Interview with Davis Police Ombudsman Bob Aaronson

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Last year around this time, the City of Davis hired its first Police Ombudsman Bob Aaronson. Aaronson has served in the capacity of independent auditor for the City of Santa Cruz among other municipalities. At the time this culminated a rather tumultuous year in Davis that saw allegations, protests, and the disbanding of the city’s Human Relations Commission. Now a year later, things have calmed down, but have the underlying problems that led to these complaints and protests dissipated, the Vanguard sits down as talks to the Ombudsman Bob Aaronson to get his take on the current situation.

You’ve been here nearly a year, I know you’ve talked about it before, but is Davis what you expected?

No. Davis is a much more interesting place than I expected. And Davis is a much more interesting place culturally than I expected. As someone who has passed by Davis thousands and thousands of times, I did not have a clue.

What are your impressions of the Davis Police Department?

I don’t think that’s changed a whole lot since my discussion in front of the council. I think there are a lot of good people in the Davis Police Department. I think there are a lot of the challenges, some of the challenges are because of history, problems that have been present historically and you still live with the ghosts and then there are problems that are related to how many people are comparatively new at being peace officers. I think those are quite significant challenges.

So far, what are your impressions of Landy Black?

So far my impressions of Landy Black are positive. My sense is that he is getting out into the community; my sense is that he’s making connections within the department. And my sense is that those connections are good. Landy Black strikes me as an eminently decent guy and someone who is a real cop.

What has the primary focus of your position entailed?

There are two different things that I have been doing. One component that I have been doing is responding to citizens who have complaints and on average I am probably talking to between half a dozen and a dozen people a month. They call to talk about their situations and telling them what the process is and sometimes all it is is explaining to them that the procedural issues that they saw were appropriate.

The second part of what I’m doing is almost like being an organizational facilitator. And an example of that is being part of a process that got the cameras and the computers working. But there are also a myriad of ways that I have become an alternative channel for communication for different parts of city government about what’s going on. And what the problems are.

Do you believe that Davis was in need of an independent police oversight system?

I’m not the right person to ask because I’m someone who believes that every law enforcement organization ought to have some form of oversight. I’ve worked with a lot of organizations around the state and to me it’s not a critique of law enforcement it has to do with the fact that in absence of oversight not everyone is going to be squared away. That’s why we have cops. Because in the absence of cops, some of us are going to speed. Some of us are not going obey traffic laws and commit offenses. We need oversight. I think we all need oversight and benefit from it. It’s the reason why we don’t come into the world hatched out of eggs. We come into the world with two overseers.

Do you believe that the Police Internal Affairs Department serves an effective function or do you believe that too often police departments seek to protect themselves from scrutiny?

In my experience, most internal affairs organizations do a good job 90 to 95 percent of the time on cases. And of the remaining five to ten percent, are not handled the way I’d have them handle them. Not out of malice but out of a lack of training. There are instances where organizations will have a tendancy in order to avoid the limelight or order to avoid the harsh reality will try to find a way to avoid getting to the right result. But the number of times I’ve seen that happen I could probably count on two hands. And that’s based on over 20 years of work with law enforcement.

What changes would you like to see in the Davis police oversight system?

Clearly I would like to have more time to spend in Davis doing more active outreach to the community and also doing more ridealongs. But the challenge for a place like Davis—because the implication and the question is ‘what instead’ or ‘in addition to’—the challenge for a community like Davis, and it’s the reason why I came here, most oversight models are geared toward far larger jurisdictions and larger departments. I have a hard time arguing that a jurisdiction the size of Davis ought to be spending a quarter of a million dollars on oversight. I have a hard time arguing that. I could see spending a couple of million dollars on oversight or more for the city of San Jose. But smaller oversight, no one is really trying to figure out a way to do that and so my work here and my work in Santa Cruz also are efforts to explore is there a cost effective way to use some of the oversight tools in a smaller jurisdiction.

What do you view as the biggest mistake made by former Chief Jim Hyde during his tenure? How can we work to prevent repeat mistakes with the new Chief, Landy Black?

I try to have this rule that if I was not present, it is not fair of me to find fault. I have not viewed my charge as what occurred prior to my watch although I’ve accumulated some information about it. I think there is a host of things, where if I had been involved I would have hoped would have been responded to differently. I certainly have not been shy about the fact that I believe there was a missed opportunity for the community and the department to use the Buzayan incident as a means of having a discussion as opposed to a means of having an argument.

You mentioned that the city of Davis missed out on an opportunity during the contentious 2006 year. What do you think as an outsider looking in, should have been done differently?

If I had been involved in the underlying incident and I have not listened to tapes and I have not reviewed reports, but I have read enough information. I think I would have made different decisions about what occurred at the scene. Decisions that were not as intrusive. I think that decisions that were made in my view don’t amount to misconduct or I certainly haven’t seen anything that would suggest to me that they were misconduct, but I would say that in my view they are misjudgments. Candidly on the other side of it, I will also tell you… if I had been, if my family had been in the situation, I think I would have responded differently as well. And that to me is the point of the Buzayan case, there were opportunities for everyone to learn. Not just for the department to learn about how to handle something in a way that it is as effect but less intrusive, but also for the community to learn about how they can more effectively interact with the department in a way that increases the likelihood of a more positive or less negative outcome.

Does Davis PD have a problem of racial profiling in your view?

I have not seen first hand evidence of it. Where I have seen documents or I have seen incidents first hand that would allow me to establish that that occurred. On the other hand, there have been enough complaints by people of color that I’m not prepared to say it’s not an issue. As well there is some statistical information that I don’t know enough about to know whether it’s credible and if it is credible what it’s really saying. But clearly there is something there that requires more attention.

The DPOA has repeatedly asked for more police officers as a means for crime prevention, do you believe that such hires are necessary?

I am far more conscious about how much I don’t know than how much I do. If I were going to answer that question in this sort of a public fashion, I would want to have done some sort of a serious study of auditing response times, auditing workloads and the like. In all honesty, I don’t know. To answer that question one way or another would require me on some level to speculate.

What lessons can we learn from the UCLA tasering incident?

That one to me is pretty clean. Tasers are less than deadly force. But are probably the equivalent to the use of the baton. It is pretty hard to kill someone with a baton, but you are likely to have more moderate range injuries. You can argue it one way or another. I would be surprised if any officer would have used a baton on the student in the UCLA PD case. When you have a passive resister, you should not be using Tasers. To me that is a fairly basic lesson and one of the problems has been… that most of the first round of instruction in how to use Tasers was controlled by Taser International. And Taser International, and I’ve viewed some of their instruction, in the first round, but definitely in the first round there were scenarios where Tasers were being used on people who were not violently resisting. Hence what happened at UCLA PD.

(I follow up: So how best would it be for police officers to handle people who are not cooperating but not violent resisting and not a physical threat to either the officer or the public?)

Depends on the situation and the size of the person. Officers get taught all sorts of control holds and take down techniques, in the academy and in the FTO process. In an instance where there’s a large crowd gathered, the use of a Taser on someone who is not actively resistant and who is not actively violent is actually increasing the risk to the officer not decreasing it. Now it’s important to be clear and I have viewed on a number of occasions the videotape of the UCLA PD incident and my problem with the videotapes while the videotapes are very troubling, it’s really hard to be able to see enough of the student in a lot of the frames to know what things I would have done or what things I hoped an officer would have done.

What changes can Davis do in the next year to improve relations between portions of the community and the police department?

I would like to see a way that members of the Davis police department become more involved in the community as individuals and as officers and that means community meetings, neighborhood meetings, it also means encouraging people to do ridealongs with the Davis Police Department. There does need to be more of a connection. There clearly does.

You have previously mentioned problems with both supervision, chain of command, and overall morale—have these areas improved under the new chief? What further needs to be done?

Morale has improved because the department is grateful to have a new chief on board. But the underlying issues—the new chief has been there for three and a half months. You don’t fix a damaged family in three and a half months—this is clearly a work in progress. And the underlying issues involving supervision, chain of command, and communication are still there. They remain to be resolved in a successful way.

My biggest frustration for the past year has been the inability or unwillingness for people with legitimate complaints against the police department to come forward—what can we do about that?

That’s a good question. I have had a similar experience and not just with you but with other people who have brought forward to me that there are people who they were in touch with who had complaints and I have begged, cajoled, pleaded… You know, I have two different ways of expressing it. One is that I have an Amnesty International T-shirt that says ‘All it takes for the triumph of evil is for enough good people to be silent.’ The other one is just a more straightforward one. In the absence of people willing to bear witness, no one goes to jail. I understand why people are reluctant, I genuinely do, I understand that for a lot of people, it’s an act of bravery, it’s an act of courage to come forward with a complaint. But it’s really important, and part of the side benefit is that people who come forward with complaints ultimately, regardless of any other resolution, feel unburdened by having done that.

How can we effect change in the absence of people willing to come forward and to use your words—bear witness?

I don’t know, I think that’s probably my single biggest challenge. One of the things I could do is to do more outreach in the community. I have been reluctant to ask the city for more hours, because the city is trying to be fiscally responsible and I respect that. And the problem with what I talk about in terms of getting out into the community is that it’s time consuming. But there is a way candidly that I feel that I know the Davis Police Department right now better than I do the community.

I’ve been told you are not a big fan of anonymity on the internet, can you share your thoughts?

I tend to work by analogy. I think that people’s behavior on freeways is much worse than their behavior at parties or in bars because they are basically anonymous. I think that when you provide people with an anonymous environment a lot of the social controls for some people tend to dissipate. And if we can be anonymous, there are people who are prepared in a theater to stand up and scream [obscenities] to a guy on stage. Now they would never do that if the guy on stage could see their face and see who they were. But in a darkened theater there are people who do that. I have watched and I respect both the vote that was taken and also the sentiment that there are people who otherwise would not post if it was [not] anonymous, but if no one has noticed it, I’m an outspoken person, I’m not shy about offering my perspective and part of my attitude as a student of race relations and the holocaust is you got be willing to speak out and put your name to something.

Your impressions so far of the Vanguard? How can the Vanguard become a more effective tool in the community?

The most positive thing I think about the Vanguard is that there are things being reported in the Vanguard that I haven’t seen in any other media outlets that are at least available to me. And I appreciate that because I don’t just study Davis police issues, I study all of the Davis community issues to better educate myself. So I really appreciated that. I think there have been times that I have been concerned that the tenor of comments and discussion and some of them of them are by the bloggist and some of them by the commenters that are less than civil. I guess the starting place for me, if I caste you as evil, I lose the opportunity to have an effective conversation with you where I really get through to you. I worry about that aspect. That being said, I’m not arguing that the bite should go away. I think part of the bite is what works about it. It’s also true that I think in the year that the Vanguard, I ought to be interviewing you about the Vanguard because it has been about a year and three months or a year and two months that you’ve been doing the Vanguard, and I ought to be interviewing you about how’s that year been, what do you think your successes have been and what have your failures been. I think that the Vanguard has matured in that past year in really powerful ways. I’m sure that you asking in a way is a little self-serving… but I’m grateful that the Vanguard is there. I don’t always agree with it, but it’s rare I don’t learn something.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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152 thoughts on “Interview with Davis Police Ombudsman Bob Aaronson”

  1. davisite

    Bob Aaronson’s decidedly measured(and completely appropriate) perspective concerning poster anonymity is not surprising. Unfettered comments and dialogue that can often have a confrontational edge
    are the “bite”(as he calls it) of Vanguard comments and allow posters to express their uninhibited opinions without concern of retribution. Being able to publicly.. “call ’em like you see ’em” empowers grassroots movements when confronting powerful, entrenched interests.

  2. davisite

    Bob Aaronson’s decidedly measured(and completely appropriate) perspective concerning poster anonymity is not surprising. Unfettered comments and dialogue that can often have a confrontational edge
    are the “bite”(as he calls it) of Vanguard comments and allow posters to express their uninhibited opinions without concern of retribution. Being able to publicly.. “call ’em like you see ’em” empowers grassroots movements when confronting powerful, entrenched interests.

  3. davisite

    Bob Aaronson’s decidedly measured(and completely appropriate) perspective concerning poster anonymity is not surprising. Unfettered comments and dialogue that can often have a confrontational edge
    are the “bite”(as he calls it) of Vanguard comments and allow posters to express their uninhibited opinions without concern of retribution. Being able to publicly.. “call ’em like you see ’em” empowers grassroots movements when confronting powerful, entrenched interests.

  4. davisite

    Bob Aaronson’s decidedly measured(and completely appropriate) perspective concerning poster anonymity is not surprising. Unfettered comments and dialogue that can often have a confrontational edge
    are the “bite”(as he calls it) of Vanguard comments and allow posters to express their uninhibited opinions without concern of retribution. Being able to publicly.. “call ’em like you see ’em” empowers grassroots movements when confronting powerful, entrenched interests.

  5. sah

    I agree oversight is critical. If the city thinks the cost is too high then UCD should be asked to contribute to the program because of the potential impact on students.

    Next topic
    “In the absence of people willing to bear witness, no one goes to jail. I understand why people are reluctant, I genuinely do, I understand that for a lot of people, it’s an act of bravery, it’s an act of courage to come forward with a complaint.”

    Courage may be required, but equally important is Trust in what the information will be used for. Each time there is a Buzayan type case where there is police “misjudgment”, the police lose some respect. Certainly a single police officer can and will make mistakes, but the organization supporting him/her should demonstrate some ability to rectify those errors and not just attempt to cover them up. A segment of the population will view them in a negative way and will be less likely to step forward, at least in minor incidents. It is very important that a police organization, as a whole, uses good judgment and is honest all of the time. If those qualities are missing support will dwindle – in terms of help and money.

  6. sah

    I agree oversight is critical. If the city thinks the cost is too high then UCD should be asked to contribute to the program because of the potential impact on students.

    Next topic
    “In the absence of people willing to bear witness, no one goes to jail. I understand why people are reluctant, I genuinely do, I understand that for a lot of people, it’s an act of bravery, it’s an act of courage to come forward with a complaint.”

    Courage may be required, but equally important is Trust in what the information will be used for. Each time there is a Buzayan type case where there is police “misjudgment”, the police lose some respect. Certainly a single police officer can and will make mistakes, but the organization supporting him/her should demonstrate some ability to rectify those errors and not just attempt to cover them up. A segment of the population will view them in a negative way and will be less likely to step forward, at least in minor incidents. It is very important that a police organization, as a whole, uses good judgment and is honest all of the time. If those qualities are missing support will dwindle – in terms of help and money.

  7. sah

    I agree oversight is critical. If the city thinks the cost is too high then UCD should be asked to contribute to the program because of the potential impact on students.

    Next topic
    “In the absence of people willing to bear witness, no one goes to jail. I understand why people are reluctant, I genuinely do, I understand that for a lot of people, it’s an act of bravery, it’s an act of courage to come forward with a complaint.”

    Courage may be required, but equally important is Trust in what the information will be used for. Each time there is a Buzayan type case where there is police “misjudgment”, the police lose some respect. Certainly a single police officer can and will make mistakes, but the organization supporting him/her should demonstrate some ability to rectify those errors and not just attempt to cover them up. A segment of the population will view them in a negative way and will be less likely to step forward, at least in minor incidents. It is very important that a police organization, as a whole, uses good judgment and is honest all of the time. If those qualities are missing support will dwindle – in terms of help and money.

  8. sah

    I agree oversight is critical. If the city thinks the cost is too high then UCD should be asked to contribute to the program because of the potential impact on students.

    Next topic
    “In the absence of people willing to bear witness, no one goes to jail. I understand why people are reluctant, I genuinely do, I understand that for a lot of people, it’s an act of bravery, it’s an act of courage to come forward with a complaint.”

    Courage may be required, but equally important is Trust in what the information will be used for. Each time there is a Buzayan type case where there is police “misjudgment”, the police lose some respect. Certainly a single police officer can and will make mistakes, but the organization supporting him/her should demonstrate some ability to rectify those errors and not just attempt to cover them up. A segment of the population will view them in a negative way and will be less likely to step forward, at least in minor incidents. It is very important that a police organization, as a whole, uses good judgment and is honest all of the time. If those qualities are missing support will dwindle – in terms of help and money.

  9. Richard

    the Buzayan case is a classic example of why no one wants to file complaints against the Davis Police Department

    –the Internal Affairs Investigator used the complaint as an opportunity to try to collect evidence against Buzayan instead of dealing with the complaint itself, in other words, the officer sought to intimidate Buzayan into dropping the complaint

    –the police department referred Buzayan’s case to the DAs office for prosecution, resulting in substantial legal fees to the Buzayan family

    –the DA assigned to the case, Pattie Fong, declined to exercise her independent judgment as a prosecutor to drop the case, but, instead, pushed it aggressively, and attempted, unsuccessfully, to get the court to prevent the Buzayans from even talking publicly about the case (in somewhat Orwellian fashion, in the interest of Buzayan herself)

    –after the case was dismissed, the DAs office selectively leaked confidential information from Buzayan’s court file to the Davis Enterprise, in violation of the code relating to juveniles and Judge Warriner’s order, and Judge Warriner declined to take any action against it, setting a precedent that the DA’s office may publicly release such information whenever it suits an attorney there

    –the Davis Enterprise initially posted the information provided, without redacting Halima’s social security number

    –a councilmember, Ruth Asmundson (wasn’t she the mayor at the time?) publicly stated during a council meeting that Halima Buzayan “had been taught a lesson”

    –a DA associated with the case, Tim Wallace, then assumed the role of advising the Buzayan family on parenting, when he said that the parents were doing a disservice to Halima

    –a Davis Enterprise columnist, Bob Dunning, used his column to falsely describe a provision of the juvenile code related to Halima’s arrest, and refused to acknowledge his “mistake” after it was drawn to his attention by Mel Trujillo and others

    with all this, is it any wonder that no one wants to file complaints against the Davis Police Department?

    Aaronson comes across as a sincere, competent, well-meaning guy, but, unless someone in a position of authority is willing to publicly acknowledge what happened to Buzayans, instead of engaging in a distanced, even handed, “everyone can learn” how to communicate better perspective, suggesting that both the police, and members of the community who objected are equally culpable, I see no reason to be hopeful that Aaronson is going to be anything other another good, ethical person who is going to get chewed up by the provincialism of Davis

    –Richard Estes

  10. Richard

    the Buzayan case is a classic example of why no one wants to file complaints against the Davis Police Department

    –the Internal Affairs Investigator used the complaint as an opportunity to try to collect evidence against Buzayan instead of dealing with the complaint itself, in other words, the officer sought to intimidate Buzayan into dropping the complaint

    –the police department referred Buzayan’s case to the DAs office for prosecution, resulting in substantial legal fees to the Buzayan family

    –the DA assigned to the case, Pattie Fong, declined to exercise her independent judgment as a prosecutor to drop the case, but, instead, pushed it aggressively, and attempted, unsuccessfully, to get the court to prevent the Buzayans from even talking publicly about the case (in somewhat Orwellian fashion, in the interest of Buzayan herself)

    –after the case was dismissed, the DAs office selectively leaked confidential information from Buzayan’s court file to the Davis Enterprise, in violation of the code relating to juveniles and Judge Warriner’s order, and Judge Warriner declined to take any action against it, setting a precedent that the DA’s office may publicly release such information whenever it suits an attorney there

    –the Davis Enterprise initially posted the information provided, without redacting Halima’s social security number

    –a councilmember, Ruth Asmundson (wasn’t she the mayor at the time?) publicly stated during a council meeting that Halima Buzayan “had been taught a lesson”

    –a DA associated with the case, Tim Wallace, then assumed the role of advising the Buzayan family on parenting, when he said that the parents were doing a disservice to Halima

    –a Davis Enterprise columnist, Bob Dunning, used his column to falsely describe a provision of the juvenile code related to Halima’s arrest, and refused to acknowledge his “mistake” after it was drawn to his attention by Mel Trujillo and others

    with all this, is it any wonder that no one wants to file complaints against the Davis Police Department?

    Aaronson comes across as a sincere, competent, well-meaning guy, but, unless someone in a position of authority is willing to publicly acknowledge what happened to Buzayans, instead of engaging in a distanced, even handed, “everyone can learn” how to communicate better perspective, suggesting that both the police, and members of the community who objected are equally culpable, I see no reason to be hopeful that Aaronson is going to be anything other another good, ethical person who is going to get chewed up by the provincialism of Davis

    –Richard Estes

  11. Richard

    the Buzayan case is a classic example of why no one wants to file complaints against the Davis Police Department

    –the Internal Affairs Investigator used the complaint as an opportunity to try to collect evidence against Buzayan instead of dealing with the complaint itself, in other words, the officer sought to intimidate Buzayan into dropping the complaint

    –the police department referred Buzayan’s case to the DAs office for prosecution, resulting in substantial legal fees to the Buzayan family

    –the DA assigned to the case, Pattie Fong, declined to exercise her independent judgment as a prosecutor to drop the case, but, instead, pushed it aggressively, and attempted, unsuccessfully, to get the court to prevent the Buzayans from even talking publicly about the case (in somewhat Orwellian fashion, in the interest of Buzayan herself)

    –after the case was dismissed, the DAs office selectively leaked confidential information from Buzayan’s court file to the Davis Enterprise, in violation of the code relating to juveniles and Judge Warriner’s order, and Judge Warriner declined to take any action against it, setting a precedent that the DA’s office may publicly release such information whenever it suits an attorney there

    –the Davis Enterprise initially posted the information provided, without redacting Halima’s social security number

    –a councilmember, Ruth Asmundson (wasn’t she the mayor at the time?) publicly stated during a council meeting that Halima Buzayan “had been taught a lesson”

    –a DA associated with the case, Tim Wallace, then assumed the role of advising the Buzayan family on parenting, when he said that the parents were doing a disservice to Halima

    –a Davis Enterprise columnist, Bob Dunning, used his column to falsely describe a provision of the juvenile code related to Halima’s arrest, and refused to acknowledge his “mistake” after it was drawn to his attention by Mel Trujillo and others

    with all this, is it any wonder that no one wants to file complaints against the Davis Police Department?

    Aaronson comes across as a sincere, competent, well-meaning guy, but, unless someone in a position of authority is willing to publicly acknowledge what happened to Buzayans, instead of engaging in a distanced, even handed, “everyone can learn” how to communicate better perspective, suggesting that both the police, and members of the community who objected are equally culpable, I see no reason to be hopeful that Aaronson is going to be anything other another good, ethical person who is going to get chewed up by the provincialism of Davis

    –Richard Estes

  12. Richard

    the Buzayan case is a classic example of why no one wants to file complaints against the Davis Police Department

    –the Internal Affairs Investigator used the complaint as an opportunity to try to collect evidence against Buzayan instead of dealing with the complaint itself, in other words, the officer sought to intimidate Buzayan into dropping the complaint

    –the police department referred Buzayan’s case to the DAs office for prosecution, resulting in substantial legal fees to the Buzayan family

    –the DA assigned to the case, Pattie Fong, declined to exercise her independent judgment as a prosecutor to drop the case, but, instead, pushed it aggressively, and attempted, unsuccessfully, to get the court to prevent the Buzayans from even talking publicly about the case (in somewhat Orwellian fashion, in the interest of Buzayan herself)

    –after the case was dismissed, the DAs office selectively leaked confidential information from Buzayan’s court file to the Davis Enterprise, in violation of the code relating to juveniles and Judge Warriner’s order, and Judge Warriner declined to take any action against it, setting a precedent that the DA’s office may publicly release such information whenever it suits an attorney there

    –the Davis Enterprise initially posted the information provided, without redacting Halima’s social security number

    –a councilmember, Ruth Asmundson (wasn’t she the mayor at the time?) publicly stated during a council meeting that Halima Buzayan “had been taught a lesson”

    –a DA associated with the case, Tim Wallace, then assumed the role of advising the Buzayan family on parenting, when he said that the parents were doing a disservice to Halima

    –a Davis Enterprise columnist, Bob Dunning, used his column to falsely describe a provision of the juvenile code related to Halima’s arrest, and refused to acknowledge his “mistake” after it was drawn to his attention by Mel Trujillo and others

    with all this, is it any wonder that no one wants to file complaints against the Davis Police Department?

    Aaronson comes across as a sincere, competent, well-meaning guy, but, unless someone in a position of authority is willing to publicly acknowledge what happened to Buzayans, instead of engaging in a distanced, even handed, “everyone can learn” how to communicate better perspective, suggesting that both the police, and members of the community who objected are equally culpable, I see no reason to be hopeful that Aaronson is going to be anything other another good, ethical person who is going to get chewed up by the provincialism of Davis

    –Richard Estes

  13. Vincente

    Several good comments so far here that I think need more discussion.

    “I agree oversight is critical. If the city thinks the cost is too high then UCD should be asked to contribute to the program because of the potential impact on students.”

    That’s an interesting point raised by SAH, but one thing that is perhaps overlooked is that UC is probably in a worse position than the city to perform oversight and traditionally UC police not just Davis but system wide have been far worse than municipal police. In fact, there have been a number of serious incidents at UC Davis over the past year and they have gotten little play because there is no ombudsman, no oversight, and no elected officials who can be held accountable.

    “Courage may be required, but equally important is Trust in what the information will be used for. Each time there is a Buzayan type case where there is police “misjudgment”, the police lose some respect.”

    In my mind, this is an excellent point that needs to be reiterated over and over again. The Buzayan case showed everyone why it is best to not fight the system–it is expensive and you get smeared in the media.

    Finally Richard raises another important point with regards to Mr. Aaronson.

    “Aaronson comes across as a sincere, competent, well-meaning guy, but, unless someone in a position of authority is willing to publicly acknowledge what happened to Buzayans, instead of engaging in a distanced, even handed, “everyone can learn” how to communicate better perspective, suggesting that both the police, and members of the community who objected are equally culpable, I see no reason to be hopeful that Aaronson is going to be anything other another good, ethical person who is going to get chewed up by the provincialism of Davis”

    I agree with that statement 100 percent. Aaronson has decidedly not rocked the boat since he has come here–that’s a degree of caution that is politically advisable, but also ultimately will not help us come to terms with our past. Mr. Aaronson may not want to pass judgment on things passed however at the same time he acknowledges the importance of history. So how do we come to terms with history if we are unwilling to bear witness upon it and make judgments about things passed?

  14. Vincente

    Several good comments so far here that I think need more discussion.

    “I agree oversight is critical. If the city thinks the cost is too high then UCD should be asked to contribute to the program because of the potential impact on students.”

    That’s an interesting point raised by SAH, but one thing that is perhaps overlooked is that UC is probably in a worse position than the city to perform oversight and traditionally UC police not just Davis but system wide have been far worse than municipal police. In fact, there have been a number of serious incidents at UC Davis over the past year and they have gotten little play because there is no ombudsman, no oversight, and no elected officials who can be held accountable.

    “Courage may be required, but equally important is Trust in what the information will be used for. Each time there is a Buzayan type case where there is police “misjudgment”, the police lose some respect.”

    In my mind, this is an excellent point that needs to be reiterated over and over again. The Buzayan case showed everyone why it is best to not fight the system–it is expensive and you get smeared in the media.

    Finally Richard raises another important point with regards to Mr. Aaronson.

    “Aaronson comes across as a sincere, competent, well-meaning guy, but, unless someone in a position of authority is willing to publicly acknowledge what happened to Buzayans, instead of engaging in a distanced, even handed, “everyone can learn” how to communicate better perspective, suggesting that both the police, and members of the community who objected are equally culpable, I see no reason to be hopeful that Aaronson is going to be anything other another good, ethical person who is going to get chewed up by the provincialism of Davis”

    I agree with that statement 100 percent. Aaronson has decidedly not rocked the boat since he has come here–that’s a degree of caution that is politically advisable, but also ultimately will not help us come to terms with our past. Mr. Aaronson may not want to pass judgment on things passed however at the same time he acknowledges the importance of history. So how do we come to terms with history if we are unwilling to bear witness upon it and make judgments about things passed?

  15. Vincente

    Several good comments so far here that I think need more discussion.

    “I agree oversight is critical. If the city thinks the cost is too high then UCD should be asked to contribute to the program because of the potential impact on students.”

    That’s an interesting point raised by SAH, but one thing that is perhaps overlooked is that UC is probably in a worse position than the city to perform oversight and traditionally UC police not just Davis but system wide have been far worse than municipal police. In fact, there have been a number of serious incidents at UC Davis over the past year and they have gotten little play because there is no ombudsman, no oversight, and no elected officials who can be held accountable.

    “Courage may be required, but equally important is Trust in what the information will be used for. Each time there is a Buzayan type case where there is police “misjudgment”, the police lose some respect.”

    In my mind, this is an excellent point that needs to be reiterated over and over again. The Buzayan case showed everyone why it is best to not fight the system–it is expensive and you get smeared in the media.

    Finally Richard raises another important point with regards to Mr. Aaronson.

    “Aaronson comes across as a sincere, competent, well-meaning guy, but, unless someone in a position of authority is willing to publicly acknowledge what happened to Buzayans, instead of engaging in a distanced, even handed, “everyone can learn” how to communicate better perspective, suggesting that both the police, and members of the community who objected are equally culpable, I see no reason to be hopeful that Aaronson is going to be anything other another good, ethical person who is going to get chewed up by the provincialism of Davis”

    I agree with that statement 100 percent. Aaronson has decidedly not rocked the boat since he has come here–that’s a degree of caution that is politically advisable, but also ultimately will not help us come to terms with our past. Mr. Aaronson may not want to pass judgment on things passed however at the same time he acknowledges the importance of history. So how do we come to terms with history if we are unwilling to bear witness upon it and make judgments about things passed?

  16. Vincente

    Several good comments so far here that I think need more discussion.

    “I agree oversight is critical. If the city thinks the cost is too high then UCD should be asked to contribute to the program because of the potential impact on students.”

    That’s an interesting point raised by SAH, but one thing that is perhaps overlooked is that UC is probably in a worse position than the city to perform oversight and traditionally UC police not just Davis but system wide have been far worse than municipal police. In fact, there have been a number of serious incidents at UC Davis over the past year and they have gotten little play because there is no ombudsman, no oversight, and no elected officials who can be held accountable.

    “Courage may be required, but equally important is Trust in what the information will be used for. Each time there is a Buzayan type case where there is police “misjudgment”, the police lose some respect.”

    In my mind, this is an excellent point that needs to be reiterated over and over again. The Buzayan case showed everyone why it is best to not fight the system–it is expensive and you get smeared in the media.

    Finally Richard raises another important point with regards to Mr. Aaronson.

    “Aaronson comes across as a sincere, competent, well-meaning guy, but, unless someone in a position of authority is willing to publicly acknowledge what happened to Buzayans, instead of engaging in a distanced, even handed, “everyone can learn” how to communicate better perspective, suggesting that both the police, and members of the community who objected are equally culpable, I see no reason to be hopeful that Aaronson is going to be anything other another good, ethical person who is going to get chewed up by the provincialism of Davis”

    I agree with that statement 100 percent. Aaronson has decidedly not rocked the boat since he has come here–that’s a degree of caution that is politically advisable, but also ultimately will not help us come to terms with our past. Mr. Aaronson may not want to pass judgment on things passed however at the same time he acknowledges the importance of history. So how do we come to terms with history if we are unwilling to bear witness upon it and make judgments about things passed?

  17. Bob Aaronson

    I have tried to refrain from making judgments about past incidents because there is no up side to my doing so and only down sides:
    – I don’t have all the information and did not witness the contemporaneous unfolding of events;
    – any judgment of mine would come late enough that it would make no difference in helping the resolve the underlying community conflict;
    – I have no interest in seeing my critical comments used as a cudgel by angry community members. There have been far too many intemporate words spoken already.

    That said, I think I’ve been very clear, privately and publicly, that nearly everyone involved made regretable decisions. But, nobody learns from being shouted at and the time for calm words passed long before I got here.

    (As a side note and a single example of what HAS been accomplished with little fanfare: based on my explicit training to the Department, they now know that you cannot try to advance a criminal investigation through the investigation of a citizen complaint.)

    I apologize that I can’t provide more satisfying answers and I very much regret that I was not on the scene when the Buzayan case unfolded. I certainly would have had far more to say about it.

    Rather than testing me on history, test me on how things are improving and what I say if/when another serious incident occurs. I’m not trying to avoid conflict; I’m trying to avoid wasting my position’s leverage on something that is too far down the road for me to have an impact on.

  18. Bob Aaronson

    I have tried to refrain from making judgments about past incidents because there is no up side to my doing so and only down sides:
    – I don’t have all the information and did not witness the contemporaneous unfolding of events;
    – any judgment of mine would come late enough that it would make no difference in helping the resolve the underlying community conflict;
    – I have no interest in seeing my critical comments used as a cudgel by angry community members. There have been far too many intemporate words spoken already.

    That said, I think I’ve been very clear, privately and publicly, that nearly everyone involved made regretable decisions. But, nobody learns from being shouted at and the time for calm words passed long before I got here.

    (As a side note and a single example of what HAS been accomplished with little fanfare: based on my explicit training to the Department, they now know that you cannot try to advance a criminal investigation through the investigation of a citizen complaint.)

    I apologize that I can’t provide more satisfying answers and I very much regret that I was not on the scene when the Buzayan case unfolded. I certainly would have had far more to say about it.

    Rather than testing me on history, test me on how things are improving and what I say if/when another serious incident occurs. I’m not trying to avoid conflict; I’m trying to avoid wasting my position’s leverage on something that is too far down the road for me to have an impact on.

  19. Bob Aaronson

    I have tried to refrain from making judgments about past incidents because there is no up side to my doing so and only down sides:
    – I don’t have all the information and did not witness the contemporaneous unfolding of events;
    – any judgment of mine would come late enough that it would make no difference in helping the resolve the underlying community conflict;
    – I have no interest in seeing my critical comments used as a cudgel by angry community members. There have been far too many intemporate words spoken already.

    That said, I think I’ve been very clear, privately and publicly, that nearly everyone involved made regretable decisions. But, nobody learns from being shouted at and the time for calm words passed long before I got here.

    (As a side note and a single example of what HAS been accomplished with little fanfare: based on my explicit training to the Department, they now know that you cannot try to advance a criminal investigation through the investigation of a citizen complaint.)

    I apologize that I can’t provide more satisfying answers and I very much regret that I was not on the scene when the Buzayan case unfolded. I certainly would have had far more to say about it.

    Rather than testing me on history, test me on how things are improving and what I say if/when another serious incident occurs. I’m not trying to avoid conflict; I’m trying to avoid wasting my position’s leverage on something that is too far down the road for me to have an impact on.

  20. Bob Aaronson

    I have tried to refrain from making judgments about past incidents because there is no up side to my doing so and only down sides:
    – I don’t have all the information and did not witness the contemporaneous unfolding of events;
    – any judgment of mine would come late enough that it would make no difference in helping the resolve the underlying community conflict;
    – I have no interest in seeing my critical comments used as a cudgel by angry community members. There have been far too many intemporate words spoken already.

    That said, I think I’ve been very clear, privately and publicly, that nearly everyone involved made regretable decisions. But, nobody learns from being shouted at and the time for calm words passed long before I got here.

    (As a side note and a single example of what HAS been accomplished with little fanfare: based on my explicit training to the Department, they now know that you cannot try to advance a criminal investigation through the investigation of a citizen complaint.)

    I apologize that I can’t provide more satisfying answers and I very much regret that I was not on the scene when the Buzayan case unfolded. I certainly would have had far more to say about it.

    Rather than testing me on history, test me on how things are improving and what I say if/when another serious incident occurs. I’m not trying to avoid conflict; I’m trying to avoid wasting my position’s leverage on something that is too far down the road for me to have an impact on.

  21. ACLU Supporter

    I can appreciate Mr. Aaronson’s position.

    I think there are two things that stand out to me.

    First, is that while all sides may or may not have made mistakes, it strikes me that the police are trained professionals and a private family are rank amateurs. This is overly simplisitic but nevertheless points out a critical distinction between a mistake that Jamaal or Halema might have made and one that Office Ly, Chief Hyde or even Don Saylor did make.

    Second, while I appreciate Bob’s position on things in the past and hoping to change things in the future, there are some open and gaping wounds that need to be corrected and healed and cannot be until and unless people are willing to be held accountable and take responsibility for their actions. There can be no healing perhaps without more bloodletting.

  22. ACLU Supporter

    I can appreciate Mr. Aaronson’s position.

    I think there are two things that stand out to me.

    First, is that while all sides may or may not have made mistakes, it strikes me that the police are trained professionals and a private family are rank amateurs. This is overly simplisitic but nevertheless points out a critical distinction between a mistake that Jamaal or Halema might have made and one that Office Ly, Chief Hyde or even Don Saylor did make.

    Second, while I appreciate Bob’s position on things in the past and hoping to change things in the future, there are some open and gaping wounds that need to be corrected and healed and cannot be until and unless people are willing to be held accountable and take responsibility for their actions. There can be no healing perhaps without more bloodletting.

  23. ACLU Supporter

    I can appreciate Mr. Aaronson’s position.

    I think there are two things that stand out to me.

    First, is that while all sides may or may not have made mistakes, it strikes me that the police are trained professionals and a private family are rank amateurs. This is overly simplisitic but nevertheless points out a critical distinction between a mistake that Jamaal or Halema might have made and one that Office Ly, Chief Hyde or even Don Saylor did make.

    Second, while I appreciate Bob’s position on things in the past and hoping to change things in the future, there are some open and gaping wounds that need to be corrected and healed and cannot be until and unless people are willing to be held accountable and take responsibility for their actions. There can be no healing perhaps without more bloodletting.

  24. ACLU Supporter

    I can appreciate Mr. Aaronson’s position.

    I think there are two things that stand out to me.

    First, is that while all sides may or may not have made mistakes, it strikes me that the police are trained professionals and a private family are rank amateurs. This is overly simplisitic but nevertheless points out a critical distinction between a mistake that Jamaal or Halema might have made and one that Office Ly, Chief Hyde or even Don Saylor did make.

    Second, while I appreciate Bob’s position on things in the past and hoping to change things in the future, there are some open and gaping wounds that need to be corrected and healed and cannot be until and unless people are willing to be held accountable and take responsibility for their actions. There can be no healing perhaps without more bloodletting.

  25. Anonymous

    “There can be no healing perhaps without more bloodletting.”

    That sounds a little antiquated and harsh. Perhaps a more modern approach would merely be a few short taser blasts.

    Seriously, tasers are being used too much and all I hope for is a perception that somebody is interested in and fixing broken processes.

  26. Anonymous

    “There can be no healing perhaps without more bloodletting.”

    That sounds a little antiquated and harsh. Perhaps a more modern approach would merely be a few short taser blasts.

    Seriously, tasers are being used too much and all I hope for is a perception that somebody is interested in and fixing broken processes.

  27. Anonymous

    “There can be no healing perhaps without more bloodletting.”

    That sounds a little antiquated and harsh. Perhaps a more modern approach would merely be a few short taser blasts.

    Seriously, tasers are being used too much and all I hope for is a perception that somebody is interested in and fixing broken processes.

  28. Anonymous

    “There can be no healing perhaps without more bloodletting.”

    That sounds a little antiquated and harsh. Perhaps a more modern approach would merely be a few short taser blasts.

    Seriously, tasers are being used too much and all I hope for is a perception that somebody is interested in and fixing broken processes.

  29. Anonymous

    “Bob Aaronson is finding out that if you are not with the progressives, then you end up being a target of them.”

    Try crossing Don Saylor sometime and then come talk

  30. Anonymous

    “Bob Aaronson is finding out that if you are not with the progressives, then you end up being a target of them.”

    Try crossing Don Saylor sometime and then come talk

  31. Anonymous

    “Bob Aaronson is finding out that if you are not with the progressives, then you end up being a target of them.”

    Try crossing Don Saylor sometime and then come talk

  32. Anonymous

    “Bob Aaronson is finding out that if you are not with the progressives, then you end up being a target of them.”

    Try crossing Don Saylor sometime and then come talk

  33. sharla

    A family member of mine – a teenager – refused to file a police report after being hit by a car on his bicycle last winter.

    The car hit him and drove off, leaving him laying in the street. He was on the wrong side of the street, but crossing in the crosswalk at a 3 way stop in front of the Vet’s Memorial. The car gunned through the stop sign and caught his back wheel, spinning him across the pavement.

    The teenager’s reasoning for not reporting the hit and run was that he didn’t feel he could give any more of a description than “a black car” and – this was the upsetting part – the police would just turn it around and make it his fault. He was on the wrong side of the street, you know.

    The bruises on his neck and body eventually went away, a new helmet was purchased and his bike was repaired by Ken’s Bike & Ski at a huge discount because they instantly recognized that the damage was the result of being hit by a car and used spare parts they had in their repair shop. I only had to pay for their labor.

    This incident clearly told me how far we as a community need to go in fostering trust in our police department amongst our youth.

    The biggest help that Bob has provided is giving us a knowlegable person who can explain police proceedure to us non-police and law types and increase our understanding about what factors play a part in decisions made by officers.

    I’m glad your here, Bob. Please stick around.

  34. sharla

    A family member of mine – a teenager – refused to file a police report after being hit by a car on his bicycle last winter.

    The car hit him and drove off, leaving him laying in the street. He was on the wrong side of the street, but crossing in the crosswalk at a 3 way stop in front of the Vet’s Memorial. The car gunned through the stop sign and caught his back wheel, spinning him across the pavement.

    The teenager’s reasoning for not reporting the hit and run was that he didn’t feel he could give any more of a description than “a black car” and – this was the upsetting part – the police would just turn it around and make it his fault. He was on the wrong side of the street, you know.

    The bruises on his neck and body eventually went away, a new helmet was purchased and his bike was repaired by Ken’s Bike & Ski at a huge discount because they instantly recognized that the damage was the result of being hit by a car and used spare parts they had in their repair shop. I only had to pay for their labor.

    This incident clearly told me how far we as a community need to go in fostering trust in our police department amongst our youth.

    The biggest help that Bob has provided is giving us a knowlegable person who can explain police proceedure to us non-police and law types and increase our understanding about what factors play a part in decisions made by officers.

    I’m glad your here, Bob. Please stick around.

  35. sharla

    A family member of mine – a teenager – refused to file a police report after being hit by a car on his bicycle last winter.

    The car hit him and drove off, leaving him laying in the street. He was on the wrong side of the street, but crossing in the crosswalk at a 3 way stop in front of the Vet’s Memorial. The car gunned through the stop sign and caught his back wheel, spinning him across the pavement.

    The teenager’s reasoning for not reporting the hit and run was that he didn’t feel he could give any more of a description than “a black car” and – this was the upsetting part – the police would just turn it around and make it his fault. He was on the wrong side of the street, you know.

    The bruises on his neck and body eventually went away, a new helmet was purchased and his bike was repaired by Ken’s Bike & Ski at a huge discount because they instantly recognized that the damage was the result of being hit by a car and used spare parts they had in their repair shop. I only had to pay for their labor.

    This incident clearly told me how far we as a community need to go in fostering trust in our police department amongst our youth.

    The biggest help that Bob has provided is giving us a knowlegable person who can explain police proceedure to us non-police and law types and increase our understanding about what factors play a part in decisions made by officers.

    I’m glad your here, Bob. Please stick around.

  36. sharla

    A family member of mine – a teenager – refused to file a police report after being hit by a car on his bicycle last winter.

    The car hit him and drove off, leaving him laying in the street. He was on the wrong side of the street, but crossing in the crosswalk at a 3 way stop in front of the Vet’s Memorial. The car gunned through the stop sign and caught his back wheel, spinning him across the pavement.

    The teenager’s reasoning for not reporting the hit and run was that he didn’t feel he could give any more of a description than “a black car” and – this was the upsetting part – the police would just turn it around and make it his fault. He was on the wrong side of the street, you know.

    The bruises on his neck and body eventually went away, a new helmet was purchased and his bike was repaired by Ken’s Bike & Ski at a huge discount because they instantly recognized that the damage was the result of being hit by a car and used spare parts they had in their repair shop. I only had to pay for their labor.

    This incident clearly told me how far we as a community need to go in fostering trust in our police department amongst our youth.

    The biggest help that Bob has provided is giving us a knowlegable person who can explain police proceedure to us non-police and law types and increase our understanding about what factors play a part in decisions made by officers.

    I’m glad your here, Bob. Please stick around.

  37. Anonymous

    sharla said…
    A family member of mine – a teenager – refused to file a police report after being hit by a car on his bicycle last winter.

    This incident clearly told me how far we as a community need to go in fostering trust in our police department amongst our youth.

    8/17/07 5:31 PM

    Which part of this was the fault of the Police?.

    Wasn’t this your fault as a parent or adult. Did you foster trust and take him to the police department anyway to make the report.

    Why not??.

  38. Anonymous

    sharla said…
    A family member of mine – a teenager – refused to file a police report after being hit by a car on his bicycle last winter.

    This incident clearly told me how far we as a community need to go in fostering trust in our police department amongst our youth.

    8/17/07 5:31 PM

    Which part of this was the fault of the Police?.

    Wasn’t this your fault as a parent or adult. Did you foster trust and take him to the police department anyway to make the report.

    Why not??.

  39. Anonymous

    sharla said…
    A family member of mine – a teenager – refused to file a police report after being hit by a car on his bicycle last winter.

    This incident clearly told me how far we as a community need to go in fostering trust in our police department amongst our youth.

    8/17/07 5:31 PM

    Which part of this was the fault of the Police?.

    Wasn’t this your fault as a parent or adult. Did you foster trust and take him to the police department anyway to make the report.

    Why not??.

  40. Anonymous

    sharla said…
    A family member of mine – a teenager – refused to file a police report after being hit by a car on his bicycle last winter.

    This incident clearly told me how far we as a community need to go in fostering trust in our police department amongst our youth.

    8/17/07 5:31 PM

    Which part of this was the fault of the Police?.

    Wasn’t this your fault as a parent or adult. Did you foster trust and take him to the police department anyway to make the report.

    Why not??.

  41. Anonymous

    sharla said…
    “The teenager’s reasoning for not reporting the hit and run was that he didn’t feel he could give any more of a description than “a black car” and – this was the upsetting part – the police would just turn it around and make it his fault. He was on the wrong side of the street, you know.”

    What? Give me a break!! I’ve read a lot of ridiculous things on this blog but this rates the top…

  42. Anonymous

    sharla said…
    “The teenager’s reasoning for not reporting the hit and run was that he didn’t feel he could give any more of a description than “a black car” and – this was the upsetting part – the police would just turn it around and make it his fault. He was on the wrong side of the street, you know.”

    What? Give me a break!! I’ve read a lot of ridiculous things on this blog but this rates the top…

  43. Anonymous

    sharla said…
    “The teenager’s reasoning for not reporting the hit and run was that he didn’t feel he could give any more of a description than “a black car” and – this was the upsetting part – the police would just turn it around and make it his fault. He was on the wrong side of the street, you know.”

    What? Give me a break!! I’ve read a lot of ridiculous things on this blog but this rates the top…

  44. Anonymous

    sharla said…
    “The teenager’s reasoning for not reporting the hit and run was that he didn’t feel he could give any more of a description than “a black car” and – this was the upsetting part – the police would just turn it around and make it his fault. He was on the wrong side of the street, you know.”

    What? Give me a break!! I’ve read a lot of ridiculous things on this blog but this rates the top…

  45. Anonymous

    “The teenager’s reasoning for not reporting the hit and run was that he didn’t feel he could give any more of a description than “a black car” and – this was the upsetting part – the police would just turn it around and make it his fault. He was on the wrong side of the street, you know.”

    What kind of idiots are the parents of this kid? Jeez, just call the police yourself, Sharla. Do you have no common sense at all?

  46. Anonymous

    “The teenager’s reasoning for not reporting the hit and run was that he didn’t feel he could give any more of a description than “a black car” and – this was the upsetting part – the police would just turn it around and make it his fault. He was on the wrong side of the street, you know.”

    What kind of idiots are the parents of this kid? Jeez, just call the police yourself, Sharla. Do you have no common sense at all?

  47. Anonymous

    “The teenager’s reasoning for not reporting the hit and run was that he didn’t feel he could give any more of a description than “a black car” and – this was the upsetting part – the police would just turn it around and make it his fault. He was on the wrong side of the street, you know.”

    What kind of idiots are the parents of this kid? Jeez, just call the police yourself, Sharla. Do you have no common sense at all?

  48. Anonymous

    “The teenager’s reasoning for not reporting the hit and run was that he didn’t feel he could give any more of a description than “a black car” and – this was the upsetting part – the police would just turn it around and make it his fault. He was on the wrong side of the street, you know.”

    What kind of idiots are the parents of this kid? Jeez, just call the police yourself, Sharla. Do you have no common sense at all?

  49. Vincente

    “Jeez, just call the police yourself, Sharla. Do you have no common sense at all?”

    Perfect example of why not to have anonymous posting right there. What’s more is that it is likely this anonymous person posted twice.

  50. Vincente

    “Jeez, just call the police yourself, Sharla. Do you have no common sense at all?”

    Perfect example of why not to have anonymous posting right there. What’s more is that it is likely this anonymous person posted twice.

  51. Vincente

    “Jeez, just call the police yourself, Sharla. Do you have no common sense at all?”

    Perfect example of why not to have anonymous posting right there. What’s more is that it is likely this anonymous person posted twice.

  52. Vincente

    “Jeez, just call the police yourself, Sharla. Do you have no common sense at all?”

    Perfect example of why not to have anonymous posting right there. What’s more is that it is likely this anonymous person posted twice.

  53. Anonymous

    Vincente said…
    “Jeez, just call the police yourself, Sharla. Do you have no common sense at all?”

    Perfect example of why not to have anonymous posting right there. What’s more is that it is likely this anonymous person posted twice.

    8/17/07 8:17 PM

    What does this have to do with anonymous posting Vincente. This was a prime example of bad parenting/bad adult responsibility. For you to try to defend it in anyway lumps you in with sharla as part of the problem.

  54. Anonymous

    Vincente said…
    “Jeez, just call the police yourself, Sharla. Do you have no common sense at all?”

    Perfect example of why not to have anonymous posting right there. What’s more is that it is likely this anonymous person posted twice.

    8/17/07 8:17 PM

    What does this have to do with anonymous posting Vincente. This was a prime example of bad parenting/bad adult responsibility. For you to try to defend it in anyway lumps you in with sharla as part of the problem.

  55. Anonymous

    Vincente said…
    “Jeez, just call the police yourself, Sharla. Do you have no common sense at all?”

    Perfect example of why not to have anonymous posting right there. What’s more is that it is likely this anonymous person posted twice.

    8/17/07 8:17 PM

    What does this have to do with anonymous posting Vincente. This was a prime example of bad parenting/bad adult responsibility. For you to try to defend it in anyway lumps you in with sharla as part of the problem.

  56. Anonymous

    Vincente said…
    “Jeez, just call the police yourself, Sharla. Do you have no common sense at all?”

    Perfect example of why not to have anonymous posting right there. What’s more is that it is likely this anonymous person posted twice.

    8/17/07 8:17 PM

    What does this have to do with anonymous posting Vincente. This was a prime example of bad parenting/bad adult responsibility. For you to try to defend it in anyway lumps you in with sharla as part of the problem.

  57. Anonymous

    Vincente said…
    Just call the police herself–and do what exactly???

    8/17/07 8:21 PM

    Just because nothing probably would have come of it does not mean that you do not report it and then blame the DPD for in-action

  58. Anonymous

    Vincente said…
    Just call the police herself–and do what exactly???

    8/17/07 8:21 PM

    Just because nothing probably would have come of it does not mean that you do not report it and then blame the DPD for in-action

  59. Anonymous

    Vincente said…
    Just call the police herself–and do what exactly???

    8/17/07 8:21 PM

    Just because nothing probably would have come of it does not mean that you do not report it and then blame the DPD for in-action

  60. Anonymous

    Vincente said…
    Just call the police herself–and do what exactly???

    8/17/07 8:21 PM

    Just because nothing probably would have come of it does not mean that you do not report it and then blame the DPD for in-action

  61. Anonymous

    Vincente,
    I (anonymous) posted 7:55 but not 7:59…there are more of us that think ridiculous than not.

    If you don’t go to the police, you CAN’T blame the police.

    Sharla’s argument would have merit IF they had gone to the police!! BUT without going to the police there is no way to BLAME the police.

  62. Anonymous

    Vincente,
    I (anonymous) posted 7:55 but not 7:59…there are more of us that think ridiculous than not.

    If you don’t go to the police, you CAN’T blame the police.

    Sharla’s argument would have merit IF they had gone to the police!! BUT without going to the police there is no way to BLAME the police.

  63. Anonymous

    Vincente,
    I (anonymous) posted 7:55 but not 7:59…there are more of us that think ridiculous than not.

    If you don’t go to the police, you CAN’T blame the police.

    Sharla’s argument would have merit IF they had gone to the police!! BUT without going to the police there is no way to BLAME the police.

  64. Anonymous

    Vincente,
    I (anonymous) posted 7:55 but not 7:59…there are more of us that think ridiculous than not.

    If you don’t go to the police, you CAN’T blame the police.

    Sharla’s argument would have merit IF they had gone to the police!! BUT without going to the police there is no way to BLAME the police.

  65. Vincente

    I’m again going to assume that all three of these posts posted five minutes apart on a Friday night from anonymous people are from the same person.

    Sharla’s point if I understand it has to do with certain segments of the population not trusting the police enough to come forward with a report about a crime. I think that goes to the heart of the trust issue. It’s not all about the police, but there seems to me to be a breakdown of trust between the police and some segments of the population–mainly the young and people of color.

    The real question is whether that fact is concerning to you rather than whether Sharla handled the situation as you think she ought to have.

    Sticking to that point, does it concern you that some in this community do not have enough trust to go to the police when a crime has been committed against them? Or do you simply say, hey it’s their fault and move on about your day?

  66. Vincente

    I’m again going to assume that all three of these posts posted five minutes apart on a Friday night from anonymous people are from the same person.

    Sharla’s point if I understand it has to do with certain segments of the population not trusting the police enough to come forward with a report about a crime. I think that goes to the heart of the trust issue. It’s not all about the police, but there seems to me to be a breakdown of trust between the police and some segments of the population–mainly the young and people of color.

    The real question is whether that fact is concerning to you rather than whether Sharla handled the situation as you think she ought to have.

    Sticking to that point, does it concern you that some in this community do not have enough trust to go to the police when a crime has been committed against them? Or do you simply say, hey it’s their fault and move on about your day?

  67. Vincente

    I’m again going to assume that all three of these posts posted five minutes apart on a Friday night from anonymous people are from the same person.

    Sharla’s point if I understand it has to do with certain segments of the population not trusting the police enough to come forward with a report about a crime. I think that goes to the heart of the trust issue. It’s not all about the police, but there seems to me to be a breakdown of trust between the police and some segments of the population–mainly the young and people of color.

    The real question is whether that fact is concerning to you rather than whether Sharla handled the situation as you think she ought to have.

    Sticking to that point, does it concern you that some in this community do not have enough trust to go to the police when a crime has been committed against them? Or do you simply say, hey it’s their fault and move on about your day?

  68. Vincente

    I’m again going to assume that all three of these posts posted five minutes apart on a Friday night from anonymous people are from the same person.

    Sharla’s point if I understand it has to do with certain segments of the population not trusting the police enough to come forward with a report about a crime. I think that goes to the heart of the trust issue. It’s not all about the police, but there seems to me to be a breakdown of trust between the police and some segments of the population–mainly the young and people of color.

    The real question is whether that fact is concerning to you rather than whether Sharla handled the situation as you think she ought to have.

    Sticking to that point, does it concern you that some in this community do not have enough trust to go to the police when a crime has been committed against them? Or do you simply say, hey it’s their fault and move on about your day?

  69. Becky

    “On the otherhand there have been enough complaints by people of color thatI am not prepared to say its not an issue.”

    I have not to my knowlege seen anything in the enterprise ( sadly do not get to read it all the time)
    that Mr. Aaronson has let the public have this information and has implied otherwise. What are the statistics.

    Why has he not let the public know it appears to be an issue. What are the other issues? what about other minorities and other mishandling by police?

    At the city council meeting on the HRC I personally talked to a few individuals that told me their personal stories and it made me ill.

    Because Mr. Aaronson was not there and obviously does not want to make a judgement then does he only tell them what right they have or what they can do? I assume all statistics are kept.

    Yes, of course Most of the police are hardworking decent individuals.

    I hope I am wrong so anyone, honestly, please let me know if he has informed the media correctly and/or can answer any of my questions.

  70. Becky

    “On the otherhand there have been enough complaints by people of color thatI am not prepared to say its not an issue.”

    I have not to my knowlege seen anything in the enterprise ( sadly do not get to read it all the time)
    that Mr. Aaronson has let the public have this information and has implied otherwise. What are the statistics.

    Why has he not let the public know it appears to be an issue. What are the other issues? what about other minorities and other mishandling by police?

    At the city council meeting on the HRC I personally talked to a few individuals that told me their personal stories and it made me ill.

    Because Mr. Aaronson was not there and obviously does not want to make a judgement then does he only tell them what right they have or what they can do? I assume all statistics are kept.

    Yes, of course Most of the police are hardworking decent individuals.

    I hope I am wrong so anyone, honestly, please let me know if he has informed the media correctly and/or can answer any of my questions.

  71. Becky

    “On the otherhand there have been enough complaints by people of color thatI am not prepared to say its not an issue.”

    I have not to my knowlege seen anything in the enterprise ( sadly do not get to read it all the time)
    that Mr. Aaronson has let the public have this information and has implied otherwise. What are the statistics.

    Why has he not let the public know it appears to be an issue. What are the other issues? what about other minorities and other mishandling by police?

    At the city council meeting on the HRC I personally talked to a few individuals that told me their personal stories and it made me ill.

    Because Mr. Aaronson was not there and obviously does not want to make a judgement then does he only tell them what right they have or what they can do? I assume all statistics are kept.

    Yes, of course Most of the police are hardworking decent individuals.

    I hope I am wrong so anyone, honestly, please let me know if he has informed the media correctly and/or can answer any of my questions.

  72. Becky

    “On the otherhand there have been enough complaints by people of color thatI am not prepared to say its not an issue.”

    I have not to my knowlege seen anything in the enterprise ( sadly do not get to read it all the time)
    that Mr. Aaronson has let the public have this information and has implied otherwise. What are the statistics.

    Why has he not let the public know it appears to be an issue. What are the other issues? what about other minorities and other mishandling by police?

    At the city council meeting on the HRC I personally talked to a few individuals that told me their personal stories and it made me ill.

    Because Mr. Aaronson was not there and obviously does not want to make a judgement then does he only tell them what right they have or what they can do? I assume all statistics are kept.

    Yes, of course Most of the police are hardworking decent individuals.

    I hope I am wrong so anyone, honestly, please let me know if he has informed the media correctly and/or can answer any of my questions.

  73. Rebecca

    I went by Becky for twenty years in Davis but decided I liked Rebecca my formal name. Don’t care what I am called but thought I should attach Rebecca to the last comment as well.

  74. Rebecca

    I went by Becky for twenty years in Davis but decided I liked Rebecca my formal name. Don’t care what I am called but thought I should attach Rebecca to the last comment as well.

  75. Rebecca

    I went by Becky for twenty years in Davis but decided I liked Rebecca my formal name. Don’t care what I am called but thought I should attach Rebecca to the last comment as well.

  76. Rebecca

    I went by Becky for twenty years in Davis but decided I liked Rebecca my formal name. Don’t care what I am called but thought I should attach Rebecca to the last comment as well.

  77. Anonymous

    “I’m again going to assume that all three of these posts posted five minutes apart on a Friday night from anonymous people are from the same person.”

    2 of the 3 are from the same…not all 3.

    I just don’t understand how you can place blame when you don’t at least try going to the police. To assume that you won’t be heard and blaming the untold department is non-sensical in my mind.

    Granted I only have an undergrad and grad degree from UCD…and have lived here for a total of 15 years…I just don’t understand the left side of the argument.

    Signed,
    Anon 2 out of 3 (now 4)

    Cheers

  78. Anonymous

    “I’m again going to assume that all three of these posts posted five minutes apart on a Friday night from anonymous people are from the same person.”

    2 of the 3 are from the same…not all 3.

    I just don’t understand how you can place blame when you don’t at least try going to the police. To assume that you won’t be heard and blaming the untold department is non-sensical in my mind.

    Granted I only have an undergrad and grad degree from UCD…and have lived here for a total of 15 years…I just don’t understand the left side of the argument.

    Signed,
    Anon 2 out of 3 (now 4)

    Cheers

  79. Anonymous

    “I’m again going to assume that all three of these posts posted five minutes apart on a Friday night from anonymous people are from the same person.”

    2 of the 3 are from the same…not all 3.

    I just don’t understand how you can place blame when you don’t at least try going to the police. To assume that you won’t be heard and blaming the untold department is non-sensical in my mind.

    Granted I only have an undergrad and grad degree from UCD…and have lived here for a total of 15 years…I just don’t understand the left side of the argument.

    Signed,
    Anon 2 out of 3 (now 4)

    Cheers

  80. Anonymous

    “I’m again going to assume that all three of these posts posted five minutes apart on a Friday night from anonymous people are from the same person.”

    2 of the 3 are from the same…not all 3.

    I just don’t understand how you can place blame when you don’t at least try going to the police. To assume that you won’t be heard and blaming the untold department is non-sensical in my mind.

    Granted I only have an undergrad and grad degree from UCD…and have lived here for a total of 15 years…I just don’t understand the left side of the argument.

    Signed,
    Anon 2 out of 3 (now 4)

    Cheers

  81. Vincente

    Fair enough 2 of 3 and 3 of 4 (a little joke)…

    I don’t know that blame is the correct word here. If there is a communication or trust problem, that is something that needs to be addressed, do you not agree?

  82. Vincente

    Fair enough 2 of 3 and 3 of 4 (a little joke)…

    I don’t know that blame is the correct word here. If there is a communication or trust problem, that is something that needs to be addressed, do you not agree?

  83. Vincente

    Fair enough 2 of 3 and 3 of 4 (a little joke)…

    I don’t know that blame is the correct word here. If there is a communication or trust problem, that is something that needs to be addressed, do you not agree?

  84. Vincente

    Fair enough 2 of 3 and 3 of 4 (a little joke)…

    I don’t know that blame is the correct word here. If there is a communication or trust problem, that is something that needs to be addressed, do you not agree?

  85. Anonymous

    Vincente said…
    Anon 1 of 4 Said…

    Vincente said…

    I don’t know that blame is the correct word here. If there is a communication or trust problem, that is something that needs to be addressed, do you not agree?

    8/17/07 9:44 PM

    Lets boil this down.

    Sharla says..

    My Realitive was on the wrong side of the road and was hit by a car that did not stop (hit & run). That accident leads my realitive to not trust the police, because the police are untrustworthy already.

  86. Anonymous

    Vincente said…
    Anon 1 of 4 Said…

    Vincente said…

    I don’t know that blame is the correct word here. If there is a communication or trust problem, that is something that needs to be addressed, do you not agree?

    8/17/07 9:44 PM

    Lets boil this down.

    Sharla says..

    My Realitive was on the wrong side of the road and was hit by a car that did not stop (hit & run). That accident leads my realitive to not trust the police, because the police are untrustworthy already.

  87. Anonymous

    Vincente said…
    Anon 1 of 4 Said…

    Vincente said…

    I don’t know that blame is the correct word here. If there is a communication or trust problem, that is something that needs to be addressed, do you not agree?

    8/17/07 9:44 PM

    Lets boil this down.

    Sharla says..

    My Realitive was on the wrong side of the road and was hit by a car that did not stop (hit & run). That accident leads my realitive to not trust the police, because the police are untrustworthy already.

  88. Anonymous

    Vincente said…
    Anon 1 of 4 Said…

    Vincente said…

    I don’t know that blame is the correct word here. If there is a communication or trust problem, that is something that needs to be addressed, do you not agree?

    8/17/07 9:44 PM

    Lets boil this down.

    Sharla says..

    My Realitive was on the wrong side of the road and was hit by a car that did not stop (hit & run). That accident leads my realitive to not trust the police, because the police are untrustworthy already.

  89. Vincente

    Actually I think you have it backwards–the accident did not lead her son to not trust the police, rather he didn’t report the incident because he thought that the police would turn it around on him. And what she has not told you is that he actually had pretty good reason based on his past experiences with the police to deduce this (even if in this case they may not have).

    Here’s her quote:

    “The teenager’s reasoning for not reporting the hit and run was that he didn’t feel he could give any more of a description than “a black car” and – this was the upsetting part – the police would just turn it around and make it his fault.”

    Again, you reversed the causation here.

  90. Vincente

    Actually I think you have it backwards–the accident did not lead her son to not trust the police, rather he didn’t report the incident because he thought that the police would turn it around on him. And what she has not told you is that he actually had pretty good reason based on his past experiences with the police to deduce this (even if in this case they may not have).

    Here’s her quote:

    “The teenager’s reasoning for not reporting the hit and run was that he didn’t feel he could give any more of a description than “a black car” and – this was the upsetting part – the police would just turn it around and make it his fault.”

    Again, you reversed the causation here.

  91. Vincente

    Actually I think you have it backwards–the accident did not lead her son to not trust the police, rather he didn’t report the incident because he thought that the police would turn it around on him. And what she has not told you is that he actually had pretty good reason based on his past experiences with the police to deduce this (even if in this case they may not have).

    Here’s her quote:

    “The teenager’s reasoning for not reporting the hit and run was that he didn’t feel he could give any more of a description than “a black car” and – this was the upsetting part – the police would just turn it around and make it his fault.”

    Again, you reversed the causation here.

  92. Vincente

    Actually I think you have it backwards–the accident did not lead her son to not trust the police, rather he didn’t report the incident because he thought that the police would turn it around on him. And what she has not told you is that he actually had pretty good reason based on his past experiences with the police to deduce this (even if in this case they may not have).

    Here’s her quote:

    “The teenager’s reasoning for not reporting the hit and run was that he didn’t feel he could give any more of a description than “a black car” and – this was the upsetting part – the police would just turn it around and make it his fault.”

    Again, you reversed the causation here.

  93. sharla

    I did call the police department to report the crime. I was told by the police department when I called that the victim had to be willing to talk to and be interviewed by the officer. If the victim was unwilling, then the report would not be taken. There was nothing I could do. The victim in this case did not trust the police and refused to be interviewed and no report was taken.

  94. sharla

    I did call the police department to report the crime. I was told by the police department when I called that the victim had to be willing to talk to and be interviewed by the officer. If the victim was unwilling, then the report would not be taken. There was nothing I could do. The victim in this case did not trust the police and refused to be interviewed and no report was taken.

  95. sharla

    I did call the police department to report the crime. I was told by the police department when I called that the victim had to be willing to talk to and be interviewed by the officer. If the victim was unwilling, then the report would not be taken. There was nothing I could do. The victim in this case did not trust the police and refused to be interviewed and no report was taken.

  96. sharla

    I did call the police department to report the crime. I was told by the police department when I called that the victim had to be willing to talk to and be interviewed by the officer. If the victim was unwilling, then the report would not be taken. There was nothing I could do. The victim in this case did not trust the police and refused to be interviewed and no report was taken.

  97. sharla

    I think the anonymous postings missed my point altogether.

    The point is that there is enough distrust in the Davis police department amongst our youth that, even when clearly the victim of a crime, kids will avoid contact with the police.

    We have a lot of work to do in this community in this regard and it has been acknowledged even in Chief Black’s 3 phase plan that a school resource officer or other such service is sorely needed in the community – someone who can establish themselves as a resource for kids. Right now the only contact is when an officer is called to the High School to arrest a student. Or when receiving helmet tickets around the corner from the Junior High school. Then there was the incident a year or so ago when officers came onto the DHS campus and took pictures of the kids gathered on the quad in order to certify some as gang members. Then there was the arrest of Halema. There are complaints of repeated stops by officers of kids. I’m sure that there are other incidents that kids know that we adults have no clue about. You don’t think kids talk amongst themselves about these things?

    In the case of my relative, there was no one he knew and trusted in the police department and his previous experiences in talking with law enforcement told him that doing so would be unwise and should be avoided at all cost.

    The anonymous postings above tell me that people really do not understand how things work in the police department. The parent or another person cannot report the crime on behalf of the victim. That’s apparently not how it works. At least that is what I found out when I called to report the crime.
    The officer I talked to at the police department was apologetic, but there was nothing that could be done.

  98. sharla

    I think the anonymous postings missed my point altogether.

    The point is that there is enough distrust in the Davis police department amongst our youth that, even when clearly the victim of a crime, kids will avoid contact with the police.

    We have a lot of work to do in this community in this regard and it has been acknowledged even in Chief Black’s 3 phase plan that a school resource officer or other such service is sorely needed in the community – someone who can establish themselves as a resource for kids. Right now the only contact is when an officer is called to the High School to arrest a student. Or when receiving helmet tickets around the corner from the Junior High school. Then there was the incident a year or so ago when officers came onto the DHS campus and took pictures of the kids gathered on the quad in order to certify some as gang members. Then there was the arrest of Halema. There are complaints of repeated stops by officers of kids. I’m sure that there are other incidents that kids know that we adults have no clue about. You don’t think kids talk amongst themselves about these things?

    In the case of my relative, there was no one he knew and trusted in the police department and his previous experiences in talking with law enforcement told him that doing so would be unwise and should be avoided at all cost.

    The anonymous postings above tell me that people really do not understand how things work in the police department. The parent or another person cannot report the crime on behalf of the victim. That’s apparently not how it works. At least that is what I found out when I called to report the crime.
    The officer I talked to at the police department was apologetic, but there was nothing that could be done.

  99. sharla

    I think the anonymous postings missed my point altogether.

    The point is that there is enough distrust in the Davis police department amongst our youth that, even when clearly the victim of a crime, kids will avoid contact with the police.

    We have a lot of work to do in this community in this regard and it has been acknowledged even in Chief Black’s 3 phase plan that a school resource officer or other such service is sorely needed in the community – someone who can establish themselves as a resource for kids. Right now the only contact is when an officer is called to the High School to arrest a student. Or when receiving helmet tickets around the corner from the Junior High school. Then there was the incident a year or so ago when officers came onto the DHS campus and took pictures of the kids gathered on the quad in order to certify some as gang members. Then there was the arrest of Halema. There are complaints of repeated stops by officers of kids. I’m sure that there are other incidents that kids know that we adults have no clue about. You don’t think kids talk amongst themselves about these things?

    In the case of my relative, there was no one he knew and trusted in the police department and his previous experiences in talking with law enforcement told him that doing so would be unwise and should be avoided at all cost.

    The anonymous postings above tell me that people really do not understand how things work in the police department. The parent or another person cannot report the crime on behalf of the victim. That’s apparently not how it works. At least that is what I found out when I called to report the crime.
    The officer I talked to at the police department was apologetic, but there was nothing that could be done.

  100. sharla

    I think the anonymous postings missed my point altogether.

    The point is that there is enough distrust in the Davis police department amongst our youth that, even when clearly the victim of a crime, kids will avoid contact with the police.

    We have a lot of work to do in this community in this regard and it has been acknowledged even in Chief Black’s 3 phase plan that a school resource officer or other such service is sorely needed in the community – someone who can establish themselves as a resource for kids. Right now the only contact is when an officer is called to the High School to arrest a student. Or when receiving helmet tickets around the corner from the Junior High school. Then there was the incident a year or so ago when officers came onto the DHS campus and took pictures of the kids gathered on the quad in order to certify some as gang members. Then there was the arrest of Halema. There are complaints of repeated stops by officers of kids. I’m sure that there are other incidents that kids know that we adults have no clue about. You don’t think kids talk amongst themselves about these things?

    In the case of my relative, there was no one he knew and trusted in the police department and his previous experiences in talking with law enforcement told him that doing so would be unwise and should be avoided at all cost.

    The anonymous postings above tell me that people really do not understand how things work in the police department. The parent or another person cannot report the crime on behalf of the victim. That’s apparently not how it works. At least that is what I found out when I called to report the crime.
    The officer I talked to at the police department was apologetic, but there was nothing that could be done.

  101. Anonymous

    Well, it probably is a mixture of different things. A part of the issue may have been parents who instill in their children a distrust in their local police department (I come from a poor lower class Mexican American family who still believes that the American system of government is less corrupt than the motherland. You know, death squads and such).

    Also keep in mind, that getting answers or suggestions from an officer depends on the questions presented. I would have asked the officer if the issue of being on the right side of the road would have been a factor. Depending if the juvenile presents the problem to as a explanation for not reporting it. Also, very few officers actually deal with accidents often.

    Regrettably, i have to agree with Vincente (with whom I don’t agree frequently). This unreported incident would have been reported with better outreach from the city. How many programs are out there for the youth of the city with the Police Department?

    DPD, I would suggest presenting this at your next interview with Chief Black.

    Also, I am just Throwing this out there, but don’t you think Black looks like a classic 80’s TV cop? Just saying…

  102. Anonymous

    Well, it probably is a mixture of different things. A part of the issue may have been parents who instill in their children a distrust in their local police department (I come from a poor lower class Mexican American family who still believes that the American system of government is less corrupt than the motherland. You know, death squads and such).

    Also keep in mind, that getting answers or suggestions from an officer depends on the questions presented. I would have asked the officer if the issue of being on the right side of the road would have been a factor. Depending if the juvenile presents the problem to as a explanation for not reporting it. Also, very few officers actually deal with accidents often.

    Regrettably, i have to agree with Vincente (with whom I don’t agree frequently). This unreported incident would have been reported with better outreach from the city. How many programs are out there for the youth of the city with the Police Department?

    DPD, I would suggest presenting this at your next interview with Chief Black.

    Also, I am just Throwing this out there, but don’t you think Black looks like a classic 80’s TV cop? Just saying…

  103. Anonymous

    Well, it probably is a mixture of different things. A part of the issue may have been parents who instill in their children a distrust in their local police department (I come from a poor lower class Mexican American family who still believes that the American system of government is less corrupt than the motherland. You know, death squads and such).

    Also keep in mind, that getting answers or suggestions from an officer depends on the questions presented. I would have asked the officer if the issue of being on the right side of the road would have been a factor. Depending if the juvenile presents the problem to as a explanation for not reporting it. Also, very few officers actually deal with accidents often.

    Regrettably, i have to agree with Vincente (with whom I don’t agree frequently). This unreported incident would have been reported with better outreach from the city. How many programs are out there for the youth of the city with the Police Department?

    DPD, I would suggest presenting this at your next interview with Chief Black.

    Also, I am just Throwing this out there, but don’t you think Black looks like a classic 80’s TV cop? Just saying…

  104. Anonymous

    Well, it probably is a mixture of different things. A part of the issue may have been parents who instill in their children a distrust in their local police department (I come from a poor lower class Mexican American family who still believes that the American system of government is less corrupt than the motherland. You know, death squads and such).

    Also keep in mind, that getting answers or suggestions from an officer depends on the questions presented. I would have asked the officer if the issue of being on the right side of the road would have been a factor. Depending if the juvenile presents the problem to as a explanation for not reporting it. Also, very few officers actually deal with accidents often.

    Regrettably, i have to agree with Vincente (with whom I don’t agree frequently). This unreported incident would have been reported with better outreach from the city. How many programs are out there for the youth of the city with the Police Department?

    DPD, I would suggest presenting this at your next interview with Chief Black.

    Also, I am just Throwing this out there, but don’t you think Black looks like a classic 80’s TV cop? Just saying…

  105. ERS

    The distrust in the Davis Police Department has gone on for a very long time.

    There have been times under certain Chiefs that there has been more connection between the officers and the community and trust issue has only been limited to a few officers.

    I believe what Sharla was attempting to say, and I don’t know, because I don’t know her but have heard the same scenario from others, is that they were reluctant to report it, because of past practice and experience with the DPD. Clear and simple.

    Does it make sense? To those who have not experienced this it does not make sense.

    However, to a mom, who worries about her kid, and to others who saw how the Saylorites, Souza, and Asmundson attacked anyone who was concerned about the Buzayan’s daughter…then I can understand her concern as a mom (even if it was before that Buzayan incident, I don’t know if it was).

    There is no need for personal attacks. Thank you for sharing your experience Sharla.

  106. ERS

    The distrust in the Davis Police Department has gone on for a very long time.

    There have been times under certain Chiefs that there has been more connection between the officers and the community and trust issue has only been limited to a few officers.

    I believe what Sharla was attempting to say, and I don’t know, because I don’t know her but have heard the same scenario from others, is that they were reluctant to report it, because of past practice and experience with the DPD. Clear and simple.

    Does it make sense? To those who have not experienced this it does not make sense.

    However, to a mom, who worries about her kid, and to others who saw how the Saylorites, Souza, and Asmundson attacked anyone who was concerned about the Buzayan’s daughter…then I can understand her concern as a mom (even if it was before that Buzayan incident, I don’t know if it was).

    There is no need for personal attacks. Thank you for sharing your experience Sharla.

  107. ERS

    The distrust in the Davis Police Department has gone on for a very long time.

    There have been times under certain Chiefs that there has been more connection between the officers and the community and trust issue has only been limited to a few officers.

    I believe what Sharla was attempting to say, and I don’t know, because I don’t know her but have heard the same scenario from others, is that they were reluctant to report it, because of past practice and experience with the DPD. Clear and simple.

    Does it make sense? To those who have not experienced this it does not make sense.

    However, to a mom, who worries about her kid, and to others who saw how the Saylorites, Souza, and Asmundson attacked anyone who was concerned about the Buzayan’s daughter…then I can understand her concern as a mom (even if it was before that Buzayan incident, I don’t know if it was).

    There is no need for personal attacks. Thank you for sharing your experience Sharla.

  108. ERS

    The distrust in the Davis Police Department has gone on for a very long time.

    There have been times under certain Chiefs that there has been more connection between the officers and the community and trust issue has only been limited to a few officers.

    I believe what Sharla was attempting to say, and I don’t know, because I don’t know her but have heard the same scenario from others, is that they were reluctant to report it, because of past practice and experience with the DPD. Clear and simple.

    Does it make sense? To those who have not experienced this it does not make sense.

    However, to a mom, who worries about her kid, and to others who saw how the Saylorites, Souza, and Asmundson attacked anyone who was concerned about the Buzayan’s daughter…then I can understand her concern as a mom (even if it was before that Buzayan incident, I don’t know if it was).

    There is no need for personal attacks. Thank you for sharing your experience Sharla.

  109. Rebecca

    I like the point that Sharla has. People can be afraid to go to the police due to either past experiences or by what they have heard.
    Imagine going to the police for something an individual police officer did let alone another person.

  110. Rebecca

    I like the point that Sharla has. People can be afraid to go to the police due to either past experiences or by what they have heard.
    Imagine going to the police for something an individual police officer did let alone another person.

  111. Rebecca

    I like the point that Sharla has. People can be afraid to go to the police due to either past experiences or by what they have heard.
    Imagine going to the police for something an individual police officer did let alone another person.

  112. Rebecca

    I like the point that Sharla has. People can be afraid to go to the police due to either past experiences or by what they have heard.
    Imagine going to the police for something an individual police officer did let alone another person.

  113. Rebecca

    After searching the Davis Enterprise, I came across a few articles on Bob. Although the newspaper mentions that there were many compliants on racial profiling for last year it has not detailed any for this year in progress.
    In one, “City Council Praises oversight measures…” article the staff writer states on Feb 21, 2007 “Members of the PAC and CAB as well as new ombudsman Bob Aaronson reported that their responsibilities were rewarding and that the police Department-wich didn’t deserve the bad rap it got, according to some- was getting better.” It makes it sound like Bob said that the department didnt deserve the bad rap. However, he could have just said it was getting better and that the insert is just acording to some. If “acording to some” does not include bob then it is a little misleading as if “according to some” are backed by highly respected individuals and organizations.

  114. Rebecca

    After searching the Davis Enterprise, I came across a few articles on Bob. Although the newspaper mentions that there were many compliants on racial profiling for last year it has not detailed any for this year in progress.
    In one, “City Council Praises oversight measures…” article the staff writer states on Feb 21, 2007 “Members of the PAC and CAB as well as new ombudsman Bob Aaronson reported that their responsibilities were rewarding and that the police Department-wich didn’t deserve the bad rap it got, according to some- was getting better.” It makes it sound like Bob said that the department didnt deserve the bad rap. However, he could have just said it was getting better and that the insert is just acording to some. If “acording to some” does not include bob then it is a little misleading as if “according to some” are backed by highly respected individuals and organizations.

  115. Rebecca

    After searching the Davis Enterprise, I came across a few articles on Bob. Although the newspaper mentions that there were many compliants on racial profiling for last year it has not detailed any for this year in progress.
    In one, “City Council Praises oversight measures…” article the staff writer states on Feb 21, 2007 “Members of the PAC and CAB as well as new ombudsman Bob Aaronson reported that their responsibilities were rewarding and that the police Department-wich didn’t deserve the bad rap it got, according to some- was getting better.” It makes it sound like Bob said that the department didnt deserve the bad rap. However, he could have just said it was getting better and that the insert is just acording to some. If “acording to some” does not include bob then it is a little misleading as if “according to some” are backed by highly respected individuals and organizations.

  116. Rebecca

    After searching the Davis Enterprise, I came across a few articles on Bob. Although the newspaper mentions that there were many compliants on racial profiling for last year it has not detailed any for this year in progress.
    In one, “City Council Praises oversight measures…” article the staff writer states on Feb 21, 2007 “Members of the PAC and CAB as well as new ombudsman Bob Aaronson reported that their responsibilities were rewarding and that the police Department-wich didn’t deserve the bad rap it got, according to some- was getting better.” It makes it sound like Bob said that the department didnt deserve the bad rap. However, he could have just said it was getting better and that the insert is just acording to some. If “acording to some” does not include bob then it is a little misleading as if “according to some” are backed by highly respected individuals and organizations.

  117. Anonymous

    When will the debate open as to whether the Human Relations Committee headed by Cecilia Escamilla-Greenwald was a, albeit messy at times, open and aboveboard forum in which to discuss/document and hopefully reshape police behavior in this town?

  118. Anonymous

    When will the debate open as to whether the Human Relations Committee headed by Cecilia Escamilla-Greenwald was a, albeit messy at times, open and aboveboard forum in which to discuss/document and hopefully reshape police behavior in this town?

  119. Anonymous

    When will the debate open as to whether the Human Relations Committee headed by Cecilia Escamilla-Greenwald was a, albeit messy at times, open and aboveboard forum in which to discuss/document and hopefully reshape police behavior in this town?

  120. Anonymous

    When will the debate open as to whether the Human Relations Committee headed by Cecilia Escamilla-Greenwald was a, albeit messy at times, open and aboveboard forum in which to discuss/document and hopefully reshape police behavior in this town?

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