Commentary: Gay Homecoming Court and the Meaning of Diversity

This week I got an interesting email from New York with a link to the Sacramento Bee article describing the fact that the Davis High Junior Homecoming court was comprised actually of two princes–as the honor went to a gay couple, elected by the student body.

Now what was interesting about this email is that this individual had discovered Davis and the blog last year during the incident where a Junior High School student was harassed because he had two gay parents.

He asked how the same district that was somewhat indifferent at least originally to the issue of harassment of a student could also be so path breaking as to honor a gay couple.

From the Sacramento Bee article:

“People were so excited for us,” Gatewood said of the couple’s victory, announced a few weeks ago. “We were a little surprised, but Davis …”

“Is a liberal town,” interrupts his boyfriend of four months, Raphael. “Go 10 miles in any other direction and you’ll get some other feeling.”

Indeed, the news might surprise few in Davis, a city embraced and, at times, mocked for its liberal leanings.

In my opinion, this fits very neatly into my perception of Davis. In many ways it is on the surface very liberal, very progressive, very tolerant. That manifests itself in many very overt demonstrations that are strong on symbolic value, but very weak in terms of actual policy matters.

There is what I have termed: the dark underbelly of the People’s Republic of Davis. Everyone asks me what that means, to me the People’s Republic of Davis implies that Davis is some far left Utopian. The dark underbelly is one of ugly reactionism. It is the voice of hatred, division, corruption, and conservatism. It is the part of ourselves that we all deny and try to hide away in the dark recesses of our minds and souls.

But it looms there at every step of the way. We support diversity when it is easy, simple and symbolic.

But when we talk about hiring a more diverse faculty, there is a strong voice of dissension.

We had a long discussion earlier this week on the Vanguard as to whether we really need a more diverse teaching workforce.

There was a strong undercurrent that a more diverse teaching workforce means having to hired less qualified teachers.

Jann Murray-Garcia, one of the organizers of the Diversity Forum on Monday, wrote on the blog:

“Here we are again…when we ask for racial/ethnic diversity in the teaching workforce, for the good of all students..some folks are assuming we NEED to settle for lower quality teachers. Wow.

I don’t know what to say, Neighbors. It’s 2007. A diverse teaching workforce does not HAVE TO mean a less qualified teaching workforce. Give us as applicants and as parents a little more credit than this.

Hear the implicit notion screaming from many of the comments: racial/ethnic diversity means inferiority. “

So we go back to square one: how does a city that will celebrate, not just tolerate, but celebrate the fact that it has a gay couple for the junior homecoming couple, at the same time argue that we do not need diversity in the teaching force and that such discussion is really looking at PC. At the same time there has been lack of follow through regarding issues of diversity and tolerance in the school district. We have a pervasive achievement gap between whites and Asians on the one hand and African Americans and Latinos on the other–even in households where the parents are college educated. We have tough problems, that require tough solutions.

I do not have answers to these questions, but for a town that is so firmly liberal or perceived as such, there are many non-liberal opinions that end up posted on this blog from people who claim to be liberals. These are not liberal views that I know, support, and believe in. These are not the values that I was taught to embrace and celebrate.

If Davis can have a gay homecoming couple, we can certainly find a way to hire more minority teachers. We can certainly find a way to make minorities feel more safe in their homes, our community, and in our schools. I do not think that is such an unreasonable request.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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140 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    I was pleased to learn that Davis High School administration has “grown” since indifference to the past abusive situation toward gays. However, you are right about the underbelly of racism and other darknesses in Davis. Our town is way too impressed with itself. We, as a community, need to develop a little humility.

  2. Anonymous

    I was pleased to learn that Davis High School administration has “grown” since indifference to the past abusive situation toward gays. However, you are right about the underbelly of racism and other darknesses in Davis. Our town is way too impressed with itself. We, as a community, need to develop a little humility.

  3. Anonymous

    I was pleased to learn that Davis High School administration has “grown” since indifference to the past abusive situation toward gays. However, you are right about the underbelly of racism and other darknesses in Davis. Our town is way too impressed with itself. We, as a community, need to develop a little humility.

  4. Anonymous

    I was pleased to learn that Davis High School administration has “grown” since indifference to the past abusive situation toward gays. However, you are right about the underbelly of racism and other darknesses in Davis. Our town is way too impressed with itself. We, as a community, need to develop a little humility.

  5. Mike

    The worst crimes of “hatred, division, corruption, and conservatism” committed at DHS is perhaps forgetting to give a Kwanzaa gift on time…

    The pecking order in Davis appears to devolve to the person with the greatest attitude of outrage wins. Since only a rounding-errors worth of minorities actually participate in this game it comes down to a comical game of white, well-educated former hippies (driving $30,000 cars and living in $500,000 homes) trying to show their sense of outrage. Clearly, this is the semi-finals of the game and I should sit quietly and wait for the next performance.

  6. Mike

    The worst crimes of “hatred, division, corruption, and conservatism” committed at DHS is perhaps forgetting to give a Kwanzaa gift on time…

    The pecking order in Davis appears to devolve to the person with the greatest attitude of outrage wins. Since only a rounding-errors worth of minorities actually participate in this game it comes down to a comical game of white, well-educated former hippies (driving $30,000 cars and living in $500,000 homes) trying to show their sense of outrage. Clearly, this is the semi-finals of the game and I should sit quietly and wait for the next performance.

  7. Mike

    The worst crimes of “hatred, division, corruption, and conservatism” committed at DHS is perhaps forgetting to give a Kwanzaa gift on time…

    The pecking order in Davis appears to devolve to the person with the greatest attitude of outrage wins. Since only a rounding-errors worth of minorities actually participate in this game it comes down to a comical game of white, well-educated former hippies (driving $30,000 cars and living in $500,000 homes) trying to show their sense of outrage. Clearly, this is the semi-finals of the game and I should sit quietly and wait for the next performance.

  8. Mike

    The worst crimes of “hatred, division, corruption, and conservatism” committed at DHS is perhaps forgetting to give a Kwanzaa gift on time…

    The pecking order in Davis appears to devolve to the person with the greatest attitude of outrage wins. Since only a rounding-errors worth of minorities actually participate in this game it comes down to a comical game of white, well-educated former hippies (driving $30,000 cars and living in $500,000 homes) trying to show their sense of outrage. Clearly, this is the semi-finals of the game and I should sit quietly and wait for the next performance.

  9. davis hater

    “The dark underbelly is one of ugly reactionism. It is the voice of hatred, division, corruption, and conservatism.”

    Yes, Davis is a terrible, intolerant bastion of evil. We would never, for example, elect a lesbian to the school board or a minority to be mayor. Never.

  10. davis hater

    “The dark underbelly is one of ugly reactionism. It is the voice of hatred, division, corruption, and conservatism.”

    Yes, Davis is a terrible, intolerant bastion of evil. We would never, for example, elect a lesbian to the school board or a minority to be mayor. Never.

  11. davis hater

    “The dark underbelly is one of ugly reactionism. It is the voice of hatred, division, corruption, and conservatism.”

    Yes, Davis is a terrible, intolerant bastion of evil. We would never, for example, elect a lesbian to the school board or a minority to be mayor. Never.

  12. davis hater

    “The dark underbelly is one of ugly reactionism. It is the voice of hatred, division, corruption, and conservatism.”

    Yes, Davis is a terrible, intolerant bastion of evil. We would never, for example, elect a lesbian to the school board or a minority to be mayor. Never.

  13. Anonymous

    Davis Hater:

    “We support diversity when it is easy, simple and symbolic.”

    What’s easier, simpler, or more symbolic than elected an establishment and somewhat safe and conservative Filipino Mayor?

  14. Anonymous

    Davis Hater:

    “We support diversity when it is easy, simple and symbolic.”

    What’s easier, simpler, or more symbolic than elected an establishment and somewhat safe and conservative Filipino Mayor?

  15. Anonymous

    Davis Hater:

    “We support diversity when it is easy, simple and symbolic.”

    What’s easier, simpler, or more symbolic than elected an establishment and somewhat safe and conservative Filipino Mayor?

  16. Anonymous

    Davis Hater:

    “We support diversity when it is easy, simple and symbolic.”

    What’s easier, simpler, or more symbolic than elected an establishment and somewhat safe and conservative Filipino Mayor?

  17. Infuriated Former Teacher

    As an older retired teacher from an area on the East Coast that has dabbled over the years with “fixing” racial inequality, forcing a more diverse faculty results in mediocrity. I watched it happen. A sad but true FACT. As uncomfortable as that notion is to idealistic young progressives, it is imperative to make the first and foremost priority in our schools to hire the best qualified teachers available, PERIOD. It matters not a whit what ethnicity the faculty is.

    If parents of an ethnic minority are boycotting STAR testing because their children are disadvantaged in taking the test, how is hiring teachers who are of an ethnic minority necessarily going to help? However, hiring the best qualified teachers is guaranteed to help!

    If we as a city get caught up in endless discussions of the racial inequities in our school system, and see the solution to our problems as hiring a more diverse faculty – we are doomed to keeping our problems unaddressed.

    Hiring a more diverse faculty would not have helped keep Valley Oak open. What has kept the possibility of Valley Oak remaining viable is the talk about not closing a successful ELS program that helped minority children learn English. Clearly the faculty that developed that program are the best qualified, whatever their ethnicity.

    No one in the comment section even remotely implied that teachers of an ethnic minority are somehow less qualified than Caucasion teachers. But when programs are instituted that concentrate on filling minority faculty quotas, things go horribly wrong – because a diverse faculty is not the answer to poor quality education. It is beside the point.

    Let’s face it – Valley Oak was probably closed to make way for the new elementary school in South Davis (which is probably a boon doggle for some local developer who has the right connections). Valley Oak was the school serving more of our minority students than the other schools. How the heck would hiring a more diverse faculty have helped this appalling situation of closing a school that heavily emphasized helping minority students to make way for a new elementary school? The answer is it wouldn’t have.

    All things being equal, hire the minority teacher rather than a Caucasion one. But don’t ever hire a less qualified teacher just because they are of an ethnic minority, to prove you have a diverse faculty and thus are meeting the needs of minority students. One has nothing to do with the other.

    I will bet you my bottom dollar, if you asked the parents of those minority students who boycotted STAR testing – they will emphatically tell you the most qualified teacher is what they want for their children rather than a necessarily diverse faculty. (Try a poll with this question – As a parent of an ethnic minority, which is of more importance to you: a) a diverse faculty; b) best qualifed teachers?)

    To put it another way – endless debates about diversity are not getting the job done to make sure our minority students get as excellent an education as possible. Instead the School Board chose to kill the best ELS program in Davis, at the expense of its minority children.

    Parents and teachers alike rose up and defied the School Board’s bad decision – and are attempting to set up Valley Oak as a charter school. Ironically if it succeeds, and I think it will, the School Board will have shot itself in the foot. Why? Think about it.

    Ostensibly Valley Oak was closed because of declining enrollment. However, if Valley Oak becomes a charter school, the School Board will have to pay for the education of those attending Valley Oak that come from inside the Davis City limits. However, the Davis public school system will lose those Davis students attending Valley Oak from their average daily attendance rolls – just the thing the School Board was trying to avoid with its claim of “declining enrollment” and ridiculous new truancy policy.

    Now how is hiring a more diverse faculty going to fix any of this mess? It won’t. But making Valley Oak a charter school and independent of the School Board’s poor decision making process is going to make it the envy of the county – when it has the best ELS program available that can’t be eliminated for political reasons.

  18. Infuriated Former Teacher

    As an older retired teacher from an area on the East Coast that has dabbled over the years with “fixing” racial inequality, forcing a more diverse faculty results in mediocrity. I watched it happen. A sad but true FACT. As uncomfortable as that notion is to idealistic young progressives, it is imperative to make the first and foremost priority in our schools to hire the best qualified teachers available, PERIOD. It matters not a whit what ethnicity the faculty is.

    If parents of an ethnic minority are boycotting STAR testing because their children are disadvantaged in taking the test, how is hiring teachers who are of an ethnic minority necessarily going to help? However, hiring the best qualified teachers is guaranteed to help!

    If we as a city get caught up in endless discussions of the racial inequities in our school system, and see the solution to our problems as hiring a more diverse faculty – we are doomed to keeping our problems unaddressed.

    Hiring a more diverse faculty would not have helped keep Valley Oak open. What has kept the possibility of Valley Oak remaining viable is the talk about not closing a successful ELS program that helped minority children learn English. Clearly the faculty that developed that program are the best qualified, whatever their ethnicity.

    No one in the comment section even remotely implied that teachers of an ethnic minority are somehow less qualified than Caucasion teachers. But when programs are instituted that concentrate on filling minority faculty quotas, things go horribly wrong – because a diverse faculty is not the answer to poor quality education. It is beside the point.

    Let’s face it – Valley Oak was probably closed to make way for the new elementary school in South Davis (which is probably a boon doggle for some local developer who has the right connections). Valley Oak was the school serving more of our minority students than the other schools. How the heck would hiring a more diverse faculty have helped this appalling situation of closing a school that heavily emphasized helping minority students to make way for a new elementary school? The answer is it wouldn’t have.

    All things being equal, hire the minority teacher rather than a Caucasion one. But don’t ever hire a less qualified teacher just because they are of an ethnic minority, to prove you have a diverse faculty and thus are meeting the needs of minority students. One has nothing to do with the other.

    I will bet you my bottom dollar, if you asked the parents of those minority students who boycotted STAR testing – they will emphatically tell you the most qualified teacher is what they want for their children rather than a necessarily diverse faculty. (Try a poll with this question – As a parent of an ethnic minority, which is of more importance to you: a) a diverse faculty; b) best qualifed teachers?)

    To put it another way – endless debates about diversity are not getting the job done to make sure our minority students get as excellent an education as possible. Instead the School Board chose to kill the best ELS program in Davis, at the expense of its minority children.

    Parents and teachers alike rose up and defied the School Board’s bad decision – and are attempting to set up Valley Oak as a charter school. Ironically if it succeeds, and I think it will, the School Board will have shot itself in the foot. Why? Think about it.

    Ostensibly Valley Oak was closed because of declining enrollment. However, if Valley Oak becomes a charter school, the School Board will have to pay for the education of those attending Valley Oak that come from inside the Davis City limits. However, the Davis public school system will lose those Davis students attending Valley Oak from their average daily attendance rolls – just the thing the School Board was trying to avoid with its claim of “declining enrollment” and ridiculous new truancy policy.

    Now how is hiring a more diverse faculty going to fix any of this mess? It won’t. But making Valley Oak a charter school and independent of the School Board’s poor decision making process is going to make it the envy of the county – when it has the best ELS program available that can’t be eliminated for political reasons.

  19. Infuriated Former Teacher

    As an older retired teacher from an area on the East Coast that has dabbled over the years with “fixing” racial inequality, forcing a more diverse faculty results in mediocrity. I watched it happen. A sad but true FACT. As uncomfortable as that notion is to idealistic young progressives, it is imperative to make the first and foremost priority in our schools to hire the best qualified teachers available, PERIOD. It matters not a whit what ethnicity the faculty is.

    If parents of an ethnic minority are boycotting STAR testing because their children are disadvantaged in taking the test, how is hiring teachers who are of an ethnic minority necessarily going to help? However, hiring the best qualified teachers is guaranteed to help!

    If we as a city get caught up in endless discussions of the racial inequities in our school system, and see the solution to our problems as hiring a more diverse faculty – we are doomed to keeping our problems unaddressed.

    Hiring a more diverse faculty would not have helped keep Valley Oak open. What has kept the possibility of Valley Oak remaining viable is the talk about not closing a successful ELS program that helped minority children learn English. Clearly the faculty that developed that program are the best qualified, whatever their ethnicity.

    No one in the comment section even remotely implied that teachers of an ethnic minority are somehow less qualified than Caucasion teachers. But when programs are instituted that concentrate on filling minority faculty quotas, things go horribly wrong – because a diverse faculty is not the answer to poor quality education. It is beside the point.

    Let’s face it – Valley Oak was probably closed to make way for the new elementary school in South Davis (which is probably a boon doggle for some local developer who has the right connections). Valley Oak was the school serving more of our minority students than the other schools. How the heck would hiring a more diverse faculty have helped this appalling situation of closing a school that heavily emphasized helping minority students to make way for a new elementary school? The answer is it wouldn’t have.

    All things being equal, hire the minority teacher rather than a Caucasion one. But don’t ever hire a less qualified teacher just because they are of an ethnic minority, to prove you have a diverse faculty and thus are meeting the needs of minority students. One has nothing to do with the other.

    I will bet you my bottom dollar, if you asked the parents of those minority students who boycotted STAR testing – they will emphatically tell you the most qualified teacher is what they want for their children rather than a necessarily diverse faculty. (Try a poll with this question – As a parent of an ethnic minority, which is of more importance to you: a) a diverse faculty; b) best qualifed teachers?)

    To put it another way – endless debates about diversity are not getting the job done to make sure our minority students get as excellent an education as possible. Instead the School Board chose to kill the best ELS program in Davis, at the expense of its minority children.

    Parents and teachers alike rose up and defied the School Board’s bad decision – and are attempting to set up Valley Oak as a charter school. Ironically if it succeeds, and I think it will, the School Board will have shot itself in the foot. Why? Think about it.

    Ostensibly Valley Oak was closed because of declining enrollment. However, if Valley Oak becomes a charter school, the School Board will have to pay for the education of those attending Valley Oak that come from inside the Davis City limits. However, the Davis public school system will lose those Davis students attending Valley Oak from their average daily attendance rolls – just the thing the School Board was trying to avoid with its claim of “declining enrollment” and ridiculous new truancy policy.

    Now how is hiring a more diverse faculty going to fix any of this mess? It won’t. But making Valley Oak a charter school and independent of the School Board’s poor decision making process is going to make it the envy of the county – when it has the best ELS program available that can’t be eliminated for political reasons.

  20. Infuriated Former Teacher

    As an older retired teacher from an area on the East Coast that has dabbled over the years with “fixing” racial inequality, forcing a more diverse faculty results in mediocrity. I watched it happen. A sad but true FACT. As uncomfortable as that notion is to idealistic young progressives, it is imperative to make the first and foremost priority in our schools to hire the best qualified teachers available, PERIOD. It matters not a whit what ethnicity the faculty is.

    If parents of an ethnic minority are boycotting STAR testing because their children are disadvantaged in taking the test, how is hiring teachers who are of an ethnic minority necessarily going to help? However, hiring the best qualified teachers is guaranteed to help!

    If we as a city get caught up in endless discussions of the racial inequities in our school system, and see the solution to our problems as hiring a more diverse faculty – we are doomed to keeping our problems unaddressed.

    Hiring a more diverse faculty would not have helped keep Valley Oak open. What has kept the possibility of Valley Oak remaining viable is the talk about not closing a successful ELS program that helped minority children learn English. Clearly the faculty that developed that program are the best qualified, whatever their ethnicity.

    No one in the comment section even remotely implied that teachers of an ethnic minority are somehow less qualified than Caucasion teachers. But when programs are instituted that concentrate on filling minority faculty quotas, things go horribly wrong – because a diverse faculty is not the answer to poor quality education. It is beside the point.

    Let’s face it – Valley Oak was probably closed to make way for the new elementary school in South Davis (which is probably a boon doggle for some local developer who has the right connections). Valley Oak was the school serving more of our minority students than the other schools. How the heck would hiring a more diverse faculty have helped this appalling situation of closing a school that heavily emphasized helping minority students to make way for a new elementary school? The answer is it wouldn’t have.

    All things being equal, hire the minority teacher rather than a Caucasion one. But don’t ever hire a less qualified teacher just because they are of an ethnic minority, to prove you have a diverse faculty and thus are meeting the needs of minority students. One has nothing to do with the other.

    I will bet you my bottom dollar, if you asked the parents of those minority students who boycotted STAR testing – they will emphatically tell you the most qualified teacher is what they want for their children rather than a necessarily diverse faculty. (Try a poll with this question – As a parent of an ethnic minority, which is of more importance to you: a) a diverse faculty; b) best qualifed teachers?)

    To put it another way – endless debates about diversity are not getting the job done to make sure our minority students get as excellent an education as possible. Instead the School Board chose to kill the best ELS program in Davis, at the expense of its minority children.

    Parents and teachers alike rose up and defied the School Board’s bad decision – and are attempting to set up Valley Oak as a charter school. Ironically if it succeeds, and I think it will, the School Board will have shot itself in the foot. Why? Think about it.

    Ostensibly Valley Oak was closed because of declining enrollment. However, if Valley Oak becomes a charter school, the School Board will have to pay for the education of those attending Valley Oak that come from inside the Davis City limits. However, the Davis public school system will lose those Davis students attending Valley Oak from their average daily attendance rolls – just the thing the School Board was trying to avoid with its claim of “declining enrollment” and ridiculous new truancy policy.

    Now how is hiring a more diverse faculty going to fix any of this mess? It won’t. But making Valley Oak a charter school and independent of the School Board’s poor decision making process is going to make it the envy of the county – when it has the best ELS program available that can’t be eliminated for political reasons.

  21. Closet Conservative

    Hey, this article is the very reason why many conservatives are afraid to voice their opinions openly in Davis. They are considered the “dark underbelly of Davis” just for being conservative. Not a fair characterization and a rank generalization.

  22. Closet Conservative

    Hey, this article is the very reason why many conservatives are afraid to voice their opinions openly in Davis. They are considered the “dark underbelly of Davis” just for being conservative. Not a fair characterization and a rank generalization.

  23. Closet Conservative

    Hey, this article is the very reason why many conservatives are afraid to voice their opinions openly in Davis. They are considered the “dark underbelly of Davis” just for being conservative. Not a fair characterization and a rank generalization.

  24. Closet Conservative

    Hey, this article is the very reason why many conservatives are afraid to voice their opinions openly in Davis. They are considered the “dark underbelly of Davis” just for being conservative. Not a fair characterization and a rank generalization.

  25. Anonymous

    “I do not have answers to these questions, but for a town that is so firmly liberal or perceived as such, there are many non-liberal opinions that end up posted on this blog from people who claim to be liberals. These are not liberal views that I know, support, and believe in. These are not the values that I was taught to embrace and celebrate.”

    What, if one doesn’t hold the same opinions as DPD, they are somehow not as worthy a person? The true way is only if one believes as a “true liberal” believes, which is what exactly? How is this an example of tolerance – only DPD’s way of seeing things is the right way? Whoops – I think passion got in the way of reason here a bit.

  26. Anonymous

    “I do not have answers to these questions, but for a town that is so firmly liberal or perceived as such, there are many non-liberal opinions that end up posted on this blog from people who claim to be liberals. These are not liberal views that I know, support, and believe in. These are not the values that I was taught to embrace and celebrate.”

    What, if one doesn’t hold the same opinions as DPD, they are somehow not as worthy a person? The true way is only if one believes as a “true liberal” believes, which is what exactly? How is this an example of tolerance – only DPD’s way of seeing things is the right way? Whoops – I think passion got in the way of reason here a bit.

  27. Anonymous

    “I do not have answers to these questions, but for a town that is so firmly liberal or perceived as such, there are many non-liberal opinions that end up posted on this blog from people who claim to be liberals. These are not liberal views that I know, support, and believe in. These are not the values that I was taught to embrace and celebrate.”

    What, if one doesn’t hold the same opinions as DPD, they are somehow not as worthy a person? The true way is only if one believes as a “true liberal” believes, which is what exactly? How is this an example of tolerance – only DPD’s way of seeing things is the right way? Whoops – I think passion got in the way of reason here a bit.

  28. Anonymous

    “I do not have answers to these questions, but for a town that is so firmly liberal or perceived as such, there are many non-liberal opinions that end up posted on this blog from people who claim to be liberals. These are not liberal views that I know, support, and believe in. These are not the values that I was taught to embrace and celebrate.”

    What, if one doesn’t hold the same opinions as DPD, they are somehow not as worthy a person? The true way is only if one believes as a “true liberal” believes, which is what exactly? How is this an example of tolerance – only DPD’s way of seeing things is the right way? Whoops – I think passion got in the way of reason here a bit.

  29. happy and black in davis

    “What’s easier, simpler, or more symbolic than elected an establishment and somewhat safe and conservative Filipino Mayor?”

    You live in a teeny weenie pathetic bubble if you think Ruth is a “conservative.” She is establishment: an established, successful, very popular liberal woman who has done more to elect liberal Democrats than you ever will.

    Second, if Davis were so racist and sexist and homophobic as you pretend, it would not provide so much comfort and welcome to a gay member of the school board, an immigrant mayor or all of the other people of color who choose to live here.

    “That whole article just went right over your pretty little head now didn’t it.”

    That whole article was caca. I had to duck when the author flung it out of his rectum.

  30. happy and black in davis

    “What’s easier, simpler, or more symbolic than elected an establishment and somewhat safe and conservative Filipino Mayor?”

    You live in a teeny weenie pathetic bubble if you think Ruth is a “conservative.” She is establishment: an established, successful, very popular liberal woman who has done more to elect liberal Democrats than you ever will.

    Second, if Davis were so racist and sexist and homophobic as you pretend, it would not provide so much comfort and welcome to a gay member of the school board, an immigrant mayor or all of the other people of color who choose to live here.

    “That whole article just went right over your pretty little head now didn’t it.”

    That whole article was caca. I had to duck when the author flung it out of his rectum.

  31. happy and black in davis

    “What’s easier, simpler, or more symbolic than elected an establishment and somewhat safe and conservative Filipino Mayor?”

    You live in a teeny weenie pathetic bubble if you think Ruth is a “conservative.” She is establishment: an established, successful, very popular liberal woman who has done more to elect liberal Democrats than you ever will.

    Second, if Davis were so racist and sexist and homophobic as you pretend, it would not provide so much comfort and welcome to a gay member of the school board, an immigrant mayor or all of the other people of color who choose to live here.

    “That whole article just went right over your pretty little head now didn’t it.”

    That whole article was caca. I had to duck when the author flung it out of his rectum.

  32. happy and black in davis

    “What’s easier, simpler, or more symbolic than elected an establishment and somewhat safe and conservative Filipino Mayor?”

    You live in a teeny weenie pathetic bubble if you think Ruth is a “conservative.” She is establishment: an established, successful, very popular liberal woman who has done more to elect liberal Democrats than you ever will.

    Second, if Davis were so racist and sexist and homophobic as you pretend, it would not provide so much comfort and welcome to a gay member of the school board, an immigrant mayor or all of the other people of color who choose to live here.

    “That whole article just went right over your pretty little head now didn’t it.”

    That whole article was caca. I had to duck when the author flung it out of his rectum.

  33. Vincente

    “Hey, this article is the very reason why many conservatives are afraid to voice their opinions openly in Davis. They are considered the “dark underbelly of Davis” just for being conservative.”

    Actually the criticism is leveled toward so-called liberals who are not rather than conservatives.

  34. Vincente

    “Hey, this article is the very reason why many conservatives are afraid to voice their opinions openly in Davis. They are considered the “dark underbelly of Davis” just for being conservative.”

    Actually the criticism is leveled toward so-called liberals who are not rather than conservatives.

  35. Vincente

    “Hey, this article is the very reason why many conservatives are afraid to voice their opinions openly in Davis. They are considered the “dark underbelly of Davis” just for being conservative.”

    Actually the criticism is leveled toward so-called liberals who are not rather than conservatives.

  36. Vincente

    “Hey, this article is the very reason why many conservatives are afraid to voice their opinions openly in Davis. They are considered the “dark underbelly of Davis” just for being conservative.”

    Actually the criticism is leveled toward so-called liberals who are not rather than conservatives.

  37. Vincente

    “What part of “best qualified teacher” doesn’t Jann understand?”

    The part where that means it must be a white teacher. I would also suggest to you that her other problem is the measure of “best qualified teacher.” So maybe I will ask this–how would you quantify in precise objective terms, who the best qualified teacher is?

  38. Vincente

    “What part of “best qualified teacher” doesn’t Jann understand?”

    The part where that means it must be a white teacher. I would also suggest to you that her other problem is the measure of “best qualified teacher.” So maybe I will ask this–how would you quantify in precise objective terms, who the best qualified teacher is?

  39. Vincente

    “What part of “best qualified teacher” doesn’t Jann understand?”

    The part where that means it must be a white teacher. I would also suggest to you that her other problem is the measure of “best qualified teacher.” So maybe I will ask this–how would you quantify in precise objective terms, who the best qualified teacher is?

  40. Vincente

    “What part of “best qualified teacher” doesn’t Jann understand?”

    The part where that means it must be a white teacher. I would also suggest to you that her other problem is the measure of “best qualified teacher.” So maybe I will ask this–how would you quantify in precise objective terms, who the best qualified teacher is?

  41. Vincente

    “Second, if Davis were so racist and sexist and homophobic as you pretend, it would not provide so much comfort and welcome to a gay member of the school board, an immigrant mayor or all of the other people of color who choose to live here.”

    Who claimed Davis was racist, sexist and homophobic?

  42. Vincente

    “Second, if Davis were so racist and sexist and homophobic as you pretend, it would not provide so much comfort and welcome to a gay member of the school board, an immigrant mayor or all of the other people of color who choose to live here.”

    Who claimed Davis was racist, sexist and homophobic?

  43. Vincente

    “Second, if Davis were so racist and sexist and homophobic as you pretend, it would not provide so much comfort and welcome to a gay member of the school board, an immigrant mayor or all of the other people of color who choose to live here.”

    Who claimed Davis was racist, sexist and homophobic?

  44. Vincente

    “Second, if Davis were so racist and sexist and homophobic as you pretend, it would not provide so much comfort and welcome to a gay member of the school board, an immigrant mayor or all of the other people of color who choose to live here.”

    Who claimed Davis was racist, sexist and homophobic?

  45. don shor

    It is clear that the greatest diversity deficiency in public schools is a lack of male teachers. The percentage of male teachers has dropped from 34% in 1971 to 21% in 2001. There is an achievement gap between female and male students nationally: girls now outperform boys on achievement tests, even in math and science. The lack of role models for boys in school is detrimental to their educational and emotional development.

    To my knowledge, the school district has done nothing to promote the hiring of qualified male teachers.

  46. don shor

    It is clear that the greatest diversity deficiency in public schools is a lack of male teachers. The percentage of male teachers has dropped from 34% in 1971 to 21% in 2001. There is an achievement gap between female and male students nationally: girls now outperform boys on achievement tests, even in math and science. The lack of role models for boys in school is detrimental to their educational and emotional development.

    To my knowledge, the school district has done nothing to promote the hiring of qualified male teachers.

  47. don shor

    It is clear that the greatest diversity deficiency in public schools is a lack of male teachers. The percentage of male teachers has dropped from 34% in 1971 to 21% in 2001. There is an achievement gap between female and male students nationally: girls now outperform boys on achievement tests, even in math and science. The lack of role models for boys in school is detrimental to their educational and emotional development.

    To my knowledge, the school district has done nothing to promote the hiring of qualified male teachers.

  48. don shor

    It is clear that the greatest diversity deficiency in public schools is a lack of male teachers. The percentage of male teachers has dropped from 34% in 1971 to 21% in 2001. There is an achievement gap between female and male students nationally: girls now outperform boys on achievement tests, even in math and science. The lack of role models for boys in school is detrimental to their educational and emotional development.

    To my knowledge, the school district has done nothing to promote the hiring of qualified male teachers.

  49. Anonymous

    What is caca is Davis’ definition of diversity and the fact that there are people so shallow that cannot see that you can recruit top notch candidates to be teachers, but they don’t feel welcomed, so they don’t come to Davis.

    What are you willing to do to change that?
    Are you okay letting your kids grow up and learn in a homogeneous environment?

    !f conservatives don’t feel welcomed in Davis that is ok with me. We have had enough in the White House, on city council…and other elected bodies. Take your conservatism to Fresno. They will welcome you with open arms and we will celebrate.

    True Blue Liberal

  50. Anonymous

    What is caca is Davis’ definition of diversity and the fact that there are people so shallow that cannot see that you can recruit top notch candidates to be teachers, but they don’t feel welcomed, so they don’t come to Davis.

    What are you willing to do to change that?
    Are you okay letting your kids grow up and learn in a homogeneous environment?

    !f conservatives don’t feel welcomed in Davis that is ok with me. We have had enough in the White House, on city council…and other elected bodies. Take your conservatism to Fresno. They will welcome you with open arms and we will celebrate.

    True Blue Liberal

  51. Anonymous

    What is caca is Davis’ definition of diversity and the fact that there are people so shallow that cannot see that you can recruit top notch candidates to be teachers, but they don’t feel welcomed, so they don’t come to Davis.

    What are you willing to do to change that?
    Are you okay letting your kids grow up and learn in a homogeneous environment?

    !f conservatives don’t feel welcomed in Davis that is ok with me. We have had enough in the White House, on city council…and other elected bodies. Take your conservatism to Fresno. They will welcome you with open arms and we will celebrate.

    True Blue Liberal

  52. Anonymous

    What is caca is Davis’ definition of diversity and the fact that there are people so shallow that cannot see that you can recruit top notch candidates to be teachers, but they don’t feel welcomed, so they don’t come to Davis.

    What are you willing to do to change that?
    Are you okay letting your kids grow up and learn in a homogeneous environment?

    !f conservatives don’t feel welcomed in Davis that is ok with me. We have had enough in the White House, on city council…and other elected bodies. Take your conservatism to Fresno. They will welcome you with open arms and we will celebrate.

    True Blue Liberal

  53. Anonymous

    Anonymous –

    You whine about the great work of the Vanguard, yet you keep coming back for more?

    Hypocrit? Or just sour grapes? Start your own blog and stop whining.

  54. Anonymous

    Anonymous –

    You whine about the great work of the Vanguard, yet you keep coming back for more?

    Hypocrit? Or just sour grapes? Start your own blog and stop whining.

  55. Anonymous

    Anonymous –

    You whine about the great work of the Vanguard, yet you keep coming back for more?

    Hypocrit? Or just sour grapes? Start your own blog and stop whining.

  56. Anonymous

    Anonymous –

    You whine about the great work of the Vanguard, yet you keep coming back for more?

    Hypocrit? Or just sour grapes? Start your own blog and stop whining.

  57. Practical person

    DPD said:

    There is what I have termed: the dark underbelly of the People’s Republic of Davis. Everyone asks me what that means, to me the People’s Republic of Davis implies that Davis is some far left Utopian. The dark underbelly is one of ugly reactionism. It is the voice of hatred, division, corruption, and conservatism. It is the part of ourselves that we all deny and try to hide away in the dark recesses of our minds and souls.

    DPD – People’s Republic of Davis does not and has not ever referred to Utopia — rather, it refers to the similarity between Davis liberal policies and those failed communist states that tried to impose communistic and socialistic rules on people. Marxism has clearly failed in the past 100 years, and it fails anywhere in the US, including Davis.

    I think Don Shor made a very interesting and obvious point, but as far as I can see, no progressive has picked this flag up and tried to make sure that we have plenty of male teachers in the high schools. Why not – Is gender not important? Shouldn’t we have 50% male teachers for diversity’s sake?

  58. Practical person

    DPD said:

    There is what I have termed: the dark underbelly of the People’s Republic of Davis. Everyone asks me what that means, to me the People’s Republic of Davis implies that Davis is some far left Utopian. The dark underbelly is one of ugly reactionism. It is the voice of hatred, division, corruption, and conservatism. It is the part of ourselves that we all deny and try to hide away in the dark recesses of our minds and souls.

    DPD – People’s Republic of Davis does not and has not ever referred to Utopia — rather, it refers to the similarity between Davis liberal policies and those failed communist states that tried to impose communistic and socialistic rules on people. Marxism has clearly failed in the past 100 years, and it fails anywhere in the US, including Davis.

    I think Don Shor made a very interesting and obvious point, but as far as I can see, no progressive has picked this flag up and tried to make sure that we have plenty of male teachers in the high schools. Why not – Is gender not important? Shouldn’t we have 50% male teachers for diversity’s sake?

  59. Practical person

    DPD said:

    There is what I have termed: the dark underbelly of the People’s Republic of Davis. Everyone asks me what that means, to me the People’s Republic of Davis implies that Davis is some far left Utopian. The dark underbelly is one of ugly reactionism. It is the voice of hatred, division, corruption, and conservatism. It is the part of ourselves that we all deny and try to hide away in the dark recesses of our minds and souls.

    DPD – People’s Republic of Davis does not and has not ever referred to Utopia — rather, it refers to the similarity between Davis liberal policies and those failed communist states that tried to impose communistic and socialistic rules on people. Marxism has clearly failed in the past 100 years, and it fails anywhere in the US, including Davis.

    I think Don Shor made a very interesting and obvious point, but as far as I can see, no progressive has picked this flag up and tried to make sure that we have plenty of male teachers in the high schools. Why not – Is gender not important? Shouldn’t we have 50% male teachers for diversity’s sake?

  60. Practical person

    DPD said:

    There is what I have termed: the dark underbelly of the People’s Republic of Davis. Everyone asks me what that means, to me the People’s Republic of Davis implies that Davis is some far left Utopian. The dark underbelly is one of ugly reactionism. It is the voice of hatred, division, corruption, and conservatism. It is the part of ourselves that we all deny and try to hide away in the dark recesses of our minds and souls.

    DPD – People’s Republic of Davis does not and has not ever referred to Utopia — rather, it refers to the similarity between Davis liberal policies and those failed communist states that tried to impose communistic and socialistic rules on people. Marxism has clearly failed in the past 100 years, and it fails anywhere in the US, including Davis.

    I think Don Shor made a very interesting and obvious point, but as far as I can see, no progressive has picked this flag up and tried to make sure that we have plenty of male teachers in the high schools. Why not – Is gender not important? Shouldn’t we have 50% male teachers for diversity’s sake?

  61. don shor

    From the NEA — strategies for closing achievement gaps:
    http://www.nea.org/achievement/strategies.html
    ———–
    Also from the NEA —
    The male teacher dilemma:

    Wanted: More male teachers

    Men are in demand in America’s public schools as a greater focus is placed on the need to diversify the historically female-dominated profession. Nationally, NEA is waging a drive to get more men into teaching. At the Association’s 2002 Representative Assembly, NEA members approved a measure to “identify, recognize, recruit and retain” more male teachers, with an emphasis on elementary and minority teachers.

    According to NEA research, just 24.9 percent of the nation’s 3 million teachers are men. And over the last two decades, the ratio of males to females in teaching has steadily declined. The number of male teachers now stands at a 40-year low.

    The percentage of male teachers in elementary schools has fallen regularly since 1981 – that year, it reached an all-time high of 18 percent. Today, a scant 9 percent of elementary school teachers are men. Likewise, the percentage of males in secondary schools has fluctuated over the years, but now stands at its lowest level (35 percent).
    The male teacher dilemma

    *

    Colleges of education historically have a tough time luring men because of dated notions that teaching is women’s work.
    *

    Salaries are low for teachers when compared to salaries for other professionals, which lowers the prestige and social value of a career in teaching.
    *

    Many men don’t see the teaching profession as a lucrative way to provide for their families.
    *

    The prevailing philosophy within education is that men go into teaching to “teach the subject,” and women enter teaching to nurture and develop children. Since males tend to gravitate toward secondary teaching, this leaves a critical shortage of male teachers at the elementary level.

    Strategies for increasing the number of male teachers

    Address the wage gap
    States with the highest salaries tend to have the highest proportion of male teachers. Michigan is ranked 1st in the percentage of male teachers (37 percent); Michigan ranks in the top 5 nationally in teacher pay. Mississippi is ranked 50th in the percentage of male teachers (18 percent); Mississippi is ranked 49th out of 50 states in teacher pay.

    Identify and recruit young men into teaching in high school
    There is a perennial shortage of male applicants to schools of education. Initiatives to identify prospective teachers early in their academic careers have proven successful. Secondary school surveys, career counseling, and college prep courses can help boost enrollment.

    Teachers: Spread the word!
    Teachers can talk up the golden opportunities of teaching to their male students. NEA asked the nation’s teachers to select, from a list of options, the principal reason they originally decided to become a teacher. The influence of a teacher in elementary or secondary school was the 4th most frequently chosen reason (32 percent). Most notably, teachers under 30 gave this reason with greater frequency than did teachers over 30 (39% vs. 31%).

  62. don shor

    From the NEA — strategies for closing achievement gaps:
    http://www.nea.org/achievement/strategies.html
    ———–
    Also from the NEA —
    The male teacher dilemma:

    Wanted: More male teachers

    Men are in demand in America’s public schools as a greater focus is placed on the need to diversify the historically female-dominated profession. Nationally, NEA is waging a drive to get more men into teaching. At the Association’s 2002 Representative Assembly, NEA members approved a measure to “identify, recognize, recruit and retain” more male teachers, with an emphasis on elementary and minority teachers.

    According to NEA research, just 24.9 percent of the nation’s 3 million teachers are men. And over the last two decades, the ratio of males to females in teaching has steadily declined. The number of male teachers now stands at a 40-year low.

    The percentage of male teachers in elementary schools has fallen regularly since 1981 – that year, it reached an all-time high of 18 percent. Today, a scant 9 percent of elementary school teachers are men. Likewise, the percentage of males in secondary schools has fluctuated over the years, but now stands at its lowest level (35 percent).
    The male teacher dilemma

    *

    Colleges of education historically have a tough time luring men because of dated notions that teaching is women’s work.
    *

    Salaries are low for teachers when compared to salaries for other professionals, which lowers the prestige and social value of a career in teaching.
    *

    Many men don’t see the teaching profession as a lucrative way to provide for their families.
    *

    The prevailing philosophy within education is that men go into teaching to “teach the subject,” and women enter teaching to nurture and develop children. Since males tend to gravitate toward secondary teaching, this leaves a critical shortage of male teachers at the elementary level.

    Strategies for increasing the number of male teachers

    Address the wage gap
    States with the highest salaries tend to have the highest proportion of male teachers. Michigan is ranked 1st in the percentage of male teachers (37 percent); Michigan ranks in the top 5 nationally in teacher pay. Mississippi is ranked 50th in the percentage of male teachers (18 percent); Mississippi is ranked 49th out of 50 states in teacher pay.

    Identify and recruit young men into teaching in high school
    There is a perennial shortage of male applicants to schools of education. Initiatives to identify prospective teachers early in their academic careers have proven successful. Secondary school surveys, career counseling, and college prep courses can help boost enrollment.

    Teachers: Spread the word!
    Teachers can talk up the golden opportunities of teaching to their male students. NEA asked the nation’s teachers to select, from a list of options, the principal reason they originally decided to become a teacher. The influence of a teacher in elementary or secondary school was the 4th most frequently chosen reason (32 percent). Most notably, teachers under 30 gave this reason with greater frequency than did teachers over 30 (39% vs. 31%).

  63. don shor

    From the NEA — strategies for closing achievement gaps:
    http://www.nea.org/achievement/strategies.html
    ———–
    Also from the NEA —
    The male teacher dilemma:

    Wanted: More male teachers

    Men are in demand in America’s public schools as a greater focus is placed on the need to diversify the historically female-dominated profession. Nationally, NEA is waging a drive to get more men into teaching. At the Association’s 2002 Representative Assembly, NEA members approved a measure to “identify, recognize, recruit and retain” more male teachers, with an emphasis on elementary and minority teachers.

    According to NEA research, just 24.9 percent of the nation’s 3 million teachers are men. And over the last two decades, the ratio of males to females in teaching has steadily declined. The number of male teachers now stands at a 40-year low.

    The percentage of male teachers in elementary schools has fallen regularly since 1981 – that year, it reached an all-time high of 18 percent. Today, a scant 9 percent of elementary school teachers are men. Likewise, the percentage of males in secondary schools has fluctuated over the years, but now stands at its lowest level (35 percent).
    The male teacher dilemma

    *

    Colleges of education historically have a tough time luring men because of dated notions that teaching is women’s work.
    *

    Salaries are low for teachers when compared to salaries for other professionals, which lowers the prestige and social value of a career in teaching.
    *

    Many men don’t see the teaching profession as a lucrative way to provide for their families.
    *

    The prevailing philosophy within education is that men go into teaching to “teach the subject,” and women enter teaching to nurture and develop children. Since males tend to gravitate toward secondary teaching, this leaves a critical shortage of male teachers at the elementary level.

    Strategies for increasing the number of male teachers

    Address the wage gap
    States with the highest salaries tend to have the highest proportion of male teachers. Michigan is ranked 1st in the percentage of male teachers (37 percent); Michigan ranks in the top 5 nationally in teacher pay. Mississippi is ranked 50th in the percentage of male teachers (18 percent); Mississippi is ranked 49th out of 50 states in teacher pay.

    Identify and recruit young men into teaching in high school
    There is a perennial shortage of male applicants to schools of education. Initiatives to identify prospective teachers early in their academic careers have proven successful. Secondary school surveys, career counseling, and college prep courses can help boost enrollment.

    Teachers: Spread the word!
    Teachers can talk up the golden opportunities of teaching to their male students. NEA asked the nation’s teachers to select, from a list of options, the principal reason they originally decided to become a teacher. The influence of a teacher in elementary or secondary school was the 4th most frequently chosen reason (32 percent). Most notably, teachers under 30 gave this reason with greater frequency than did teachers over 30 (39% vs. 31%).

  64. don shor

    From the NEA — strategies for closing achievement gaps:
    http://www.nea.org/achievement/strategies.html
    ———–
    Also from the NEA —
    The male teacher dilemma:

    Wanted: More male teachers

    Men are in demand in America’s public schools as a greater focus is placed on the need to diversify the historically female-dominated profession. Nationally, NEA is waging a drive to get more men into teaching. At the Association’s 2002 Representative Assembly, NEA members approved a measure to “identify, recognize, recruit and retain” more male teachers, with an emphasis on elementary and minority teachers.

    According to NEA research, just 24.9 percent of the nation’s 3 million teachers are men. And over the last two decades, the ratio of males to females in teaching has steadily declined. The number of male teachers now stands at a 40-year low.

    The percentage of male teachers in elementary schools has fallen regularly since 1981 – that year, it reached an all-time high of 18 percent. Today, a scant 9 percent of elementary school teachers are men. Likewise, the percentage of males in secondary schools has fluctuated over the years, but now stands at its lowest level (35 percent).
    The male teacher dilemma

    *

    Colleges of education historically have a tough time luring men because of dated notions that teaching is women’s work.
    *

    Salaries are low for teachers when compared to salaries for other professionals, which lowers the prestige and social value of a career in teaching.
    *

    Many men don’t see the teaching profession as a lucrative way to provide for their families.
    *

    The prevailing philosophy within education is that men go into teaching to “teach the subject,” and women enter teaching to nurture and develop children. Since males tend to gravitate toward secondary teaching, this leaves a critical shortage of male teachers at the elementary level.

    Strategies for increasing the number of male teachers

    Address the wage gap
    States with the highest salaries tend to have the highest proportion of male teachers. Michigan is ranked 1st in the percentage of male teachers (37 percent); Michigan ranks in the top 5 nationally in teacher pay. Mississippi is ranked 50th in the percentage of male teachers (18 percent); Mississippi is ranked 49th out of 50 states in teacher pay.

    Identify and recruit young men into teaching in high school
    There is a perennial shortage of male applicants to schools of education. Initiatives to identify prospective teachers early in their academic careers have proven successful. Secondary school surveys, career counseling, and college prep courses can help boost enrollment.

    Teachers: Spread the word!
    Teachers can talk up the golden opportunities of teaching to their male students. NEA asked the nation’s teachers to select, from a list of options, the principal reason they originally decided to become a teacher. The influence of a teacher in elementary or secondary school was the 4th most frequently chosen reason (32 percent). Most notably, teachers under 30 gave this reason with greater frequency than did teachers over 30 (39% vs. 31%).

  65. Anonymous

    Does the “dark underbelly” also include conservative, no growth economic policies, ironically self-labeled as “progressive”, which while shrouded in “environmental” concerns, have the clear and direct economic impact of driving up property values, thereby contributing to the wealth of non-minority homeowners in Davis? It is missing the point to say that forcing a more ethnically diverse faculty carries an expectation of lesser qualified minority teachers. Rather, it is a simple economics questions. The higher qualified minority teaching candidates (unspoken, but in the case of the advocates for the cause in Davis, meaning only “black”)have lots of options, because there is a supply shortage of such candidates. This is well-documented, and has been explained by DJUSD which has failed in its efforts to hire such candidates. At the same time, Davis has both a high cost of living, a group of parents of all ethnicities who are ridiculously over-involved in their children’s daily academic and extracurricular activities (and who regularly harass teachers for the sake of their self-important darling children), and a small but highly vocal group of minority advocates who deliberately play the race card at the drop of a pin. It’s simple, the highly qualified minority candidates quickly conclude they will be better off both economically and in their daily life if they take jobs elsewhere. Rather than screaming racism and pointing fingers, if the community is truly interested in recruiting minority candidates, it should be focusing on the economics and teaching environment faced by potential candidates, and coming up with policies that help to overcome those hurdles (housing subsidy, compensation enhancements, etc.)

  66. Anonymous

    Does the “dark underbelly” also include conservative, no growth economic policies, ironically self-labeled as “progressive”, which while shrouded in “environmental” concerns, have the clear and direct economic impact of driving up property values, thereby contributing to the wealth of non-minority homeowners in Davis? It is missing the point to say that forcing a more ethnically diverse faculty carries an expectation of lesser qualified minority teachers. Rather, it is a simple economics questions. The higher qualified minority teaching candidates (unspoken, but in the case of the advocates for the cause in Davis, meaning only “black”)have lots of options, because there is a supply shortage of such candidates. This is well-documented, and has been explained by DJUSD which has failed in its efforts to hire such candidates. At the same time, Davis has both a high cost of living, a group of parents of all ethnicities who are ridiculously over-involved in their children’s daily academic and extracurricular activities (and who regularly harass teachers for the sake of their self-important darling children), and a small but highly vocal group of minority advocates who deliberately play the race card at the drop of a pin. It’s simple, the highly qualified minority candidates quickly conclude they will be better off both economically and in their daily life if they take jobs elsewhere. Rather than screaming racism and pointing fingers, if the community is truly interested in recruiting minority candidates, it should be focusing on the economics and teaching environment faced by potential candidates, and coming up with policies that help to overcome those hurdles (housing subsidy, compensation enhancements, etc.)

  67. Anonymous

    Does the “dark underbelly” also include conservative, no growth economic policies, ironically self-labeled as “progressive”, which while shrouded in “environmental” concerns, have the clear and direct economic impact of driving up property values, thereby contributing to the wealth of non-minority homeowners in Davis? It is missing the point to say that forcing a more ethnically diverse faculty carries an expectation of lesser qualified minority teachers. Rather, it is a simple economics questions. The higher qualified minority teaching candidates (unspoken, but in the case of the advocates for the cause in Davis, meaning only “black”)have lots of options, because there is a supply shortage of such candidates. This is well-documented, and has been explained by DJUSD which has failed in its efforts to hire such candidates. At the same time, Davis has both a high cost of living, a group of parents of all ethnicities who are ridiculously over-involved in their children’s daily academic and extracurricular activities (and who regularly harass teachers for the sake of their self-important darling children), and a small but highly vocal group of minority advocates who deliberately play the race card at the drop of a pin. It’s simple, the highly qualified minority candidates quickly conclude they will be better off both economically and in their daily life if they take jobs elsewhere. Rather than screaming racism and pointing fingers, if the community is truly interested in recruiting minority candidates, it should be focusing on the economics and teaching environment faced by potential candidates, and coming up with policies that help to overcome those hurdles (housing subsidy, compensation enhancements, etc.)

  68. Anonymous

    Does the “dark underbelly” also include conservative, no growth economic policies, ironically self-labeled as “progressive”, which while shrouded in “environmental” concerns, have the clear and direct economic impact of driving up property values, thereby contributing to the wealth of non-minority homeowners in Davis? It is missing the point to say that forcing a more ethnically diverse faculty carries an expectation of lesser qualified minority teachers. Rather, it is a simple economics questions. The higher qualified minority teaching candidates (unspoken, but in the case of the advocates for the cause in Davis, meaning only “black”)have lots of options, because there is a supply shortage of such candidates. This is well-documented, and has been explained by DJUSD which has failed in its efforts to hire such candidates. At the same time, Davis has both a high cost of living, a group of parents of all ethnicities who are ridiculously over-involved in their children’s daily academic and extracurricular activities (and who regularly harass teachers for the sake of their self-important darling children), and a small but highly vocal group of minority advocates who deliberately play the race card at the drop of a pin. It’s simple, the highly qualified minority candidates quickly conclude they will be better off both economically and in their daily life if they take jobs elsewhere. Rather than screaming racism and pointing fingers, if the community is truly interested in recruiting minority candidates, it should be focusing on the economics and teaching environment faced by potential candidates, and coming up with policies that help to overcome those hurdles (housing subsidy, compensation enhancements, etc.)

  69. katherine

    I am surprised and disappointed to see people on this blog stating that recruiting nonwhite teachers gets you less qualified teachers. I had MANY excellent and well qualified African American teachers from elementary school though high school (in Chapel Hill, NC).

    It is valuable for students of all races to interact with teachers and mentors of both the same race as themselves as well as from other ethnic backgrounds.

  70. katherine

    I am surprised and disappointed to see people on this blog stating that recruiting nonwhite teachers gets you less qualified teachers. I had MANY excellent and well qualified African American teachers from elementary school though high school (in Chapel Hill, NC).

    It is valuable for students of all races to interact with teachers and mentors of both the same race as themselves as well as from other ethnic backgrounds.

  71. katherine

    I am surprised and disappointed to see people on this blog stating that recruiting nonwhite teachers gets you less qualified teachers. I had MANY excellent and well qualified African American teachers from elementary school though high school (in Chapel Hill, NC).

    It is valuable for students of all races to interact with teachers and mentors of both the same race as themselves as well as from other ethnic backgrounds.

  72. katherine

    I am surprised and disappointed to see people on this blog stating that recruiting nonwhite teachers gets you less qualified teachers. I had MANY excellent and well qualified African American teachers from elementary school though high school (in Chapel Hill, NC).

    It is valuable for students of all races to interact with teachers and mentors of both the same race as themselves as well as from other ethnic backgrounds.

  73. don shor

    I would guess that if a teacher got a credential anywhere in the US, that teacher is qualified. But it does seem that transferring credentials state to state is an obstacle.

    This problem isn’t unique to Davis, and there isn’t that much the school district can do about it. Nobody on this blog has really proposed any specific actions the district could be taking to change the makeup of the teaching staff. NEA suggests recruiting from support staff and encouraging local high school students to pursue teaching careers (because teachers tend to settle and teach in the area they grew up or went to college). But Davis will be competing with every other school district in the country.

    From the NEA
    http://www.educationworld.com/a_admin/admin/admin171.shtml

    …. The U.S. Department of Education predicts that during the early part of this century, only 5 percent of teachers will be minority teachers though the student minority population will be 40 percent.

    School districts are also having a difficult time hiring minority principals, partly because of aggressive recruiting by businesses that can offer two to three times the salary that schools can offer…

    The NEA offers many reasons for the minority teacher shortage. Following are just a few…
    * Some regions are experiencing a shortage of ethnic minority candidates.
    * Minority teachers suffer burnout and frustration caused by on-the-job hazards such as discipline problems, school violence, and the lack of colleague support.
    * Standardized tests often have cutoff scores that exclude minority students; and licensure tests screen out minorities disproportionately.
    * Minority teachers leave the field at higher rates than white teachers.
    * Salaries, prestige, and the social value of teachers are lower compared with those for other professions.

    New York City’s problems hiring minority teachers:
    http://gothamist.com/2006/09/25/citys_difficult.php

    Though the city has been attempting to hire more minority teachers, very few minorities are teaching students. Over 71% of public school students are black or Hispanic, but only 33% of the teachers are black or Hispanic. And recruitment of black and Hispanic teachers has dropped in the past years. …
    One hypothesis is that less minorities are interested in teaching when there are better paying opportunities out there, while another is that certification is too tough.
    Christopher Brown, an executive with the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education, said the federal No Child Left Behind law has hampered recruitment of minorities because teaching licenses are now not as easily transferable from state to state.
    “The majority of blacks in this nation attend traditionally black colleges, most of which are in the South,” Brown said. “We’re seeing an increasing number of teacher candidates remaining in the states where they earned their degrees, because that’s where they get certified.”

    From the NEA:
    … High-stakes tests impede efforts to expand the pool of prospective teachers of color. And the logistics of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) continue to create significant barriers to recruiting teachers of color.

    Some key trends include:
    * Nationally, about 17 percent of public school students are African American and 6 percent of teachers are African American. Likewise, about 17 percent of public school students are Hispanic and 5 percent of teachers are Hispanic.
    * In more than one-third (38 percent) of America’s public schools, there is not a single teacher of color on staff.
    * Students of color tend to perform better – academically, personally and socially – when taught by teachers from their own ethnic groups.
    * In most instances, fewer than 50 percent of African Americans pass teacher entrance exams. This pattern prevails across time, location and types of tests.

  74. don shor

    I would guess that if a teacher got a credential anywhere in the US, that teacher is qualified. But it does seem that transferring credentials state to state is an obstacle.

    This problem isn’t unique to Davis, and there isn’t that much the school district can do about it. Nobody on this blog has really proposed any specific actions the district could be taking to change the makeup of the teaching staff. NEA suggests recruiting from support staff and encouraging local high school students to pursue teaching careers (because teachers tend to settle and teach in the area they grew up or went to college). But Davis will be competing with every other school district in the country.

    From the NEA
    http://www.educationworld.com/a_admin/admin/admin171.shtml

    …. The U.S. Department of Education predicts that during the early part of this century, only 5 percent of teachers will be minority teachers though the student minority population will be 40 percent.

    School districts are also having a difficult time hiring minority principals, partly because of aggressive recruiting by businesses that can offer two to three times the salary that schools can offer…

    The NEA offers many reasons for the minority teacher shortage. Following are just a few…
    * Some regions are experiencing a shortage of ethnic minority candidates.
    * Minority teachers suffer burnout and frustration caused by on-the-job hazards such as discipline problems, school violence, and the lack of colleague support.
    * Standardized tests often have cutoff scores that exclude minority students; and licensure tests screen out minorities disproportionately.
    * Minority teachers leave the field at higher rates than white teachers.
    * Salaries, prestige, and the social value of teachers are lower compared with those for other professions.

    New York City’s problems hiring minority teachers:
    http://gothamist.com/2006/09/25/citys_difficult.php

    Though the city has been attempting to hire more minority teachers, very few minorities are teaching students. Over 71% of public school students are black or Hispanic, but only 33% of the teachers are black or Hispanic. And recruitment of black and Hispanic teachers has dropped in the past years. …
    One hypothesis is that less minorities are interested in teaching when there are better paying opportunities out there, while another is that certification is too tough.
    Christopher Brown, an executive with the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education, said the federal No Child Left Behind law has hampered recruitment of minorities because teaching licenses are now not as easily transferable from state to state.
    “The majority of blacks in this nation attend traditionally black colleges, most of which are in the South,” Brown said. “We’re seeing an increasing number of teacher candidates remaining in the states where they earned their degrees, because that’s where they get certified.”

    From the NEA:
    … High-stakes tests impede efforts to expand the pool of prospective teachers of color. And the logistics of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) continue to create significant barriers to recruiting teachers of color.

    Some key trends include:
    * Nationally, about 17 percent of public school students are African American and 6 percent of teachers are African American. Likewise, about 17 percent of public school students are Hispanic and 5 percent of teachers are Hispanic.
    * In more than one-third (38 percent) of America’s public schools, there is not a single teacher of color on staff.
    * Students of color tend to perform better – academically, personally and socially – when taught by teachers from their own ethnic groups.
    * In most instances, fewer than 50 percent of African Americans pass teacher entrance exams. This pattern prevails across time, location and types of tests.

  75. don shor

    I would guess that if a teacher got a credential anywhere in the US, that teacher is qualified. But it does seem that transferring credentials state to state is an obstacle.

    This problem isn’t unique to Davis, and there isn’t that much the school district can do about it. Nobody on this blog has really proposed any specific actions the district could be taking to change the makeup of the teaching staff. NEA suggests recruiting from support staff and encouraging local high school students to pursue teaching careers (because teachers tend to settle and teach in the area they grew up or went to college). But Davis will be competing with every other school district in the country.

    From the NEA
    http://www.educationworld.com/a_admin/admin/admin171.shtml

    …. The U.S. Department of Education predicts that during the early part of this century, only 5 percent of teachers will be minority teachers though the student minority population will be 40 percent.

    School districts are also having a difficult time hiring minority principals, partly because of aggressive recruiting by businesses that can offer two to three times the salary that schools can offer…

    The NEA offers many reasons for the minority teacher shortage. Following are just a few…
    * Some regions are experiencing a shortage of ethnic minority candidates.
    * Minority teachers suffer burnout and frustration caused by on-the-job hazards such as discipline problems, school violence, and the lack of colleague support.
    * Standardized tests often have cutoff scores that exclude minority students; and licensure tests screen out minorities disproportionately.
    * Minority teachers leave the field at higher rates than white teachers.
    * Salaries, prestige, and the social value of teachers are lower compared with those for other professions.

    New York City’s problems hiring minority teachers:
    http://gothamist.com/2006/09/25/citys_difficult.php

    Though the city has been attempting to hire more minority teachers, very few minorities are teaching students. Over 71% of public school students are black or Hispanic, but only 33% of the teachers are black or Hispanic. And recruitment of black and Hispanic teachers has dropped in the past years. …
    One hypothesis is that less minorities are interested in teaching when there are better paying opportunities out there, while another is that certification is too tough.
    Christopher Brown, an executive with the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education, said the federal No Child Left Behind law has hampered recruitment of minorities because teaching licenses are now not as easily transferable from state to state.
    “The majority of blacks in this nation attend traditionally black colleges, most of which are in the South,” Brown said. “We’re seeing an increasing number of teacher candidates remaining in the states where they earned their degrees, because that’s where they get certified.”

    From the NEA:
    … High-stakes tests impede efforts to expand the pool of prospective teachers of color. And the logistics of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) continue to create significant barriers to recruiting teachers of color.

    Some key trends include:
    * Nationally, about 17 percent of public school students are African American and 6 percent of teachers are African American. Likewise, about 17 percent of public school students are Hispanic and 5 percent of teachers are Hispanic.
    * In more than one-third (38 percent) of America’s public schools, there is not a single teacher of color on staff.
    * Students of color tend to perform better – academically, personally and socially – when taught by teachers from their own ethnic groups.
    * In most instances, fewer than 50 percent of African Americans pass teacher entrance exams. This pattern prevails across time, location and types of tests.

  76. don shor

    I would guess that if a teacher got a credential anywhere in the US, that teacher is qualified. But it does seem that transferring credentials state to state is an obstacle.

    This problem isn’t unique to Davis, and there isn’t that much the school district can do about it. Nobody on this blog has really proposed any specific actions the district could be taking to change the makeup of the teaching staff. NEA suggests recruiting from support staff and encouraging local high school students to pursue teaching careers (because teachers tend to settle and teach in the area they grew up or went to college). But Davis will be competing with every other school district in the country.

    From the NEA
    http://www.educationworld.com/a_admin/admin/admin171.shtml

    …. The U.S. Department of Education predicts that during the early part of this century, only 5 percent of teachers will be minority teachers though the student minority population will be 40 percent.

    School districts are also having a difficult time hiring minority principals, partly because of aggressive recruiting by businesses that can offer two to three times the salary that schools can offer…

    The NEA offers many reasons for the minority teacher shortage. Following are just a few…
    * Some regions are experiencing a shortage of ethnic minority candidates.
    * Minority teachers suffer burnout and frustration caused by on-the-job hazards such as discipline problems, school violence, and the lack of colleague support.
    * Standardized tests often have cutoff scores that exclude minority students; and licensure tests screen out minorities disproportionately.
    * Minority teachers leave the field at higher rates than white teachers.
    * Salaries, prestige, and the social value of teachers are lower compared with those for other professions.

    New York City’s problems hiring minority teachers:
    http://gothamist.com/2006/09/25/citys_difficult.php

    Though the city has been attempting to hire more minority teachers, very few minorities are teaching students. Over 71% of public school students are black or Hispanic, but only 33% of the teachers are black or Hispanic. And recruitment of black and Hispanic teachers has dropped in the past years. …
    One hypothesis is that less minorities are interested in teaching when there are better paying opportunities out there, while another is that certification is too tough.
    Christopher Brown, an executive with the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education, said the federal No Child Left Behind law has hampered recruitment of minorities because teaching licenses are now not as easily transferable from state to state.
    “The majority of blacks in this nation attend traditionally black colleges, most of which are in the South,” Brown said. “We’re seeing an increasing number of teacher candidates remaining in the states where they earned their degrees, because that’s where they get certified.”

    From the NEA:
    … High-stakes tests impede efforts to expand the pool of prospective teachers of color. And the logistics of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) continue to create significant barriers to recruiting teachers of color.

    Some key trends include:
    * Nationally, about 17 percent of public school students are African American and 6 percent of teachers are African American. Likewise, about 17 percent of public school students are Hispanic and 5 percent of teachers are Hispanic.
    * In more than one-third (38 percent) of America’s public schools, there is not a single teacher of color on staff.
    * Students of color tend to perform better – academically, personally and socially – when taught by teachers from their own ethnic groups.
    * In most instances, fewer than 50 percent of African Americans pass teacher entrance exams. This pattern prevails across time, location and types of tests.

  77. Anonymous

    There is a way to recruit both male and minority highly qualified teachers in Davis. You could pay them well to attract them. Davis has a cap on how many years of salary credit DJUSD will accept for placement on the salary schedule. As a result I did not apply for the Physics opening last summer although I have 20 years of experience teaching science to students of all levels and ethnicities.
    So much for recruiting the most qualified teachers.

    I also think we should give the Superintendent time to see if he can improve the climate and attract a more diverse faculty. Lack of diversity in faculty is a silent form of racism. If you don’t understand that you don’t understand the importance of role models in education. Still there are ways teachers can try to mitigate any deficiencies they have as ethnic role models but they often take many years to master.

    Ron Glick

  78. Anonymous

    There is a way to recruit both male and minority highly qualified teachers in Davis. You could pay them well to attract them. Davis has a cap on how many years of salary credit DJUSD will accept for placement on the salary schedule. As a result I did not apply for the Physics opening last summer although I have 20 years of experience teaching science to students of all levels and ethnicities.
    So much for recruiting the most qualified teachers.

    I also think we should give the Superintendent time to see if he can improve the climate and attract a more diverse faculty. Lack of diversity in faculty is a silent form of racism. If you don’t understand that you don’t understand the importance of role models in education. Still there are ways teachers can try to mitigate any deficiencies they have as ethnic role models but they often take many years to master.

    Ron Glick

  79. Anonymous

    There is a way to recruit both male and minority highly qualified teachers in Davis. You could pay them well to attract them. Davis has a cap on how many years of salary credit DJUSD will accept for placement on the salary schedule. As a result I did not apply for the Physics opening last summer although I have 20 years of experience teaching science to students of all levels and ethnicities.
    So much for recruiting the most qualified teachers.

    I also think we should give the Superintendent time to see if he can improve the climate and attract a more diverse faculty. Lack of diversity in faculty is a silent form of racism. If you don’t understand that you don’t understand the importance of role models in education. Still there are ways teachers can try to mitigate any deficiencies they have as ethnic role models but they often take many years to master.

    Ron Glick

  80. Anonymous

    There is a way to recruit both male and minority highly qualified teachers in Davis. You could pay them well to attract them. Davis has a cap on how many years of salary credit DJUSD will accept for placement on the salary schedule. As a result I did not apply for the Physics opening last summer although I have 20 years of experience teaching science to students of all levels and ethnicities.
    So much for recruiting the most qualified teachers.

    I also think we should give the Superintendent time to see if he can improve the climate and attract a more diverse faculty. Lack of diversity in faculty is a silent form of racism. If you don’t understand that you don’t understand the importance of role models in education. Still there are ways teachers can try to mitigate any deficiencies they have as ethnic role models but they often take many years to master.

    Ron Glick

  81. Disgusted

    Interesting discussion about lack of male teachers; low pay for teachers.

    Getting a teaching credential does not make you automatically the “best qualified teacher”. We are missing a huge resource – teachers from the business world who know math and science inside out and backwards, who want to teach but are stopped by the lack of teaching credentials.

    Clearly low pay, including ridiculous requirements that a third of the teachers salary goes to pay for health insurance, is another egregious issue that is keeping us from getting the “best qualified teachers”.

    Why is the School Board not doing everything in its power to increase teacher salaries rather than administrative ones; developing a program to encourage retired businessmen to share their expertise in math and science; diligently working to preserve successful programs such as the ELS program at Valley Oak?

    Instead the School Board is showing lukewarm enthusiasm to Valley Oak as a charter school; hiring the most expensive Superintendent they can find; building a new elementary school as they close one that is functioning very well at serving minority students thank you very much; is fighting tooth and nail against raising the pay for teachers; yet wants the taxpayers to foot the bill to create new programs while existing ones are put on the chopping block; rounds up truant kids in police sweeps to keep up average daily attendance so as not to lose any funding so they can pay the old superintendent for sitting on his keaster and doing nothing… Good grief!

    The School Board could be doing a lot more to improve the situation, yet it seems more like they are just carrying on business as usual…high administrative salaries, low teachers pay, develop good programs but don’t carry through and support them, develop new programs that make little or no sense to facilitate someone’s move to an administrative position, then squeeze the taxpayer for more funds – threatening to cut off music and art programs if money isn’t forthcoming. What a scam!

  82. Disgusted

    Interesting discussion about lack of male teachers; low pay for teachers.

    Getting a teaching credential does not make you automatically the “best qualified teacher”. We are missing a huge resource – teachers from the business world who know math and science inside out and backwards, who want to teach but are stopped by the lack of teaching credentials.

    Clearly low pay, including ridiculous requirements that a third of the teachers salary goes to pay for health insurance, is another egregious issue that is keeping us from getting the “best qualified teachers”.

    Why is the School Board not doing everything in its power to increase teacher salaries rather than administrative ones; developing a program to encourage retired businessmen to share their expertise in math and science; diligently working to preserve successful programs such as the ELS program at Valley Oak?

    Instead the School Board is showing lukewarm enthusiasm to Valley Oak as a charter school; hiring the most expensive Superintendent they can find; building a new elementary school as they close one that is functioning very well at serving minority students thank you very much; is fighting tooth and nail against raising the pay for teachers; yet wants the taxpayers to foot the bill to create new programs while existing ones are put on the chopping block; rounds up truant kids in police sweeps to keep up average daily attendance so as not to lose any funding so they can pay the old superintendent for sitting on his keaster and doing nothing… Good grief!

    The School Board could be doing a lot more to improve the situation, yet it seems more like they are just carrying on business as usual…high administrative salaries, low teachers pay, develop good programs but don’t carry through and support them, develop new programs that make little or no sense to facilitate someone’s move to an administrative position, then squeeze the taxpayer for more funds – threatening to cut off music and art programs if money isn’t forthcoming. What a scam!

  83. Disgusted

    Interesting discussion about lack of male teachers; low pay for teachers.

    Getting a teaching credential does not make you automatically the “best qualified teacher”. We are missing a huge resource – teachers from the business world who know math and science inside out and backwards, who want to teach but are stopped by the lack of teaching credentials.

    Clearly low pay, including ridiculous requirements that a third of the teachers salary goes to pay for health insurance, is another egregious issue that is keeping us from getting the “best qualified teachers”.

    Why is the School Board not doing everything in its power to increase teacher salaries rather than administrative ones; developing a program to encourage retired businessmen to share their expertise in math and science; diligently working to preserve successful programs such as the ELS program at Valley Oak?

    Instead the School Board is showing lukewarm enthusiasm to Valley Oak as a charter school; hiring the most expensive Superintendent they can find; building a new elementary school as they close one that is functioning very well at serving minority students thank you very much; is fighting tooth and nail against raising the pay for teachers; yet wants the taxpayers to foot the bill to create new programs while existing ones are put on the chopping block; rounds up truant kids in police sweeps to keep up average daily attendance so as not to lose any funding so they can pay the old superintendent for sitting on his keaster and doing nothing… Good grief!

    The School Board could be doing a lot more to improve the situation, yet it seems more like they are just carrying on business as usual…high administrative salaries, low teachers pay, develop good programs but don’t carry through and support them, develop new programs that make little or no sense to facilitate someone’s move to an administrative position, then squeeze the taxpayer for more funds – threatening to cut off music and art programs if money isn’t forthcoming. What a scam!

  84. Disgusted

    Interesting discussion about lack of male teachers; low pay for teachers.

    Getting a teaching credential does not make you automatically the “best qualified teacher”. We are missing a huge resource – teachers from the business world who know math and science inside out and backwards, who want to teach but are stopped by the lack of teaching credentials.

    Clearly low pay, including ridiculous requirements that a third of the teachers salary goes to pay for health insurance, is another egregious issue that is keeping us from getting the “best qualified teachers”.

    Why is the School Board not doing everything in its power to increase teacher salaries rather than administrative ones; developing a program to encourage retired businessmen to share their expertise in math and science; diligently working to preserve successful programs such as the ELS program at Valley Oak?

    Instead the School Board is showing lukewarm enthusiasm to Valley Oak as a charter school; hiring the most expensive Superintendent they can find; building a new elementary school as they close one that is functioning very well at serving minority students thank you very much; is fighting tooth and nail against raising the pay for teachers; yet wants the taxpayers to foot the bill to create new programs while existing ones are put on the chopping block; rounds up truant kids in police sweeps to keep up average daily attendance so as not to lose any funding so they can pay the old superintendent for sitting on his keaster and doing nothing… Good grief!

    The School Board could be doing a lot more to improve the situation, yet it seems more like they are just carrying on business as usual…high administrative salaries, low teachers pay, develop good programs but don’t carry through and support them, develop new programs that make little or no sense to facilitate someone’s move to an administrative position, then squeeze the taxpayer for more funds – threatening to cut off music and art programs if money isn’t forthcoming. What a scam!

  85. Anonymous

    Valley Oak Elementary was closed to make room for the B St. facilities. Period. The entire “make the case for your school” approach to each elementary site by the Task Force was demeaning showmanship. The final recommendation was presented as a trial summation, not a professional recommendation. If it weren’t obvious from the beginning, it became obvious at the last board meeting when all of the baord’s questions centered around how much of B St. could they put at Valley Oak if there were a charter school there.
    Valley Oak has several male teachers: S Kelleher, B Creely, B Millee, B Storm, Mr. Blacker. (Excuse the name mangling and misspelling, gentlemen.)
    Ethnicity aside, Valley Oak has as good or better test scores than any other elementary school in the distrct. It is the only majority minority school in the district.
    Ms. Arvin runs the largest,most successful, and least costly EL program in the district. Her ethnicity plays no part in it.
    When women join a field in large numbers, typically that field suffers a loss in prestige, upward mobility, and salary. Why would a man go into a field like that?
    The stumbling blocks to attracting the best teachers of any color are Davis’ low pay scale, horrible benefits, and inflated housing costs.
    Phrases like “the dark underbelly” are sensationalism and don’t serve anyone well. And also, they’re over-written drek. (Really DPD, where is your editor?)
    One easily accomplished step towards equality in Davis public school education would be to eliminate the GATE program and have everyone learning together in the same classes. That is what “public” is all about, isn’t it?

  86. Anonymous

    Valley Oak Elementary was closed to make room for the B St. facilities. Period. The entire “make the case for your school” approach to each elementary site by the Task Force was demeaning showmanship. The final recommendation was presented as a trial summation, not a professional recommendation. If it weren’t obvious from the beginning, it became obvious at the last board meeting when all of the baord’s questions centered around how much of B St. could they put at Valley Oak if there were a charter school there.
    Valley Oak has several male teachers: S Kelleher, B Creely, B Millee, B Storm, Mr. Blacker. (Excuse the name mangling and misspelling, gentlemen.)
    Ethnicity aside, Valley Oak has as good or better test scores than any other elementary school in the distrct. It is the only majority minority school in the district.
    Ms. Arvin runs the largest,most successful, and least costly EL program in the district. Her ethnicity plays no part in it.
    When women join a field in large numbers, typically that field suffers a loss in prestige, upward mobility, and salary. Why would a man go into a field like that?
    The stumbling blocks to attracting the best teachers of any color are Davis’ low pay scale, horrible benefits, and inflated housing costs.
    Phrases like “the dark underbelly” are sensationalism and don’t serve anyone well. And also, they’re over-written drek. (Really DPD, where is your editor?)
    One easily accomplished step towards equality in Davis public school education would be to eliminate the GATE program and have everyone learning together in the same classes. That is what “public” is all about, isn’t it?

  87. Anonymous

    Valley Oak Elementary was closed to make room for the B St. facilities. Period. The entire “make the case for your school” approach to each elementary site by the Task Force was demeaning showmanship. The final recommendation was presented as a trial summation, not a professional recommendation. If it weren’t obvious from the beginning, it became obvious at the last board meeting when all of the baord’s questions centered around how much of B St. could they put at Valley Oak if there were a charter school there.
    Valley Oak has several male teachers: S Kelleher, B Creely, B Millee, B Storm, Mr. Blacker. (Excuse the name mangling and misspelling, gentlemen.)
    Ethnicity aside, Valley Oak has as good or better test scores than any other elementary school in the distrct. It is the only majority minority school in the district.
    Ms. Arvin runs the largest,most successful, and least costly EL program in the district. Her ethnicity plays no part in it.
    When women join a field in large numbers, typically that field suffers a loss in prestige, upward mobility, and salary. Why would a man go into a field like that?
    The stumbling blocks to attracting the best teachers of any color are Davis’ low pay scale, horrible benefits, and inflated housing costs.
    Phrases like “the dark underbelly” are sensationalism and don’t serve anyone well. And also, they’re over-written drek. (Really DPD, where is your editor?)
    One easily accomplished step towards equality in Davis public school education would be to eliminate the GATE program and have everyone learning together in the same classes. That is what “public” is all about, isn’t it?

  88. Anonymous

    Valley Oak Elementary was closed to make room for the B St. facilities. Period. The entire “make the case for your school” approach to each elementary site by the Task Force was demeaning showmanship. The final recommendation was presented as a trial summation, not a professional recommendation. If it weren’t obvious from the beginning, it became obvious at the last board meeting when all of the baord’s questions centered around how much of B St. could they put at Valley Oak if there were a charter school there.
    Valley Oak has several male teachers: S Kelleher, B Creely, B Millee, B Storm, Mr. Blacker. (Excuse the name mangling and misspelling, gentlemen.)
    Ethnicity aside, Valley Oak has as good or better test scores than any other elementary school in the distrct. It is the only majority minority school in the district.
    Ms. Arvin runs the largest,most successful, and least costly EL program in the district. Her ethnicity plays no part in it.
    When women join a field in large numbers, typically that field suffers a loss in prestige, upward mobility, and salary. Why would a man go into a field like that?
    The stumbling blocks to attracting the best teachers of any color are Davis’ low pay scale, horrible benefits, and inflated housing costs.
    Phrases like “the dark underbelly” are sensationalism and don’t serve anyone well. And also, they’re over-written drek. (Really DPD, where is your editor?)
    One easily accomplished step towards equality in Davis public school education would be to eliminate the GATE program and have everyone learning together in the same classes. That is what “public” is all about, isn’t it?

  89. Anonymous

    The young man with the two dads is a troubled individual who is being used as a pawn, publicly, to further an adult agenda. He has many personal problems and using him in this way doesn’t help him. If we really are child advocates, and tolerant people, we would be questioning his two dads for submitting their son’s photo to be published in the newspaper and for putting him on camera during public comment. It was sad to see that young man try to strike just the right pose as victim. I would never subject my son to that kind of public humiliation.
    The father reports his son was already was seeing a psychiatrist at the time of the incodent. I’m not surprised.

  90. Anonymous

    The young man with the two dads is a troubled individual who is being used as a pawn, publicly, to further an adult agenda. He has many personal problems and using him in this way doesn’t help him. If we really are child advocates, and tolerant people, we would be questioning his two dads for submitting their son’s photo to be published in the newspaper and for putting him on camera during public comment. It was sad to see that young man try to strike just the right pose as victim. I would never subject my son to that kind of public humiliation.
    The father reports his son was already was seeing a psychiatrist at the time of the incodent. I’m not surprised.

  91. Anonymous

    The young man with the two dads is a troubled individual who is being used as a pawn, publicly, to further an adult agenda. He has many personal problems and using him in this way doesn’t help him. If we really are child advocates, and tolerant people, we would be questioning his two dads for submitting their son’s photo to be published in the newspaper and for putting him on camera during public comment. It was sad to see that young man try to strike just the right pose as victim. I would never subject my son to that kind of public humiliation.
    The father reports his son was already was seeing a psychiatrist at the time of the incodent. I’m not surprised.

  92. Anonymous

    The young man with the two dads is a troubled individual who is being used as a pawn, publicly, to further an adult agenda. He has many personal problems and using him in this way doesn’t help him. If we really are child advocates, and tolerant people, we would be questioning his two dads for submitting their son’s photo to be published in the newspaper and for putting him on camera during public comment. It was sad to see that young man try to strike just the right pose as victim. I would never subject my son to that kind of public humiliation.
    The father reports his son was already was seeing a psychiatrist at the time of the incodent. I’m not surprised.

  93. don shor

    Valley Oak has several male teachers: S Kelleher, B Creely, B Millee, B Storm, Mr. Blacker. (Excuse the name mangling and misspelling, gentlemen.)
    Ethnicity aside, Valley Oak has as good or better test scores than any other elementary school in the distrct.

    Plus A. Carlson.
    I agree. There were a number of things that made Valley Oak one of the best schools in the district. I’m glad my kids went there. Among those assets I’d include the GATE program and the outstanding Special Ed resources.
    Valley Oak as a charter school can be a model for the rest of the district.

    Regarding the comments about teacher pay and benefits, I’d be curious how DJUSD compares with comparable districts.

  94. don shor

    Valley Oak has several male teachers: S Kelleher, B Creely, B Millee, B Storm, Mr. Blacker. (Excuse the name mangling and misspelling, gentlemen.)
    Ethnicity aside, Valley Oak has as good or better test scores than any other elementary school in the distrct.

    Plus A. Carlson.
    I agree. There were a number of things that made Valley Oak one of the best schools in the district. I’m glad my kids went there. Among those assets I’d include the GATE program and the outstanding Special Ed resources.
    Valley Oak as a charter school can be a model for the rest of the district.

    Regarding the comments about teacher pay and benefits, I’d be curious how DJUSD compares with comparable districts.

  95. don shor

    Valley Oak has several male teachers: S Kelleher, B Creely, B Millee, B Storm, Mr. Blacker. (Excuse the name mangling and misspelling, gentlemen.)
    Ethnicity aside, Valley Oak has as good or better test scores than any other elementary school in the distrct.

    Plus A. Carlson.
    I agree. There were a number of things that made Valley Oak one of the best schools in the district. I’m glad my kids went there. Among those assets I’d include the GATE program and the outstanding Special Ed resources.
    Valley Oak as a charter school can be a model for the rest of the district.

    Regarding the comments about teacher pay and benefits, I’d be curious how DJUSD compares with comparable districts.

  96. don shor

    Valley Oak has several male teachers: S Kelleher, B Creely, B Millee, B Storm, Mr. Blacker. (Excuse the name mangling and misspelling, gentlemen.)
    Ethnicity aside, Valley Oak has as good or better test scores than any other elementary school in the distrct.

    Plus A. Carlson.
    I agree. There were a number of things that made Valley Oak one of the best schools in the district. I’m glad my kids went there. Among those assets I’d include the GATE program and the outstanding Special Ed resources.
    Valley Oak as a charter school can be a model for the rest of the district.

    Regarding the comments about teacher pay and benefits, I’d be curious how DJUSD compares with comparable districts.

  97. don shor

    Ron Glick wrote: “Davis has a cap on how many years of salary credit DJUSD will accept for placement on the salary schedule.”

    Is this a union contract issue, or a district policy? Can it be changed by the school board? If so, it might be worth asking the current candidates where they stand on that.

  98. don shor

    Ron Glick wrote: “Davis has a cap on how many years of salary credit DJUSD will accept for placement on the salary schedule.”

    Is this a union contract issue, or a district policy? Can it be changed by the school board? If so, it might be worth asking the current candidates where they stand on that.

  99. don shor

    Ron Glick wrote: “Davis has a cap on how many years of salary credit DJUSD will accept for placement on the salary schedule.”

    Is this a union contract issue, or a district policy? Can it be changed by the school board? If so, it might be worth asking the current candidates where they stand on that.

  100. don shor

    Ron Glick wrote: “Davis has a cap on how many years of salary credit DJUSD will accept for placement on the salary schedule.”

    Is this a union contract issue, or a district policy? Can it be changed by the school board? If so, it might be worth asking the current candidates where they stand on that.

  101. Anonymous

    Re:
    10/29/07 12:09 AM’s comment:

    “People’s Republic of Davis

    People’s Republic of China”

    Both are capitalist entities in which dissent is relatively intolerated, but some members of each pay lipservice to radical ideas…DPD and his supporters getting away with a bit more than the Falun Gong, of course.

  102. Anonymous

    Re:
    10/29/07 12:09 AM’s comment:

    “People’s Republic of Davis

    People’s Republic of China”

    Both are capitalist entities in which dissent is relatively intolerated, but some members of each pay lipservice to radical ideas…DPD and his supporters getting away with a bit more than the Falun Gong, of course.

  103. Anonymous

    Re:
    10/29/07 12:09 AM’s comment:

    “People’s Republic of Davis

    People’s Republic of China”

    Both are capitalist entities in which dissent is relatively intolerated, but some members of each pay lipservice to radical ideas…DPD and his supporters getting away with a bit more than the Falun Gong, of course.

  104. Anonymous

    Re:
    10/29/07 12:09 AM’s comment:

    “People’s Republic of Davis

    People’s Republic of China”

    Both are capitalist entities in which dissent is relatively intolerated, but some members of each pay lipservice to radical ideas…DPD and his supporters getting away with a bit more than the Falun Gong, of course.

  105. Anonymous

    Don,

    It is a contractual issue. Most districts had these limitations in the past on how many years they would accept for placement on the salary schedule. Since no child left behind has pressured districts to have fully credentialed teachers some districts have removed this from the contract. Woodland no longer has a cap on how many years they will accept.

    Ron

  106. Anonymous

    Don,

    It is a contractual issue. Most districts had these limitations in the past on how many years they would accept for placement on the salary schedule. Since no child left behind has pressured districts to have fully credentialed teachers some districts have removed this from the contract. Woodland no longer has a cap on how many years they will accept.

    Ron

  107. Anonymous

    Don,

    It is a contractual issue. Most districts had these limitations in the past on how many years they would accept for placement on the salary schedule. Since no child left behind has pressured districts to have fully credentialed teachers some districts have removed this from the contract. Woodland no longer has a cap on how many years they will accept.

    Ron

  108. Anonymous

    Don,

    It is a contractual issue. Most districts had these limitations in the past on how many years they would accept for placement on the salary schedule. Since no child left behind has pressured districts to have fully credentialed teachers some districts have removed this from the contract. Woodland no longer has a cap on how many years they will accept.

    Ron

  109. Anonymous

    Davis starts its teachers at about $36,000. $10,000 less than surrounding districts. Teachers cap ot at about $66,00, once again $10,000 short of neighboring districts. We’ve all heard about the miserable health benefits.
    It will be interesting to see what happens to our schools when this current crop of senior teachers retires. Many of them would have changed district if they could have taken their seniority with them. Most districts, as does DJUSD, only accept six or seven years experience so senior teachers are trapped in their districts as their pay scales lag and benefit packages deteriorate over the years..

  110. Anonymous

    Davis starts its teachers at about $36,000. $10,000 less than surrounding districts. Teachers cap ot at about $66,00, once again $10,000 short of neighboring districts. We’ve all heard about the miserable health benefits.
    It will be interesting to see what happens to our schools when this current crop of senior teachers retires. Many of them would have changed district if they could have taken their seniority with them. Most districts, as does DJUSD, only accept six or seven years experience so senior teachers are trapped in their districts as their pay scales lag and benefit packages deteriorate over the years..

  111. Anonymous

    Davis starts its teachers at about $36,000. $10,000 less than surrounding districts. Teachers cap ot at about $66,00, once again $10,000 short of neighboring districts. We’ve all heard about the miserable health benefits.
    It will be interesting to see what happens to our schools when this current crop of senior teachers retires. Many of them would have changed district if they could have taken their seniority with them. Most districts, as does DJUSD, only accept six or seven years experience so senior teachers are trapped in their districts as their pay scales lag and benefit packages deteriorate over the years..

  112. Anonymous

    Davis starts its teachers at about $36,000. $10,000 less than surrounding districts. Teachers cap ot at about $66,00, once again $10,000 short of neighboring districts. We’ve all heard about the miserable health benefits.
    It will be interesting to see what happens to our schools when this current crop of senior teachers retires. Many of them would have changed district if they could have taken their seniority with them. Most districts, as does DJUSD, only accept six or seven years experience so senior teachers are trapped in their districts as their pay scales lag and benefit packages deteriorate over the years..

  113. don shor

    Thanks, Ron and Anon,
    So two of the simplest things the district could do to possibly increase the number of minority and male teachers would be to
    –raise the salaries to parity with other local school districts, and
    –eliminate the cap on how many years they allow for placement in the salary schedule.
    These are things someone could ask the candidates about. Since they would require more money, it would tell the voters something about their budget priorities.

    Longer-term ideas might include housing vouchers or other benefits that would make it easier for teachers to relocate to Davis, and the NEA suggestions about recruiting from within staff ranks and mentoring local students who are considering teaching as a career.

  114. don shor

    Thanks, Ron and Anon,
    So two of the simplest things the district could do to possibly increase the number of minority and male teachers would be to
    –raise the salaries to parity with other local school districts, and
    –eliminate the cap on how many years they allow for placement in the salary schedule.
    These are things someone could ask the candidates about. Since they would require more money, it would tell the voters something about their budget priorities.

    Longer-term ideas might include housing vouchers or other benefits that would make it easier for teachers to relocate to Davis, and the NEA suggestions about recruiting from within staff ranks and mentoring local students who are considering teaching as a career.

  115. don shor

    Thanks, Ron and Anon,
    So two of the simplest things the district could do to possibly increase the number of minority and male teachers would be to
    –raise the salaries to parity with other local school districts, and
    –eliminate the cap on how many years they allow for placement in the salary schedule.
    These are things someone could ask the candidates about. Since they would require more money, it would tell the voters something about their budget priorities.

    Longer-term ideas might include housing vouchers or other benefits that would make it easier for teachers to relocate to Davis, and the NEA suggestions about recruiting from within staff ranks and mentoring local students who are considering teaching as a career.

  116. don shor

    Thanks, Ron and Anon,
    So two of the simplest things the district could do to possibly increase the number of minority and male teachers would be to
    –raise the salaries to parity with other local school districts, and
    –eliminate the cap on how many years they allow for placement in the salary schedule.
    These are things someone could ask the candidates about. Since they would require more money, it would tell the voters something about their budget priorities.

    Longer-term ideas might include housing vouchers or other benefits that would make it easier for teachers to relocate to Davis, and the NEA suggestions about recruiting from within staff ranks and mentoring local students who are considering teaching as a career.

  117. Anonymous

    BTW: Regarding the charter school siphening off ADA from the DJUSD. Usually, between 80% and 90% of ADA goes for salaries. I checked the VOCharter web site, all eighteen teachers who signed onto the charter have been teaching here a long time. They’re propbably at the higher end of the pay scale, paltry though it may be. The district will have some ADA encroachment, but also lower payroll costs.

  118. Anonymous

    BTW: Regarding the charter school siphening off ADA from the DJUSD. Usually, between 80% and 90% of ADA goes for salaries. I checked the VOCharter web site, all eighteen teachers who signed onto the charter have been teaching here a long time. They’re propbably at the higher end of the pay scale, paltry though it may be. The district will have some ADA encroachment, but also lower payroll costs.

  119. Anonymous

    BTW: Regarding the charter school siphening off ADA from the DJUSD. Usually, between 80% and 90% of ADA goes for salaries. I checked the VOCharter web site, all eighteen teachers who signed onto the charter have been teaching here a long time. They’re propbably at the higher end of the pay scale, paltry though it may be. The district will have some ADA encroachment, but also lower payroll costs.

  120. Anonymous

    BTW: Regarding the charter school siphening off ADA from the DJUSD. Usually, between 80% and 90% of ADA goes for salaries. I checked the VOCharter web site, all eighteen teachers who signed onto the charter have been teaching here a long time. They’re propbably at the higher end of the pay scale, paltry though it may be. The district will have some ADA encroachment, but also lower payroll costs.

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