own commentary you are acknowledging that information posted by you on this blog has created a distinct impression for both good and bad in this community and can negatively affect any issue you touch. To say that you have alienated a majority of the current council would be mild. It is admirable that you support hiring more police officers. Your reasoning for doing so is very logical and I agree with it. However, at this point the council majority that you need would rather cross the street than talk to you, no matter what they say to your face. Your post is that everybody should read your commentary and judge it on its merits. There is no one left who believes that there is any media outlet; blog; newspaper; radio station; or TV news broadcaster that does not slant the story to the left or the right for their own purposes. Your positive commentary on the need for more police went out the window when you decided who was to blame for it. The current status and problems of the City of Davis are not the fault of a small evil gang of three. These are the choices made by the Davis Voters for years. If you really want to make a difference then you need to run for City Council. Let’s see how well you can do it.

  42. Anonymous

    DPD Commentary:
    I can only imagine what was going through the minds of the many police officers that were in attendance that night. However and perhaps surprisingly to the DPD officials who were there, I spoke of the need to hire six new police officers in the near future.

    As this blog has progressed, I have spoken less and less during public comment. For one thing, I feel I can speak better through the blog. For another, I sometimes get the distinct impression I make things more likely to fail than pass.

    On the other hand, I think some of those perceptions are wrong.

    DPD, In your own commentary you are acknowledging that information posted by you on this blog has created a distinct impression for both good and bad in this community and can negatively affect any issue you touch. To say that you have alienated a majority of the current council would be mild. It is admirable that you support hiring more police officers. Your reasoning for doing so is very logical and I agree with it. However, at this point the council majority that you need would rather cross the street than talk to you, no matter what they say to your face. Your post is that everybody should read your commentary and judge it on its merits. There is no one left who believes that there is any media outlet; blog; newspaper; radio station; or TV news broadcaster that does not slant the story to the left or the right for their own purposes. Your positive commentary on the need for more police went out the window when you decided who was to blame for it. The current status and problems of the City of Davis are not the fault of a small evil gang of three. These are the choices made by the Davis Voters for years. If you really want to make a difference then you need to run for City Council. Let’s see how well you can do it.

  43. Anonymous

    DPD Commentary:
    I can only imagine what was going through the minds of the many police officers that were in attendance that night. However and perhaps surprisingly to the DPD officials who were there, I spoke of the need to hire six new police officers in the near future.

    As this blog has progressed, I have spoken less and less during public comment. For one thing, I feel I can speak better through the blog. For another, I sometimes get the distinct impression I make things more likely to fail than pass.

    On the other hand, I think some of those perceptions are wrong.

    DPD, In your own commentary you are acknowledging that information posted by you on this blog has created a distinct impression for both good and bad in this community and can negatively affect any issue you touch. To say that you have alienated a majority of the current council would be mild. It is admirable that you support hiring more police officers. Your reasoning for doing so is very logical and I agree with it. However, at this point the council majority that you need would rather cross the street than talk to you, no matter what they say to your face. Your post is that everybody should read your commentary and judge it on its merits. There is no one left who believes that there is any media outlet; blog; newspaper; radio station; or TV news broadcaster that does not slant the story to the left or the right for their own purposes. Your positive commentary on the need for more police went out the window when you decided who was to blame for it. The current status and problems of the City of Davis are not the fault of a small evil gang of three. These are the choices made by the Davis Voters for years. If you really want to make a difference then you need to run for City Council. Let’s see how well you can do it.

  44. Anonymous

    DPD Commentary:
    I can only imagine what was going through the minds of the many police officers that were in attendance that night. However and perhaps surprisingly to the DPD officials who were there, I spoke of the need to hire six new police officers in the near future.

    As this blog has progressed, I have spoken less and less during public comment. For one thing, I feel I can speak better through the blog. For another, I sometimes get the distinct impression I make things more likely to fail than pass.

    On the other hand, I think some of those perceptions are wrong.

    DPD, In your own commentary you are acknowledging that information posted by you on this blog has created a distinct impression for both good and bad in this community and can negatively affect any issue you touch. To say that you have alienated a majority of the current council would be mild. It is admirable that you support hiring more police officers. Your reasoning for doing so is very logical and I agree with it. However, at this point the council majority that you need would rather cross the street than talk to you, no matter what they say to your face. Your post is that everybody should read your commentary and judge it on its merits. There is no one left who believes that there is any media outlet; blog; newspaper; radio station; or TV news broadcaster that does not slant the story to the left or the right for their own purposes. Your positive commentary on the need for more police went out the window when you decided who was to blame for it. The current status and problems of the City of Davis are not the fault of a small evil gang of three. These are the choices made by the Davis Voters for years. If you really want to make a difference then you need to run for City Council. Let’s see how well you can do it.

  45. Robin

    I agree that we need more police officers, but I am not sure I would be willing to pay for them until I see some change in the manner in which policing is done in this community.

    The police in Davis are frequently “mean,” as an earlier comment said, and they are not mean only to minorities — they are mean to parents picking their kids up at school, to teens hanging out downtown, and to anyone when they make a traffic stop (young, old, any race, any reason for the stop).

    Community policing, with officers on foot, is essential. But so is a message from the top that a badge is not an excuse to be a bully, and that they can only do their job effectively if they are trusted by the community. This will require some serious interpersonal skills training.

    As for the limits on how much taxation Davis residents will approve for public services, I do believe a problem is brewing. Our city utilities (not gas & electric) now cost about 10 times what they cost when we moved into our current home 13 years ago. And it will get worse with the water improvement plans.

    Will this affect my comfort level when I see a ballot measure for parks, schools, or additional police? Of course it will.

  46. Robin

    I agree that we need more police officers, but I am not sure I would be willing to pay for them until I see some change in the manner in which policing is done in this community.

    The police in Davis are frequently “mean,” as an earlier comment said, and they are not mean only to minorities — they are mean to parents picking their kids up at school, to teens hanging out downtown, and to anyone when they make a traffic stop (young, old, any race, any reason for the stop).

    Community policing, with officers on foot, is essential. But so is a message from the top that a badge is not an excuse to be a bully, and that they can only do their job effectively if they are trusted by the community. This will require some serious interpersonal skills training.

    As for the limits on how much taxation Davis residents will approve for public services, I do believe a problem is brewing. Our city utilities (not gas & electric) now cost about 10 times what they cost when we moved into our current home 13 years ago. And it will get worse with the water improvement plans.

    Will this affect my comfort level when I see a ballot measure for parks, schools, or additional police? Of course it will.

  47. Robin

    I agree that we need more police officers, but I am not sure I would be willing to pay for them until I see some change in the manner in which policing is done in this community.

    The police in Davis are frequently “mean,” as an earlier comment said, and they are not mean only to minorities — they are mean to parents picking their kids up at school, to teens hanging out downtown, and to anyone when they make a traffic stop (young, old, any race, any reason for the stop).

    Community policing, with officers on foot, is essential. But so is a message from the top that a badge is not an excuse to be a bully, and that they can only do their job effectively if they are trusted by the community. This will require some serious interpersonal skills training.

    As for the limits on how much taxation Davis residents will approve for public services, I do believe a problem is brewing. Our city utilities (not gas & electric) now cost about 10 times what they cost when we moved into our current home 13 years ago. And it will get worse with the water improvement plans.

    Will this affect my comfort level when I see a ballot measure for parks, schools, or additional police? Of course it will.

  48. Robin

    I agree that we need more police officers, but I am not sure I would be willing to pay for them until I see some change in the manner in which policing is done in this community.

    The police in Davis are frequently “mean,” as an earlier comment said, and they are not mean only to minorities — they are mean to parents picking their kids up at school, to teens hanging out downtown, and to anyone when they make a traffic stop (young, old, any race, any reason for the stop).

    Community policing, with officers on foot, is essential. But so is a message from the top that a badge is not an excuse to be a bully, and that they can only do their job effectively if they are trusted by the community. This will require some serious interpersonal skills training.

    As for the limits on how much taxation Davis residents will approve for public services, I do believe a problem is brewing. Our city utilities (not gas & electric) now cost about 10 times what they cost when we moved into our current home 13 years ago. And it will get worse with the water improvement plans.

    Will this affect my comfort level when I see a ballot measure for parks, schools, or additional police? Of course it will.

  49. Doug Paul Davis

    Robin: I very much agree with your post and your concerns. I see this as a step toward improving the community-police relations and that it must be done in conjunction with better oversight, command structure, training, and other things already in place.

  50. Doug Paul Davis

    Robin: I very much agree with your post and your concerns. I see this as a step toward improving the community-police relations and that it must be done in conjunction with better oversight, command structure, training, and other things already in place.

  51. Doug Paul Davis

    Robin: I very much agree with your post and your concerns. I see this as a step toward improving the community-police relations and that it must be done in conjunction with better oversight, command structure, training, and other things already in place.

  52. Doug Paul Davis

    Robin: I very much agree with your post and your concerns. I see this as a step toward improving the community-police relations and that it must be done in conjunction with better oversight, command structure, training, and other things already in place.

  53. Rich Rifkin

    “The only way that can happen is that we have enough officers on duty to put some on foot patrol. To put some into various communities where they can work with the neighborhoods and the citizens.”

    Downtown, it probably would make good sense to have a couple of cops on foot patrol. (I’ve seen cops walking around downtown, but I don’t know if that is a regular patrol.) However, elsewhere in town, I’m not sure that a foot patrol works. Better might be to have more cops on bicycles. A bike patrol has some of the advantages of a foot patrol — they would interact with community members far more than in their cars — but they could cover more area. Of course, the problem with either — in a limited staffing situation — is that putting two cops on bikes or horse or foot takes two cops away from the ability to rapidly get across town where they might be needed in an emergency.

  54. Rich Rifkin

    “The only way that can happen is that we have enough officers on duty to put some on foot patrol. To put some into various communities where they can work with the neighborhoods and the citizens.”

    Downtown, it probably would make good sense to have a couple of cops on foot patrol. (I’ve seen cops walking around downtown, but I don’t know if that is a regular patrol.) However, elsewhere in town, I’m not sure that a foot patrol works. Better might be to have more cops on bicycles. A bike patrol has some of the advantages of a foot patrol — they would interact with community members far more than in their cars — but they could cover more area. Of course, the problem with either — in a limited staffing situation — is that putting two cops on bikes or horse or foot takes two cops away from the ability to rapidly get across town where they might be needed in an emergency.

  55. Rich Rifkin

    “The only way that can happen is that we have enough officers on duty to put some on foot patrol. To put some into various communities where they can work with the neighborhoods and the citizens.”

    Downtown, it probably would make good sense to have a couple of cops on foot patrol. (I’ve seen cops walking around downtown, but I don’t know if that is a regular patrol.) However, elsewhere in town, I’m not sure that a foot patrol works. Better might be to have more cops on bicycles. A bike patrol has some of the advantages of a foot patrol — they would interact with community members far more than in their cars — but they could cover more area. Of course, the problem with either — in a limited staffing situation — is that putting two cops on bikes or horse or foot takes two cops away from the ability to rapidly get across town where they might be needed in an emergency.

  56. Rich Rifkin

    “The only way that can happen is that we have enough officers on duty to put some on foot patrol. To put some into various communities where they can work with the neighborhoods and the citizens.”

    Downtown, it probably would make good sense to have a couple of cops on foot patrol. (I’ve seen cops walking around downtown, but I don’t know if that is a regular patrol.) However, elsewhere in town, I’m not sure that a foot patrol works. Better might be to have more cops on bicycles. A bike patrol has some of the advantages of a foot patrol — they would interact with community members far more than in their cars — but they could cover more area. Of course, the problem with either — in a limited staffing situation — is that putting two cops on bikes or horse or foot takes two cops away from the ability to rapidly get across town where they might be needed in an emergency.

  57. Anonymous

    I agree with Robin, the DPD should demonstrate the ability to manage what they already have before adding about 10% more officers. Personally, I would never vote for more police resources , although I would vote for fire protection and parks. My experience with the DPD put me over the top, and they have no one to blame other than themselves. I understand there are probably some very good Davis Police Officers (S. Smith is good although very slow at writing reports), however there is too much bullying, not enough supervision and too much dishonesty in that organization. The dishonesty is the trait I find most annoying.

    I am biased against the DPD and that will never change. However, if others think that having more officers is the way to go then I must say there is a way. Davis should have a technology industrial park, developing and selling products. The sales are key because they would generate sales tax revenue. Many of the products should/could be based on ideas coming out of UCD R&D work. Davis needs to step up the tax base, the opportunity is there. Currently, Davis is leaving money on the table while towns like Vacaville are more than willing to suck it up. This is a rather long term solution, but Davis has a long term problem. SAH

  58. Anonymous

    I agree with Robin, the DPD should demonstrate the ability to manage what they already have before adding about 10% more officers. Personally, I would never vote for more police resources , although I would vote for fire protection and parks. My experience with the DPD put me over the top, and they have no one to blame other than themselves. I understand there are probably some very good Davis Police Officers (S. Smith is good although very slow at writing reports), however there is too much bullying, not enough supervision and too much dishonesty in that organization. The dishonesty is the trait I find most annoying.

    I am biased against the DPD and that will never change. However, if others think that having more officers is the way to go then I must say there is a way. Davis should have a technology industrial park, developing and selling products. The sales are key because they would generate sales tax revenue. Many of the products should/could be based on ideas coming out of UCD R&D work. Davis needs to step up the tax base, the opportunity is there. Currently, Davis is leaving money on the table while towns like Vacaville are more than willing to suck it up. This is a rather long term solution, but Davis has a long term problem. SAH

  59. Anonymous

    I agree with Robin, the DPD should demonstrate the ability to manage what they already have before adding about 10% more officers. Personally, I would never vote for more police resources , although I would vote for fire protection and parks. My experience with the DPD put me over the top, and they have no one to blame other than themselves. I understand there are probably some very good Davis Police Officers (S. Smith is good although very slow at writing reports), however there is too much bullying, not enough supervision and too much dishonesty in that organization. The dishonesty is the trait I find most annoying.

    I am biased against the DPD and that will never change. However, if others think that having more officers is the way to go then I must say there is a way. Davis should have a technology industrial park, developing and selling products. The sales are key because they would generate sales tax revenue. Many of the products should/could be based on ideas coming out of UCD R&D work. Davis needs to step up the tax base, the opportunity is there. Currently, Davis is leaving money on the table while towns like Vacaville are more than willing to suck it up. This is a rather long term solution, but Davis has a long term problem. SAH

  60. Anonymous

    I agree with Robin, the DPD should demonstrate the ability to manage what they already have before adding about 10% more officers. Personally, I would never vote for more police resources , although I would vote for fire protection and parks. My experience with the DPD put me over the top, and they have no one to blame other than themselves. I understand there are probably some very good Davis Police Officers (S. Smith is good although very slow at writing reports), however there is too much bullying, not enough supervision and too much dishonesty in that organization. The dishonesty is the trait I find most annoying.

    I am biased against the DPD and that will never change. However, if others think that having more officers is the way to go then I must say there is a way. Davis should have a technology industrial park, developing and selling products. The sales are key because they would generate sales tax revenue. Many of the products should/could be based on ideas coming out of UCD R&D work. Davis needs to step up the tax base, the opportunity is there. Currently, Davis is leaving money on the table while towns like Vacaville are more than willing to suck it up. This is a rather long term solution, but Davis has a long term problem. SAH

  61. Rich Rifkin

    In case anyone is interested in learning about gang injunctions, this story from the SF Chronicle explains how the DA in San Francisco is following a similar course to DA Reisig in Yolo County. It apparently is a widespread practice.

  62. Rich Rifkin

    In case anyone is interested in learning about gang injunctions, this story from the SF Chronicle explains how the DA in San Francisco is following a similar course to DA Reisig in Yolo County. It apparently is a widespread practice.

  63. Rich Rifkin

    In case anyone is interested in learning about gang injunctions, this story from the SF Chronicle explains how the DA in San Francisco is following a similar course to DA Reisig in Yolo County. It apparently is a widespread practice.

  64. Rich Rifkin

    In case anyone is interested in learning about gang injunctions, this story from the SF Chronicle explains how the DA in San Francisco is following a similar course to DA Reisig in Yolo County. It apparently is a widespread practice.

  65. SAH

    There is one glaring difference between the Yolo injunction and the SF injunction. The Yolo injunction covered 350 people while the one in SF targeted 76 people. Are we to believe there are 5X more gang members in West Sacramento than there are in all of SF? That is hard to believe. It would appear the SF approach was more selective – an effort to carefully identify real gang members.

  66. SAH

    There is one glaring difference between the Yolo injunction and the SF injunction. The Yolo injunction covered 350 people while the one in SF targeted 76 people. Are we to believe there are 5X more gang members in West Sacramento than there are in all of SF? That is hard to believe. It would appear the SF approach was more selective – an effort to carefully identify real gang members.

  67. SAH

    There is one glaring difference between the Yolo injunction and the SF injunction. The Yolo injunction covered 350 people while the one in SF targeted 76 people. Are we to believe there are 5X more gang members in West Sacramento than there are in all of SF? That is hard to believe. It would appear the SF approach was more selective – an effort to carefully identify real gang members.

  68. SAH

    There is one glaring difference between the Yolo injunction and the SF injunction. The Yolo injunction covered 350 people while the one in SF targeted 76 people. Are we to believe there are 5X more gang members in West Sacramento than there are in all of SF? That is hard to believe. It would appear the SF approach was more selective – an effort to carefully identify real gang members.

  69. Anonymous

    Anonymous 1:09 pm-

    The council majority disliked DPD before he started this blog. They didn’t want to hear what he had to say and had a bit of control in shutting him down – limitations of time to comment at City Council meetings, limitations on length of letters if even published in the local newspaper. They must really be annoyed that he has found another avenue to make himself heard, and people in the community are responding and discussing things without their involvement. DPD is not CAROLE.

    CAROLE came about because of the limitations imposed to shut down the people in the community. If the Council had listened and at least appeared like they care about what people were saying, people in the community wouldn’t have had to go underground to get themselves heard. The council majority really screwed up. People in the community were and still are upset, the police chief fled and the police department was left demoralized. The Chief Hyde was not good for Davis or, it is beginning to become apparent, the department. Officers left because they could earn more elsewhere with shorter commutes. Understaffing in the department has been a situation for a long time and probably contributed to the problems in the department, where certain people were hired that weren’t a good fit for handling the Davis population – too rude, too militaristic.

    Chief Black appears to be a much better fit for Davis. The reorganization plan he and his staff have come up with says to me that he is listening to people. Things seem calmer and I believe that community trust is being restored. Officer Refredi stated that the officers support the plan, but again that they need more officers. The community needs to respond to this request and give the department what it needs to do a good job.

  70. Anonymous

    Anonymous 1:09 pm-

    The council majority disliked DPD before he started this blog. They didn’t want to hear what he had to say and had a bit of control in shutting him down – limitations of time to comment at City Council meetings, limitations on length of letters if even published in the local newspaper. They must really be annoyed that he has found another avenue to make himself heard, and people in the community are responding and discussing things without their involvement. DPD is not CAROLE.

    CAROLE came about because of the limitations imposed to shut down the people in the community. If the Council had listened and at least appeared like they care about what people were saying, people in the community wouldn’t have had to go underground to get themselves heard. The council majority really screwed up. People in the community were and still are upset, the police chief fled and the police department was left demoralized. The Chief Hyde was not good for Davis or, it is beginning to become apparent, the department. Officers left because they could earn more elsewhere with shorter commutes. Understaffing in the department has been a situation for a long time and probably contributed to the problems in the department, where certain people were hired that weren’t a good fit for handling the Davis population – too rude, too militaristic.

    Chief Black appears to be a much better fit for Davis. The reorganization plan he and his staff have come up with says to me that he is listening to people. Things seem calmer and I believe that community trust is being restored. Officer Refredi stated that the officers support the plan, but again that they need more officers. The community needs to respond to this request and give the department what it needs to do a good job.

  71. Anonymous

    Anonymous 1:09 pm-

    The council majority disliked DPD before he started this blog. They didn’t want to hear what he had to say and had a bit of control in shutting him down – limitations of time to comment at City Council meetings, limitations on length of letters if even published in the local newspaper. They must really be annoyed that he has found another avenue to make himself heard, and people in the community are responding and discussing things without their involvement. DPD is not CAROLE.

    CAROLE came about because of the limitations imposed to shut down the people in the community. If the Council had listened and at least appeared like they care about what people were saying, people in the community wouldn’t have had to go underground to get themselves heard. The council majority really screwed up. People in the community were and still are upset, the police chief fled and the police department was left demoralized. The Chief Hyde was not good for Davis or, it is beginning to become apparent, the department. Officers left because they could earn more elsewhere with shorter commutes. Understaffing in the department has been a situation for a long time and probably contributed to the problems in the department, where certain people were hired that weren’t a good fit for handling the Davis population – too rude, too militaristic.

    Chief Black appears to be a much better fit for Davis. The reorganization plan he and his staff have come up with says to me that he is listening to people. Things seem calmer and I believe that community trust is being restored. Officer Refredi stated that the officers support the plan, but again that they need more officers. The community needs to respond to this request and give the department what it needs to do a good job.

  72. Anonymous

    Anonymous 1:09 pm-

    The council majority disliked DPD before he started this blog. They didn’t want to hear what he had to say and had a bit of control in shutting him down – limitations of time to comment at City Council meetings, limitations on length of letters if even published in the local newspaper. They must really be annoyed that he has found another avenue to make himself heard, and people in the community are responding and discussing things without their involvement. DPD is not CAROLE.

    CAROLE came about because of the limitations imposed to shut down the people in the community. If the Council had listened and at least appeared like they care about what people were saying, people in the community wouldn’t have had to go underground to get themselves heard. The council majority really screwed up. People in the community were and still are upset, the police chief fled and the police department was left demoralized. The Chief Hyde was not good for Davis or, it is beginning to become apparent, the department. Officers left because they could earn more elsewhere with shorter commutes. Understaffing in the department has been a situation for a long time and probably contributed to the problems in the department, where certain people were hired that weren’t a good fit for handling the Davis population – too rude, too militaristic.

    Chief Black appears to be a much better fit for Davis. The reorganization plan he and his staff have come up with says to me that he is listening to people. Things seem calmer and I believe that community trust is being restored. Officer Refredi stated that the officers support the plan, but again that they need more officers. The community needs to respond to this request and give the department what it needs to do a good job.

  73. Rich Rifkin

    “The Yolo injunction covered 350 people while the one in SF targeted 76 people.”

    Sah, where did you get those numbers?

    According to this article, the injunction in Broderick affects 95 people.

    By contrast, you say 76 people in San Francisco, but the article I linked says 85: “[San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera] will ask a judge to restrict the movements of as many as 85 members in three neighborhood safety zones.”

    I understand that the Yolo DA’s office claims that there are as many as 300 members of the Broderick Boys. But to my knowledge, based mostly on an article I read in the SN&R, they have only served 90 or so members of the gang.

    In San Francisco, it is probably the case that there are in the gang affected areas hundreds of gang members. But because the DA only planned to serve 85 members, they will be the ones affected (once the SF plan is put into effect).

  74. Rich Rifkin

    “The Yolo injunction covered 350 people while the one in SF targeted 76 people.”

    Sah, where did you get those numbers?

    According to this article, the injunction in Broderick affects 95 people.

    By contrast, you say 76 people in San Francisco, but the article I linked says 85: “[San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera] will ask a judge to restrict the movements of as many as 85 members in three neighborhood safety zones.”

    I understand that the Yolo DA’s office claims that there are as many as 300 members of the Broderick Boys. But to my knowledge, based mostly on an article I read in the SN&R, they have only served 90 or so members of the gang.

    In San Francisco, it is probably the case that there are in the gang affected areas hundreds of gang members. But because the DA only planned to serve 85 members, they will be the ones affected (once the SF plan is put into effect).

  75. Rich Rifkin

    “The Yolo injunction covered 350 people while the one in SF targeted 76 people.”

    Sah, where did you get those numbers?

    According to this article, the injunction in Broderick affects 95 people.

    By contrast, you say 76 people in San Francisco, but the article I linked says 85: “[San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera] will ask a judge to restrict the movements of as many as 85 members in three neighborhood safety zones.”

    I understand that the Yolo DA’s office claims that there are as many as 300 members of the Broderick Boys. But to my knowledge, based mostly on an article I read in the SN&R, they have only served 90 or so members of the gang.

    In San Francisco, it is probably the case that there are in the gang affected areas hundreds of gang members. But because the DA only planned to serve 85 members, they will be the ones affected (once the SF plan is put into effect).

  76. Rich Rifkin

    “The Yolo injunction covered 350 people while the one in SF targeted 76 people.”

    Sah, where did you get those numbers?

    According to this article, the injunction in Broderick affects 95 people.

    By contrast, you say 76 people in San Francisco, but the article I linked says 85: “[San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera] will ask a judge to restrict the movements of as many as 85 members in three neighborhood safety zones.”

    I understand that the Yolo DA’s office claims that there are as many as 300 members of the Broderick Boys. But to my knowledge, based mostly on an article I read in the SN&R, they have only served 90 or so members of the gang.

    In San Francisco, it is probably the case that there are in the gang affected areas hundreds of gang members. But because the DA only planned to serve 85 members, they will be the ones affected (once the SF plan is put into effect).

  77. sah

    I got the 350 number from a SAC Bee story dated Apri 24, 2007 6:22AM

    “The West Sacramento injunction imposed a 10 p.m. curfew and prohibited gang members from gathering in public in a 3-square-mile area of the city.

    It also prohibited possession of graffiti tools, weapons and drugs or alcohol by 350 alleged gang members.”

    It is possible that the Sac Bee story was wrong in the number, but regardless it appears SF used a more selective netting process than Yolo County. I do not have a problem with fighting gangs, but I think such programs should be very precise when it comes to the gang member selection process.

  78. sah

    I got the 350 number from a SAC Bee story dated Apri 24, 2007 6:22AM

    “The West Sacramento injunction imposed a 10 p.m. curfew and prohibited gang members from gathering in public in a 3-square-mile area of the city.

    It also prohibited possession of graffiti tools, weapons and drugs or alcohol by 350 alleged gang members.”

    It is possible that the Sac Bee story was wrong in the number, but regardless it appears SF used a more selective netting process than Yolo County. I do not have a problem with fighting gangs, but I think such programs should be very precise when it comes to the gang member selection process.

  79. sah

    I got the 350 number from a SAC Bee story dated Apri 24, 2007 6:22AM

    “The West Sacramento injunction imposed a 10 p.m. curfew and prohibited gang members from gathering in public in a 3-square-mile area of the city.

    It also prohibited possession of graffiti tools, weapons and drugs or alcohol by 350 alleged gang members.”

    It is possible that the Sac Bee story was wrong in the number, but regardless it appears SF used a more selective netting process than Yolo County. I do not have a problem with fighting gangs, but I think such programs should be very precise when it comes to the gang member selection process.

  80. sah

    I got the 350 number from a SAC Bee story dated Apri 24, 2007 6:22AM

    “The West Sacramento injunction imposed a 10 p.m. curfew and prohibited gang members from gathering in public in a 3-square-mile area of the city.

    It also prohibited possession of graffiti tools, weapons and drugs or alcohol by 350 alleged gang members.”

    It is possible that the Sac Bee story was wrong in the number, but regardless it appears SF used a more selective netting process than Yolo County. I do not have a problem with fighting gangs, but I think such programs should be very precise when it comes to the gang member selection process.

  81. Rich Rifkin

    Sah, thanks. I tend to agree with you (and David Greenwald perhaps) that every individual who is alleged to be a member of this Broderick gang should be specifically identified, and the police should have to show some evidence which shows that the person so identified is in the gang. (I guess tatoos or some kind of criminal record would be evidence, short of a membership role, which I suspect does not exist.) However, once they have identified specific individuals as members of a criminal gang, I favor the idea of limiting their ability to associate with each other. It’s probably in the best interests of the individuals, too, as sometimes these kids tend to get caught up in the criminal actions of their friends, getting them in trouble they would not if they stayed away from other gang members.

  82. Rich Rifkin

    Sah, thanks. I tend to agree with you (and David Greenwald perhaps) that every individual who is alleged to be a member of this Broderick gang should be specifically identified, and the police should have to show some evidence which shows that the person so identified is in the gang. (I guess tatoos or some kind of criminal record would be evidence, short of a membership role, which I suspect does not exist.) However, once they have identified specific individuals as members of a criminal gang, I favor the idea of limiting their ability to associate with each other. It’s probably in the best interests of the individuals, too, as sometimes these kids tend to get caught up in the criminal actions of their friends, getting them in trouble they would not if they stayed away from other gang members.

  83. Rich Rifkin

    Sah, thanks. I tend to agree with you (and David Greenwald perhaps) that every individual who is alleged to be a member of this Broderick gang should be specifically identified, and the police should have to show some evidence which shows that the person so identified is in the gang. (I guess tatoos or some kind of criminal record would be evidence, short of a membership role, which I suspect does not exist.) However, once they have identified specific individuals as members of a criminal gang, I favor the idea of limiting their ability to associate with each other. It’s probably in the best interests of the individuals, too, as sometimes these kids tend to get caught up in the criminal actions of their friends, getting them in trouble they would not if they stayed away from other gang members.

  84. Rich Rifkin

    Sah, thanks. I tend to agree with you (and David Greenwald perhaps) that every individual who is alleged to be a member of this Broderick gang should be specifically identified, and the police should have to show some evidence which shows that the person so identified is in the gang. (I guess tatoos or some kind of criminal record would be evidence, short of a membership role, which I suspect does not exist.) However, once they have identified specific individuals as members of a criminal gang, I favor the idea of limiting their ability to associate with each other. It’s probably in the best interests of the individuals, too, as sometimes these kids tend to get caught up in the criminal actions of their friends, getting them in trouble they would not if they stayed away from other gang members.

  85. Anonymous

    DPD:
    I does look as though you have decided to “go lighter” on the DPD
    than when you started this blog…
    We still need a viable independent HRC.

  86. Anonymous

    DPD:
    I does look as though you have decided to “go lighter” on the DPD
    than when you started this blog…
    We still need a viable independent HRC.

  87. Anonymous

    DPD:
    I does look as though you have decided to “go lighter” on the DPD
    than when you started this blog…
    We still need a viable independent HRC.

  88. Anonymous

    DPD:
    I does look as though you have decided to “go lighter” on the DPD
    than when you started this blog…
    We still need a viable independent HRC.

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