Interview with Assembly Candidate Christopher Cabaldon

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The Vanguard on Thursday sat down with West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Cabaldon who will face Yolo County Supervisor Mariko Yamada in the June California Primary for the Democratic nomination to the 8th Assembly District.

What do you consider the top issues facing the 8th Assembly District? Yolo County? Davis?

The biggest issues for the district are the big issues in California right now. Issues with the delta and policies around water supply, floods, environmental protection, what we value in California and really the big debate about what’s happening here in our district. So the delta is really, essentially ground zero for the future of environmental sustainability and growth and development and public policy around the future of the state. And that’s right here. The 8th Assembly District doesn’t represent the whole delta, but of all the parts of California, our district is really the stewards of that place.

Issues around growth and congestion and air quality and the quality of life, how much we’re willing to put up with and what development means is a statewide issue but it’s felt in very few places more strongly than it is across the 8th Assembly District from Benicia to West Sacramento all along the I-80 Corridor.

Probably the third big issue is education. We face a gigantic gap in skills of the emerging workforce compared both to what today’s employers need, but also the kind of careers and opportunities economic and educational that we want the next generation to have access to and we’re just not keeping up. That’s an issue again, statewide, but again we’re feeling particularly strongly in a lot of communities in this district from the poorest parts of the 8th Assembly District places like parts of West Sacramento to the communities that have traditionally been very successful like Davis. So in the district those are the key issues.

Davis feels all of those in some way or another, it is not insulated from the challenges of educational opportunity and success and particularly the gap between those students that have always done well and those that we’ve never figured out how to create a quality education for. The delta, although Davis is not legally in the delta, all of the issues around farmland preservation, habitat, who gets what water, those are issues that Davis has been a statewide leader on in terms of raising those from the beginning. How do we protect the things that make California a special place to live in? And then growth and development generally that is the hallmark issue here in Davis. Just as it is in many communities across the district and the state and the legislature is going to have a lot to say about growth and development issues.

Yesterday, I was driving from Davis to Sacramento. It took me 20 minutes on I-80 to get from the highway 113 on ramp to the very far east outskirts of Davis. This region is set to grow a large amount in the coming years. How do you plan to prevent the I-80 Capitol Corridor from becoming the Congestion Corridor?

You say the Capitol Corridor and that is a big part of that strategy. The approach to dealing with congestion, and it is the same approach for dealing with air quality issues, because that’s what’s driving air pollution and a lot of the greenhouse gas emissions in our region. So we shouldn’t think about it just as a “I don’t like sitting in traffic” question, but it is also about our long term health and the environment too. Part of it is infrastructure and that is creating the alternatives for people to get out of their cars whether that means at the very local scale good bicycle or sidewalk facilities for pedestrians and cyclists all the way to the Capitol Corridor train system itself as an alternative for commuters to be able to stay off of the highway. It’s also things like the Port of Sacramento that we’ve worked really hard to take from bankruptcy to being a successful economic engine. Every time we add a new ship we are taking hundreds of trucks off Interstate 80. Trucking is now one of the biggest drivers of congestion on that highway. But the most fundamental change and it is the only one that has the potential for solving this challenge over the long range is that we have to grow differently. If we continue to sprawl with no personality, low density, McMansion subdivisions all over the place, there is no transportation system, no matter how much money you spend, that can deliver congestion free and easy mobility. It just isn’t possible. We’ve tried, other regions have tried, you can’t do it. So we have to have land use policies that the state supports that encourage and provide real meaningful alternatives that are attractive for people to live on the land differently and to be much more efficient about how we use land in our impact on the infrastructure.

You are a board member of the California Center for Regional Leadership, which encourages regionalism and discourages local governments from competing for sales tax-generating commercial development. Yet West Sacramento has encouraged large retailers such as Ikea and Wal Mart. Do you support proposals that would reduce the competition among local governments for Big Box retailers? (Examples: swap property tax for sales tax; limit the size of retailers). What did you do as mayor of West Sacramento to encourage locally owned businesses?

First you have to take a look at the actual policy assumption in our county. There isn’t a lot of sales tax competition. The cities and the county up to this point have had a very good working agreement about who does what and where major retail establishments are. And between the cities there is not a lot of fights. I can tell you in the time I’ve been mayor, the number of retail establishments we’ve competed with Davis or Woodland over could probably be counted on one hand and you wouldn’t even need all of your fingers. In the Bay Area and Sacramento County you see a lot of these kinds of fights between local governments trying to bid and provide subsidies in order to encourage businesses to bring sales tax to their communities.

For us, developing retail like Ikea and Wal Mart and Target, was about providing land use balance, it wasn’t principally about the revenues. We had virtually no retail in our city. We didn’t have even the kind of walkable downtown that Davis has. Even the Main Street that Woodland has, it just didn’t exist in West Sacramento and so there was no local places to shop. It was important, probably the number one issue in our city elections for about a decade, was attracting significant retail to the community so that people didn’t have to get into their cars and drive halfway across the region in order to shop. Both because they wanted to be proud of where they lived but also because of the environmental consequences of all of that driving. So for us it was really about that.

Having said, I do think it is important, a lot of what the state policies are around revenues and land use do drive a lot of local government who may have lost sight of what the purpose of land use planning is, which is to figure out what kind of community you want to be and a lot of them have instead tried to figure out how to make the most money off of land use and that’s not good for the economy, that’s not good for the local communities, it doesn’t help the state either. So whether it’s changing the tax policy to provide a greater weighting to property taxes than to sales taxes or changes around land use policy, that make it more possible for housing to pay for itself, and for retail to not be seen as such a big boon, those kind of state legislative policies do make a difference and are part of the equation. It’s the purpose of that Center for Regional Leadership, but I was on the speaker’s commission on regionalism several years ago and that was our principal recommendation is that the state needs to take aggressive action to deal with its own incentives towards the fiscalization of land use.

One of the big problems facing virtually every local jurisdiction that I cover on a daily basis whether it be the schools, the city, the county, or special districts is a lack of flow of money from the state to local governments, a the same time a large burden has shifted toward those local jurisdictions to meet the service needs of their constituents, how can the state do a better job of helping local government meet the funding needs of local jurisdictions?

Given the constraints of Proposition 113 on the ability of local communities to raise revenues like they used to pre-1978, one of the most important things the state can do is get out of the way. It’s all of the state’s regulatory requirements and program requirements kind of the big brother at the state level. Some legislator in Orange County says every school board ought to do this and it sounds like a great idea. But when you add up thousands of requirements, it means a place like the Davis school district can’t set its own priorities. So it has limited amount of money in the first place and then it has to spend money on stuff that it knows is not the biggest bang for its buck for kids, but it has to do it to comply with some state law. So I think kind of the immediate change that the state can do for school districts, for counties, for cities, for mosquito districts, is to pull back all of the regulatory requirements and allow all of the communities to set their own priorities with the money that they do have.

We’re past the day when local communities are going to be able to raise lots of their own revenues, but I think Davis has provided a good example when communities and residents see the power of their investment, when I see if I vote for a parcel tax I get a better school, or I get a library that’s worth going to, or I get a decent parks system, they vote for it. And more and more local governments need to do that too, and not just blame the state but take some responsibility. We’ve done that in this county. West Sacramento was the first to pass a local sales tax to support a wide variety of service improvements and amenities, Woodland and Davis followed, now it’s a state law that allows that to happen. So it’s not just a question of saying, oh whoa is us, and the state needs to save us, it’s also getting the tools we need to be able to solve our problems locally.

Concerns about flooding in California’s Central Valley exploded following the destruction of New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina. And yet, we continue to develop areas that are flood prone and in flood plains—this includes the city of West Sacramento under your leadership. Do you believe that this is a wise planning practice and what steps do you believe are needed to ensure protection from flood given growing population pressures?

We’ve been at this for a long time. Those of us in cities that are in deep flood plains like West Sacramento, have been paying attention to this long before Katrina. Katrina kind of raised the specter of flooding for the rest of the county, and for other folks in our region in particular, but the question about flood risk and safety has been on our minds ever since the community started.

The entire city of West Sacramento is in a flood plain. So for us, it is not a question of if we build inside the flood plain or outside of the flood plain, the state requires us to grow by certain percentages every year, and that has to occur. It is legally required that that happens in the flood plain because don’t have any other land. And all of the land around us is either underwater or in the flood plain too. So for us it has always been the question of how do we maximize the safety and how do we make sure that we’re not putting new people at unnecessary risk. So one of the debates lately is about whether or not the city should expand. The city of West Sacramento as opposed to Davis, has never annexed any land in its history. I’ve come out against proposals that would annex land that’s in deep flood plains because we can’t yet assure protection for the folks that might be moving there.

The alternatives aren’t great either. If we say no building in any flood plain, that’s the vast majority of the Sacramento region where urbanization already exists. We’d be saying, you can’t build in downtown Sacramento, you can’t build in midtown, you can’t build in Natomas, and then you’re saying you can only build in Davis or in Citrus Heights. There’s not enough room to accommodate the growth there and we don’t want to encourage people to live in the wild fire prone areas of the foothills. We don’t want to put them on habitat lands on sensitive groundwater aquifers. This is all a question of what the right balance is, making sure that everybody that’s making housing and office choices know what the risks are that we’re making sure we’re taking the right steps to solve it.

How can the 8th Assembly District balance the need for housing and jobs on one hand to accommodate huge projected growth particularly in the western part of the district with need to preserve agricultural land and environmental protection? As Mayor of West Sacramento, what have you done to promote that ideal? How should California as a whole plan to deal with growth pressures in the coming decades?

For the whole state of California, what we are doing here regionally is the right model. I chaired the regions council of cities and counties, as we developed the blueprint for the future project, we talked about this before, but that articulates what the proper strategy is. It’s not about how much growth you want to have, most of us would prefer to keep the communities the way that we have them. Some places like West Sacramento over the last ten years, have needed additional investment in order to be good places to live. It’s about dealing with the growth that is coming, because we don’t prohibit our residents from having children or their kids coming back from college from out of state. We want families to be able to stay together. So it’s not about the growth itself and we don’t have policies that encourage people to come here so we can meet some growth target. It’s where the growth is happening that is really where the whole ballgame is.

And so I think the failure of the last generation was to allow so much growth and sprawl into areas where development didn’t belong on farmland, in areas that were next to sensitive habitat and species, or were destroying places for recreation or for great inspirational vistas, the kinds of things that make this a wonderful place, while at the same time, no one was making any investments on old factory sites and brown fields and parcels that have been empty and abandoned for a generation in poor neighborhoods. There’s lots of land available for infill development and while that can’t accommodate every projected housing unit that’s needed over the next 50 years, it can accommodate a heck of a lot of it, probably most of it and so really the strategy has to be, both at the local level, at the regional level, and statewide, to drive development to those areas where we’ve already got urbanization, we already have the infrastructure, and where we need an economic shot in the arm. So that green field development becomes at best a last resort. My own view is that we never have to get there in many cases.

Everyone is for health care reform. What approach do you most advocate and more importantly, how can you get it passed in the current climate or will you be looking toward 2011 with a Democratic Governor?

The governor isn’t the issue at this stage. It really is about putting together a package and we can’t wait and particularly children cannot wait for 2011 while we wait on what might be a better governor or what might be a worse governor for health care reform. I don’t pretend to have the comprehensive answer to everything on health care reform. But I do know that we’re spending more than anyone else on the planet to provide less care to fewer people. We’re operating an extraordinarily inefficient system.

Everyone who participates in it from patients to doctors, the insurance companies, and everyone else acknowledges that there’s a lot of money wasted that if it were put back into the system, could expand care to a lot more people and provide real high quality care and preventative care that make the system function a lot more effectively. So a lot of that is about prevention, it’s about better use of technology; it’s about a lot less paperwork and bureaucracy in order to make the system work. Whether that can provide the dollars necessary to do the whole thing, I don’t know. But that’s the first step is to deal with those issues. And I think it’s pretty clear, almost everyone has made a health care proposal except for legislative Republicans who have got their head in the sand, but almost everyone else has made a proposal, all of which have their flaws but I think point to the real possibility of a meaningful comprehensive solution starting with kids.

The original gang injunction was thrown out by the courts. How does the new gang injunction improve upon the original? How can we balance and where do you balance the concerns between public safety on the one hand and the rights of the accused to have a fair trial with court representation?

This is a challenging issue, particularly for folks who don’t live in West Sacramento, who for whom it’s just an abstract political philosophy question, for the folks on the street in the community, many of whom are already dealing with issues around poverty and immigration and the gang and its threat to their families is one more insult from a society that in many cases has left them behind. Tackling the challenge of the Broderick Boys, which is a documented, verified, court-sanctioned gang in our city, has been a big priority. I don’t think its any secret that there were substantial concerns after the district attorney sought and got the injunction from the court the first time around from my self and other city leaders about the injunction and its scope.

This time around its very different and that’s because of concerns and issues that were raised after the first one was put in place, we conducted a lot of community workshops, listened a lot to civil libertarians, to public defenders, to folks in the neighborhood, to community activists and made some significant changes to it. So that where the first injunction applied to hundreds and hundreds of people, this one applies only to those individuals who have recent and serious crimes that are gang related, which narrows the scope quite dramatically. It eliminates the issues around “what color are you wearing” or “what kind of tattoo do you have,” which for me is not a sufficient justification for the raw exercise of government power. The balancing that we’re trying to accomplish I think is very important that we not have a world that’s envisioned in the “Minority Report” film, where you try to pre-guess who might commit crimes and then arrest and punish them before they’ve had a chance to do it. And on the other hand we use similar kinds of tools at something like a DUI checkpoint, where we stop everybody, there’s no attorneys, we haven’t already convicted them of anything, everybody gets stopped in order to assure that folks on the streets are safe and protected from drunk drivers. So we are for those moments, for half an hour, for forty-five minutes, detaining someone who has committed no crime in order to do that. So it’s really a question of what the right balance is, when you try to draw them in black and white, you ignore the impact that the gang is having on the community or you ignore the significance of the liberty issues that we’ve been trying to address.

What accomplishment in West Sacramento are you most proud of?

The complete transformation of the city’s sense of itself and its future. It would be easy to say, Raley Field, or Ikea, or the Waterfront redevelopment, or the turn around of our local schools, but those are really the drivers of something much more powerful which is that a decade ago, there were folks in West Sacramento that wouldn’t put the city on their return address, they would write some neighborhood name like Southport, because they were ashamed of West Sacramento. If you asked them where they lived, they didn’t want to say, there was a sense of desperation about the place, that there had been so many promises for so long, like a century that never came to a fruition, so the sense that we’re a working class town with a lot of poverty and diversity and it can’t get any better and not in a good way. Today, that’s completely different, you go to the supermarket or the post office and people are proud to be in West Sacramento, they expect things to be better, so even if you just came out of the social security line or the unemployment line, you have expectations about what the future’s going to be in West Sac. And that’s important because it’s made folks who don’t normally have expectations around the political process or around government into high expectation voters and constituents. That’s what you need to sustain change over the long run. So it’s not a building or a development project, it is now a community that has a sense of purpose about it.

If you could accomplish one thing if elected to the Assembly, what would it be?

I think the biggest issue that I want to solve is around growth and development and moving towards the smart growth principles that I think are critical for preserving the quality of life and the unique character that the small towns and mid-size communities in our district have and clean up the air and protect habitat and make it so that we don’t spend the rest of our lives in traffic, those are the bread and butter issues of the 8th Assembly District and that’s what I want to tackle in the short time I hope to have there.

What politician do you kind of wish you were most like?

There’s no single politician that I emulate. One that I work with quite a bit that I admire greatly is Darryl Steinberg in the State Senate. He approaches the work of legislating with passion, he’s totally values based, very progressive, wants to change and transform the world for the better in a very powerful way, he’s not just sitting in the seat. But he’s all about getting results. It’s not just about the press releases, it’s not just about saying that I voted the right way, but it’s about delivering real and substantial change on issues of mental health, or sprawl or fiscalization of land use, or so many of the things he’s able to marry both very strong core values with a real record of accomplishment. I try to emulate that work.

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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148 thoughts on “Interview with Assembly Candidate Christopher Cabaldon”

  1. Anonymous

    “So we are for those moments, for half an hour, for forty-five minutes, detaining someone who has committed no crime in order to do that.”

    What is he referring to?

  2. Anonymous

    “So we are for those moments, for half an hour, for forty-five minutes, detaining someone who has committed no crime in order to do that.”

    What is he referring to?

  3. Anonymous

    “So we are for those moments, for half an hour, for forty-five minutes, detaining someone who has committed no crime in order to do that.”

    What is he referring to?

  4. Anonymous

    “So we are for those moments, for half an hour, for forty-five minutes, detaining someone who has committed no crime in order to do that.”

    What is he referring to?

  5. Anonymous

    She does not have to “produce” better responses. Her responses will come naturally and I believe they will be better and more genuine. He says he’s concerned about air quality and preserving land; however, his record speaks otherwise.

    Davis demo voter

  6. Anonymous

    She does not have to “produce” better responses. Her responses will come naturally and I believe they will be better and more genuine. He says he’s concerned about air quality and preserving land; however, his record speaks otherwise.

    Davis demo voter

  7. Anonymous

    She does not have to “produce” better responses. Her responses will come naturally and I believe they will be better and more genuine. He says he’s concerned about air quality and preserving land; however, his record speaks otherwise.

    Davis demo voter

  8. Anonymous

    She does not have to “produce” better responses. Her responses will come naturally and I believe they will be better and more genuine. He says he’s concerned about air quality and preserving land; however, his record speaks otherwise.

    Davis demo voter

  9. Anonymous

    I don’t know what “rsdintes” are, but I think he did a great job explaining smart growth and the fact that we do need new housing. The top goals need to be resisting pressures to develop in farmland, where the endangered habitats are, and where there are no transportation alternatives to traffic congestion. Second goal is to increase the number of infill developments.

    He was smart to say that these are communities which will continue to grow. We can’t hide from that. But we also can’t stop some new homes from being built. And if Davis voters had a choice between Cabaldon’s development in urban infill + southport homes vs. Mariko’s development on farmland, which would hurt the local environment plus add to congestion, I think the choice would be clear.

  10. Anonymous

    I don’t know what “rsdintes” are, but I think he did a great job explaining smart growth and the fact that we do need new housing. The top goals need to be resisting pressures to develop in farmland, where the endangered habitats are, and where there are no transportation alternatives to traffic congestion. Second goal is to increase the number of infill developments.

    He was smart to say that these are communities which will continue to grow. We can’t hide from that. But we also can’t stop some new homes from being built. And if Davis voters had a choice between Cabaldon’s development in urban infill + southport homes vs. Mariko’s development on farmland, which would hurt the local environment plus add to congestion, I think the choice would be clear.

  11. Anonymous

    I don’t know what “rsdintes” are, but I think he did a great job explaining smart growth and the fact that we do need new housing. The top goals need to be resisting pressures to develop in farmland, where the endangered habitats are, and where there are no transportation alternatives to traffic congestion. Second goal is to increase the number of infill developments.

    He was smart to say that these are communities which will continue to grow. We can’t hide from that. But we also can’t stop some new homes from being built. And if Davis voters had a choice between Cabaldon’s development in urban infill + southport homes vs. Mariko’s development on farmland, which would hurt the local environment plus add to congestion, I think the choice would be clear.

  12. Anonymous

    I don’t know what “rsdintes” are, but I think he did a great job explaining smart growth and the fact that we do need new housing. The top goals need to be resisting pressures to develop in farmland, where the endangered habitats are, and where there are no transportation alternatives to traffic congestion. Second goal is to increase the number of infill developments.

    He was smart to say that these are communities which will continue to grow. We can’t hide from that. But we also can’t stop some new homes from being built. And if Davis voters had a choice between Cabaldon’s development in urban infill + southport homes vs. Mariko’s development on farmland, which would hurt the local environment plus add to congestion, I think the choice would be clear.

  13. Anonymous

    The Capitol Morning Report posted a press release from Calbadon about the Davisvanguard poll:

    Monday, September 24th
    From the Christopher Cabaldon for AD 8 campaign. — According to the People’s Vanguard of Davis, a progressive political blog in the 8th Assembly District, West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Cabaldon beat his Democratic opponent, Yolo County Supervisor Mariko Yamada, 67.8% to 32.2% in the online straw poll that was open for voting for the last week. The People’s Vanguard of Davis is based in the city of Davis, Yamada’s home.

  14. Anonymous

    The Capitol Morning Report posted a press release from Calbadon about the Davisvanguard poll:

    Monday, September 24th
    From the Christopher Cabaldon for AD 8 campaign. — According to the People’s Vanguard of Davis, a progressive political blog in the 8th Assembly District, West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Cabaldon beat his Democratic opponent, Yolo County Supervisor Mariko Yamada, 67.8% to 32.2% in the online straw poll that was open for voting for the last week. The People’s Vanguard of Davis is based in the city of Davis, Yamada’s home.

  15. Anonymous

    The Capitol Morning Report posted a press release from Calbadon about the Davisvanguard poll:

    Monday, September 24th
    From the Christopher Cabaldon for AD 8 campaign. — According to the People’s Vanguard of Davis, a progressive political blog in the 8th Assembly District, West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Cabaldon beat his Democratic opponent, Yolo County Supervisor Mariko Yamada, 67.8% to 32.2% in the online straw poll that was open for voting for the last week. The People’s Vanguard of Davis is based in the city of Davis, Yamada’s home.

  16. Anonymous

    The Capitol Morning Report posted a press release from Calbadon about the Davisvanguard poll:

    Monday, September 24th
    From the Christopher Cabaldon for AD 8 campaign. — According to the People’s Vanguard of Davis, a progressive political blog in the 8th Assembly District, West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Cabaldon beat his Democratic opponent, Yolo County Supervisor Mariko Yamada, 67.8% to 32.2% in the online straw poll that was open for voting for the last week. The People’s Vanguard of Davis is based in the city of Davis, Yamada’s home.

  17. Anonymous

    …So many words that tell us so little. No wonder that Saylor is endorsing Calbadon as they both appear to have studied at the same school of campaign rhetoric. Neither reveals WHO they really are unless relentlessly pursued and cornered. Unfortunately, this interview served up “soft balls”.

  18. Anonymous

    …So many words that tell us so little. No wonder that Saylor is endorsing Calbadon as they both appear to have studied at the same school of campaign rhetoric. Neither reveals WHO they really are unless relentlessly pursued and cornered. Unfortunately, this interview served up “soft balls”.

  19. Anonymous

    …So many words that tell us so little. No wonder that Saylor is endorsing Calbadon as they both appear to have studied at the same school of campaign rhetoric. Neither reveals WHO they really are unless relentlessly pursued and cornered. Unfortunately, this interview served up “soft balls”.

  20. Anonymous

    …So many words that tell us so little. No wonder that Saylor is endorsing Calbadon as they both appear to have studied at the same school of campaign rhetoric. Neither reveals WHO they really are unless relentlessly pursued and cornered. Unfortunately, this interview served up “soft balls”.

  21. Im impressed

    I don’t know about that. I think that he has done well for West Sacramento. I really liked his answers. He seems well informed and has an ear to the ground and is responding to the needs he sees in the community. The development in West Sac under his tenure seems to be well received by the community. There are many people who work in Davis who have chosen to live in West Sac.

  22. Im impressed

    I don’t know about that. I think that he has done well for West Sacramento. I really liked his answers. He seems well informed and has an ear to the ground and is responding to the needs he sees in the community. The development in West Sac under his tenure seems to be well received by the community. There are many people who work in Davis who have chosen to live in West Sac.

  23. Im impressed

    I don’t know about that. I think that he has done well for West Sacramento. I really liked his answers. He seems well informed and has an ear to the ground and is responding to the needs he sees in the community. The development in West Sac under his tenure seems to be well received by the community. There are many people who work in Davis who have chosen to live in West Sac.

  24. Im impressed

    I don’t know about that. I think that he has done well for West Sacramento. I really liked his answers. He seems well informed and has an ear to the ground and is responding to the needs he sees in the community. The development in West Sac under his tenure seems to be well received by the community. There are many people who work in Davis who have chosen to live in West Sac.

  25. This is an easy one

    The guy is just smart. I don’t know why some of you have a hard time admitting that.

    He runs circles around most people in the area on policy matters.

    Is he the guy you want to have a beer with? Probably not.

    Is he the best candidate in this race to stand up for Davis on a general policy issue? No doubt.

    Those of you that are supporting Yamada have to be doing it out of friendship and personality. There is nothing wrong with that.

    Clearly the best candidate for the Assembly in this race is Cabaldon.

  26. This is an easy one

    The guy is just smart. I don’t know why some of you have a hard time admitting that.

    He runs circles around most people in the area on policy matters.

    Is he the guy you want to have a beer with? Probably not.

    Is he the best candidate in this race to stand up for Davis on a general policy issue? No doubt.

    Those of you that are supporting Yamada have to be doing it out of friendship and personality. There is nothing wrong with that.

    Clearly the best candidate for the Assembly in this race is Cabaldon.

  27. This is an easy one

    The guy is just smart. I don’t know why some of you have a hard time admitting that.

    He runs circles around most people in the area on policy matters.

    Is he the guy you want to have a beer with? Probably not.

    Is he the best candidate in this race to stand up for Davis on a general policy issue? No doubt.

    Those of you that are supporting Yamada have to be doing it out of friendship and personality. There is nothing wrong with that.

    Clearly the best candidate for the Assembly in this race is Cabaldon.

  28. This is an easy one

    The guy is just smart. I don’t know why some of you have a hard time admitting that.

    He runs circles around most people in the area on policy matters.

    Is he the guy you want to have a beer with? Probably not.

    Is he the best candidate in this race to stand up for Davis on a general policy issue? No doubt.

    Those of you that are supporting Yamada have to be doing it out of friendship and personality. There is nothing wrong with that.

    Clearly the best candidate for the Assembly in this race is Cabaldon.

  29. Anonymous

    “Soft balls? What questions would you have asked?”

    With political characters like Saylor and Cabaldon, you need to press them for short,clear and unambiguous answers to specific policy questions along with follow-up questions,otherwise the more they spew their rhetoric, the less they actually say.

  30. Anonymous

    “Soft balls? What questions would you have asked?”

    With political characters like Saylor and Cabaldon, you need to press them for short,clear and unambiguous answers to specific policy questions along with follow-up questions,otherwise the more they spew their rhetoric, the less they actually say.

  31. Anonymous

    “Soft balls? What questions would you have asked?”

    With political characters like Saylor and Cabaldon, you need to press them for short,clear and unambiguous answers to specific policy questions along with follow-up questions,otherwise the more they spew their rhetoric, the less they actually say.

  32. Anonymous

    “Soft balls? What questions would you have asked?”

    With political characters like Saylor and Cabaldon, you need to press them for short,clear and unambiguous answers to specific policy questions along with follow-up questions,otherwise the more they spew their rhetoric, the less they actually say.

  33. Clean House

    I agree with anonymous 9:54.

    We need to clean house in Davis!!! Saylor/Souza/Greenwald/Asmundson/Thomson all need to be gone. They are all out of their minds in supporting Cabaldon! I was all for the stem cell research center that can put us on the map when it comes to medical advances, and Mariko fought for it, while everyone else in Davis didn’t even hesitate in saying no to it. Everyone says they support stem cell centers, but Yamada is the only one who thought about supporting it. We need to CLEAN HOUSE in Davis. Voting Yamada and all new Councilmembers sends that message to the Davis establishment that they don’t even have a clue!

  34. Clean House

    I agree with anonymous 9:54.

    We need to clean house in Davis!!! Saylor/Souza/Greenwald/Asmundson/Thomson all need to be gone. They are all out of their minds in supporting Cabaldon! I was all for the stem cell research center that can put us on the map when it comes to medical advances, and Mariko fought for it, while everyone else in Davis didn’t even hesitate in saying no to it. Everyone says they support stem cell centers, but Yamada is the only one who thought about supporting it. We need to CLEAN HOUSE in Davis. Voting Yamada and all new Councilmembers sends that message to the Davis establishment that they don’t even have a clue!

  35. Clean House

    I agree with anonymous 9:54.

    We need to clean house in Davis!!! Saylor/Souza/Greenwald/Asmundson/Thomson all need to be gone. They are all out of their minds in supporting Cabaldon! I was all for the stem cell research center that can put us on the map when it comes to medical advances, and Mariko fought for it, while everyone else in Davis didn’t even hesitate in saying no to it. Everyone says they support stem cell centers, but Yamada is the only one who thought about supporting it. We need to CLEAN HOUSE in Davis. Voting Yamada and all new Councilmembers sends that message to the Davis establishment that they don’t even have a clue!

  36. Clean House

    I agree with anonymous 9:54.

    We need to clean house in Davis!!! Saylor/Souza/Greenwald/Asmundson/Thomson all need to be gone. They are all out of their minds in supporting Cabaldon! I was all for the stem cell research center that can put us on the map when it comes to medical advances, and Mariko fought for it, while everyone else in Davis didn’t even hesitate in saying no to it. Everyone says they support stem cell centers, but Yamada is the only one who thought about supporting it. We need to CLEAN HOUSE in Davis. Voting Yamada and all new Councilmembers sends that message to the Davis establishment that they don’t even have a clue!

  37. Anonymous

    Caboldon’s ear is to the ground…getting trampled on by the developers who are funding him. His actions and words contradict one another. I voted for him last time but I won’t be fooled again.

    Yamada has my vote this time around.

    Davis demo voter

  38. Anonymous

    Caboldon’s ear is to the ground…getting trampled on by the developers who are funding him. His actions and words contradict one another. I voted for him last time but I won’t be fooled again.

    Yamada has my vote this time around.

    Davis demo voter

  39. Anonymous

    Caboldon’s ear is to the ground…getting trampled on by the developers who are funding him. His actions and words contradict one another. I voted for him last time but I won’t be fooled again.

    Yamada has my vote this time around.

    Davis demo voter

  40. Anonymous

    Caboldon’s ear is to the ground…getting trampled on by the developers who are funding him. His actions and words contradict one another. I voted for him last time but I won’t be fooled again.

    Yamada has my vote this time around.

    Davis demo voter

  41. davis republican

    It’s a bit troubling that his response on health care was so inadequate. It’s so easy for politicans to say, “let’s just get rid of the inefficiencies.” To really provide health care to more people is going to take a tax increase and A LOT of government involvement. If that’s what he wants, fine, but he should be up front about it and not pretend that all problems can be solved by getting rid of inefficiencies. Also, he obviously doesn’t pay attention to what’s going on in Sacramento, since both the Senate and the Assembly Republicans put forth health care plans.

    Pretty troubling that such a short answer had so many problems…makes me think his other answers, while sounding good, were also as error-filled.

  42. davis republican

    It’s a bit troubling that his response on health care was so inadequate. It’s so easy for politicans to say, “let’s just get rid of the inefficiencies.” To really provide health care to more people is going to take a tax increase and A LOT of government involvement. If that’s what he wants, fine, but he should be up front about it and not pretend that all problems can be solved by getting rid of inefficiencies. Also, he obviously doesn’t pay attention to what’s going on in Sacramento, since both the Senate and the Assembly Republicans put forth health care plans.

    Pretty troubling that such a short answer had so many problems…makes me think his other answers, while sounding good, were also as error-filled.

  43. davis republican

    It’s a bit troubling that his response on health care was so inadequate. It’s so easy for politicans to say, “let’s just get rid of the inefficiencies.” To really provide health care to more people is going to take a tax increase and A LOT of government involvement. If that’s what he wants, fine, but he should be up front about it and not pretend that all problems can be solved by getting rid of inefficiencies. Also, he obviously doesn’t pay attention to what’s going on in Sacramento, since both the Senate and the Assembly Republicans put forth health care plans.

    Pretty troubling that such a short answer had so many problems…makes me think his other answers, while sounding good, were also as error-filled.

  44. davis republican

    It’s a bit troubling that his response on health care was so inadequate. It’s so easy for politicans to say, “let’s just get rid of the inefficiencies.” To really provide health care to more people is going to take a tax increase and A LOT of government involvement. If that’s what he wants, fine, but he should be up front about it and not pretend that all problems can be solved by getting rid of inefficiencies. Also, he obviously doesn’t pay attention to what’s going on in Sacramento, since both the Senate and the Assembly Republicans put forth health care plans.

    Pretty troubling that such a short answer had so many problems…makes me think his other answers, while sounding good, were also as error-filled.

  45. Im impressed

    I am not a campaign worker of Cabaldon’s. I am just a regular, run of the mill voter in Davis, who believes in looking carefully at each candidate, each issue before voting. I take offense that my positive comments regarding Cabaldon’s interview is so readily dismissed as a campaign tactic. I don’t think that my opinion really has that much affect on the way other people vote. I know some people will vote for or against him solely on one issue – big box development, building out West Sac, being gay, the gang injunction, who has endorsed or not endorsed him, etc. – one issue. But I find that I disagree with every politician on one or two issues and I can’t let that be the determining factor for who I would vote for.

    All I said was I was impressed with the interview. I did not say that I was ready to vote for him and I won’t be bullied into not voting for him, so lighten up.

  46. Im impressed

    I am not a campaign worker of Cabaldon’s. I am just a regular, run of the mill voter in Davis, who believes in looking carefully at each candidate, each issue before voting. I take offense that my positive comments regarding Cabaldon’s interview is so readily dismissed as a campaign tactic. I don’t think that my opinion really has that much affect on the way other people vote. I know some people will vote for or against him solely on one issue – big box development, building out West Sac, being gay, the gang injunction, who has endorsed or not endorsed him, etc. – one issue. But I find that I disagree with every politician on one or two issues and I can’t let that be the determining factor for who I would vote for.

    All I said was I was impressed with the interview. I did not say that I was ready to vote for him and I won’t be bullied into not voting for him, so lighten up.

  47. Im impressed

    I am not a campaign worker of Cabaldon’s. I am just a regular, run of the mill voter in Davis, who believes in looking carefully at each candidate, each issue before voting. I take offense that my positive comments regarding Cabaldon’s interview is so readily dismissed as a campaign tactic. I don’t think that my opinion really has that much affect on the way other people vote. I know some people will vote for or against him solely on one issue – big box development, building out West Sac, being gay, the gang injunction, who has endorsed or not endorsed him, etc. – one issue. But I find that I disagree with every politician on one or two issues and I can’t let that be the determining factor for who I would vote for.

    All I said was I was impressed with the interview. I did not say that I was ready to vote for him and I won’t be bullied into not voting for him, so lighten up.

  48. Im impressed

    I am not a campaign worker of Cabaldon’s. I am just a regular, run of the mill voter in Davis, who believes in looking carefully at each candidate, each issue before voting. I take offense that my positive comments regarding Cabaldon’s interview is so readily dismissed as a campaign tactic. I don’t think that my opinion really has that much affect on the way other people vote. I know some people will vote for or against him solely on one issue – big box development, building out West Sac, being gay, the gang injunction, who has endorsed or not endorsed him, etc. – one issue. But I find that I disagree with every politician on one or two issues and I can’t let that be the determining factor for who I would vote for.

    All I said was I was impressed with the interview. I did not say that I was ready to vote for him and I won’t be bullied into not voting for him, so lighten up.

  49. Anonymous

    i’m impressed said:
    “…so lighten up.”

    Anyone who has followed the Cabaldon campaign from its outset has observed his steamroller, saturation strategy that attempts to leave no political room for considering(or financially supporting) any other candidate than the annoited of the Yolo Democratic machine. His campaign wae chest must be in the neighborhood of 1/2 million and growing by now. If he hasn’t hired a small army of paid campaign operatives, he’s not the pro that everyone is touting.

  50. Anonymous

    i’m impressed said:
    “…so lighten up.”

    Anyone who has followed the Cabaldon campaign from its outset has observed his steamroller, saturation strategy that attempts to leave no political room for considering(or financially supporting) any other candidate than the annoited of the Yolo Democratic machine. His campaign wae chest must be in the neighborhood of 1/2 million and growing by now. If he hasn’t hired a small army of paid campaign operatives, he’s not the pro that everyone is touting.

  51. Anonymous

    i’m impressed said:
    “…so lighten up.”

    Anyone who has followed the Cabaldon campaign from its outset has observed his steamroller, saturation strategy that attempts to leave no political room for considering(or financially supporting) any other candidate than the annoited of the Yolo Democratic machine. His campaign wae chest must be in the neighborhood of 1/2 million and growing by now. If he hasn’t hired a small army of paid campaign operatives, he’s not the pro that everyone is touting.

  52. Anonymous

    i’m impressed said:
    “…so lighten up.”

    Anyone who has followed the Cabaldon campaign from its outset has observed his steamroller, saturation strategy that attempts to leave no political room for considering(or financially supporting) any other candidate than the annoited of the Yolo Democratic machine. His campaign wae chest must be in the neighborhood of 1/2 million and growing by now. If he hasn’t hired a small army of paid campaign operatives, he’s not the pro that everyone is touting.

  53. Doug Paul Davis

    I have no dog in this fight, I’m not taking a position. That said I think there needs to be some clarifications.

    1. I want to thank Christopher Cabaldon for agreeing to take time from his schedule to come to Davis and sit down with me.

    2. I have seen no evidence on this blog of any kind of concerted effort by a campaign to post comments.

    3. If Cabaldon has an “army” of paid workers, I have yet to see evidence of it. Every event that I have seen Cabaldon at has had Robbie Abelon there as his representative and assistant. Mr. Abelon is a good guy and an able assistant from what I’ve seen but he’s the only person I’ve seen who is clearly an employee of the Cabaldon campaign.

    4. I did not agree with everything that Mr. Cabaldon said, but of all the candidates I have interviewed, he was by far the most impressive in terms of the breadth of his knowledge, that should not be read as a slight on the other candidates but rather an expression of admiration for the knowledge of Mr Cabaldon.

    Again, I have taken no position in this campaign, those who have been on this blog since January know I have strong disagreements on various policy positions with both candidates. In terms of competence and knowledge there is no doubt that Cabaldon is well-qualified and very knowledgeable of the issues facing Davis and the 8th Assembly District.

  54. Doug Paul Davis

    I have no dog in this fight, I’m not taking a position. That said I think there needs to be some clarifications.

    1. I want to thank Christopher Cabaldon for agreeing to take time from his schedule to come to Davis and sit down with me.

    2. I have seen no evidence on this blog of any kind of concerted effort by a campaign to post comments.

    3. If Cabaldon has an “army” of paid workers, I have yet to see evidence of it. Every event that I have seen Cabaldon at has had Robbie Abelon there as his representative and assistant. Mr. Abelon is a good guy and an able assistant from what I’ve seen but he’s the only person I’ve seen who is clearly an employee of the Cabaldon campaign.

    4. I did not agree with everything that Mr. Cabaldon said, but of all the candidates I have interviewed, he was by far the most impressive in terms of the breadth of his knowledge, that should not be read as a slight on the other candidates but rather an expression of admiration for the knowledge of Mr Cabaldon.

    Again, I have taken no position in this campaign, those who have been on this blog since January know I have strong disagreements on various policy positions with both candidates. In terms of competence and knowledge there is no doubt that Cabaldon is well-qualified and very knowledgeable of the issues facing Davis and the 8th Assembly District.

  55. Doug Paul Davis

    I have no dog in this fight, I’m not taking a position. That said I think there needs to be some clarifications.

    1. I want to thank Christopher Cabaldon for agreeing to take time from his schedule to come to Davis and sit down with me.

    2. I have seen no evidence on this blog of any kind of concerted effort by a campaign to post comments.

    3. If Cabaldon has an “army” of paid workers, I have yet to see evidence of it. Every event that I have seen Cabaldon at has had Robbie Abelon there as his representative and assistant. Mr. Abelon is a good guy and an able assistant from what I’ve seen but he’s the only person I’ve seen who is clearly an employee of the Cabaldon campaign.

    4. I did not agree with everything that Mr. Cabaldon said, but of all the candidates I have interviewed, he was by far the most impressive in terms of the breadth of his knowledge, that should not be read as a slight on the other candidates but rather an expression of admiration for the knowledge of Mr Cabaldon.

    Again, I have taken no position in this campaign, those who have been on this blog since January know I have strong disagreements on various policy positions with both candidates. In terms of competence and knowledge there is no doubt that Cabaldon is well-qualified and very knowledgeable of the issues facing Davis and the 8th Assembly District.

  56. Doug Paul Davis

    I have no dog in this fight, I’m not taking a position. That said I think there needs to be some clarifications.

    1. I want to thank Christopher Cabaldon for agreeing to take time from his schedule to come to Davis and sit down with me.

    2. I have seen no evidence on this blog of any kind of concerted effort by a campaign to post comments.

    3. If Cabaldon has an “army” of paid workers, I have yet to see evidence of it. Every event that I have seen Cabaldon at has had Robbie Abelon there as his representative and assistant. Mr. Abelon is a good guy and an able assistant from what I’ve seen but he’s the only person I’ve seen who is clearly an employee of the Cabaldon campaign.

    4. I did not agree with everything that Mr. Cabaldon said, but of all the candidates I have interviewed, he was by far the most impressive in terms of the breadth of his knowledge, that should not be read as a slight on the other candidates but rather an expression of admiration for the knowledge of Mr Cabaldon.

    Again, I have taken no position in this campaign, those who have been on this blog since January know I have strong disagreements on various policy positions with both candidates. In terms of competence and knowledge there is no doubt that Cabaldon is well-qualified and very knowledgeable of the issues facing Davis and the 8th Assembly District.

  57. don shor

    Very impressive in general.

    I agree his answer on health care was disappointingly vague, given that there are several specific options out there (Kuehl, the governor’s, Perata/Nuñez, and the Republican proposals). He could have at least discussed some of those.

    I am not happy with the way West Sacramento has developed, nor his stand on big box stores, but he has quite a history with the ‘smart growth’ philosophy at the various agencies he’s served on.

    I’d have no problem with him being in the Assembly in Lois’ seat, and look forward to Mariko’s responses to the same questions — since, for once, this is an election being discussed on the Vanguard that I actually get to vote in.

  58. don shor

    Very impressive in general.

    I agree his answer on health care was disappointingly vague, given that there are several specific options out there (Kuehl, the governor’s, Perata/Nuñez, and the Republican proposals). He could have at least discussed some of those.

    I am not happy with the way West Sacramento has developed, nor his stand on big box stores, but he has quite a history with the ‘smart growth’ philosophy at the various agencies he’s served on.

    I’d have no problem with him being in the Assembly in Lois’ seat, and look forward to Mariko’s responses to the same questions — since, for once, this is an election being discussed on the Vanguard that I actually get to vote in.

  59. don shor

    Very impressive in general.

    I agree his answer on health care was disappointingly vague, given that there are several specific options out there (Kuehl, the governor’s, Perata/Nuñez, and the Republican proposals). He could have at least discussed some of those.

    I am not happy with the way West Sacramento has developed, nor his stand on big box stores, but he has quite a history with the ‘smart growth’ philosophy at the various agencies he’s served on.

    I’d have no problem with him being in the Assembly in Lois’ seat, and look forward to Mariko’s responses to the same questions — since, for once, this is an election being discussed on the Vanguard that I actually get to vote in.

  60. don shor

    Very impressive in general.

    I agree his answer on health care was disappointingly vague, given that there are several specific options out there (Kuehl, the governor’s, Perata/Nuñez, and the Republican proposals). He could have at least discussed some of those.

    I am not happy with the way West Sacramento has developed, nor his stand on big box stores, but he has quite a history with the ‘smart growth’ philosophy at the various agencies he’s served on.

    I’d have no problem with him being in the Assembly in Lois’ seat, and look forward to Mariko’s responses to the same questions — since, for once, this is an election being discussed on the Vanguard that I actually get to vote in.

  61. Rich Rifkin

    If there’s a Davis politician who Cabaldon reminds me of it’s David Rosenberg. Whether you agreed with David or not, he was always smarter, better prepared and harder working than everyone in the room. Davis was very, very lucky to have had Rosenberg working for us for so long; and West Sacramento has been very lucky to have Chris Cabaldon.

    I don’t say this to demean Mariko, who is herself a hard worker, but Cabaldon is clearly the better politician. He’s more articulate and more energetic. If you object to his policy choices, of course you shouldn’t vote for him. But it seems hard to doubt that he will be very successfuly in getting done what he sets out to get done in the legislature.

    My hats off to The Vanguard. That was a good interview. I know from some experience, it takes forever to transcribe an interview that long. Good job.

  62. Rich Rifkin

    If there’s a Davis politician who Cabaldon reminds me of it’s David Rosenberg. Whether you agreed with David or not, he was always smarter, better prepared and harder working than everyone in the room. Davis was very, very lucky to have had Rosenberg working for us for so long; and West Sacramento has been very lucky to have Chris Cabaldon.

    I don’t say this to demean Mariko, who is herself a hard worker, but Cabaldon is clearly the better politician. He’s more articulate and more energetic. If you object to his policy choices, of course you shouldn’t vote for him. But it seems hard to doubt that he will be very successfuly in getting done what he sets out to get done in the legislature.

    My hats off to The Vanguard. That was a good interview. I know from some experience, it takes forever to transcribe an interview that long. Good job.

  63. Rich Rifkin

    If there’s a Davis politician who Cabaldon reminds me of it’s David Rosenberg. Whether you agreed with David or not, he was always smarter, better prepared and harder working than everyone in the room. Davis was very, very lucky to have had Rosenberg working for us for so long; and West Sacramento has been very lucky to have Chris Cabaldon.

    I don’t say this to demean Mariko, who is herself a hard worker, but Cabaldon is clearly the better politician. He’s more articulate and more energetic. If you object to his policy choices, of course you shouldn’t vote for him. But it seems hard to doubt that he will be very successfuly in getting done what he sets out to get done in the legislature.

    My hats off to The Vanguard. That was a good interview. I know from some experience, it takes forever to transcribe an interview that long. Good job.

  64. Rich Rifkin

    If there’s a Davis politician who Cabaldon reminds me of it’s David Rosenberg. Whether you agreed with David or not, he was always smarter, better prepared and harder working than everyone in the room. Davis was very, very lucky to have had Rosenberg working for us for so long; and West Sacramento has been very lucky to have Chris Cabaldon.

    I don’t say this to demean Mariko, who is herself a hard worker, but Cabaldon is clearly the better politician. He’s more articulate and more energetic. If you object to his policy choices, of course you shouldn’t vote for him. But it seems hard to doubt that he will be very successfuly in getting done what he sets out to get done in the legislature.

    My hats off to The Vanguard. That was a good interview. I know from some experience, it takes forever to transcribe an interview that long. Good job.

  65. Anonymous

    If you plan to vote for Barak Obama, then Mariko is also your choice. Cabaldon is cut from the same political cloth as Hiliary Clinton. Yes, they are smart,energetic, articulate and skillful politicians. They both are also status-quo Democratic, rolling in dough from entrenched corporate special interests. The real question is: are you are looking for CHANGE or not.

  66. Anonymous

    If you plan to vote for Barak Obama, then Mariko is also your choice. Cabaldon is cut from the same political cloth as Hiliary Clinton. Yes, they are smart,energetic, articulate and skillful politicians. They both are also status-quo Democratic, rolling in dough from entrenched corporate special interests. The real question is: are you are looking for CHANGE or not.

  67. Anonymous

    If you plan to vote for Barak Obama, then Mariko is also your choice. Cabaldon is cut from the same political cloth as Hiliary Clinton. Yes, they are smart,energetic, articulate and skillful politicians. They both are also status-quo Democratic, rolling in dough from entrenched corporate special interests. The real question is: are you are looking for CHANGE or not.

  68. Anonymous

    If you plan to vote for Barak Obama, then Mariko is also your choice. Cabaldon is cut from the same political cloth as Hiliary Clinton. Yes, they are smart,energetic, articulate and skillful politicians. They both are also status-quo Democratic, rolling in dough from entrenched corporate special interests. The real question is: are you are looking for CHANGE or not.

  69. Change Agent

    You want change? What has Mariko changed in her four years as a supervisor? I can’t think of anything.

    Cabaldon has changed W. Sac plenty, and for the better.

    Mariko talks about changing things but never gets anything done. She has the passion and the beliefs, but not the skills.

    On most of the issues they are very similiar, but effectiveness is an important quality for those of us who really want change. It appears Cabaldon has that quality in spades.

  70. Change Agent

    You want change? What has Mariko changed in her four years as a supervisor? I can’t think of anything.

    Cabaldon has changed W. Sac plenty, and for the better.

    Mariko talks about changing things but never gets anything done. She has the passion and the beliefs, but not the skills.

    On most of the issues they are very similiar, but effectiveness is an important quality for those of us who really want change. It appears Cabaldon has that quality in spades.

  71. Change Agent

    You want change? What has Mariko changed in her four years as a supervisor? I can’t think of anything.

    Cabaldon has changed W. Sac plenty, and for the better.

    Mariko talks about changing things but never gets anything done. She has the passion and the beliefs, but not the skills.

    On most of the issues they are very similiar, but effectiveness is an important quality for those of us who really want change. It appears Cabaldon has that quality in spades.

  72. Change Agent

    You want change? What has Mariko changed in her four years as a supervisor? I can’t think of anything.

    Cabaldon has changed W. Sac plenty, and for the better.

    Mariko talks about changing things but never gets anything done. She has the passion and the beliefs, but not the skills.

    On most of the issues they are very similiar, but effectiveness is an important quality for those of us who really want change. It appears Cabaldon has that quality in spades.

  73. Anonymous

    It’s a pipedream to think that Cabaldon will be a leader for change.
    It’s just not his style.. he is a no-risk, professional Yolo Democratic- machine politician… We’ll get sameo..sameo.

  74. Anonymous

    It’s a pipedream to think that Cabaldon will be a leader for change.
    It’s just not his style.. he is a no-risk, professional Yolo Democratic- machine politician… We’ll get sameo..sameo.

  75. Anonymous

    It’s a pipedream to think that Cabaldon will be a leader for change.
    It’s just not his style.. he is a no-risk, professional Yolo Democratic- machine politician… We’ll get sameo..sameo.

  76. Anonymous

    It’s a pipedream to think that Cabaldon will be a leader for change.
    It’s just not his style.. he is a no-risk, professional Yolo Democratic- machine politician… We’ll get sameo..sameo.

  77. Lets compare change records

    Name for me please 4 things in Yolo County that Mariko has changed in her time as Supervisor. Just four. That’s it, four. That amounts to one accomplishment a year. Someone, please? especially the “she’ll change California” crowd?

  78. Lets compare change records

    Name for me please 4 things in Yolo County that Mariko has changed in her time as Supervisor. Just four. That’s it, four. That amounts to one accomplishment a year. Someone, please? especially the “she’ll change California” crowd?

  79. Lets compare change records

    Name for me please 4 things in Yolo County that Mariko has changed in her time as Supervisor. Just four. That’s it, four. That amounts to one accomplishment a year. Someone, please? especially the “she’ll change California” crowd?

  80. Lets compare change records

    Name for me please 4 things in Yolo County that Mariko has changed in her time as Supervisor. Just four. That’s it, four. That amounts to one accomplishment a year. Someone, please? especially the “she’ll change California” crowd?

  81. Anonymous

    “I think that he has done well for West Sacramento.”

    Cabaldon is fiddling Nero’s descendant. You remember Nero, the Emperor who fiddled while Rome burned.

    Not that West Sacramento is in any league near ancient Rome or about to burn, but the analogy holds true because:
    As Cabaldon entertains developers, the ticky-tacky tract-house grind machine chews up the landscape on down toward Clarksville, with diminishing returns for, as the years go by, West Sacramento government coffers.

    Cabaldon is simply a pied piper leading new-home buyers toward a slow burn, planned obsolescence.
    Tract homes are designed to decay into uninhabitalilty within a very few years.

    What happens when oil gets hard to get cheaply and gasoline reaches unaffordable cost? Can you read $75.00 a gallon? It’s coming. There’s only so much easily accessible oil and it is getting drained fast.

    Twenty years from now, the inhabitants of the Cabaldon’s tract-home developments (planned obsolescence designed- in) will be left high and dry, unable to drive!

    Their Humvees, SUVs, Dodge Rams, and various gas-hogs will be planters in which peas and corn will be grown, watered by siphoning water from the Deep Water Channel.

    Why can’t Cabaldon think of any other revenue sources besides land-hog developments?

    May I suggest sustainable revenue sources?
    For starters, I suggest Cabaldon put some effort and suggest some significant money into the neglected Port of Sacramento?
    Dredge the channel. Build some warehouses and modern dock facilities there and improve rail access, to where employment opportunities for local youth might be made available.

    Gainfully employed West Sacramento youths might think twice about joining gangs.

  82. Anonymous

    “I think that he has done well for West Sacramento.”

    Cabaldon is fiddling Nero’s descendant. You remember Nero, the Emperor who fiddled while Rome burned.

    Not that West Sacramento is in any league near ancient Rome or about to burn, but the analogy holds true because:
    As Cabaldon entertains developers, the ticky-tacky tract-house grind machine chews up the landscape on down toward Clarksville, with diminishing returns for, as the years go by, West Sacramento government coffers.

    Cabaldon is simply a pied piper leading new-home buyers toward a slow burn, planned obsolescence.
    Tract homes are designed to decay into uninhabitalilty within a very few years.

    What happens when oil gets hard to get cheaply and gasoline reaches unaffordable cost? Can you read $75.00 a gallon? It’s coming. There’s only so much easily accessible oil and it is getting drained fast.

    Twenty years from now, the inhabitants of the Cabaldon’s tract-home developments (planned obsolescence designed- in) will be left high and dry, unable to drive!

    Their Humvees, SUVs, Dodge Rams, and various gas-hogs will be planters in which peas and corn will be grown, watered by siphoning water from the Deep Water Channel.

    Why can’t Cabaldon think of any other revenue sources besides land-hog developments?

    May I suggest sustainable revenue sources?
    For starters, I suggest Cabaldon put some effort and suggest some significant money into the neglected Port of Sacramento?
    Dredge the channel. Build some warehouses and modern dock facilities there and improve rail access, to where employment opportunities for local youth might be made available.

    Gainfully employed West Sacramento youths might think twice about joining gangs.

  83. Anonymous

    “I think that he has done well for West Sacramento.”

    Cabaldon is fiddling Nero’s descendant. You remember Nero, the Emperor who fiddled while Rome burned.

    Not that West Sacramento is in any league near ancient Rome or about to burn, but the analogy holds true because:
    As Cabaldon entertains developers, the ticky-tacky tract-house grind machine chews up the landscape on down toward Clarksville, with diminishing returns for, as the years go by, West Sacramento government coffers.

    Cabaldon is simply a pied piper leading new-home buyers toward a slow burn, planned obsolescence.
    Tract homes are designed to decay into uninhabitalilty within a very few years.

    What happens when oil gets hard to get cheaply and gasoline reaches unaffordable cost? Can you read $75.00 a gallon? It’s coming. There’s only so much easily accessible oil and it is getting drained fast.

    Twenty years from now, the inhabitants of the Cabaldon’s tract-home developments (planned obsolescence designed- in) will be left high and dry, unable to drive!

    Their Humvees, SUVs, Dodge Rams, and various gas-hogs will be planters in which peas and corn will be grown, watered by siphoning water from the Deep Water Channel.

    Why can’t Cabaldon think of any other revenue sources besides land-hog developments?

    May I suggest sustainable revenue sources?
    For starters, I suggest Cabaldon put some effort and suggest some significant money into the neglected Port of Sacramento?
    Dredge the channel. Build some warehouses and modern dock facilities there and improve rail access, to where employment opportunities for local youth might be made available.

    Gainfully employed West Sacramento youths might think twice about joining gangs.

  84. Anonymous

    “I think that he has done well for West Sacramento.”

    Cabaldon is fiddling Nero’s descendant. You remember Nero, the Emperor who fiddled while Rome burned.

    Not that West Sacramento is in any league near ancient Rome or about to burn, but the analogy holds true because:
    As Cabaldon entertains developers, the ticky-tacky tract-house grind machine chews up the landscape on down toward Clarksville, with diminishing returns for, as the years go by, West Sacramento government coffers.

    Cabaldon is simply a pied piper leading new-home buyers toward a slow burn, planned obsolescence.
    Tract homes are designed to decay into uninhabitalilty within a very few years.

    What happens when oil gets hard to get cheaply and gasoline reaches unaffordable cost? Can you read $75.00 a gallon? It’s coming. There’s only so much easily accessible oil and it is getting drained fast.

    Twenty years from now, the inhabitants of the Cabaldon’s tract-home developments (planned obsolescence designed- in) will be left high and dry, unable to drive!

    Their Humvees, SUVs, Dodge Rams, and various gas-hogs will be planters in which peas and corn will be grown, watered by siphoning water from the Deep Water Channel.

    Why can’t Cabaldon think of any other revenue sources besides land-hog developments?

    May I suggest sustainable revenue sources?
    For starters, I suggest Cabaldon put some effort and suggest some significant money into the neglected Port of Sacramento?
    Dredge the channel. Build some warehouses and modern dock facilities there and improve rail access, to where employment opportunities for local youth might be made available.

    Gainfully employed West Sacramento youths might think twice about joining gangs.

  85. 無名 - wu ming

    actually, west sac is pretty well-positioned for peak oil, given its proximity to downtown sacramento, especially with that new trolley line that they were talking about earlier this year.

    not that building up the port wouldn’t be a great idea.

  86. 無名 - wu ming

    actually, west sac is pretty well-positioned for peak oil, given its proximity to downtown sacramento, especially with that new trolley line that they were talking about earlier this year.

    not that building up the port wouldn’t be a great idea.

  87. 無名 - wu ming

    actually, west sac is pretty well-positioned for peak oil, given its proximity to downtown sacramento, especially with that new trolley line that they were talking about earlier this year.

    not that building up the port wouldn’t be a great idea.

  88. 無名 - wu ming

    actually, west sac is pretty well-positioned for peak oil, given its proximity to downtown sacramento, especially with that new trolley line that they were talking about earlier this year.

    not that building up the port wouldn’t be a great idea.

  89. Anonymous

    Anonymous 10:41 is pulling directly from James Howard Kunstler’s blog. First, $75.00/gallon gasoline will never occur. It’s production would be discontinued before it ever reached that price.

    Second, there is the assumption that our current transportation system and economy’s efficiency cannot be drastcially improved likely by approximately around 75% even today with today’s fuels, while simultaneously substituting sustainable alternative fuels.

    Surely, as Kunstler always points out, our lifestyles will change in dramatic ways in response to peak oil. The question is whether it’s the doomsday scenario that he concludes. Kunstler is either a prophet far ahead of his time or
    an alarmist with no faith in our ability to adapt to peak oil.

  90. Anonymous

    Anonymous 10:41 is pulling directly from James Howard Kunstler’s blog. First, $75.00/gallon gasoline will never occur. It’s production would be discontinued before it ever reached that price.

    Second, there is the assumption that our current transportation system and economy’s efficiency cannot be drastcially improved likely by approximately around 75% even today with today’s fuels, while simultaneously substituting sustainable alternative fuels.

    Surely, as Kunstler always points out, our lifestyles will change in dramatic ways in response to peak oil. The question is whether it’s the doomsday scenario that he concludes. Kunstler is either a prophet far ahead of his time or
    an alarmist with no faith in our ability to adapt to peak oil.

  91. Anonymous

    Anonymous 10:41 is pulling directly from James Howard Kunstler’s blog. First, $75.00/gallon gasoline will never occur. It’s production would be discontinued before it ever reached that price.

    Second, there is the assumption that our current transportation system and economy’s efficiency cannot be drastcially improved likely by approximately around 75% even today with today’s fuels, while simultaneously substituting sustainable alternative fuels.

    Surely, as Kunstler always points out, our lifestyles will change in dramatic ways in response to peak oil. The question is whether it’s the doomsday scenario that he concludes. Kunstler is either a prophet far ahead of his time or
    an alarmist with no faith in our ability to adapt to peak oil.

  92. Anonymous

    Anonymous 10:41 is pulling directly from James Howard Kunstler’s blog. First, $75.00/gallon gasoline will never occur. It’s production would be discontinued before it ever reached that price.

    Second, there is the assumption that our current transportation system and economy’s efficiency cannot be drastcially improved likely by approximately around 75% even today with today’s fuels, while simultaneously substituting sustainable alternative fuels.

    Surely, as Kunstler always points out, our lifestyles will change in dramatic ways in response to peak oil. The question is whether it’s the doomsday scenario that he concludes. Kunstler is either a prophet far ahead of his time or
    an alarmist with no faith in our ability to adapt to peak oil.

  93. Anonymous

    Also, interesting comment about West Sacramento’s tract homes. How exactly does Davis differ in that respect? All of our development is tract homes, and low density a that. I also like the conspicuous resemblance to Kunstler’s “stuck up a cul-de-sac in a cement SUV without a fill-up” quote.

  94. Anonymous

    Also, interesting comment about West Sacramento’s tract homes. How exactly does Davis differ in that respect? All of our development is tract homes, and low density a that. I also like the conspicuous resemblance to Kunstler’s “stuck up a cul-de-sac in a cement SUV without a fill-up” quote.

  95. Anonymous

    Also, interesting comment about West Sacramento’s tract homes. How exactly does Davis differ in that respect? All of our development is tract homes, and low density a that. I also like the conspicuous resemblance to Kunstler’s “stuck up a cul-de-sac in a cement SUV without a fill-up” quote.

  96. Anonymous

    Also, interesting comment about West Sacramento’s tract homes. How exactly does Davis differ in that respect? All of our development is tract homes, and low density a that. I also like the conspicuous resemblance to Kunstler’s “stuck up a cul-de-sac in a cement SUV without a fill-up” quote.

  97. Anonymous

    West Sacramento’s growth ocurred WHILE Cabaldon was mayor, NOT BECAUSE he was mayor.Eveyone who understands how these things work recognizes that it is macro-financial and banking decisions(including the past subprime mortgage explosion) that determine these expanding and contracting cycles.

  98. Anonymous

    West Sacramento’s growth ocurred WHILE Cabaldon was mayor, NOT BECAUSE he was mayor.Eveyone who understands how these things work recognizes that it is macro-financial and banking decisions(including the past subprime mortgage explosion) that determine these expanding and contracting cycles.

  99. Anonymous

    West Sacramento’s growth ocurred WHILE Cabaldon was mayor, NOT BECAUSE he was mayor.Eveyone who understands how these things work recognizes that it is macro-financial and banking decisions(including the past subprime mortgage explosion) that determine these expanding and contracting cycles.

  100. Anonymous

    West Sacramento’s growth ocurred WHILE Cabaldon was mayor, NOT BECAUSE he was mayor.Eveyone who understands how these things work recognizes that it is macro-financial and banking decisions(including the past subprime mortgage explosion) that determine these expanding and contracting cycles.

  101. Rich Rifkin

    “the ticky-tacky tract-house grind machine chews up the landscape on down toward Clarksville”

    Clarksville? In El Dorado County, just south of El Dorado Hills? Or do you mean Clarksdale?

    Clarksdale is a really important little town (pop. 20,000 +/-) in the Mississippi Delta region. A great number of the best Blues musicians came from Clarksdale. Robert Johnson is said to have invented the Blues in Clarksdale. Son House came from Clarksdale. So did Muddy Waters, who later was called the father of Chicago Blues. Virtually every great Bluesman (and woman) either came from Clarksdale or came from one of the other nearby towns….

    The community south of West Sacramento is actually called Clarksburg.

  102. Rich Rifkin

    “the ticky-tacky tract-house grind machine chews up the landscape on down toward Clarksville”

    Clarksville? In El Dorado County, just south of El Dorado Hills? Or do you mean Clarksdale?

    Clarksdale is a really important little town (pop. 20,000 +/-) in the Mississippi Delta region. A great number of the best Blues musicians came from Clarksdale. Robert Johnson is said to have invented the Blues in Clarksdale. Son House came from Clarksdale. So did Muddy Waters, who later was called the father of Chicago Blues. Virtually every great Bluesman (and woman) either came from Clarksdale or came from one of the other nearby towns….

    The community south of West Sacramento is actually called Clarksburg.

  103. Rich Rifkin

    “the ticky-tacky tract-house grind machine chews up the landscape on down toward Clarksville”

    Clarksville? In El Dorado County, just south of El Dorado Hills? Or do you mean Clarksdale?

    Clarksdale is a really important little town (pop. 20,000 +/-) in the Mississippi Delta region. A great number of the best Blues musicians came from Clarksdale. Robert Johnson is said to have invented the Blues in Clarksdale. Son House came from Clarksdale. So did Muddy Waters, who later was called the father of Chicago Blues. Virtually every great Bluesman (and woman) either came from Clarksdale or came from one of the other nearby towns….

    The community south of West Sacramento is actually called Clarksburg.

  104. Rich Rifkin

    “the ticky-tacky tract-house grind machine chews up the landscape on down toward Clarksville”

    Clarksville? In El Dorado County, just south of El Dorado Hills? Or do you mean Clarksdale?

    Clarksdale is a really important little town (pop. 20,000 +/-) in the Mississippi Delta region. A great number of the best Blues musicians came from Clarksdale. Robert Johnson is said to have invented the Blues in Clarksdale. Son House came from Clarksdale. So did Muddy Waters, who later was called the father of Chicago Blues. Virtually every great Bluesman (and woman) either came from Clarksdale or came from one of the other nearby towns….

    The community south of West Sacramento is actually called Clarksburg.

  105. Anonymous

    Rich,
    Point taken, re: Clarksville, Clarksburg, Clarksdale, esp. the last.
    Funny coincidence: this past Saturday, I got into a great conversation with Guitar Mac, the bluesman who was entertaining the Davis Farmers Market crowd.
    He had his “resonator” guitar to play, which looked like a toy in his big dextrous hands. In addition to his amazing playing, he definitely has “stage presence” with his rakishly tilted fedora and Bogart trench coat.
    He told some great stories about Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf, whom he knew, “back in the day.”
    He also let me know about his recent visit to the wonderful Delta Blues Museum in Clarksdale, Mississippi.
    –Brian Elsasser

  106. Anonymous

    Rich,
    Point taken, re: Clarksville, Clarksburg, Clarksdale, esp. the last.
    Funny coincidence: this past Saturday, I got into a great conversation with Guitar Mac, the bluesman who was entertaining the Davis Farmers Market crowd.
    He had his “resonator” guitar to play, which looked like a toy in his big dextrous hands. In addition to his amazing playing, he definitely has “stage presence” with his rakishly tilted fedora and Bogart trench coat.
    He told some great stories about Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf, whom he knew, “back in the day.”
    He also let me know about his recent visit to the wonderful Delta Blues Museum in Clarksdale, Mississippi.
    –Brian Elsasser

  107. Anonymous

    Rich,
    Point taken, re: Clarksville, Clarksburg, Clarksdale, esp. the last.
    Funny coincidence: this past Saturday, I got into a great conversation with Guitar Mac, the bluesman who was entertaining the Davis Farmers Market crowd.
    He had his “resonator” guitar to play, which looked like a toy in his big dextrous hands. In addition to his amazing playing, he definitely has “stage presence” with his rakishly tilted fedora and Bogart trench coat.
    He told some great stories about Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf, whom he knew, “back in the day.”
    He also let me know about his recent visit to the wonderful Delta Blues Museum in Clarksdale, Mississippi.
    –Brian Elsasser

  108. Anonymous

    Rich,
    Point taken, re: Clarksville, Clarksburg, Clarksdale, esp. the last.
    Funny coincidence: this past Saturday, I got into a great conversation with Guitar Mac, the bluesman who was entertaining the Davis Farmers Market crowd.
    He had his “resonator” guitar to play, which looked like a toy in his big dextrous hands. In addition to his amazing playing, he definitely has “stage presence” with his rakishly tilted fedora and Bogart trench coat.
    He told some great stories about Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf, whom he knew, “back in the day.”
    He also let me know about his recent visit to the wonderful Delta Blues Museum in Clarksdale, Mississippi.
    –Brian Elsasser

  109. Michael

    While I hate the fact that Cabaldon is up to his gills in developer money. I have to say that his interview here was impressive enough to convince me to vote for him. Maybe I’m searching for a justification, bit it occurs to me that 1) the sprawl that happened during Cabaldon’s tenure was par for course in the Sacramento region; 2) it was prepared by zoning decisions that predate his tenure; 3) the big box development in West Sac, which is a whole world away from Davis, was actually quite tame compared to want is going on along I-80 just across the river; and 4) Yamada had her chance to draw a sharp line between herself and Cabaldon on development issues, and she failed miserably.

    So, while I am a little wary of Cabaldon, he is at least as trustworthy as Yamada and has numerous other qualities that outshine hers.

  110. Michael

    While I hate the fact that Cabaldon is up to his gills in developer money. I have to say that his interview here was impressive enough to convince me to vote for him. Maybe I’m searching for a justification, bit it occurs to me that 1) the sprawl that happened during Cabaldon’s tenure was par for course in the Sacramento region; 2) it was prepared by zoning decisions that predate his tenure; 3) the big box development in West Sac, which is a whole world away from Davis, was actually quite tame compared to want is going on along I-80 just across the river; and 4) Yamada had her chance to draw a sharp line between herself and Cabaldon on development issues, and she failed miserably.

    So, while I am a little wary of Cabaldon, he is at least as trustworthy as Yamada and has numerous other qualities that outshine hers.

  111. Michael

    While I hate the fact that Cabaldon is up to his gills in developer money. I have to say that his interview here was impressive enough to convince me to vote for him. Maybe I’m searching for a justification, bit it occurs to me that 1) the sprawl that happened during Cabaldon’s tenure was par for course in the Sacramento region; 2) it was prepared by zoning decisions that predate his tenure; 3) the big box development in West Sac, which is a whole world away from Davis, was actually quite tame compared to want is going on along I-80 just across the river; and 4) Yamada had her chance to draw a sharp line between herself and Cabaldon on development issues, and she failed miserably.

    So, while I am a little wary of Cabaldon, he is at least as trustworthy as Yamada and has numerous other qualities that outshine hers.

  112. Michael

    While I hate the fact that Cabaldon is up to his gills in developer money. I have to say that his interview here was impressive enough to convince me to vote for him. Maybe I’m searching for a justification, bit it occurs to me that 1) the sprawl that happened during Cabaldon’s tenure was par for course in the Sacramento region; 2) it was prepared by zoning decisions that predate his tenure; 3) the big box development in West Sac, which is a whole world away from Davis, was actually quite tame compared to want is going on along I-80 just across the river; and 4) Yamada had her chance to draw a sharp line between herself and Cabaldon on development issues, and she failed miserably.

    So, while I am a little wary of Cabaldon, he is at least as trustworthy as Yamada and has numerous other qualities that outshine hers.

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