Thanksgiving Turkeys for Needy Yolo County Families

Matt Rexroad called me up last week and asked me to help him get 350 Turkeys for Thanksgiving for needy Yolo County Families. I have accepted that challenge.

I need each of you to help by donating what you can.

You can help by either dropping off a turkey to the Wayfarer Center in Woodland or sending a check made out to the Wayfarer Center. Mail it or deliver it to:

711 College Street
Woodland, 95695

About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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152 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    I got THREE 5-color glossy adverts for Harris for School Boart in my mailbox today .. perhaps Harris will send some of that developer cash that his campaign is wallowing in to the Wayfarer Center.

  2. Anonymous

    I got THREE 5-color glossy adverts for Harris for School Boart in my mailbox today .. perhaps Harris will send some of that developer cash that his campaign is wallowing in to the Wayfarer Center.

  3. Anonymous

    I got THREE 5-color glossy adverts for Harris for School Boart in my mailbox today .. perhaps Harris will send some of that developer cash that his campaign is wallowing in to the Wayfarer Center.

  4. Anonymous

    I got THREE 5-color glossy adverts for Harris for School Boart in my mailbox today .. perhaps Harris will send some of that developer cash that his campaign is wallowing in to the Wayfarer Center.

  5. Rich Rifkin

    “Speaking of turkeys, what’s happened with the flock in the cemetery?”

    When I visited the Davis Cemetery this afternoon (around 5:30 pm), I saw the (seriously menacing) rafter of wild turkeys. Because there is such a large group of them — I would guess about 25 — they have no fear of people (or of my dog). I was glad that I didn’t have a grave to visit where they were feeding on the grass.

    Considering the politics of Davis and the feelings of most residents, I don’t think shooting these wild birds and feeding them to the poor is a viable solution. However, if the turkeys continue to reside at the cemetery, it probably would be a good idea to trap them and move them somewhere else (much as was done with the aggressive Chinese geese at North Davis Pond).

    It’s not so much that the turkeys will physically harm anybody. I’m fairly certain they are vegetarians. The problem is that such a large group of grass eaters makes a huge poop mess on the low lying and flat gravestones and people who come to visit their dead are intimidated by these fearless fowl.

    P.S. If you are going to buy a frozen turkey for the Wayfarer Center, you will probably get a better deal from most supermarkets in a week or two. The prices for turkeys tend to go down dramatically in the weeks leading up to Thanksgiving. I saw Safeway had turkeys for 99 cents a pound yesterday. But I suspect it won’t be too hard to find 40 cents a pound frozen turkeys in a fortnight.

  6. Rich Rifkin

    “Speaking of turkeys, what’s happened with the flock in the cemetery?”

    When I visited the Davis Cemetery this afternoon (around 5:30 pm), I saw the (seriously menacing) rafter of wild turkeys. Because there is such a large group of them — I would guess about 25 — they have no fear of people (or of my dog). I was glad that I didn’t have a grave to visit where they were feeding on the grass.

    Considering the politics of Davis and the feelings of most residents, I don’t think shooting these wild birds and feeding them to the poor is a viable solution. However, if the turkeys continue to reside at the cemetery, it probably would be a good idea to trap them and move them somewhere else (much as was done with the aggressive Chinese geese at North Davis Pond).

    It’s not so much that the turkeys will physically harm anybody. I’m fairly certain they are vegetarians. The problem is that such a large group of grass eaters makes a huge poop mess on the low lying and flat gravestones and people who come to visit their dead are intimidated by these fearless fowl.

    P.S. If you are going to buy a frozen turkey for the Wayfarer Center, you will probably get a better deal from most supermarkets in a week or two. The prices for turkeys tend to go down dramatically in the weeks leading up to Thanksgiving. I saw Safeway had turkeys for 99 cents a pound yesterday. But I suspect it won’t be too hard to find 40 cents a pound frozen turkeys in a fortnight.

  7. Rich Rifkin

    “Speaking of turkeys, what’s happened with the flock in the cemetery?”

    When I visited the Davis Cemetery this afternoon (around 5:30 pm), I saw the (seriously menacing) rafter of wild turkeys. Because there is such a large group of them — I would guess about 25 — they have no fear of people (or of my dog). I was glad that I didn’t have a grave to visit where they were feeding on the grass.

    Considering the politics of Davis and the feelings of most residents, I don’t think shooting these wild birds and feeding them to the poor is a viable solution. However, if the turkeys continue to reside at the cemetery, it probably would be a good idea to trap them and move them somewhere else (much as was done with the aggressive Chinese geese at North Davis Pond).

    It’s not so much that the turkeys will physically harm anybody. I’m fairly certain they are vegetarians. The problem is that such a large group of grass eaters makes a huge poop mess on the low lying and flat gravestones and people who come to visit their dead are intimidated by these fearless fowl.

    P.S. If you are going to buy a frozen turkey for the Wayfarer Center, you will probably get a better deal from most supermarkets in a week or two. The prices for turkeys tend to go down dramatically in the weeks leading up to Thanksgiving. I saw Safeway had turkeys for 99 cents a pound yesterday. But I suspect it won’t be too hard to find 40 cents a pound frozen turkeys in a fortnight.

  8. Rich Rifkin

    “Speaking of turkeys, what’s happened with the flock in the cemetery?”

    When I visited the Davis Cemetery this afternoon (around 5:30 pm), I saw the (seriously menacing) rafter of wild turkeys. Because there is such a large group of them — I would guess about 25 — they have no fear of people (or of my dog). I was glad that I didn’t have a grave to visit where they were feeding on the grass.

    Considering the politics of Davis and the feelings of most residents, I don’t think shooting these wild birds and feeding them to the poor is a viable solution. However, if the turkeys continue to reside at the cemetery, it probably would be a good idea to trap them and move them somewhere else (much as was done with the aggressive Chinese geese at North Davis Pond).

    It’s not so much that the turkeys will physically harm anybody. I’m fairly certain they are vegetarians. The problem is that such a large group of grass eaters makes a huge poop mess on the low lying and flat gravestones and people who come to visit their dead are intimidated by these fearless fowl.

    P.S. If you are going to buy a frozen turkey for the Wayfarer Center, you will probably get a better deal from most supermarkets in a week or two. The prices for turkeys tend to go down dramatically in the weeks leading up to Thanksgiving. I saw Safeway had turkeys for 99 cents a pound yesterday. But I suspect it won’t be too hard to find 40 cents a pound frozen turkeys in a fortnight.

  9. Rich Rifkin

    “perhaps Harris will send some of that developer cash that his campaign is wallowing in to the Wayfarer Center.”

    Developer cash? That is unfounded and completely untrue.

    If you read Sunday’s front page story in The Enterprise, Richard Harris’s campaign contributors were listed. I don’t believe a single one is “a developer” or a realtor:

    “The Harris campaign received the following contributions (from Davis, unless otherwise noted): $250 from the Mike Thomson for Congress campaign; also Katherine Schroeder, CFO with the Seneca Center. Giving $200 were: Robert Blattner, lobbyist; Heidy Kellison, homemaker; Gavin Payne, department superintendent with the California Department of Education; Timothy Schott, lobbyist, Sacramento.”

    “Giving $150 were: Jenifer West, lobbyist, Sacramento; and $100 came from Thomas Adams, executive director with a state government agency; Elena Almanzo, attorney with California Department of Justice; Sharon Ball, a physician; Ann Evans, a writer and food consultant; former Congressman Vic Fazio, attorney, Washington DC; Jeffrey Harris, attorney, Sacramento; Anthony Hernandez, director of California government affairs, CH2M Hill, Sacramento; Christopher Lehman, development consultant, Arcata; Lescroart Corp.; Jim Lites, Jr., lobbyist, Sacramento; Steven Maccaulay, legislative advocate, California Urban Water Association; city councilman and former school board trustee Don Saylor; Julie Saylor, analyst, UC Davis; Bob Schneider, consultant, Verve Enterprises; and Lauren Snow, financial aid director, UC Davis School of Medicine; and $25 from Lynelle Jolley, communications, state government.”

    The only two people connected with real estate in or around Davis gave money to Lovenburg (Lynn Yackzan) and to Schelen (Bob Bockwinkle).

    What is notable about the Harris contributions is that they are almost entirely from his colleagues in the Sacramento political scene, where he makes his living. It is pretty much the same story for Bob Schelen, who also works in Sacramento politics:

    “The Schelen campaign received: $2,500 from Plumbers Pipefitters Local 447 political action fund, Sacramento; $500 from Tina Thomas, attorney, Sacramento; Phil Angelides, former state treasurer, Sacramento, Dave Jones for Assembly campaign, Sacramento; $250 from Local Union 340, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Sacramento.

    “Giving $150 were: Davis school board trustee Jim Provenza; Nancy Miller, attorney, Sacramento; and giving $100 were: Bob Bockwinkle, Realtor; Virginia Moose, retired, Sacramento; Mike Lynch Consulting, Modesto; Yolo County Supervisor Helen Thomson; Pam Neiberg, community activist; Larry Sheingold, political consultant, Sacramento; former city councilman Jerry and Teresa Kaneko, retired; Christine Totah, parent activist; Barbara Geisler; Yolo County public guardian Cass Sylvia; Yolo County public defender Barry Melton; Robert Abelon, Jr. campaign aide with Cabaldon for Assembly; Sheryl Cambron. Other amounts given were: $99 from Barbara Langer, self-employed; $50 from Joe and Shirley Hammond, retired; Corky Brown, retired; city councilman and former school board trustee Don Saylor; Charles Godefroy; Sharla Cheney Harrington; and Evan Rothstein. There were various contributions under $50.”

  10. Rich Rifkin

    “perhaps Harris will send some of that developer cash that his campaign is wallowing in to the Wayfarer Center.”

    Developer cash? That is unfounded and completely untrue.

    If you read Sunday’s front page story in The Enterprise, Richard Harris’s campaign contributors were listed. I don’t believe a single one is “a developer” or a realtor:

    “The Harris campaign received the following contributions (from Davis, unless otherwise noted): $250 from the Mike Thomson for Congress campaign; also Katherine Schroeder, CFO with the Seneca Center. Giving $200 were: Robert Blattner, lobbyist; Heidy Kellison, homemaker; Gavin Payne, department superintendent with the California Department of Education; Timothy Schott, lobbyist, Sacramento.”

    “Giving $150 were: Jenifer West, lobbyist, Sacramento; and $100 came from Thomas Adams, executive director with a state government agency; Elena Almanzo, attorney with California Department of Justice; Sharon Ball, a physician; Ann Evans, a writer and food consultant; former Congressman Vic Fazio, attorney, Washington DC; Jeffrey Harris, attorney, Sacramento; Anthony Hernandez, director of California government affairs, CH2M Hill, Sacramento; Christopher Lehman, development consultant, Arcata; Lescroart Corp.; Jim Lites, Jr., lobbyist, Sacramento; Steven Maccaulay, legislative advocate, California Urban Water Association; city councilman and former school board trustee Don Saylor; Julie Saylor, analyst, UC Davis; Bob Schneider, consultant, Verve Enterprises; and Lauren Snow, financial aid director, UC Davis School of Medicine; and $25 from Lynelle Jolley, communications, state government.”

    The only two people connected with real estate in or around Davis gave money to Lovenburg (Lynn Yackzan) and to Schelen (Bob Bockwinkle).

    What is notable about the Harris contributions is that they are almost entirely from his colleagues in the Sacramento political scene, where he makes his living. It is pretty much the same story for Bob Schelen, who also works in Sacramento politics:

    “The Schelen campaign received: $2,500 from Plumbers Pipefitters Local 447 political action fund, Sacramento; $500 from Tina Thomas, attorney, Sacramento; Phil Angelides, former state treasurer, Sacramento, Dave Jones for Assembly campaign, Sacramento; $250 from Local Union 340, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Sacramento.

    “Giving $150 were: Davis school board trustee Jim Provenza; Nancy Miller, attorney, Sacramento; and giving $100 were: Bob Bockwinkle, Realtor; Virginia Moose, retired, Sacramento; Mike Lynch Consulting, Modesto; Yolo County Supervisor Helen Thomson; Pam Neiberg, community activist; Larry Sheingold, political consultant, Sacramento; former city councilman Jerry and Teresa Kaneko, retired; Christine Totah, parent activist; Barbara Geisler; Yolo County public guardian Cass Sylvia; Yolo County public defender Barry Melton; Robert Abelon, Jr. campaign aide with Cabaldon for Assembly; Sheryl Cambron. Other amounts given were: $99 from Barbara Langer, self-employed; $50 from Joe and Shirley Hammond, retired; Corky Brown, retired; city councilman and former school board trustee Don Saylor; Charles Godefroy; Sharla Cheney Harrington; and Evan Rothstein. There were various contributions under $50.”

  11. Rich Rifkin

    “perhaps Harris will send some of that developer cash that his campaign is wallowing in to the Wayfarer Center.”

    Developer cash? That is unfounded and completely untrue.

    If you read Sunday’s front page story in The Enterprise, Richard Harris’s campaign contributors were listed. I don’t believe a single one is “a developer” or a realtor:

    “The Harris campaign received the following contributions (from Davis, unless otherwise noted): $250 from the Mike Thomson for Congress campaign; also Katherine Schroeder, CFO with the Seneca Center. Giving $200 were: Robert Blattner, lobbyist; Heidy Kellison, homemaker; Gavin Payne, department superintendent with the California Department of Education; Timothy Schott, lobbyist, Sacramento.”

    “Giving $150 were: Jenifer West, lobbyist, Sacramento; and $100 came from Thomas Adams, executive director with a state government agency; Elena Almanzo, attorney with California Department of Justice; Sharon Ball, a physician; Ann Evans, a writer and food consultant; former Congressman Vic Fazio, attorney, Washington DC; Jeffrey Harris, attorney, Sacramento; Anthony Hernandez, director of California government affairs, CH2M Hill, Sacramento; Christopher Lehman, development consultant, Arcata; Lescroart Corp.; Jim Lites, Jr., lobbyist, Sacramento; Steven Maccaulay, legislative advocate, California Urban Water Association; city councilman and former school board trustee Don Saylor; Julie Saylor, analyst, UC Davis; Bob Schneider, consultant, Verve Enterprises; and Lauren Snow, financial aid director, UC Davis School of Medicine; and $25 from Lynelle Jolley, communications, state government.”

    The only two people connected with real estate in or around Davis gave money to Lovenburg (Lynn Yackzan) and to Schelen (Bob Bockwinkle).

    What is notable about the Harris contributions is that they are almost entirely from his colleagues in the Sacramento political scene, where he makes his living. It is pretty much the same story for Bob Schelen, who also works in Sacramento politics:

    “The Schelen campaign received: $2,500 from Plumbers Pipefitters Local 447 political action fund, Sacramento; $500 from Tina Thomas, attorney, Sacramento; Phil Angelides, former state treasurer, Sacramento, Dave Jones for Assembly campaign, Sacramento; $250 from Local Union 340, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Sacramento.

    “Giving $150 were: Davis school board trustee Jim Provenza; Nancy Miller, attorney, Sacramento; and giving $100 were: Bob Bockwinkle, Realtor; Virginia Moose, retired, Sacramento; Mike Lynch Consulting, Modesto; Yolo County Supervisor Helen Thomson; Pam Neiberg, community activist; Larry Sheingold, political consultant, Sacramento; former city councilman Jerry and Teresa Kaneko, retired; Christine Totah, parent activist; Barbara Geisler; Yolo County public guardian Cass Sylvia; Yolo County public defender Barry Melton; Robert Abelon, Jr. campaign aide with Cabaldon for Assembly; Sheryl Cambron. Other amounts given were: $99 from Barbara Langer, self-employed; $50 from Joe and Shirley Hammond, retired; Corky Brown, retired; city councilman and former school board trustee Don Saylor; Charles Godefroy; Sharla Cheney Harrington; and Evan Rothstein. There were various contributions under $50.”

  12. Rich Rifkin

    “perhaps Harris will send some of that developer cash that his campaign is wallowing in to the Wayfarer Center.”

    Developer cash? That is unfounded and completely untrue.

    If you read Sunday’s front page story in The Enterprise, Richard Harris’s campaign contributors were listed. I don’t believe a single one is “a developer” or a realtor:

    “The Harris campaign received the following contributions (from Davis, unless otherwise noted): $250 from the Mike Thomson for Congress campaign; also Katherine Schroeder, CFO with the Seneca Center. Giving $200 were: Robert Blattner, lobbyist; Heidy Kellison, homemaker; Gavin Payne, department superintendent with the California Department of Education; Timothy Schott, lobbyist, Sacramento.”

    “Giving $150 were: Jenifer West, lobbyist, Sacramento; and $100 came from Thomas Adams, executive director with a state government agency; Elena Almanzo, attorney with California Department of Justice; Sharon Ball, a physician; Ann Evans, a writer and food consultant; former Congressman Vic Fazio, attorney, Washington DC; Jeffrey Harris, attorney, Sacramento; Anthony Hernandez, director of California government affairs, CH2M Hill, Sacramento; Christopher Lehman, development consultant, Arcata; Lescroart Corp.; Jim Lites, Jr., lobbyist, Sacramento; Steven Maccaulay, legislative advocate, California Urban Water Association; city councilman and former school board trustee Don Saylor; Julie Saylor, analyst, UC Davis; Bob Schneider, consultant, Verve Enterprises; and Lauren Snow, financial aid director, UC Davis School of Medicine; and $25 from Lynelle Jolley, communications, state government.”

    The only two people connected with real estate in or around Davis gave money to Lovenburg (Lynn Yackzan) and to Schelen (Bob Bockwinkle).

    What is notable about the Harris contributions is that they are almost entirely from his colleagues in the Sacramento political scene, where he makes his living. It is pretty much the same story for Bob Schelen, who also works in Sacramento politics:

    “The Schelen campaign received: $2,500 from Plumbers Pipefitters Local 447 political action fund, Sacramento; $500 from Tina Thomas, attorney, Sacramento; Phil Angelides, former state treasurer, Sacramento, Dave Jones for Assembly campaign, Sacramento; $250 from Local Union 340, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Sacramento.

    “Giving $150 were: Davis school board trustee Jim Provenza; Nancy Miller, attorney, Sacramento; and giving $100 were: Bob Bockwinkle, Realtor; Virginia Moose, retired, Sacramento; Mike Lynch Consulting, Modesto; Yolo County Supervisor Helen Thomson; Pam Neiberg, community activist; Larry Sheingold, political consultant, Sacramento; former city councilman Jerry and Teresa Kaneko, retired; Christine Totah, parent activist; Barbara Geisler; Yolo County public guardian Cass Sylvia; Yolo County public defender Barry Melton; Robert Abelon, Jr. campaign aide with Cabaldon for Assembly; Sheryl Cambron. Other amounts given were: $99 from Barbara Langer, self-employed; $50 from Joe and Shirley Hammond, retired; Corky Brown, retired; city councilman and former school board trustee Don Saylor; Charles Godefroy; Sharla Cheney Harrington; and Evan Rothstein. There were various contributions under $50.”

  13. Rich Rifkin

    FWIW, Phil Angelides, who gave money to Schelen, is also a developer. But I don’t think Angelides has any interest in developing properties affected by decision of the DJUSD. I’m pretty sure that he, like all of Harris’s contributors, was simply helping out a person he knows and likes, Bob Schelen. Although the conspiratorially minded want to believe otherwise, I don’t think any real estate developers are trying to elect favored candidates to the Davis school board.

  14. Rich Rifkin

    FWIW, Phil Angelides, who gave money to Schelen, is also a developer. But I don’t think Angelides has any interest in developing properties affected by decision of the DJUSD. I’m pretty sure that he, like all of Harris’s contributors, was simply helping out a person he knows and likes, Bob Schelen. Although the conspiratorially minded want to believe otherwise, I don’t think any real estate developers are trying to elect favored candidates to the Davis school board.

  15. Rich Rifkin

    FWIW, Phil Angelides, who gave money to Schelen, is also a developer. But I don’t think Angelides has any interest in developing properties affected by decision of the DJUSD. I’m pretty sure that he, like all of Harris’s contributors, was simply helping out a person he knows and likes, Bob Schelen. Although the conspiratorially minded want to believe otherwise, I don’t think any real estate developers are trying to elect favored candidates to the Davis school board.

  16. Rich Rifkin

    FWIW, Phil Angelides, who gave money to Schelen, is also a developer. But I don’t think Angelides has any interest in developing properties affected by decision of the DJUSD. I’m pretty sure that he, like all of Harris’s contributors, was simply helping out a person he knows and likes, Bob Schelen. Although the conspiratorially minded want to believe otherwise, I don’t think any real estate developers are trying to elect favored candidates to the Davis school board.

  17. Doug Paul Davis

    Normally I welcome a free discussion, however, I don’t want people to lose focus here on the charity benefit that we are trying to do.

    Rich–I assume you will be contributing? Localdem?

  18. Doug Paul Davis

    Normally I welcome a free discussion, however, I don’t want people to lose focus here on the charity benefit that we are trying to do.

    Rich–I assume you will be contributing? Localdem?

  19. Doug Paul Davis

    Normally I welcome a free discussion, however, I don’t want people to lose focus here on the charity benefit that we are trying to do.

    Rich–I assume you will be contributing? Localdem?

  20. Doug Paul Davis

    Normally I welcome a free discussion, however, I don’t want people to lose focus here on the charity benefit that we are trying to do.

    Rich–I assume you will be contributing? Localdem?

  21. RIP

    “It’s not so much that the turkeys will physically harm anybody. I’m fairly certain they are vegetarians.”

    Not true. The turkeys in the Davis Cemetary are definitely not vegitarians – come over at midnight and see for yourself. Don’t bring any small dogs.

  22. RIP

    “It’s not so much that the turkeys will physically harm anybody. I’m fairly certain they are vegetarians.”

    Not true. The turkeys in the Davis Cemetary are definitely not vegitarians – come over at midnight and see for yourself. Don’t bring any small dogs.

  23. RIP

    “It’s not so much that the turkeys will physically harm anybody. I’m fairly certain they are vegetarians.”

    Not true. The turkeys in the Davis Cemetary are definitely not vegitarians – come over at midnight and see for yourself. Don’t bring any small dogs.

  24. RIP

    “It’s not so much that the turkeys will physically harm anybody. I’m fairly certain they are vegetarians.”

    Not true. The turkeys in the Davis Cemetary are definitely not vegitarians – come over at midnight and see for yourself. Don’t bring any small dogs.

  25. Anonymous

    From the Wild Turkey Zone:

    “Wild turkeys are opportunistic omnivores, eating a variety of plant and animal matter wherever and whenever available. Poults eat large quantities of insects and other animal matter to get protein needed for rapid development. Poults double their weight each week for the first 4 weeks. As turkeys grow older, plant material becomes the primary food source. About 90 percent of the mature turkey’s diet comes from plants, including green foliage of grasses, vines, and forbs; acorns; buds; seeds; and fruits of various types. Wild turkeys eat a variety of cultivated crops, including soybeans, corn, sorghum, wheat, oats, ryegrass, chufa, and clovers. Often these species are planted in food plots. While food plots are controversial in their actual benefits to wild turkeys, they are more biologically sound than are supplemental feedings. Supplemental feeding can be detrimental to turkey populations, because it tends to concentrate flocks, making them more susceptible to poaching, and facilitates the transmission of parasites and diseases.”

  26. Anonymous

    From the Wild Turkey Zone:

    “Wild turkeys are opportunistic omnivores, eating a variety of plant and animal matter wherever and whenever available. Poults eat large quantities of insects and other animal matter to get protein needed for rapid development. Poults double their weight each week for the first 4 weeks. As turkeys grow older, plant material becomes the primary food source. About 90 percent of the mature turkey’s diet comes from plants, including green foliage of grasses, vines, and forbs; acorns; buds; seeds; and fruits of various types. Wild turkeys eat a variety of cultivated crops, including soybeans, corn, sorghum, wheat, oats, ryegrass, chufa, and clovers. Often these species are planted in food plots. While food plots are controversial in their actual benefits to wild turkeys, they are more biologically sound than are supplemental feedings. Supplemental feeding can be detrimental to turkey populations, because it tends to concentrate flocks, making them more susceptible to poaching, and facilitates the transmission of parasites and diseases.”

  27. Anonymous

    From the Wild Turkey Zone:

    “Wild turkeys are opportunistic omnivores, eating a variety of plant and animal matter wherever and whenever available. Poults eat large quantities of insects and other animal matter to get protein needed for rapid development. Poults double their weight each week for the first 4 weeks. As turkeys grow older, plant material becomes the primary food source. About 90 percent of the mature turkey’s diet comes from plants, including green foliage of grasses, vines, and forbs; acorns; buds; seeds; and fruits of various types. Wild turkeys eat a variety of cultivated crops, including soybeans, corn, sorghum, wheat, oats, ryegrass, chufa, and clovers. Often these species are planted in food plots. While food plots are controversial in their actual benefits to wild turkeys, they are more biologically sound than are supplemental feedings. Supplemental feeding can be detrimental to turkey populations, because it tends to concentrate flocks, making them more susceptible to poaching, and facilitates the transmission of parasites and diseases.”

  28. Anonymous

    From the Wild Turkey Zone:

    “Wild turkeys are opportunistic omnivores, eating a variety of plant and animal matter wherever and whenever available. Poults eat large quantities of insects and other animal matter to get protein needed for rapid development. Poults double their weight each week for the first 4 weeks. As turkeys grow older, plant material becomes the primary food source. About 90 percent of the mature turkey’s diet comes from plants, including green foliage of grasses, vines, and forbs; acorns; buds; seeds; and fruits of various types. Wild turkeys eat a variety of cultivated crops, including soybeans, corn, sorghum, wheat, oats, ryegrass, chufa, and clovers. Often these species are planted in food plots. While food plots are controversial in their actual benefits to wild turkeys, they are more biologically sound than are supplemental feedings. Supplemental feeding can be detrimental to turkey populations, because it tends to concentrate flocks, making them more susceptible to poaching, and facilitates the transmission of parasites and diseases.”

  29. Developer Observer

    Rich Rifkin and Localdem you are both wrong.

    Rich – Wrong once again. Always trying to defend your fellow columnists even when they’re wrong. Always trying to defend the establishment.

    Let’s see. You say that it’s wrong to say that Richard Harris is funded by developers? Just look at his endorsements.

    One local construction company owner who has supported Harris is

    Chuck Roe, of Pyramid Construction, Inc. Chuck the developer of the horrible eyesore being built next to Taco Bell downtown. Chuck Roe the developer of many eyesores. There are others, but this is just one.

    Sorry Rich, you have to stop being an apologist for those that wish to turn Davis into a Natomas or Elk Grove.

    “I don’t think any real estate developers are trying to elect favored candidates to the Davis school board.”

    Look at his contributors more closely. Take the rose colored lenses off and look.

    On to the important issue here:

    Good job DPD and Rexroad. I’ll donate some birds. Glad to see you two doing this.

  30. Developer Observer

    Rich Rifkin and Localdem you are both wrong.

    Rich – Wrong once again. Always trying to defend your fellow columnists even when they’re wrong. Always trying to defend the establishment.

    Let’s see. You say that it’s wrong to say that Richard Harris is funded by developers? Just look at his endorsements.

    One local construction company owner who has supported Harris is

    Chuck Roe, of Pyramid Construction, Inc. Chuck the developer of the horrible eyesore being built next to Taco Bell downtown. Chuck Roe the developer of many eyesores. There are others, but this is just one.

    Sorry Rich, you have to stop being an apologist for those that wish to turn Davis into a Natomas or Elk Grove.

    “I don’t think any real estate developers are trying to elect favored candidates to the Davis school board.”

    Look at his contributors more closely. Take the rose colored lenses off and look.

    On to the important issue here:

    Good job DPD and Rexroad. I’ll donate some birds. Glad to see you two doing this.

  31. Developer Observer

    Rich Rifkin and Localdem you are both wrong.

    Rich – Wrong once again. Always trying to defend your fellow columnists even when they’re wrong. Always trying to defend the establishment.

    Let’s see. You say that it’s wrong to say that Richard Harris is funded by developers? Just look at his endorsements.

    One local construction company owner who has supported Harris is

    Chuck Roe, of Pyramid Construction, Inc. Chuck the developer of the horrible eyesore being built next to Taco Bell downtown. Chuck Roe the developer of many eyesores. There are others, but this is just one.

    Sorry Rich, you have to stop being an apologist for those that wish to turn Davis into a Natomas or Elk Grove.

    “I don’t think any real estate developers are trying to elect favored candidates to the Davis school board.”

    Look at his contributors more closely. Take the rose colored lenses off and look.

    On to the important issue here:

    Good job DPD and Rexroad. I’ll donate some birds. Glad to see you two doing this.

  32. Developer Observer

    Rich Rifkin and Localdem you are both wrong.

    Rich – Wrong once again. Always trying to defend your fellow columnists even when they’re wrong. Always trying to defend the establishment.

    Let’s see. You say that it’s wrong to say that Richard Harris is funded by developers? Just look at his endorsements.

    One local construction company owner who has supported Harris is

    Chuck Roe, of Pyramid Construction, Inc. Chuck the developer of the horrible eyesore being built next to Taco Bell downtown. Chuck Roe the developer of many eyesores. There are others, but this is just one.

    Sorry Rich, you have to stop being an apologist for those that wish to turn Davis into a Natomas or Elk Grove.

    “I don’t think any real estate developers are trying to elect favored candidates to the Davis school board.”

    Look at his contributors more closely. Take the rose colored lenses off and look.

    On to the important issue here:

    Good job DPD and Rexroad. I’ll donate some birds. Glad to see you two doing this.

  33. Karl

    Developer Observer-

    It takes more than one point to show a trend. Do you have more evidence to prove your point?

    As it stands, Rich provided a wealth of information to support his (impartial) thesis that Harris is getting support from his political associates in Sac. He had a simple point, and he proved it.

  34. Karl

    Developer Observer-

    It takes more than one point to show a trend. Do you have more evidence to prove your point?

    As it stands, Rich provided a wealth of information to support his (impartial) thesis that Harris is getting support from his political associates in Sac. He had a simple point, and he proved it.

  35. Karl

    Developer Observer-

    It takes more than one point to show a trend. Do you have more evidence to prove your point?

    As it stands, Rich provided a wealth of information to support his (impartial) thesis that Harris is getting support from his political associates in Sac. He had a simple point, and he proved it.

  36. Karl

    Developer Observer-

    It takes more than one point to show a trend. Do you have more evidence to prove your point?

    As it stands, Rich provided a wealth of information to support his (impartial) thesis that Harris is getting support from his political associates in Sac. He had a simple point, and he proved it.

  37. don shor

    Rich – Wrong once again. Always trying to defend your fellow columnists even when they’re wrong. Always trying to defend the establishment.
    That is one of the most ridiculous comments I have read on this blog.

    BTW, Chuck Roe’s building next to Taco Bell, IMO, is a big improvement over what was there and is going to be an asset to the neighborhood and the downtown.

    Now, back to the turkeys…

  38. don shor

    Rich – Wrong once again. Always trying to defend your fellow columnists even when they’re wrong. Always trying to defend the establishment.
    That is one of the most ridiculous comments I have read on this blog.

    BTW, Chuck Roe’s building next to Taco Bell, IMO, is a big improvement over what was there and is going to be an asset to the neighborhood and the downtown.

    Now, back to the turkeys…

  39. don shor

    Rich – Wrong once again. Always trying to defend your fellow columnists even when they’re wrong. Always trying to defend the establishment.
    That is one of the most ridiculous comments I have read on this blog.

    BTW, Chuck Roe’s building next to Taco Bell, IMO, is a big improvement over what was there and is going to be an asset to the neighborhood and the downtown.

    Now, back to the turkeys…

  40. don shor

    Rich – Wrong once again. Always trying to defend your fellow columnists even when they’re wrong. Always trying to defend the establishment.
    That is one of the most ridiculous comments I have read on this blog.

    BTW, Chuck Roe’s building next to Taco Bell, IMO, is a big improvement over what was there and is going to be an asset to the neighborhood and the downtown.

    Now, back to the turkeys…

  41. Rich Rifkin

    “Chuck the developer of the horrible eyesore being built next to Taco Bell downtown. Chuck Roe the developer of many eyesores. There are others, but this is just one.”

    Chuck wasn’t actually on this list of contributors to Richard’s campaign that I saw. But if he gave $100 to Harris, so what?

    I happen to like Chuck’s buildings. He developed (and owns) the mixed use building at 3rd & C Streets (Crepeville). You may call that “an eyesore.” I rated it in one of my columns as one of the five nicest buildings in the core area.

    Chuck also built The Lofts on E Street. While much of the credit for its pulchritude is owed to its brilliant architect, Richard Berteaux of Davis (who was a colleague of mine on the HRMC), The Lofts also rated in the top 5 of core area buildings.

    The building you hate so much at the corner of 5th and G is not yet complete. But from what we can see now, it looks very nice. As Don Shor said, it is a huge improvement over the gas station/weedy lot which had been on that corner.

    And in contrast with the very bland and uninviting USDA building on the southeast corner of 5th & G, the Roe building engages the street and is architecturally interesting. Nothing Chuck builds is cookie cutter. Perhaps you prefer truly bland buildings. I don’t.

  42. Rich Rifkin

    “Chuck the developer of the horrible eyesore being built next to Taco Bell downtown. Chuck Roe the developer of many eyesores. There are others, but this is just one.”

    Chuck wasn’t actually on this list of contributors to Richard’s campaign that I saw. But if he gave $100 to Harris, so what?

    I happen to like Chuck’s buildings. He developed (and owns) the mixed use building at 3rd & C Streets (Crepeville). You may call that “an eyesore.” I rated it in one of my columns as one of the five nicest buildings in the core area.

    Chuck also built The Lofts on E Street. While much of the credit for its pulchritude is owed to its brilliant architect, Richard Berteaux of Davis (who was a colleague of mine on the HRMC), The Lofts also rated in the top 5 of core area buildings.

    The building you hate so much at the corner of 5th and G is not yet complete. But from what we can see now, it looks very nice. As Don Shor said, it is a huge improvement over the gas station/weedy lot which had been on that corner.

    And in contrast with the very bland and uninviting USDA building on the southeast corner of 5th & G, the Roe building engages the street and is architecturally interesting. Nothing Chuck builds is cookie cutter. Perhaps you prefer truly bland buildings. I don’t.

  43. Rich Rifkin

    “Chuck the developer of the horrible eyesore being built next to Taco Bell downtown. Chuck Roe the developer of many eyesores. There are others, but this is just one.”

    Chuck wasn’t actually on this list of contributors to Richard’s campaign that I saw. But if he gave $100 to Harris, so what?

    I happen to like Chuck’s buildings. He developed (and owns) the mixed use building at 3rd & C Streets (Crepeville). You may call that “an eyesore.” I rated it in one of my columns as one of the five nicest buildings in the core area.

    Chuck also built The Lofts on E Street. While much of the credit for its pulchritude is owed to its brilliant architect, Richard Berteaux of Davis (who was a colleague of mine on the HRMC), The Lofts also rated in the top 5 of core area buildings.

    The building you hate so much at the corner of 5th and G is not yet complete. But from what we can see now, it looks very nice. As Don Shor said, it is a huge improvement over the gas station/weedy lot which had been on that corner.

    And in contrast with the very bland and uninviting USDA building on the southeast corner of 5th & G, the Roe building engages the street and is architecturally interesting. Nothing Chuck builds is cookie cutter. Perhaps you prefer truly bland buildings. I don’t.

  44. Rich Rifkin

    “Chuck the developer of the horrible eyesore being built next to Taco Bell downtown. Chuck Roe the developer of many eyesores. There are others, but this is just one.”

    Chuck wasn’t actually on this list of contributors to Richard’s campaign that I saw. But if he gave $100 to Harris, so what?

    I happen to like Chuck’s buildings. He developed (and owns) the mixed use building at 3rd & C Streets (Crepeville). You may call that “an eyesore.” I rated it in one of my columns as one of the five nicest buildings in the core area.

    Chuck also built The Lofts on E Street. While much of the credit for its pulchritude is owed to its brilliant architect, Richard Berteaux of Davis (who was a colleague of mine on the HRMC), The Lofts also rated in the top 5 of core area buildings.

    The building you hate so much at the corner of 5th and G is not yet complete. But from what we can see now, it looks very nice. As Don Shor said, it is a huge improvement over the gas station/weedy lot which had been on that corner.

    And in contrast with the very bland and uninviting USDA building on the southeast corner of 5th & G, the Roe building engages the street and is architecturally interesting. Nothing Chuck builds is cookie cutter. Perhaps you prefer truly bland buildings. I don’t.

  45. Anonymous

    Don Shor wrote

    “BTW, Chuck Roe’s building next to Taco Bell, IMO, is a big improvement over what was there and is going to be an asset to the neighborhood and the downtown.”

    Except it looks like giant up-ended
    shoeboxes slapped together. As Don Saylor said about the tunnel the Mishka’s owner and his cronies want to
    deface the interior or the Varsity Theatre with: “plug-ugly”
    Or, in other words,
    yet another eyesore clogging the Davis cityscape.

  46. Anonymous

    Don Shor wrote

    “BTW, Chuck Roe’s building next to Taco Bell, IMO, is a big improvement over what was there and is going to be an asset to the neighborhood and the downtown.”

    Except it looks like giant up-ended
    shoeboxes slapped together. As Don Saylor said about the tunnel the Mishka’s owner and his cronies want to
    deface the interior or the Varsity Theatre with: “plug-ugly”
    Or, in other words,
    yet another eyesore clogging the Davis cityscape.

  47. Anonymous

    Don Shor wrote

    “BTW, Chuck Roe’s building next to Taco Bell, IMO, is a big improvement over what was there and is going to be an asset to the neighborhood and the downtown.”

    Except it looks like giant up-ended
    shoeboxes slapped together. As Don Saylor said about the tunnel the Mishka’s owner and his cronies want to
    deface the interior or the Varsity Theatre with: “plug-ugly”
    Or, in other words,
    yet another eyesore clogging the Davis cityscape.

  48. Anonymous

    Don Shor wrote

    “BTW, Chuck Roe’s building next to Taco Bell, IMO, is a big improvement over what was there and is going to be an asset to the neighborhood and the downtown.”

    Except it looks like giant up-ended
    shoeboxes slapped together. As Don Saylor said about the tunnel the Mishka’s owner and his cronies want to
    deface the interior or the Varsity Theatre with: “plug-ugly”
    Or, in other words,
    yet another eyesore clogging the Davis cityscape.

  49. Anonymous

    This is so typical of Davis politics, while a republican is trying to make sure people have a decent Thanksgiving the so-called progressives on this blog are worried about developers giving money to local candidates for school board. Watch out next thing you know those school board people will be advocating for people to have places to live in addition to being fed on Thanksgiving. Two positions the Davis progressives probably oppose.

  50. Anonymous

    This is so typical of Davis politics, while a republican is trying to make sure people have a decent Thanksgiving the so-called progressives on this blog are worried about developers giving money to local candidates for school board. Watch out next thing you know those school board people will be advocating for people to have places to live in addition to being fed on Thanksgiving. Two positions the Davis progressives probably oppose.

  51. Anonymous

    This is so typical of Davis politics, while a republican is trying to make sure people have a decent Thanksgiving the so-called progressives on this blog are worried about developers giving money to local candidates for school board. Watch out next thing you know those school board people will be advocating for people to have places to live in addition to being fed on Thanksgiving. Two positions the Davis progressives probably oppose.

  52. Anonymous

    This is so typical of Davis politics, while a republican is trying to make sure people have a decent Thanksgiving the so-called progressives on this blog are worried about developers giving money to local candidates for school board. Watch out next thing you know those school board people will be advocating for people to have places to live in addition to being fed on Thanksgiving. Two positions the Davis progressives probably oppose.

  53. Rich Rifkin

    A-non wrote: “Except it looks like giant up-ended shoeboxes slapped together.”

    Regardless of your commentary, I think it looks quite nice, so far. But it’s ultimately just a matter of taste. If you are so unhappy with The Roe Building’s architecture, perhaps you can point to a contemporary building in Davis which you believe is a better example of quality design?

    As I’ve noted in my column, the best new building in Davis is the Chen Building (at 2nd & G). Maybe that is more to your taste?

  54. Rich Rifkin

    A-non wrote: “Except it looks like giant up-ended shoeboxes slapped together.”

    Regardless of your commentary, I think it looks quite nice, so far. But it’s ultimately just a matter of taste. If you are so unhappy with The Roe Building’s architecture, perhaps you can point to a contemporary building in Davis which you believe is a better example of quality design?

    As I’ve noted in my column, the best new building in Davis is the Chen Building (at 2nd & G). Maybe that is more to your taste?

  55. Rich Rifkin

    A-non wrote: “Except it looks like giant up-ended shoeboxes slapped together.”

    Regardless of your commentary, I think it looks quite nice, so far. But it’s ultimately just a matter of taste. If you are so unhappy with The Roe Building’s architecture, perhaps you can point to a contemporary building in Davis which you believe is a better example of quality design?

    As I’ve noted in my column, the best new building in Davis is the Chen Building (at 2nd & G). Maybe that is more to your taste?

  56. Rich Rifkin

    A-non wrote: “Except it looks like giant up-ended shoeboxes slapped together.”

    Regardless of your commentary, I think it looks quite nice, so far. But it’s ultimately just a matter of taste. If you are so unhappy with The Roe Building’s architecture, perhaps you can point to a contemporary building in Davis which you believe is a better example of quality design?

    As I’ve noted in my column, the best new building in Davis is the Chen Building (at 2nd & G). Maybe that is more to your taste?

  57. Rich Rifkin

    “Also I like the Eleanor Roosevelt Circle.”

    Here’s a picture of Eleanor Roosevelt Circle. I don’t think it’s ugly. However, it seems rather ordinary to single out as exceptional design.

    “Palm court hotel and Crepeville”

    I’m with you on Crepeville. That’s a nice Chuck Roe building, of course.

    On the inside, the Palm Court Hotel is very nice. And while I like the exterior design — it does an especially good job of hiding the fact how big it is — the faux Spanish style has been done a million times, and much better in places like Santa Barbara (where I used to live). Nonetheless, it’s not a terrible choice.

    FWIW, the house with the newly expanded outdoor seating and porch at the corner of 3rd and C — katty corner from Crepeville — which used to house Hibachi Grille, looks like a very nice adaptation to me. I’m sure some will argue it is kitschy, but I really like the mural they painted under the old gable (you’ll see it as you walk up the steps). I don’t know when that place is going to open, but it looks just about done. I have a feeling it’s going to be very popular, based on the setting.

  58. Rich Rifkin

    “Also I like the Eleanor Roosevelt Circle.”

    Here’s a picture of Eleanor Roosevelt Circle. I don’t think it’s ugly. However, it seems rather ordinary to single out as exceptional design.

    “Palm court hotel and Crepeville”

    I’m with you on Crepeville. That’s a nice Chuck Roe building, of course.

    On the inside, the Palm Court Hotel is very nice. And while I like the exterior design — it does an especially good job of hiding the fact how big it is — the faux Spanish style has been done a million times, and much better in places like Santa Barbara (where I used to live). Nonetheless, it’s not a terrible choice.

    FWIW, the house with the newly expanded outdoor seating and porch at the corner of 3rd and C — katty corner from Crepeville — which used to house Hibachi Grille, looks like a very nice adaptation to me. I’m sure some will argue it is kitschy, but I really like the mural they painted under the old gable (you’ll see it as you walk up the steps). I don’t know when that place is going to open, but it looks just about done. I have a feeling it’s going to be very popular, based on the setting.

  59. Rich Rifkin

    “Also I like the Eleanor Roosevelt Circle.”

    Here’s a picture of Eleanor Roosevelt Circle. I don’t think it’s ugly. However, it seems rather ordinary to single out as exceptional design.

    “Palm court hotel and Crepeville”

    I’m with you on Crepeville. That’s a nice Chuck Roe building, of course.

    On the inside, the Palm Court Hotel is very nice. And while I like the exterior design — it does an especially good job of hiding the fact how big it is — the faux Spanish style has been done a million times, and much better in places like Santa Barbara (where I used to live). Nonetheless, it’s not a terrible choice.

    FWIW, the house with the newly expanded outdoor seating and porch at the corner of 3rd and C — katty corner from Crepeville — which used to house Hibachi Grille, looks like a very nice adaptation to me. I’m sure some will argue it is kitschy, but I really like the mural they painted under the old gable (you’ll see it as you walk up the steps). I don’t know when that place is going to open, but it looks just about done. I have a feeling it’s going to be very popular, based on the setting.

  60. Rich Rifkin

    “Also I like the Eleanor Roosevelt Circle.”

    Here’s a picture of Eleanor Roosevelt Circle. I don’t think it’s ugly. However, it seems rather ordinary to single out as exceptional design.

    “Palm court hotel and Crepeville”

    I’m with you on Crepeville. That’s a nice Chuck Roe building, of course.

    On the inside, the Palm Court Hotel is very nice. And while I like the exterior design — it does an especially good job of hiding the fact how big it is — the faux Spanish style has been done a million times, and much better in places like Santa Barbara (where I used to live). Nonetheless, it’s not a terrible choice.

    FWIW, the house with the newly expanded outdoor seating and porch at the corner of 3rd and C — katty corner from Crepeville — which used to house Hibachi Grille, looks like a very nice adaptation to me. I’m sure some will argue it is kitschy, but I really like the mural they painted under the old gable (you’ll see it as you walk up the steps). I don’t know when that place is going to open, but it looks just about done. I have a feeling it’s going to be very popular, based on the setting.

  61. Anonymous

    “I’m with you on Crepeville. That’s a nice [prefab] Chuck Roe building, of course.”

    Kitty-corner across the intersection of 3rd and C, a new establishment, Burger and Brews, is getting ready to open for business in a wonderfully remodeled structure. Unlike the nail-gun wielding, sheet-rock hanging unskilled laborers who piece together prefab projects around town, real carpenters are at work on this remodel. Using top-grade lumber and other materials while integrating the extended porch and interior features with care and craftsmanship into the original design, they are doing a fine job of adding a subtly attractive structure to the downtown built landscape.
    Abstract political/economic concerns about taste aside, the care with which real carpenters work is evident in the quality of this particular building.
    Also, the living landscaping fits in nicely with the overall design of this project in a complementary fashion.

  62. Anonymous

    “I’m with you on Crepeville. That’s a nice [prefab] Chuck Roe building, of course.”

    Kitty-corner across the intersection of 3rd and C, a new establishment, Burger and Brews, is getting ready to open for business in a wonderfully remodeled structure. Unlike the nail-gun wielding, sheet-rock hanging unskilled laborers who piece together prefab projects around town, real carpenters are at work on this remodel. Using top-grade lumber and other materials while integrating the extended porch and interior features with care and craftsmanship into the original design, they are doing a fine job of adding a subtly attractive structure to the downtown built landscape.
    Abstract political/economic concerns about taste aside, the care with which real carpenters work is evident in the quality of this particular building.
    Also, the living landscaping fits in nicely with the overall design of this project in a complementary fashion.

  63. Anonymous

    “I’m with you on Crepeville. That’s a nice [prefab] Chuck Roe building, of course.”

    Kitty-corner across the intersection of 3rd and C, a new establishment, Burger and Brews, is getting ready to open for business in a wonderfully remodeled structure. Unlike the nail-gun wielding, sheet-rock hanging unskilled laborers who piece together prefab projects around town, real carpenters are at work on this remodel. Using top-grade lumber and other materials while integrating the extended porch and interior features with care and craftsmanship into the original design, they are doing a fine job of adding a subtly attractive structure to the downtown built landscape.
    Abstract political/economic concerns about taste aside, the care with which real carpenters work is evident in the quality of this particular building.
    Also, the living landscaping fits in nicely with the overall design of this project in a complementary fashion.

  64. Anonymous

    “I’m with you on Crepeville. That’s a nice [prefab] Chuck Roe building, of course.”

    Kitty-corner across the intersection of 3rd and C, a new establishment, Burger and Brews, is getting ready to open for business in a wonderfully remodeled structure. Unlike the nail-gun wielding, sheet-rock hanging unskilled laborers who piece together prefab projects around town, real carpenters are at work on this remodel. Using top-grade lumber and other materials while integrating the extended porch and interior features with care and craftsmanship into the original design, they are doing a fine job of adding a subtly attractive structure to the downtown built landscape.
    Abstract political/economic concerns about taste aside, the care with which real carpenters work is evident in the quality of this particular building.
    Also, the living landscaping fits in nicely with the overall design of this project in a complementary fashion.

  65. Rich Rifkin

    The Crepeville building is not prefab. Perhaps it does not have the workmanship of Burger & Brews — I must say, I was really, really impressed when I saw some of the work they are doing (albeit very slowly), especially the painting — but the Crepeville Building is an original structure, with original architecture, like it or not. I happen to like it a lot. And as I said above, the old Hibachi Grille site, Burger and Brews, should be a huge success, there.

  66. Rich Rifkin

    The Crepeville building is not prefab. Perhaps it does not have the workmanship of Burger & Brews — I must say, I was really, really impressed when I saw some of the work they are doing (albeit very slowly), especially the painting — but the Crepeville Building is an original structure, with original architecture, like it or not. I happen to like it a lot. And as I said above, the old Hibachi Grille site, Burger and Brews, should be a huge success, there.

  67. Rich Rifkin

    The Crepeville building is not prefab. Perhaps it does not have the workmanship of Burger & Brews — I must say, I was really, really impressed when I saw some of the work they are doing (albeit very slowly), especially the painting — but the Crepeville Building is an original structure, with original architecture, like it or not. I happen to like it a lot. And as I said above, the old Hibachi Grille site, Burger and Brews, should be a huge success, there.

  68. Rich Rifkin

    The Crepeville building is not prefab. Perhaps it does not have the workmanship of Burger & Brews — I must say, I was really, really impressed when I saw some of the work they are doing (albeit very slowly), especially the painting — but the Crepeville Building is an original structure, with original architecture, like it or not. I happen to like it a lot. And as I said above, the old Hibachi Grille site, Burger and Brews, should be a huge success, there.

  69. Bauhauser

    Chuck Roe also did Aggie Village. Quite nice. I defy anyone to name any designer/builder who has done more consistently good work in Davis over the last decade. He may not be Frank Lloyd Wright, but he does high quality, innovative, reasonably priced projects that fit into Davis very well.

    When it comes to mixed use, smart growth, infill, nobody else even comes close in our little city. Roe is also patient enough to deal with our weird and often antagonistic politics. We’re lucky to have him.

    He’s also a generous supporter of many non-profit groups in town.

    I suggest picking on somebody else for your political sport.

  70. Bauhauser

    Chuck Roe also did Aggie Village. Quite nice. I defy anyone to name any designer/builder who has done more consistently good work in Davis over the last decade. He may not be Frank Lloyd Wright, but he does high quality, innovative, reasonably priced projects that fit into Davis very well.

    When it comes to mixed use, smart growth, infill, nobody else even comes close in our little city. Roe is also patient enough to deal with our weird and often antagonistic politics. We’re lucky to have him.

    He’s also a generous supporter of many non-profit groups in town.

    I suggest picking on somebody else for your political sport.

  71. Bauhauser

    Chuck Roe also did Aggie Village. Quite nice. I defy anyone to name any designer/builder who has done more consistently good work in Davis over the last decade. He may not be Frank Lloyd Wright, but he does high quality, innovative, reasonably priced projects that fit into Davis very well.

    When it comes to mixed use, smart growth, infill, nobody else even comes close in our little city. Roe is also patient enough to deal with our weird and often antagonistic politics. We’re lucky to have him.

    He’s also a generous supporter of many non-profit groups in town.

    I suggest picking on somebody else for your political sport.

  72. Bauhauser

    Chuck Roe also did Aggie Village. Quite nice. I defy anyone to name any designer/builder who has done more consistently good work in Davis over the last decade. He may not be Frank Lloyd Wright, but he does high quality, innovative, reasonably priced projects that fit into Davis very well.

    When it comes to mixed use, smart growth, infill, nobody else even comes close in our little city. Roe is also patient enough to deal with our weird and often antagonistic politics. We’re lucky to have him.

    He’s also a generous supporter of many non-profit groups in town.

    I suggest picking on somebody else for your political sport.

  73. Doug Paul Davis

    You can help by either dropping off a turkey to the Wayfarer Center in Woodland or sending a check made out to the Wayfarer Center. Mail it or deliver it to:

    711 College Street
    Woodland, 95695

  74. Doug Paul Davis

    You can help by either dropping off a turkey to the Wayfarer Center in Woodland or sending a check made out to the Wayfarer Center. Mail it or deliver it to:

    711 College Street
    Woodland, 95695

  75. Doug Paul Davis

    You can help by either dropping off a turkey to the Wayfarer Center in Woodland or sending a check made out to the Wayfarer Center. Mail it or deliver it to:

    711 College Street
    Woodland, 95695

  76. Doug Paul Davis

    You can help by either dropping off a turkey to the Wayfarer Center in Woodland or sending a check made out to the Wayfarer Center. Mail it or deliver it to:

    711 College Street
    Woodland, 95695

  77. David Thompson

    Thanks to Vincent and Rich for their appreciated comments on ERC. I’d like to post a recent photo which shows ERC at its best but I do not know how.
    David Thompson

  78. David Thompson

    Thanks to Vincent and Rich for their appreciated comments on ERC. I’d like to post a recent photo which shows ERC at its best but I do not know how.
    David Thompson

  79. David Thompson

    Thanks to Vincent and Rich for their appreciated comments on ERC. I’d like to post a recent photo which shows ERC at its best but I do not know how.
    David Thompson

  80. David Thompson

    Thanks to Vincent and Rich for their appreciated comments on ERC. I’d like to post a recent photo which shows ERC at its best but I do not know how.
    David Thompson

  81. Anonymous

    Dear “bauhauser”:

    Do you live in a bauhaus house?
    How ironic, if so. I mean that you
    harbor such bourgeoise sentiments
    and live in and support a type of
    architecture the prototype of which was first conceived by German refugees from Nazi Germany
    as housing for poor working class families.
    Tom Wolfe in his witty, tongue-in-cheek book “From Bauhaus To Our Haus” tells the whole convoluted tale whereby towns like Davis got saddled with a rash of stripped-down, soulless “International Style” boxes that are no more fun to look at than … boxes. Ah, but they are attractive to builders like Chuck Roe, because they can be thrown up in a hurry by semi-skilled laborers at low cost.

  82. Anonymous

    Dear “bauhauser”:

    Do you live in a bauhaus house?
    How ironic, if so. I mean that you
    harbor such bourgeoise sentiments
    and live in and support a type of
    architecture the prototype of which was first conceived by German refugees from Nazi Germany
    as housing for poor working class families.
    Tom Wolfe in his witty, tongue-in-cheek book “From Bauhaus To Our Haus” tells the whole convoluted tale whereby towns like Davis got saddled with a rash of stripped-down, soulless “International Style” boxes that are no more fun to look at than … boxes. Ah, but they are attractive to builders like Chuck Roe, because they can be thrown up in a hurry by semi-skilled laborers at low cost.

  83. Anonymous

    Dear “bauhauser”:

    Do you live in a bauhaus house?
    How ironic, if so. I mean that you
    harbor such bourgeoise sentiments
    and live in and support a type of
    architecture the prototype of which was first conceived by German refugees from Nazi Germany
    as housing for poor working class families.
    Tom Wolfe in his witty, tongue-in-cheek book “From Bauhaus To Our Haus” tells the whole convoluted tale whereby towns like Davis got saddled with a rash of stripped-down, soulless “International Style” boxes that are no more fun to look at than … boxes. Ah, but they are attractive to builders like Chuck Roe, because they can be thrown up in a hurry by semi-skilled laborers at low cost.

  84. Anonymous

    Dear “bauhauser”:

    Do you live in a bauhaus house?
    How ironic, if so. I mean that you
    harbor such bourgeoise sentiments
    and live in and support a type of
    architecture the prototype of which was first conceived by German refugees from Nazi Germany
    as housing for poor working class families.
    Tom Wolfe in his witty, tongue-in-cheek book “From Bauhaus To Our Haus” tells the whole convoluted tale whereby towns like Davis got saddled with a rash of stripped-down, soulless “International Style” boxes that are no more fun to look at than … boxes. Ah, but they are attractive to builders like Chuck Roe, because they can be thrown up in a hurry by semi-skilled laborers at low cost.

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