Commentary: Atria’s Increased Rents Imperils Seniors on Fixed Incomes

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On November 24, 2007, Margaret Walker, President, associated residents of Covell Gardens, Davis, a senior living facility in Davis wrote a letter to the Davis Enterprise protesting the decision by Atria Senior Living company based in Lexington, KY to raise rent by 8 percent for the second straight year.

Ms. Walker writes:

“The residents of Covell Gardens senior living community are dismayed by the management’s announcement of a rent increase of 8 percent, to take effect in January. This follows an 8 percent increase in January 2007. We are an economically diverse community and this increase will cause a hardship to many. Those on a fixed income will face a noticeable decrease in their quality of life as they struggle to meet these higher costs. The Social Security increase will be only 2.3 percent.

We feel we are part of the Davis community. Some have owned homes here, many have family living nearby. The pleasures of living at Covell Gardens are many, but we must protest the exorbitant proposed increase in cost.

The owner, Atria Senior Living, is a private company based in Lexington, Ky. It is legal but unethical for them to impose this burden on senior citizens who are living on a fixed income. “

Another resident, Arthur Zalkan was quoted as saying:

“We expected an increase… But we didn’t expect Atria to gouge us–and that’s what they’re doing.”

The facility’s executive director, Robert Godfrey responded by citing increased costs and there is no doubt that is accurate.

The Davis Enterprise story quotes him:

“I’m certainly empathetic… But it’s an unfortunate reality to business right now. Lots of people we do business with are now charging us fuel surcharges, for example.”

To turn this around on Mr. Godfrey, while I am empathetic to your cost concerns and understand that you are trying to run a business and make a profit, you also have to understand that you are running a business geared towards seniors. And when you run a business geared towards seniors, you are acknowledging that the residents there are on basically a fixed income. That means that they get only a 2.3 percent increase in their income–not near enough to cover an 8 percent increase, let alone for two years in a row.

When you are a business that relies on seniors for your profits, you have to recognize that the downfall of that market is that you cannot do things the way you would do them in other sectors of the economy. You cannot increase rents by more than their cost of living adjustments. Otherwise, what you will do, is put elderly people on the streets.

This is not a knock on Atria. I am sure that Covell Gardens is a fine place, well run, but when you deal with people on fixed incomes, you must understand that large increases in costs put them in peril.

There are ways to deal with increased costs in the short term, and one way, is to instead of increasing the rent by 8 percent some years and likely zero in other years, use the years where costs are not going up to bank for when costs are soaring.

The second thing that comes to mind is that the city of Davis needs step in to protect the vulnerable–and the most vulnerable are people on fixed incomes, some of whom do not have a lot of savings, and many of whom are not in great health.

Again, the upside of the senior market, is that it appears to be a growth industry but the downside, is that sometimes if you serve seniors, you are the one that needs to bite the bullet during lean years because they cannot. Atria should have known that they could not get away with back-to-back 8 percent rent increases. That was never a wise plan.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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68 thoughts on “Commentary: Atria’s Increased Rents Imperils Seniors on Fixed Incomes”

  1. Diane

    Perhaps the Senior Citizen’s Commission can have a town hall meeting to discuss this issue and shed some light on it.

    I wonder if the majority on the city council would step in and tell them that they can’t think for themselves and put them on a “time out” as they have attempted to in the past.

    Something has to be done. Subjecting seniors, or anyone who is on a fixed income to the threat of becoming homeless is horrible.

  2. Diane

    Perhaps the Senior Citizen’s Commission can have a town hall meeting to discuss this issue and shed some light on it.

    I wonder if the majority on the city council would step in and tell them that they can’t think for themselves and put them on a “time out” as they have attempted to in the past.

    Something has to be done. Subjecting seniors, or anyone who is on a fixed income to the threat of becoming homeless is horrible.

  3. Diane

    Perhaps the Senior Citizen’s Commission can have a town hall meeting to discuss this issue and shed some light on it.

    I wonder if the majority on the city council would step in and tell them that they can’t think for themselves and put them on a “time out” as they have attempted to in the past.

    Something has to be done. Subjecting seniors, or anyone who is on a fixed income to the threat of becoming homeless is horrible.

  4. Diane

    Perhaps the Senior Citizen’s Commission can have a town hall meeting to discuss this issue and shed some light on it.

    I wonder if the majority on the city council would step in and tell them that they can’t think for themselves and put them on a “time out” as they have attempted to in the past.

    Something has to be done. Subjecting seniors, or anyone who is on a fixed income to the threat of becoming homeless is horrible.

  5. Anonymous

    What have been the price increases at Covell Garden during the last 5 or 10 years? Is the funding solely based on charges to the elderly residents, or is there some other form of subsidization? There seem to be some missing details to this story.

  6. Anonymous

    What have been the price increases at Covell Garden during the last 5 or 10 years? Is the funding solely based on charges to the elderly residents, or is there some other form of subsidization? There seem to be some missing details to this story.

  7. Anonymous

    What have been the price increases at Covell Garden during the last 5 or 10 years? Is the funding solely based on charges to the elderly residents, or is there some other form of subsidization? There seem to be some missing details to this story.

  8. Anonymous

    What have been the price increases at Covell Garden during the last 5 or 10 years? Is the funding solely based on charges to the elderly residents, or is there some other form of subsidization? There seem to be some missing details to this story.

  9. Anonymous

    “The second thing that comes to mind is that the city of Davis needs step in to protect the vulnerable–and the most vulnerable are people on fixed incomes, some of whom do not have a lot of savings, and many of whom are not in great health.”

    Covell Gardens costs $3,500/mo. These are not poor folks. They don’t deserve to get screwed. But they’re not “the most vulnerable.” We should first do more to help the majority of seniors who could never afford to live in that place.

  10. Anonymous

    “The second thing that comes to mind is that the city of Davis needs step in to protect the vulnerable–and the most vulnerable are people on fixed incomes, some of whom do not have a lot of savings, and many of whom are not in great health.”

    Covell Gardens costs $3,500/mo. These are not poor folks. They don’t deserve to get screwed. But they’re not “the most vulnerable.” We should first do more to help the majority of seniors who could never afford to live in that place.

  11. Anonymous

    “The second thing that comes to mind is that the city of Davis needs step in to protect the vulnerable–and the most vulnerable are people on fixed incomes, some of whom do not have a lot of savings, and many of whom are not in great health.”

    Covell Gardens costs $3,500/mo. These are not poor folks. They don’t deserve to get screwed. But they’re not “the most vulnerable.” We should first do more to help the majority of seniors who could never afford to live in that place.

  12. Anonymous

    “The second thing that comes to mind is that the city of Davis needs step in to protect the vulnerable–and the most vulnerable are people on fixed incomes, some of whom do not have a lot of savings, and many of whom are not in great health.”

    Covell Gardens costs $3,500/mo. These are not poor folks. They don’t deserve to get screwed. But they’re not “the most vulnerable.” We should first do more to help the majority of seniors who could never afford to live in that place.

  13. Elaine Roberts Musser

    As a member of the Davis Senior Citizens Commission, but speaking as a private citizen, I would like to comment. Our last commission meeting was held off-site at Atria Covell Gardens, where 60 residents turned out to speak with us. We encouraged them to write letters to the editor, contact the Davis Enterprise and Davis Vanguard to interest these media outlets to do feature articles, anything we could think of to bring attention to their plight. I was very glad to see our advice was heeded. Thank you DPD for doing this article on their behalf.

    Unfortunately the reality of the situation is the residents of Atria Covell Gardens signed a contract (lease) that did not cap rent increases. So legally Atria Covell can set the rents as they see fit. A new company bought Covell Gardens recently (Atria), and is doing some remodeling and repairs (such as roof replacement), which ostensibly is a good part of the reason for the rent increases.

    This particular problem at Atria Covell Gardens runs on two tracks. First, there is a need for affordable middle income senior housing of the assisted living variety in general. Secondly, the folks at Atria Covell Gardens need something to happen now, and could care less about housing needs in the distant future at the moment.

    While it would be nice if the City Council could somehow “do something” immediately, what is the big question. The reality is that if some at Atria Covell cannot afford to live there anymore, should or can the City Council come up with stop-gap emergency funding to help these people? My guess is probably not. The City has very restrictive requirements about what it can spend its money on, depending on which pot of money we are talking about.

    However, that is not why the residents spoke up. They really do not expect the City Council to rush in like white knights to somehow “save them”. The idea is to put enough pressure on Atria to get them to lower the increase, which makes good sense.

    If the remodel is the reason for the rate increase, then phase it in over time so it doesn’t hit so hard all at once. A close friend of mine from many years ago was faced with this same problem, at Covell Gardens. She outlived her money, the rent was increased to a point she could no longer afford. The result was she was forced to leave all her friends, move back East, and live with a daughter-in-law who treated her poorly. My friend was 93 years old, and none of the family helped her move. She was left entirely on her own to do it.

    I know, because I was the only one who came to her rescue. We packed things up as best we could, but the poor thing was so frazzled, and sad to be leaving. Her future seemed very bleak. She stopped writing to me soon after she arrived at her new destination.

    This particular issue is common across the country. What is really needed is legislative reform and a more informed electorate. When a senior moves into a facility like Atria Covell Gardens, they are not in a position to bargain for a rent cap. There are plenty of customers behind them who will take the contract “as is”.

    In consequence, one of two things has to happen – rent control of some sort or federal/state regulation of rent increases at assisted living facilities. Seniors are living longer and longer, and so this problem will occur with greater frequency.

    It might be worth investigating how many at Atria Covell (or other Atria facilities) will actually have to move because of this latest round of rate increases. And if so, where do they plan to move to?

    I assure everyone that the Davis Senior Citizens Commission will be actively looking at the senior housing issue, as will the Social Services Commission. My concern is that developers exploit this need for very specific types of senior housing as a way of promoting entire housing projects in places that they have been unsuccessful in gaining permission. I don’t want the issue used for political purposes, rather than getting the actual specific problem unique to our city solved.

  14. Elaine Roberts Musser

    As a member of the Davis Senior Citizens Commission, but speaking as a private citizen, I would like to comment. Our last commission meeting was held off-site at Atria Covell Gardens, where 60 residents turned out to speak with us. We encouraged them to write letters to the editor, contact the Davis Enterprise and Davis Vanguard to interest these media outlets to do feature articles, anything we could think of to bring attention to their plight. I was very glad to see our advice was heeded. Thank you DPD for doing this article on their behalf.

    Unfortunately the reality of the situation is the residents of Atria Covell Gardens signed a contract (lease) that did not cap rent increases. So legally Atria Covell can set the rents as they see fit. A new company bought Covell Gardens recently (Atria), and is doing some remodeling and repairs (such as roof replacement), which ostensibly is a good part of the reason for the rent increases.

    This particular problem at Atria Covell Gardens runs on two tracks. First, there is a need for affordable middle income senior housing of the assisted living variety in general. Secondly, the folks at Atria Covell Gardens need something to happen now, and could care less about housing needs in the distant future at the moment.

    While it would be nice if the City Council could somehow “do something” immediately, what is the big question. The reality is that if some at Atria Covell cannot afford to live there anymore, should or can the City Council come up with stop-gap emergency funding to help these people? My guess is probably not. The City has very restrictive requirements about what it can spend its money on, depending on which pot of money we are talking about.

    However, that is not why the residents spoke up. They really do not expect the City Council to rush in like white knights to somehow “save them”. The idea is to put enough pressure on Atria to get them to lower the increase, which makes good sense.

    If the remodel is the reason for the rate increase, then phase it in over time so it doesn’t hit so hard all at once. A close friend of mine from many years ago was faced with this same problem, at Covell Gardens. She outlived her money, the rent was increased to a point she could no longer afford. The result was she was forced to leave all her friends, move back East, and live with a daughter-in-law who treated her poorly. My friend was 93 years old, and none of the family helped her move. She was left entirely on her own to do it.

    I know, because I was the only one who came to her rescue. We packed things up as best we could, but the poor thing was so frazzled, and sad to be leaving. Her future seemed very bleak. She stopped writing to me soon after she arrived at her new destination.

    This particular issue is common across the country. What is really needed is legislative reform and a more informed electorate. When a senior moves into a facility like Atria Covell Gardens, they are not in a position to bargain for a rent cap. There are plenty of customers behind them who will take the contract “as is”.

    In consequence, one of two things has to happen – rent control of some sort or federal/state regulation of rent increases at assisted living facilities. Seniors are living longer and longer, and so this problem will occur with greater frequency.

    It might be worth investigating how many at Atria Covell (or other Atria facilities) will actually have to move because of this latest round of rate increases. And if so, where do they plan to move to?

    I assure everyone that the Davis Senior Citizens Commission will be actively looking at the senior housing issue, as will the Social Services Commission. My concern is that developers exploit this need for very specific types of senior housing as a way of promoting entire housing projects in places that they have been unsuccessful in gaining permission. I don’t want the issue used for political purposes, rather than getting the actual specific problem unique to our city solved.

  15. Elaine Roberts Musser

    As a member of the Davis Senior Citizens Commission, but speaking as a private citizen, I would like to comment. Our last commission meeting was held off-site at Atria Covell Gardens, where 60 residents turned out to speak with us. We encouraged them to write letters to the editor, contact the Davis Enterprise and Davis Vanguard to interest these media outlets to do feature articles, anything we could think of to bring attention to their plight. I was very glad to see our advice was heeded. Thank you DPD for doing this article on their behalf.

    Unfortunately the reality of the situation is the residents of Atria Covell Gardens signed a contract (lease) that did not cap rent increases. So legally Atria Covell can set the rents as they see fit. A new company bought Covell Gardens recently (Atria), and is doing some remodeling and repairs (such as roof replacement), which ostensibly is a good part of the reason for the rent increases.

    This particular problem at Atria Covell Gardens runs on two tracks. First, there is a need for affordable middle income senior housing of the assisted living variety in general. Secondly, the folks at Atria Covell Gardens need something to happen now, and could care less about housing needs in the distant future at the moment.

    While it would be nice if the City Council could somehow “do something” immediately, what is the big question. The reality is that if some at Atria Covell cannot afford to live there anymore, should or can the City Council come up with stop-gap emergency funding to help these people? My guess is probably not. The City has very restrictive requirements about what it can spend its money on, depending on which pot of money we are talking about.

    However, that is not why the residents spoke up. They really do not expect the City Council to rush in like white knights to somehow “save them”. The idea is to put enough pressure on Atria to get them to lower the increase, which makes good sense.

    If the remodel is the reason for the rate increase, then phase it in over time so it doesn’t hit so hard all at once. A close friend of mine from many years ago was faced with this same problem, at Covell Gardens. She outlived her money, the rent was increased to a point she could no longer afford. The result was she was forced to leave all her friends, move back East, and live with a daughter-in-law who treated her poorly. My friend was 93 years old, and none of the family helped her move. She was left entirely on her own to do it.

    I know, because I was the only one who came to her rescue. We packed things up as best we could, but the poor thing was so frazzled, and sad to be leaving. Her future seemed very bleak. She stopped writing to me soon after she arrived at her new destination.

    This particular issue is common across the country. What is really needed is legislative reform and a more informed electorate. When a senior moves into a facility like Atria Covell Gardens, they are not in a position to bargain for a rent cap. There are plenty of customers behind them who will take the contract “as is”.

    In consequence, one of two things has to happen – rent control of some sort or federal/state regulation of rent increases at assisted living facilities. Seniors are living longer and longer, and so this problem will occur with greater frequency.

    It might be worth investigating how many at Atria Covell (or other Atria facilities) will actually have to move because of this latest round of rate increases. And if so, where do they plan to move to?

    I assure everyone that the Davis Senior Citizens Commission will be actively looking at the senior housing issue, as will the Social Services Commission. My concern is that developers exploit this need for very specific types of senior housing as a way of promoting entire housing projects in places that they have been unsuccessful in gaining permission. I don’t want the issue used for political purposes, rather than getting the actual specific problem unique to our city solved.

  16. Elaine Roberts Musser

    As a member of the Davis Senior Citizens Commission, but speaking as a private citizen, I would like to comment. Our last commission meeting was held off-site at Atria Covell Gardens, where 60 residents turned out to speak with us. We encouraged them to write letters to the editor, contact the Davis Enterprise and Davis Vanguard to interest these media outlets to do feature articles, anything we could think of to bring attention to their plight. I was very glad to see our advice was heeded. Thank you DPD for doing this article on their behalf.

    Unfortunately the reality of the situation is the residents of Atria Covell Gardens signed a contract (lease) that did not cap rent increases. So legally Atria Covell can set the rents as they see fit. A new company bought Covell Gardens recently (Atria), and is doing some remodeling and repairs (such as roof replacement), which ostensibly is a good part of the reason for the rent increases.

    This particular problem at Atria Covell Gardens runs on two tracks. First, there is a need for affordable middle income senior housing of the assisted living variety in general. Secondly, the folks at Atria Covell Gardens need something to happen now, and could care less about housing needs in the distant future at the moment.

    While it would be nice if the City Council could somehow “do something” immediately, what is the big question. The reality is that if some at Atria Covell cannot afford to live there anymore, should or can the City Council come up with stop-gap emergency funding to help these people? My guess is probably not. The City has very restrictive requirements about what it can spend its money on, depending on which pot of money we are talking about.

    However, that is not why the residents spoke up. They really do not expect the City Council to rush in like white knights to somehow “save them”. The idea is to put enough pressure on Atria to get them to lower the increase, which makes good sense.

    If the remodel is the reason for the rate increase, then phase it in over time so it doesn’t hit so hard all at once. A close friend of mine from many years ago was faced with this same problem, at Covell Gardens. She outlived her money, the rent was increased to a point she could no longer afford. The result was she was forced to leave all her friends, move back East, and live with a daughter-in-law who treated her poorly. My friend was 93 years old, and none of the family helped her move. She was left entirely on her own to do it.

    I know, because I was the only one who came to her rescue. We packed things up as best we could, but the poor thing was so frazzled, and sad to be leaving. Her future seemed very bleak. She stopped writing to me soon after she arrived at her new destination.

    This particular issue is common across the country. What is really needed is legislative reform and a more informed electorate. When a senior moves into a facility like Atria Covell Gardens, they are not in a position to bargain for a rent cap. There are plenty of customers behind them who will take the contract “as is”.

    In consequence, one of two things has to happen – rent control of some sort or federal/state regulation of rent increases at assisted living facilities. Seniors are living longer and longer, and so this problem will occur with greater frequency.

    It might be worth investigating how many at Atria Covell (or other Atria facilities) will actually have to move because of this latest round of rate increases. And if so, where do they plan to move to?

    I assure everyone that the Davis Senior Citizens Commission will be actively looking at the senior housing issue, as will the Social Services Commission. My concern is that developers exploit this need for very specific types of senior housing as a way of promoting entire housing projects in places that they have been unsuccessful in gaining permission. I don’t want the issue used for political purposes, rather than getting the actual specific problem unique to our city solved.

  17. 無名 - wu ming

    we are going to see a lot more of this in the coming year, as the dollar collapses and the price of oil skyrockets.

    this is why the market cannot be relied upon to provide for everything.

  18. 無名 - wu ming

    we are going to see a lot more of this in the coming year, as the dollar collapses and the price of oil skyrockets.

    this is why the market cannot be relied upon to provide for everything.

  19. 無名 - wu ming

    we are going to see a lot more of this in the coming year, as the dollar collapses and the price of oil skyrockets.

    this is why the market cannot be relied upon to provide for everything.

  20. 無名 - wu ming

    we are going to see a lot more of this in the coming year, as the dollar collapses and the price of oil skyrockets.

    this is why the market cannot be relied upon to provide for everything.

  21. davis republican

    “we are going to see a lot more of this in the coming year, as the dollar collapses and the price of oil skyrockets.

    this is why the market cannot be relied upon to provide for everything.”

    I couldn’t disagree more – with housing prices plummeting, rents will have to follow (simple economics).

    The market can be relied on to provide housing for seniors – but seniors will need to move from complexes that are overly expensive…if people leave the complex, the rents will have to go down. If the city/state/federal government implements price controls on senior housing, no one will build it. Again, simple economics.

    How to deal with the growing population of elderly is indeed a difficult question. I have personal experience with it, having a grandmother 3,000 miles away with no one around to be able to care for her on a daily basis. Often, it seems that the failure to care for our elederly is a failure of the family, and not of society. If a son cannot get his wife to properly treat his mother(see elaine’s comment), how can we expect landlords to, even with government controls in place? More importantly, how can we trust government to do the right thing? The government provides subsidized housing for poor people, yet the housing is often some of the most dangerous and dirty. The elderly may need assistance of some sort, but government regulations will only serve to limit the types and quality of housing available. Families need to step in…it really doesn’t take a village to care for our elderly – it takes a family.

  22. davis republican

    “we are going to see a lot more of this in the coming year, as the dollar collapses and the price of oil skyrockets.

    this is why the market cannot be relied upon to provide for everything.”

    I couldn’t disagree more – with housing prices plummeting, rents will have to follow (simple economics).

    The market can be relied on to provide housing for seniors – but seniors will need to move from complexes that are overly expensive…if people leave the complex, the rents will have to go down. If the city/state/federal government implements price controls on senior housing, no one will build it. Again, simple economics.

    How to deal with the growing population of elderly is indeed a difficult question. I have personal experience with it, having a grandmother 3,000 miles away with no one around to be able to care for her on a daily basis. Often, it seems that the failure to care for our elederly is a failure of the family, and not of society. If a son cannot get his wife to properly treat his mother(see elaine’s comment), how can we expect landlords to, even with government controls in place? More importantly, how can we trust government to do the right thing? The government provides subsidized housing for poor people, yet the housing is often some of the most dangerous and dirty. The elderly may need assistance of some sort, but government regulations will only serve to limit the types and quality of housing available. Families need to step in…it really doesn’t take a village to care for our elderly – it takes a family.

  23. davis republican

    “we are going to see a lot more of this in the coming year, as the dollar collapses and the price of oil skyrockets.

    this is why the market cannot be relied upon to provide for everything.”

    I couldn’t disagree more – with housing prices plummeting, rents will have to follow (simple economics).

    The market can be relied on to provide housing for seniors – but seniors will need to move from complexes that are overly expensive…if people leave the complex, the rents will have to go down. If the city/state/federal government implements price controls on senior housing, no one will build it. Again, simple economics.

    How to deal with the growing population of elderly is indeed a difficult question. I have personal experience with it, having a grandmother 3,000 miles away with no one around to be able to care for her on a daily basis. Often, it seems that the failure to care for our elederly is a failure of the family, and not of society. If a son cannot get his wife to properly treat his mother(see elaine’s comment), how can we expect landlords to, even with government controls in place? More importantly, how can we trust government to do the right thing? The government provides subsidized housing for poor people, yet the housing is often some of the most dangerous and dirty. The elderly may need assistance of some sort, but government regulations will only serve to limit the types and quality of housing available. Families need to step in…it really doesn’t take a village to care for our elderly – it takes a family.

  24. davis republican

    “we are going to see a lot more of this in the coming year, as the dollar collapses and the price of oil skyrockets.

    this is why the market cannot be relied upon to provide for everything.”

    I couldn’t disagree more – with housing prices plummeting, rents will have to follow (simple economics).

    The market can be relied on to provide housing for seniors – but seniors will need to move from complexes that are overly expensive…if people leave the complex, the rents will have to go down. If the city/state/federal government implements price controls on senior housing, no one will build it. Again, simple economics.

    How to deal with the growing population of elderly is indeed a difficult question. I have personal experience with it, having a grandmother 3,000 miles away with no one around to be able to care for her on a daily basis. Often, it seems that the failure to care for our elederly is a failure of the family, and not of society. If a son cannot get his wife to properly treat his mother(see elaine’s comment), how can we expect landlords to, even with government controls in place? More importantly, how can we trust government to do the right thing? The government provides subsidized housing for poor people, yet the housing is often some of the most dangerous and dirty. The elderly may need assistance of some sort, but government regulations will only serve to limit the types and quality of housing available. Families need to step in…it really doesn’t take a village to care for our elderly – it takes a family.

  25. Anonymous

    With the tenants signing lease agreements that do not have any limitations on annual rent increases, I don’t know what kind of help they expect from the community. Why write letters to the Enterprise, post on the blog, bring it to the attention of the Davis City Council, etc.?

  26. Anonymous

    With the tenants signing lease agreements that do not have any limitations on annual rent increases, I don’t know what kind of help they expect from the community. Why write letters to the Enterprise, post on the blog, bring it to the attention of the Davis City Council, etc.?

  27. Anonymous

    With the tenants signing lease agreements that do not have any limitations on annual rent increases, I don’t know what kind of help they expect from the community. Why write letters to the Enterprise, post on the blog, bring it to the attention of the Davis City Council, etc.?

  28. Anonymous

    With the tenants signing lease agreements that do not have any limitations on annual rent increases, I don’t know what kind of help they expect from the community. Why write letters to the Enterprise, post on the blog, bring it to the attention of the Davis City Council, etc.?

  29. Anonymous

    In a lot of cases, housing such as Covell Gardens is how children are taking care of their elderly parents. In the article in the Enterprise, one tenant was described as relocating to Davis from out of state to be close to her daughter…who lives in Oakland. (As an aside, I wonder how Covell Garden’s rates compare with similar facilities in the Bay Area.)

  30. Anonymous

    In a lot of cases, housing such as Covell Gardens is how children are taking care of their elderly parents. In the article in the Enterprise, one tenant was described as relocating to Davis from out of state to be close to her daughter…who lives in Oakland. (As an aside, I wonder how Covell Garden’s rates compare with similar facilities in the Bay Area.)

  31. Anonymous

    In a lot of cases, housing such as Covell Gardens is how children are taking care of their elderly parents. In the article in the Enterprise, one tenant was described as relocating to Davis from out of state to be close to her daughter…who lives in Oakland. (As an aside, I wonder how Covell Garden’s rates compare with similar facilities in the Bay Area.)

  32. Anonymous

    In a lot of cases, housing such as Covell Gardens is how children are taking care of their elderly parents. In the article in the Enterprise, one tenant was described as relocating to Davis from out of state to be close to her daughter…who lives in Oakland. (As an aside, I wonder how Covell Garden’s rates compare with similar facilities in the Bay Area.)

  33. keeping the faith

    This blog is in real danger when its blog administrators use their own subjective judgement to “sanitize” the comments and decide what is relevant rather than following the stated rules that bring about deletion.

  34. keeping the faith

    This blog is in real danger when its blog administrators use their own subjective judgement to “sanitize” the comments and decide what is relevant rather than following the stated rules that bring about deletion.

  35. keeping the faith

    This blog is in real danger when its blog administrators use their own subjective judgement to “sanitize” the comments and decide what is relevant rather than following the stated rules that bring about deletion.

  36. keeping the faith

    This blog is in real danger when its blog administrators use their own subjective judgement to “sanitize” the comments and decide what is relevant rather than following the stated rules that bring about deletion.

  37. keeping the faith

    Doug Paul Davis said…

    “The only posts that were deleted were some spam.”

    keep the faith said:
    2007 marks the 40th anniversary of his martyrdom, VIVA CHE.
    I can find no definition of spam that fits this comment(as best as I can now remember it).

  38. keeping the faith

    Doug Paul Davis said…

    “The only posts that were deleted were some spam.”

    keep the faith said:
    2007 marks the 40th anniversary of his martyrdom, VIVA CHE.
    I can find no definition of spam that fits this comment(as best as I can now remember it).

  39. keeping the faith

    Doug Paul Davis said…

    “The only posts that were deleted were some spam.”

    keep the faith said:
    2007 marks the 40th anniversary of his martyrdom, VIVA CHE.
    I can find no definition of spam that fits this comment(as best as I can now remember it).

  40. keeping the faith

    Doug Paul Davis said…

    “The only posts that were deleted were some spam.”

    keep the faith said:
    2007 marks the 40th anniversary of his martyrdom, VIVA CHE.
    I can find no definition of spam that fits this comment(as best as I can now remember it).

  41. anti-deevolutionist

    Vincente said…
    After all public pressure has never led to any kind of change in our society…

    Yeah, public pressure didn’t end the Vietnam War. Or end Jim Crow.

  42. anti-deevolutionist

    Vincente said…
    After all public pressure has never led to any kind of change in our society…

    Yeah, public pressure didn’t end the Vietnam War. Or end Jim Crow.

  43. anti-deevolutionist

    Vincente said…
    After all public pressure has never led to any kind of change in our society…

    Yeah, public pressure didn’t end the Vietnam War. Or end Jim Crow.

  44. anti-deevolutionist

    Vincente said…
    After all public pressure has never led to any kind of change in our society…

    Yeah, public pressure didn’t end the Vietnam War. Or end Jim Crow.

  45. Che

    Keeping the faith –

    It was spam. Either people stick to the subject at hand and not post random thoughts, or they get deleted. Good work DPD. Get rid of spam when it shows up.

  46. Che

    Keeping the faith –

    It was spam. Either people stick to the subject at hand and not post random thoughts, or they get deleted. Good work DPD. Get rid of spam when it shows up.

  47. Che

    Keeping the faith –

    It was spam. Either people stick to the subject at hand and not post random thoughts, or they get deleted. Good work DPD. Get rid of spam when it shows up.

  48. Che

    Keeping the faith –

    It was spam. Either people stick to the subject at hand and not post random thoughts, or they get deleted. Good work DPD. Get rid of spam when it shows up.

  49. Anonymous

    “Yeah, public pressure didn’t end the Vietnam War.”

    That is true. The Vietnam War ended when the North Vietnamese communists seized Saigon in 1975, killing a half a million South Vietnamese patriots, sending two million more into forced labor re-education camps, and sending two million others fleeing in boats to neighboring countries or by land into refugee camps in Thailand and Malaysia.

  50. Anonymous

    “Yeah, public pressure didn’t end the Vietnam War.”

    That is true. The Vietnam War ended when the North Vietnamese communists seized Saigon in 1975, killing a half a million South Vietnamese patriots, sending two million more into forced labor re-education camps, and sending two million others fleeing in boats to neighboring countries or by land into refugee camps in Thailand and Malaysia.

  51. Anonymous

    “Yeah, public pressure didn’t end the Vietnam War.”

    That is true. The Vietnam War ended when the North Vietnamese communists seized Saigon in 1975, killing a half a million South Vietnamese patriots, sending two million more into forced labor re-education camps, and sending two million others fleeing in boats to neighboring countries or by land into refugee camps in Thailand and Malaysia.

  52. Anonymous

    “Yeah, public pressure didn’t end the Vietnam War.”

    That is true. The Vietnam War ended when the North Vietnamese communists seized Saigon in 1975, killing a half a million South Vietnamese patriots, sending two million more into forced labor re-education camps, and sending two million others fleeing in boats to neighboring countries or by land into refugee camps in Thailand and Malaysia.

  53. Anonymous

    The first step is to put the finger on the pulse. The CEO their counterparts. In one particular Atria facility the rents were increases as high as 12%. Incomes are not taken into account here-profit is. Without the increases who would pay for the expenses accounts and the waste?

  54. Anonymous

    The first step is to put the finger on the pulse. The CEO their counterparts. In one particular Atria facility the rents were increases as high as 12%. Incomes are not taken into account here-profit is. Without the increases who would pay for the expenses accounts and the waste?

  55. Anonymous

    The first step is to put the finger on the pulse. The CEO their counterparts. In one particular Atria facility the rents were increases as high as 12%. Incomes are not taken into account here-profit is. Without the increases who would pay for the expenses accounts and the waste?

  56. Anonymous

    The first step is to put the finger on the pulse. The CEO their counterparts. In one particular Atria facility the rents were increases as high as 12%. Incomes are not taken into account here-profit is. Without the increases who would pay for the expenses accounts and the waste?

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