Lovenburg, Harris, Measures Q and P win amid low turnout

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On an evening when the school board races were all but decided during absentee voting and the ballot measures decided shortly thereafter, the story of the day was the extremely low turnout. While the final figures are perhaps a few days away from being made official, it appears certain that turnout did not top 30 percent.

This was not a tremendous surprise given the relatively low interest that the school board election seemed to draw on this blog and throughout the community.

In the end, the results were pretty much as expected. Susan Lovenburg finished first, Richard Harris finished a comfortable, but relatively close second to Lovenburg. There was a considerable gap to the third place finish of Bob Schelen who was narrowly above Joe Spector.

In the low turnout, the establishment and relatively better known candidates won.

At first the ballot measures looked to be in doubt with Measure P drawing a very narrow margin above the two-thirds needed and Measure Q falling four votes shy of the two-thirds needed. But as the precincts themselves came in, both Measure P and Measure Q passed by comfortable margins with P garnering over 73% and Q just under 73%.

Both Measures won just under 80% of the vote that was cast on election day. So while the absentees mirrored the results of the school board election, there was a sizable gap between the results of the ballot measures. The folks at the election office felt that was somewhat typical, with the gap closing in recent years between absentee and non-absentee voters, nevertheless, absentee voters still tend to be more conservative and less supportive of tax measures.

The Vanguard will have some interviews and postmortems with the winning school board candidates. We are quite pleased that both parcel tax measures passed, the money was badly needed by both the library and the schools. Stay tuned for much more coverage.

—-Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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88 thoughts on “Lovenburg, Harris, Measures Q and P win amid low turnout”

  1. Don the Dragon-Lover

    As the dust settles from election day, the faithful Vanguard reader will begin the debriefing of this election cycle. While saddened by the low voter turnout and the poor showing of Schelen and Spector, I am pleased to see P and Q pass. In a nutshell, this school board race consisted of candidates grasping for relevant educational issues to discuss with a dis-engaged and largely uninterested electorate. Congrats to Mr. Harris and Mrs. Lovenburg on their victories. Do our community a big favor now. Settle the contract dispute with the teachrs. We do not need labor strife in this community for a crummy 1% more on the teachers’ salary schedule. The BOE had $1/4 mil to dish off to Mr. Murphy and enough to give the new super a 33% raise over the last super, so let’s get real and give the teachers their modest 2% in salary and 2% in benefits and get on with the task of governing the schools. I thought the teachers showed great restraint during the campaign season, trying very hard not to upset the Measure Q “apple cart”. Teachers helped deliver the vote on Q….so it is now time to settle up with the teachers. Do the right thing-new boe members!

  2. Don the Dragon-Lover

    As the dust settles from election day, the faithful Vanguard reader will begin the debriefing of this election cycle. While saddened by the low voter turnout and the poor showing of Schelen and Spector, I am pleased to see P and Q pass. In a nutshell, this school board race consisted of candidates grasping for relevant educational issues to discuss with a dis-engaged and largely uninterested electorate. Congrats to Mr. Harris and Mrs. Lovenburg on their victories. Do our community a big favor now. Settle the contract dispute with the teachrs. We do not need labor strife in this community for a crummy 1% more on the teachers’ salary schedule. The BOE had $1/4 mil to dish off to Mr. Murphy and enough to give the new super a 33% raise over the last super, so let’s get real and give the teachers their modest 2% in salary and 2% in benefits and get on with the task of governing the schools. I thought the teachers showed great restraint during the campaign season, trying very hard not to upset the Measure Q “apple cart”. Teachers helped deliver the vote on Q….so it is now time to settle up with the teachers. Do the right thing-new boe members!

  3. Don the Dragon-Lover

    As the dust settles from election day, the faithful Vanguard reader will begin the debriefing of this election cycle. While saddened by the low voter turnout and the poor showing of Schelen and Spector, I am pleased to see P and Q pass. In a nutshell, this school board race consisted of candidates grasping for relevant educational issues to discuss with a dis-engaged and largely uninterested electorate. Congrats to Mr. Harris and Mrs. Lovenburg on their victories. Do our community a big favor now. Settle the contract dispute with the teachrs. We do not need labor strife in this community for a crummy 1% more on the teachers’ salary schedule. The BOE had $1/4 mil to dish off to Mr. Murphy and enough to give the new super a 33% raise over the last super, so let’s get real and give the teachers their modest 2% in salary and 2% in benefits and get on with the task of governing the schools. I thought the teachers showed great restraint during the campaign season, trying very hard not to upset the Measure Q “apple cart”. Teachers helped deliver the vote on Q….so it is now time to settle up with the teachers. Do the right thing-new boe members!

  4. Don the Dragon-Lover

    As the dust settles from election day, the faithful Vanguard reader will begin the debriefing of this election cycle. While saddened by the low voter turnout and the poor showing of Schelen and Spector, I am pleased to see P and Q pass. In a nutshell, this school board race consisted of candidates grasping for relevant educational issues to discuss with a dis-engaged and largely uninterested electorate. Congrats to Mr. Harris and Mrs. Lovenburg on their victories. Do our community a big favor now. Settle the contract dispute with the teachrs. We do not need labor strife in this community for a crummy 1% more on the teachers’ salary schedule. The BOE had $1/4 mil to dish off to Mr. Murphy and enough to give the new super a 33% raise over the last super, so let’s get real and give the teachers their modest 2% in salary and 2% in benefits and get on with the task of governing the schools. I thought the teachers showed great restraint during the campaign season, trying very hard not to upset the Measure Q “apple cart”. Teachers helped deliver the vote on Q….so it is now time to settle up with the teachers. Do the right thing-new boe members!

  5. Ann

    Congrats to Lovenburg and Harris! I thought all candidates did a good job and were committed to the students.

    I too am very happy that Measures P & Q won! I was sweating bullets watching and reading the returns on the Vanguard.

    I hope Harris and Lovenburg give the teachers the raise they deserve! We have great teachers in DJUSD now let’s show them that we appreciate them!

  6. Ann

    Congrats to Lovenburg and Harris! I thought all candidates did a good job and were committed to the students.

    I too am very happy that Measures P & Q won! I was sweating bullets watching and reading the returns on the Vanguard.

    I hope Harris and Lovenburg give the teachers the raise they deserve! We have great teachers in DJUSD now let’s show them that we appreciate them!

  7. Ann

    Congrats to Lovenburg and Harris! I thought all candidates did a good job and were committed to the students.

    I too am very happy that Measures P & Q won! I was sweating bullets watching and reading the returns on the Vanguard.

    I hope Harris and Lovenburg give the teachers the raise they deserve! We have great teachers in DJUSD now let’s show them that we appreciate them!

  8. Ann

    Congrats to Lovenburg and Harris! I thought all candidates did a good job and were committed to the students.

    I too am very happy that Measures P & Q won! I was sweating bullets watching and reading the returns on the Vanguard.

    I hope Harris and Lovenburg give the teachers the raise they deserve! We have great teachers in DJUSD now let’s show them that we appreciate them!

  9. Anonymous

    In contrast to the other posts, I hope that Lovenberg and Harris make the budgetary decisions that are best for our students. If they decide that the district cannot afford a raise for our teachers, I will respect that decision. As for the salaries of the school administrators (or other high level government administrators, for that matter), they are paid high salaries because they are charged with ensuring that the schools spend their money as wisely as possible. I would expect that a good administrator could bring far more money home to the district through grants or creative cost savings than their salaries cost the district.

    regardless of whether that involves a raise for our teachers.

  10. Anonymous

    In contrast to the other posts, I hope that Lovenberg and Harris make the budgetary decisions that are best for our students. If they decide that the district cannot afford a raise for our teachers, I will respect that decision. As for the salaries of the school administrators (or other high level government administrators, for that matter), they are paid high salaries because they are charged with ensuring that the schools spend their money as wisely as possible. I would expect that a good administrator could bring far more money home to the district through grants or creative cost savings than their salaries cost the district.

    regardless of whether that involves a raise for our teachers.

  11. Anonymous

    In contrast to the other posts, I hope that Lovenberg and Harris make the budgetary decisions that are best for our students. If they decide that the district cannot afford a raise for our teachers, I will respect that decision. As for the salaries of the school administrators (or other high level government administrators, for that matter), they are paid high salaries because they are charged with ensuring that the schools spend their money as wisely as possible. I would expect that a good administrator could bring far more money home to the district through grants or creative cost savings than their salaries cost the district.

    regardless of whether that involves a raise for our teachers.

  12. Anonymous

    In contrast to the other posts, I hope that Lovenberg and Harris make the budgetary decisions that are best for our students. If they decide that the district cannot afford a raise for our teachers, I will respect that decision. As for the salaries of the school administrators (or other high level government administrators, for that matter), they are paid high salaries because they are charged with ensuring that the schools spend their money as wisely as possible. I would expect that a good administrator could bring far more money home to the district through grants or creative cost savings than their salaries cost the district.

    regardless of whether that involves a raise for our teachers.

  13. Anonymous

    The Yolo county Elections Office web page includes details by precinct for each measure, along with a map showing how precints voted. For P and Q it’s an interesting map – looks like a belaguered green-for-yes center under attack by big red-for-no blocs to the NW and SE. Make your own interpretation.

  14. Anonymous

    The Yolo county Elections Office web page includes details by precinct for each measure, along with a map showing how precints voted. For P and Q it’s an interesting map – looks like a belaguered green-for-yes center under attack by big red-for-no blocs to the NW and SE. Make your own interpretation.

  15. Anonymous

    The Yolo county Elections Office web page includes details by precinct for each measure, along with a map showing how precints voted. For P and Q it’s an interesting map – looks like a belaguered green-for-yes center under attack by big red-for-no blocs to the NW and SE. Make your own interpretation.

  16. Anonymous

    The Yolo county Elections Office web page includes details by precinct for each measure, along with a map showing how precints voted. For P and Q it’s an interesting map – looks like a belaguered green-for-yes center under attack by big red-for-no blocs to the NW and SE. Make your own interpretation.

  17. Richard Livingston

    The history of high paid superintendents and administrators has never been a fix for education. In most cases they come and go while the teachers stay on and maintain the local systems. Budget problems in education come from poor financing and often state imposed rules and regulation that are frightfully unrealistic and motivated by powerful special interests. Teacher’s unions are only one of those special interest groups and they too are frequently guilty of not recognizing specific local needs. If the teachers want a raise they are going to have to fight for it. The recent election does not give the teachers new friends on the BOE. So don’t whine and beg, roll up your sleeves and get ready to demand what you think you deserve. Otherwise take what you get.

  18. Richard Livingston

    The history of high paid superintendents and administrators has never been a fix for education. In most cases they come and go while the teachers stay on and maintain the local systems. Budget problems in education come from poor financing and often state imposed rules and regulation that are frightfully unrealistic and motivated by powerful special interests. Teacher’s unions are only one of those special interest groups and they too are frequently guilty of not recognizing specific local needs. If the teachers want a raise they are going to have to fight for it. The recent election does not give the teachers new friends on the BOE. So don’t whine and beg, roll up your sleeves and get ready to demand what you think you deserve. Otherwise take what you get.

  19. Richard Livingston

    The history of high paid superintendents and administrators has never been a fix for education. In most cases they come and go while the teachers stay on and maintain the local systems. Budget problems in education come from poor financing and often state imposed rules and regulation that are frightfully unrealistic and motivated by powerful special interests. Teacher’s unions are only one of those special interest groups and they too are frequently guilty of not recognizing specific local needs. If the teachers want a raise they are going to have to fight for it. The recent election does not give the teachers new friends on the BOE. So don’t whine and beg, roll up your sleeves and get ready to demand what you think you deserve. Otherwise take what you get.

  20. Richard Livingston

    The history of high paid superintendents and administrators has never been a fix for education. In most cases they come and go while the teachers stay on and maintain the local systems. Budget problems in education come from poor financing and often state imposed rules and regulation that are frightfully unrealistic and motivated by powerful special interests. Teacher’s unions are only one of those special interest groups and they too are frequently guilty of not recognizing specific local needs. If the teachers want a raise they are going to have to fight for it. The recent election does not give the teachers new friends on the BOE. So don’t whine and beg, roll up your sleeves and get ready to demand what you think you deserve. Otherwise take what you get.

  21. for all the kids

    We will all very quickly see if the new School Board embraces the idea of the Valley Oak Charter School or if they are going to nit-pick and force the application through the appeal process to discourage parents from signing their children up.

  22. for all the kids

    We will all very quickly see if the new School Board embraces the idea of the Valley Oak Charter School or if they are going to nit-pick and force the application through the appeal process to discourage parents from signing their children up.

  23. for all the kids

    We will all very quickly see if the new School Board embraces the idea of the Valley Oak Charter School or if they are going to nit-pick and force the application through the appeal process to discourage parents from signing their children up.

  24. for all the kids

    We will all very quickly see if the new School Board embraces the idea of the Valley Oak Charter School or if they are going to nit-pick and force the application through the appeal process to discourage parents from signing their children up.

  25. Anonymous

    Given the precarious condition of the state budget, I think the Board will have to be very careful in its bargaining. The best possible outcome for K-14 next year will be growth and COLA (growth for Davis will likley be nonexistent), and a suspension of the Prop 98 guarantee can’t be ruled out. That could mean a 0% COLA or even a reduction to general purpose funding.

    The district must prepare for lean times.

  26. Anonymous

    Given the precarious condition of the state budget, I think the Board will have to be very careful in its bargaining. The best possible outcome for K-14 next year will be growth and COLA (growth for Davis will likley be nonexistent), and a suspension of the Prop 98 guarantee can’t be ruled out. That could mean a 0% COLA or even a reduction to general purpose funding.

    The district must prepare for lean times.

  27. Anonymous

    Given the precarious condition of the state budget, I think the Board will have to be very careful in its bargaining. The best possible outcome for K-14 next year will be growth and COLA (growth for Davis will likley be nonexistent), and a suspension of the Prop 98 guarantee can’t be ruled out. That could mean a 0% COLA or even a reduction to general purpose funding.

    The district must prepare for lean times.

  28. Anonymous

    Given the precarious condition of the state budget, I think the Board will have to be very careful in its bargaining. The best possible outcome for K-14 next year will be growth and COLA (growth for Davis will likley be nonexistent), and a suspension of the Prop 98 guarantee can’t be ruled out. That could mean a 0% COLA or even a reduction to general purpose funding.

    The district must prepare for lean times.

  29. Anonymous

    In the low turnout, the establishment and relatively better known candidates won.

    Better known maybe, but how is Schelen – a politico who has worked with the city/county/state Dems and got the party endorsement – not an “establishment” candidate?

  30. Anonymous

    In the low turnout, the establishment and relatively better known candidates won.

    Better known maybe, but how is Schelen – a politico who has worked with the city/county/state Dems and got the party endorsement – not an “establishment” candidate?

  31. Anonymous

    In the low turnout, the establishment and relatively better known candidates won.

    Better known maybe, but how is Schelen – a politico who has worked with the city/county/state Dems and got the party endorsement – not an “establishment” candidate?

  32. Anonymous

    In the low turnout, the establishment and relatively better known candidates won.

    Better known maybe, but how is Schelen – a politico who has worked with the city/county/state Dems and got the party endorsement – not an “establishment” candidate?

  33. True Progressive

    If the Covell Village election was a mandate FOR the Progressives, wasn’t the school board election a mandate AGAINST the Progressives? Will be there be some realignment before the council election?

    DPD, I’d be interested in hearing your take on this.

  34. True Progressive

    If the Covell Village election was a mandate FOR the Progressives, wasn’t the school board election a mandate AGAINST the Progressives? Will be there be some realignment before the council election?

    DPD, I’d be interested in hearing your take on this.

  35. True Progressive

    If the Covell Village election was a mandate FOR the Progressives, wasn’t the school board election a mandate AGAINST the Progressives? Will be there be some realignment before the council election?

    DPD, I’d be interested in hearing your take on this.

  36. True Progressive

    If the Covell Village election was a mandate FOR the Progressives, wasn’t the school board election a mandate AGAINST the Progressives? Will be there be some realignment before the council election?

    DPD, I’d be interested in hearing your take on this.

  37. Richard

    let me jump in here: my sense has been, historically, that the progressives have done better in city council races, because that is the natural forum for their issues, while they have struggled in school board races, because it is more difficult to translate progressive issues into the governance of the school district

    as for this race, do Harris and Lovenburg really know what they have signed on for? Valley Oak is just the tip of the iceberg. The possibility of a generational decline in enrollment as Davis has gentrified, state budget cuts around the corner as California is going into a recession and a moribund housing market

    Yikes! If they haven’t done it already, they will probably need to have one unlisted phone number for personal use, and another one for school district business, because the future looks ugly.

    –Richard Estes

    –Richard Estes

  38. Richard

    let me jump in here: my sense has been, historically, that the progressives have done better in city council races, because that is the natural forum for their issues, while they have struggled in school board races, because it is more difficult to translate progressive issues into the governance of the school district

    as for this race, do Harris and Lovenburg really know what they have signed on for? Valley Oak is just the tip of the iceberg. The possibility of a generational decline in enrollment as Davis has gentrified, state budget cuts around the corner as California is going into a recession and a moribund housing market

    Yikes! If they haven’t done it already, they will probably need to have one unlisted phone number for personal use, and another one for school district business, because the future looks ugly.

    –Richard Estes

    –Richard Estes

  39. Richard

    let me jump in here: my sense has been, historically, that the progressives have done better in city council races, because that is the natural forum for their issues, while they have struggled in school board races, because it is more difficult to translate progressive issues into the governance of the school district

    as for this race, do Harris and Lovenburg really know what they have signed on for? Valley Oak is just the tip of the iceberg. The possibility of a generational decline in enrollment as Davis has gentrified, state budget cuts around the corner as California is going into a recession and a moribund housing market

    Yikes! If they haven’t done it already, they will probably need to have one unlisted phone number for personal use, and another one for school district business, because the future looks ugly.

    –Richard Estes

    –Richard Estes

  40. Richard

    let me jump in here: my sense has been, historically, that the progressives have done better in city council races, because that is the natural forum for their issues, while they have struggled in school board races, because it is more difficult to translate progressive issues into the governance of the school district

    as for this race, do Harris and Lovenburg really know what they have signed on for? Valley Oak is just the tip of the iceberg. The possibility of a generational decline in enrollment as Davis has gentrified, state budget cuts around the corner as California is going into a recession and a moribund housing market

    Yikes! If they haven’t done it already, they will probably need to have one unlisted phone number for personal use, and another one for school district business, because the future looks ugly.

    –Richard Estes

    –Richard Estes

  41. Rich Rifkin

    “For P and Q it’s an interesting map – looks like a belaguered green-for-yes center under attack by big red-for-no blocs to the NW and SE.”

    I could be wrong about this, but I think those two outlier districts (NW and SE) are mostly rural, out of the city of Davis, and sparsely populated. As such, just a handful of farmers or large landholders on the margin could change a “green” vote to a “red” one.

    “how is Schelen … not an ‘establishment’ candidate?”

    Having heard this quasi-perjorative term, “establishment,” tossed around (and at times directed at me personally) for a number of years, I’ve come to realize that the people who use it tend to be young, agitated and in some cases intellectually lazy. If a person thinks of himself as “anti-establishment,” then someone he often disagrees with is refelxively stereotyped as “establishment.” At the same time, anyone he mostly agrees with, no matter the person’s job and social connections, is stamped, “anti-establishment.”

    That said, I think the term could be fairly used, if a candidate (or politically involved person) is pushing an agenda which overwhelmingly goes against the mainstream thought of the people in charge. For example, a candidate for the school board this year who was advocating against Measure Q, and was for getting rid of intermural sports, and opposed STAR testing, etc, would have been an anti-establishment candidate, regardless of his job history and personal contacts. My take is that all of the four candidates were mostly “establishment” candidates, but Spector (based on his strong views on DJUSD real estate) was the closest to “anti-establishment.”

    I don’t think the marginal Valley Oak Charter differences can be divided that way. However, if a candidate ran with the promise of forcing a new vote to keep VO open as a regular neighborhood elementary and had a whole host of differences with the established DJUSD regime, such a person would be in my opinion fairly called, “anti-establishment.”

  42. Rich Rifkin

    “For P and Q it’s an interesting map – looks like a belaguered green-for-yes center under attack by big red-for-no blocs to the NW and SE.”

    I could be wrong about this, but I think those two outlier districts (NW and SE) are mostly rural, out of the city of Davis, and sparsely populated. As such, just a handful of farmers or large landholders on the margin could change a “green” vote to a “red” one.

    “how is Schelen … not an ‘establishment’ candidate?”

    Having heard this quasi-perjorative term, “establishment,” tossed around (and at times directed at me personally) for a number of years, I’ve come to realize that the people who use it tend to be young, agitated and in some cases intellectually lazy. If a person thinks of himself as “anti-establishment,” then someone he often disagrees with is refelxively stereotyped as “establishment.” At the same time, anyone he mostly agrees with, no matter the person’s job and social connections, is stamped, “anti-establishment.”

    That said, I think the term could be fairly used, if a candidate (or politically involved person) is pushing an agenda which overwhelmingly goes against the mainstream thought of the people in charge. For example, a candidate for the school board this year who was advocating against Measure Q, and was for getting rid of intermural sports, and opposed STAR testing, etc, would have been an anti-establishment candidate, regardless of his job history and personal contacts. My take is that all of the four candidates were mostly “establishment” candidates, but Spector (based on his strong views on DJUSD real estate) was the closest to “anti-establishment.”

    I don’t think the marginal Valley Oak Charter differences can be divided that way. However, if a candidate ran with the promise of forcing a new vote to keep VO open as a regular neighborhood elementary and had a whole host of differences with the established DJUSD regime, such a person would be in my opinion fairly called, “anti-establishment.”

  43. Rich Rifkin

    “For P and Q it’s an interesting map – looks like a belaguered green-for-yes center under attack by big red-for-no blocs to the NW and SE.”

    I could be wrong about this, but I think those two outlier districts (NW and SE) are mostly rural, out of the city of Davis, and sparsely populated. As such, just a handful of farmers or large landholders on the margin could change a “green” vote to a “red” one.

    “how is Schelen … not an ‘establishment’ candidate?”

    Having heard this quasi-perjorative term, “establishment,” tossed around (and at times directed at me personally) for a number of years, I’ve come to realize that the people who use it tend to be young, agitated and in some cases intellectually lazy. If a person thinks of himself as “anti-establishment,” then someone he often disagrees with is refelxively stereotyped as “establishment.” At the same time, anyone he mostly agrees with, no matter the person’s job and social connections, is stamped, “anti-establishment.”

    That said, I think the term could be fairly used, if a candidate (or politically involved person) is pushing an agenda which overwhelmingly goes against the mainstream thought of the people in charge. For example, a candidate for the school board this year who was advocating against Measure Q, and was for getting rid of intermural sports, and opposed STAR testing, etc, would have been an anti-establishment candidate, regardless of his job history and personal contacts. My take is that all of the four candidates were mostly “establishment” candidates, but Spector (based on his strong views on DJUSD real estate) was the closest to “anti-establishment.”

    I don’t think the marginal Valley Oak Charter differences can be divided that way. However, if a candidate ran with the promise of forcing a new vote to keep VO open as a regular neighborhood elementary and had a whole host of differences with the established DJUSD regime, such a person would be in my opinion fairly called, “anti-establishment.”

  44. Rich Rifkin

    “For P and Q it’s an interesting map – looks like a belaguered green-for-yes center under attack by big red-for-no blocs to the NW and SE.”

    I could be wrong about this, but I think those two outlier districts (NW and SE) are mostly rural, out of the city of Davis, and sparsely populated. As such, just a handful of farmers or large landholders on the margin could change a “green” vote to a “red” one.

    “how is Schelen … not an ‘establishment’ candidate?”

    Having heard this quasi-perjorative term, “establishment,” tossed around (and at times directed at me personally) for a number of years, I’ve come to realize that the people who use it tend to be young, agitated and in some cases intellectually lazy. If a person thinks of himself as “anti-establishment,” then someone he often disagrees with is refelxively stereotyped as “establishment.” At the same time, anyone he mostly agrees with, no matter the person’s job and social connections, is stamped, “anti-establishment.”

    That said, I think the term could be fairly used, if a candidate (or politically involved person) is pushing an agenda which overwhelmingly goes against the mainstream thought of the people in charge. For example, a candidate for the school board this year who was advocating against Measure Q, and was for getting rid of intermural sports, and opposed STAR testing, etc, would have been an anti-establishment candidate, regardless of his job history and personal contacts. My take is that all of the four candidates were mostly “establishment” candidates, but Spector (based on his strong views on DJUSD real estate) was the closest to “anti-establishment.”

    I don’t think the marginal Valley Oak Charter differences can be divided that way. However, if a candidate ran with the promise of forcing a new vote to keep VO open as a regular neighborhood elementary and had a whole host of differences with the established DJUSD regime, such a person would be in my opinion fairly called, “anti-establishment.”

  45. Matt Williams

    Well said Rich. I would only add that the color coding in the Measures P and Q maps breaks at 66.7%. There isn’t a single precinct where more people voted against one of the measures than voted for it.

    Any characterization of “We vs. They” is stretching things . . . at best.

  46. Matt Williams

    Well said Rich. I would only add that the color coding in the Measures P and Q maps breaks at 66.7%. There isn’t a single precinct where more people voted against one of the measures than voted for it.

    Any characterization of “We vs. They” is stretching things . . . at best.

  47. Matt Williams

    Well said Rich. I would only add that the color coding in the Measures P and Q maps breaks at 66.7%. There isn’t a single precinct where more people voted against one of the measures than voted for it.

    Any characterization of “We vs. They” is stretching things . . . at best.

  48. Matt Williams

    Well said Rich. I would only add that the color coding in the Measures P and Q maps breaks at 66.7%. There isn’t a single precinct where more people voted against one of the measures than voted for it.

    Any characterization of “We vs. They” is stretching things . . . at best.

  49. westdavisfred

    If you look at the Yolo Co. elections archives:

    http://www.yoloelections.org/archives

    you will see that in 2003 and 1999 voter turnout was roughly the same. There were 11,000+ voters this year, which is more than either of those two parcel tax renewal elections, but slightly less, as a percentage of total registered voters, than 1999. In 2003, about 28% voted.

    Overall, not really any huge surprise about election turnout.

  50. westdavisfred

    If you look at the Yolo Co. elections archives:

    http://www.yoloelections.org/archives

    you will see that in 2003 and 1999 voter turnout was roughly the same. There were 11,000+ voters this year, which is more than either of those two parcel tax renewal elections, but slightly less, as a percentage of total registered voters, than 1999. In 2003, about 28% voted.

    Overall, not really any huge surprise about election turnout.

  51. westdavisfred

    If you look at the Yolo Co. elections archives:

    http://www.yoloelections.org/archives

    you will see that in 2003 and 1999 voter turnout was roughly the same. There were 11,000+ voters this year, which is more than either of those two parcel tax renewal elections, but slightly less, as a percentage of total registered voters, than 1999. In 2003, about 28% voted.

    Overall, not really any huge surprise about election turnout.

  52. westdavisfred

    If you look at the Yolo Co. elections archives:

    http://www.yoloelections.org/archives

    you will see that in 2003 and 1999 voter turnout was roughly the same. There were 11,000+ voters this year, which is more than either of those two parcel tax renewal elections, but slightly less, as a percentage of total registered voters, than 1999. In 2003, about 28% voted.

    Overall, not really any huge surprise about election turnout.

  53. Anonymous

    I think what DPD means by “anti-establishment” is that Bob Schelen took stands different than what were seen as establishment ideas. For instance, he stood up for Valley Oak when it was not a popular position throughout the community. The subtitle of the blog is “the dark underbelly of Davis.” Schelen’s campaign took a hard honest look at the issues that create that underbelly and it appears he wanted a honest conversation about them. Sometimes, it might be easier to pretend things are wonderful and there are no problems in the Davis schools. Schelen, probably to his detriment, was honest about those issues. Add to that, he was one of the candidates that did suggest the school budget be balanced on the backs of Davis teachers. Perhaps that is what DPD meant by calling Schelen “an anti-establishment candidate.”

  54. Anonymous

    I think what DPD means by “anti-establishment” is that Bob Schelen took stands different than what were seen as establishment ideas. For instance, he stood up for Valley Oak when it was not a popular position throughout the community. The subtitle of the blog is “the dark underbelly of Davis.” Schelen’s campaign took a hard honest look at the issues that create that underbelly and it appears he wanted a honest conversation about them. Sometimes, it might be easier to pretend things are wonderful and there are no problems in the Davis schools. Schelen, probably to his detriment, was honest about those issues. Add to that, he was one of the candidates that did suggest the school budget be balanced on the backs of Davis teachers. Perhaps that is what DPD meant by calling Schelen “an anti-establishment candidate.”

  55. Anonymous

    I think what DPD means by “anti-establishment” is that Bob Schelen took stands different than what were seen as establishment ideas. For instance, he stood up for Valley Oak when it was not a popular position throughout the community. The subtitle of the blog is “the dark underbelly of Davis.” Schelen’s campaign took a hard honest look at the issues that create that underbelly and it appears he wanted a honest conversation about them. Sometimes, it might be easier to pretend things are wonderful and there are no problems in the Davis schools. Schelen, probably to his detriment, was honest about those issues. Add to that, he was one of the candidates that did suggest the school budget be balanced on the backs of Davis teachers. Perhaps that is what DPD meant by calling Schelen “an anti-establishment candidate.”

  56. Anonymous

    I think what DPD means by “anti-establishment” is that Bob Schelen took stands different than what were seen as establishment ideas. For instance, he stood up for Valley Oak when it was not a popular position throughout the community. The subtitle of the blog is “the dark underbelly of Davis.” Schelen’s campaign took a hard honest look at the issues that create that underbelly and it appears he wanted a honest conversation about them. Sometimes, it might be easier to pretend things are wonderful and there are no problems in the Davis schools. Schelen, probably to his detriment, was honest about those issues. Add to that, he was one of the candidates that did suggest the school budget be balanced on the backs of Davis teachers. Perhaps that is what DPD meant by calling Schelen “an anti-establishment candidate.”

  57. 無名 - wu ming

    the NW district includes the mcmansions out by the golf course, IIRC, while the other red areas were mace ranch (rich folks) el macero (rich folks) and an on-campus station that got so few people for the % to be rather meaningless.

    those neighborhoods always have the highest % f republican and antitax votes, it’s not much of a surprise.

    what was news was the very low turnout right next to valley oak, and the lack of a 2/3 vote there. the other districts sort of come with the territory. build luxury homes, you’re going to get people voting against taxes.

  58. 無名 - wu ming

    the NW district includes the mcmansions out by the golf course, IIRC, while the other red areas were mace ranch (rich folks) el macero (rich folks) and an on-campus station that got so few people for the % to be rather meaningless.

    those neighborhoods always have the highest % f republican and antitax votes, it’s not much of a surprise.

    what was news was the very low turnout right next to valley oak, and the lack of a 2/3 vote there. the other districts sort of come with the territory. build luxury homes, you’re going to get people voting against taxes.

  59. 無名 - wu ming

    the NW district includes the mcmansions out by the golf course, IIRC, while the other red areas were mace ranch (rich folks) el macero (rich folks) and an on-campus station that got so few people for the % to be rather meaningless.

    those neighborhoods always have the highest % f republican and antitax votes, it’s not much of a surprise.

    what was news was the very low turnout right next to valley oak, and the lack of a 2/3 vote there. the other districts sort of come with the territory. build luxury homes, you’re going to get people voting against taxes.

  60. 無名 - wu ming

    the NW district includes the mcmansions out by the golf course, IIRC, while the other red areas were mace ranch (rich folks) el macero (rich folks) and an on-campus station that got so few people for the % to be rather meaningless.

    those neighborhoods always have the highest % f republican and antitax votes, it’s not much of a surprise.

    what was news was the very low turnout right next to valley oak, and the lack of a 2/3 vote there. the other districts sort of come with the territory. build luxury homes, you’re going to get people voting against taxes.

  61. Anonymous

    How ironic the last statement is.

    People always say their children are the most important part of their lives, yet the election that most affects them is the most insignificant?

  62. Anonymous

    How ironic the last statement is.

    People always say their children are the most important part of their lives, yet the election that most affects them is the most insignificant?

  63. Anonymous

    How ironic the last statement is.

    People always say their children are the most important part of their lives, yet the election that most affects them is the most insignificant?

  64. Anonymous

    How ironic the last statement is.

    People always say their children are the most important part of their lives, yet the election that most affects them is the most insignificant?

  65. Rich Rifkin

    “Bob Schelen took stands different than what were seen as establishment ideas. He was one of the candidates that did suggest the school budget (not) be balanced on the backs of Davis teachers.”

    In my opinion, it would have been far more “anti-establishment” to run for office in Davis on the slogan, “I want to balance the school budget on the backs of Davis teachers.” Or far more radical to say, “We don’t need a superintendent of schools. Let’s just make that a voluntary position and give the money we save to teachers.”

    While his slogan may have appealed to you (and many other voters), it’s not the case that supporting teachers is going against the grain or radical in any respect. I would typify that kind of promise more “populist” than “anti-establishment.” Promising to support teachers when running for school board is just common sense.

  66. Rich Rifkin

    “Bob Schelen took stands different than what were seen as establishment ideas. He was one of the candidates that did suggest the school budget (not) be balanced on the backs of Davis teachers.”

    In my opinion, it would have been far more “anti-establishment” to run for office in Davis on the slogan, “I want to balance the school budget on the backs of Davis teachers.” Or far more radical to say, “We don’t need a superintendent of schools. Let’s just make that a voluntary position and give the money we save to teachers.”

    While his slogan may have appealed to you (and many other voters), it’s not the case that supporting teachers is going against the grain or radical in any respect. I would typify that kind of promise more “populist” than “anti-establishment.” Promising to support teachers when running for school board is just common sense.

  67. Rich Rifkin

    “Bob Schelen took stands different than what were seen as establishment ideas. He was one of the candidates that did suggest the school budget (not) be balanced on the backs of Davis teachers.”

    In my opinion, it would have been far more “anti-establishment” to run for office in Davis on the slogan, “I want to balance the school budget on the backs of Davis teachers.” Or far more radical to say, “We don’t need a superintendent of schools. Let’s just make that a voluntary position and give the money we save to teachers.”

    While his slogan may have appealed to you (and many other voters), it’s not the case that supporting teachers is going against the grain or radical in any respect. I would typify that kind of promise more “populist” than “anti-establishment.” Promising to support teachers when running for school board is just common sense.

  68. Rich Rifkin

    “Bob Schelen took stands different than what were seen as establishment ideas. He was one of the candidates that did suggest the school budget (not) be balanced on the backs of Davis teachers.”

    In my opinion, it would have been far more “anti-establishment” to run for office in Davis on the slogan, “I want to balance the school budget on the backs of Davis teachers.” Or far more radical to say, “We don’t need a superintendent of schools. Let’s just make that a voluntary position and give the money we save to teachers.”

    While his slogan may have appealed to you (and many other voters), it’s not the case that supporting teachers is going against the grain or radical in any respect. I would typify that kind of promise more “populist” than “anti-establishment.” Promising to support teachers when running for school board is just common sense.

  69. sheila

    I called the Elections office to clarify the red section in the middle of the map for both P and Q. It was not Mace Ranch or the immediate Valley Oak neighborhood but the section right in between consisting of Rancho Yolo in the south and a swath north right through Birch Lane to Covell. FYI the Red Section in the edges were outlying rural areas plus North Davis Meadow (near Public Golf Course) and El Macero.

  70. sheila

    I called the Elections office to clarify the red section in the middle of the map for both P and Q. It was not Mace Ranch or the immediate Valley Oak neighborhood but the section right in between consisting of Rancho Yolo in the south and a swath north right through Birch Lane to Covell. FYI the Red Section in the edges were outlying rural areas plus North Davis Meadow (near Public Golf Course) and El Macero.

  71. sheila

    I called the Elections office to clarify the red section in the middle of the map for both P and Q. It was not Mace Ranch or the immediate Valley Oak neighborhood but the section right in between consisting of Rancho Yolo in the south and a swath north right through Birch Lane to Covell. FYI the Red Section in the edges were outlying rural areas plus North Davis Meadow (near Public Golf Course) and El Macero.

  72. sheila

    I called the Elections office to clarify the red section in the middle of the map for both P and Q. It was not Mace Ranch or the immediate Valley Oak neighborhood but the section right in between consisting of Rancho Yolo in the south and a swath north right through Birch Lane to Covell. FYI the Red Section in the edges were outlying rural areas plus North Davis Meadow (near Public Golf Course) and El Macero.

  73. Matt Williams

    sheila said…
    I called the Elections office to clarify the red section in the middle of the map for both P and Q. FYI the Red Section in the edges were outlying rural areas plus North Davis Meadow (near Public Golf Course) and El Macero.

    In addition to the outlying rural regions and El Macero, Precinct 44 contains the County portion of Willowbank, as well as (don’t ask me why) the Royal Oak manufactured home park and Da Vinci Court off Research Park Drive.

  74. Matt Williams

    sheila said…
    I called the Elections office to clarify the red section in the middle of the map for both P and Q. FYI the Red Section in the edges were outlying rural areas plus North Davis Meadow (near Public Golf Course) and El Macero.

    In addition to the outlying rural regions and El Macero, Precinct 44 contains the County portion of Willowbank, as well as (don’t ask me why) the Royal Oak manufactured home park and Da Vinci Court off Research Park Drive.

  75. Matt Williams

    sheila said…
    I called the Elections office to clarify the red section in the middle of the map for both P and Q. FYI the Red Section in the edges were outlying rural areas plus North Davis Meadow (near Public Golf Course) and El Macero.

    In addition to the outlying rural regions and El Macero, Precinct 44 contains the County portion of Willowbank, as well as (don’t ask me why) the Royal Oak manufactured home park and Da Vinci Court off Research Park Drive.

  76. Matt Williams

    sheila said…
    I called the Elections office to clarify the red section in the middle of the map for both P and Q. FYI the Red Section in the edges were outlying rural areas plus North Davis Meadow (near Public Golf Course) and El Macero.

    In addition to the outlying rural regions and El Macero, Precinct 44 contains the County portion of Willowbank, as well as (don’t ask me why) the Royal Oak manufactured home park and Da Vinci Court off Research Park Drive.

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