Saturday Notes from the Underbelly

Davis to Woodland Bike Path in the Works

The County Board of Supervisors this week announced that funding was secured for a Davis-Woodland Bikepathway.

According to the staff report:

“Bids were opened October 31, 2007 and a construction contract to add 4’ bike lanes on County Road 99 between 27 and 29 was awarded to Central Valley Engineering and Paving in November 2007. Construction is expected to begin in Spring 2008 as weather allows, and to be completed after 45 working days.”

“Funding for major road improvement projects comes primarily from state and federal sources. This funding is generally awarded on a competitive, project specific basis. The discretionary revenue received by the Road Fund generally covers only the annual cost to maintain the County’s 794 road miles, with the remainder available to meet match funding requirements.

An application was submitted to SACOG for the Regional Bicycle and Pedestrian Funding Program on December 3, 2007. $1.6 million was requested for the widening of the County Road 29 segment.

A pre-application letter was submitted to SACOG on November 16, 2007 for $600,000 of SACOG Community Design Funds to improve County Road 99 between County Road 25A for bicyclists.”

Supervisors Mariko Yamada and Matt Rexroad have led the way on this.

According to Supervisor Rexroad on his blog,

“My mission in January will be to focus on the dedicated bike path between Woodland and Davis. This information will be part of the discussion.”

From the map it appears there will be dedicated four foot bike paths on both sides of the roads. While this is clearly an improvement over the existing road conditions and in fact I have enjoyed using such bike paths on some of the county roads.

That said, I would really prefer a separate bike path such as they have along Russell Blvd as it heads out to Winters (I never quite why the path suddenly stops halfway there). That way bicyclists would be separate from motorists who are traveling in excess of 60 mph along these roads.

As I said, the current plan is certainly an improvement, but if we are spending over $2 million at least in outside source money already, why not go the rest of the way for maximum safety and convenience for bicyclists?

I Object

Look at the two pictures above. One is from the Davis Enterprise website. The other is a scanned copy of yesterday’s newspaper. Anyone notice a difference between the two pictures? Apparently some of the Vanguard’s readers do. And, despite the appearances on this blog, the one on the right is much larger than the one on the left.

Before I get the sanctimonious and self-importance complaints again, I want to stress that while I find this absolutely hilarious, my objection is that they didn’t also crop the picture on the left a bit more.

Donate to the 22nd Annual Holiday Meal

from Shelly Bailes and Ellen Pontac

The Davis Food Co-op is hosting the 22nd annual Holiday Meal on Monday, Dec. 24, from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Veterans’ Memorial Center, and we need some help. Groups like Davis Community Meals and STEAC report a continuing demand for their services. Last year, the Holiday Meal served a full nutritious dinner, free of charge, to more than 800 people.

We appreciate the support we have received in the past from local businesses and individuals. Please help us continue this Davis tradition with your financial donation. Donors who contribute will have their names listed at the meal, and those who donate $50 or more will be acknowledged also in our pre- and post-event advertising. All donations of any amount are appreciated.

Please take a moment to write a check and send it to: Holiday Meal, Davis Food Co-op, 620 G St., Davis. If you wish, you may leave your contribution at the Co-op as well. For more information, just call the Co-op at 758-2667 and speak to Seth Larsen or e-mail him at slarsen@davisfood.coop.

Thanks for your help.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

Related posts

40 Comments

  1. Matt Rexroad

    David:

    We have a little room on the side of the road for bikes but I don’t deserve any credit for that. I would say it is a safer bike route. The “path” in my mind would be dedicated non-auto uses.

    The improvements mentioned have been in the works for a while. I had almost nothing to do with them. Yamada may have been involved with them but I was not.

    My only involvement so far is to advocate for a larger project. That would be a dedicated bike path between Woodland and Davis that does not have automobiles on it.

    That work starts for me in January.

    Matt Rexroad
    662-5184

  2. Matt Rexroad

    David:

    We have a little room on the side of the road for bikes but I don’t deserve any credit for that. I would say it is a safer bike route. The “path” in my mind would be dedicated non-auto uses.

    The improvements mentioned have been in the works for a while. I had almost nothing to do with them. Yamada may have been involved with them but I was not.

    My only involvement so far is to advocate for a larger project. That would be a dedicated bike path between Woodland and Davis that does not have automobiles on it.

    That work starts for me in January.

    Matt Rexroad
    662-5184

  3. Matt Rexroad

    David:

    We have a little room on the side of the road for bikes but I don’t deserve any credit for that. I would say it is a safer bike route. The “path” in my mind would be dedicated non-auto uses.

    The improvements mentioned have been in the works for a while. I had almost nothing to do with them. Yamada may have been involved with them but I was not.

    My only involvement so far is to advocate for a larger project. That would be a dedicated bike path between Woodland and Davis that does not have automobiles on it.

    That work starts for me in January.

    Matt Rexroad
    662-5184

  4. Matt Rexroad

    David:

    We have a little room on the side of the road for bikes but I don’t deserve any credit for that. I would say it is a safer bike route. The “path” in my mind would be dedicated non-auto uses.

    The improvements mentioned have been in the works for a while. I had almost nothing to do with them. Yamada may have been involved with them but I was not.

    My only involvement so far is to advocate for a larger project. That would be a dedicated bike path between Woodland and Davis that does not have automobiles on it.

    That work starts for me in January.

    Matt Rexroad
    662-5184

  5. no

    DPD – The caption under the picture should have read,

    “…In the background are teachers Steve Kelleher, center, and Cathy Haskell. (Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo)and David Greenwald, a.k.a “Doug Paul Davis” from the blog, The People’s Vanguard, of Davis that reminds us that we are a newspaper that is way out of sync with the community.

    I also noticed it and thought it was hilarious.

  6. no

    DPD – The caption under the picture should have read,

    “…In the background are teachers Steve Kelleher, center, and Cathy Haskell. (Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo)and David Greenwald, a.k.a “Doug Paul Davis” from the blog, The People’s Vanguard, of Davis that reminds us that we are a newspaper that is way out of sync with the community.

    I also noticed it and thought it was hilarious.

  7. no

    DPD – The caption under the picture should have read,

    “…In the background are teachers Steve Kelleher, center, and Cathy Haskell. (Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo)and David Greenwald, a.k.a “Doug Paul Davis” from the blog, The People’s Vanguard, of Davis that reminds us that we are a newspaper that is way out of sync with the community.

    I also noticed it and thought it was hilarious.

  8. no

    DPD – The caption under the picture should have read,

    “…In the background are teachers Steve Kelleher, center, and Cathy Haskell. (Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo)and David Greenwald, a.k.a “Doug Paul Davis” from the blog, The People’s Vanguard, of Davis that reminds us that we are a newspaper that is way out of sync with the community.

    I also noticed it and thought it was hilarious.

  9. Life is Ironic

    Loved the bit about the picture being cropped. Do you ever get the impression the Davis Enterprise is afraid of you, DPD? Now why might that be? I have also noted that certain Davis Enterprise columnists get on your blog and often try to diffuse criticism of establishment folks the Davis Enterprise supports. DPD, if the local paper is afraid of you – you should feel proud!

  10. Life is Ironic

    Loved the bit about the picture being cropped. Do you ever get the impression the Davis Enterprise is afraid of you, DPD? Now why might that be? I have also noted that certain Davis Enterprise columnists get on your blog and often try to diffuse criticism of establishment folks the Davis Enterprise supports. DPD, if the local paper is afraid of you – you should feel proud!

  11. Life is Ironic

    Loved the bit about the picture being cropped. Do you ever get the impression the Davis Enterprise is afraid of you, DPD? Now why might that be? I have also noted that certain Davis Enterprise columnists get on your blog and often try to diffuse criticism of establishment folks the Davis Enterprise supports. DPD, if the local paper is afraid of you – you should feel proud!

  12. Life is Ironic

    Loved the bit about the picture being cropped. Do you ever get the impression the Davis Enterprise is afraid of you, DPD? Now why might that be? I have also noted that certain Davis Enterprise columnists get on your blog and often try to diffuse criticism of establishment folks the Davis Enterprise supports. DPD, if the local paper is afraid of you – you should feel proud!

  13. Mike Adams

    The separate bike path debate goes on – the problem being one of separate but “equal”. What we find is that separate bike paths are built in ways that soon lead to cracking and pavement failure, and often are overgrown with the puncturiffic star thistle. If a separate bike path was going to be well made and maintained, that would get my vote, otherwise I prefer to be mainstreamed.

  14. Mike Adams

    The separate bike path debate goes on – the problem being one of separate but “equal”. What we find is that separate bike paths are built in ways that soon lead to cracking and pavement failure, and often are overgrown with the puncturiffic star thistle. If a separate bike path was going to be well made and maintained, that would get my vote, otherwise I prefer to be mainstreamed.

  15. Mike Adams

    The separate bike path debate goes on – the problem being one of separate but “equal”. What we find is that separate bike paths are built in ways that soon lead to cracking and pavement failure, and often are overgrown with the puncturiffic star thistle. If a separate bike path was going to be well made and maintained, that would get my vote, otherwise I prefer to be mainstreamed.

  16. Mike Adams

    The separate bike path debate goes on – the problem being one of separate but “equal”. What we find is that separate bike paths are built in ways that soon lead to cracking and pavement failure, and often are overgrown with the puncturiffic star thistle. If a separate bike path was going to be well made and maintained, that would get my vote, otherwise I prefer to be mainstreamed.

  17. 無名 - wu ming

    using concrete instead of asphault might help the path last longer, although it’s also be more expensive. mostly the thing that wrecks bike lanes are the tree roots of the trees planted next to them. while the shade is nice, it’s hell on pavement.

  18. 無名 - wu ming

    using concrete instead of asphault might help the path last longer, although it’s also be more expensive. mostly the thing that wrecks bike lanes are the tree roots of the trees planted next to them. while the shade is nice, it’s hell on pavement.

  19. 無名 - wu ming

    using concrete instead of asphault might help the path last longer, although it’s also be more expensive. mostly the thing that wrecks bike lanes are the tree roots of the trees planted next to them. while the shade is nice, it’s hell on pavement.

  20. 無名 - wu ming

    using concrete instead of asphault might help the path last longer, although it’s also be more expensive. mostly the thing that wrecks bike lanes are the tree roots of the trees planted next to them. while the shade is nice, it’s hell on pavement.

  21. Rich Rifkin

    wu,

    I’ve been told by two civil engineers that the bigger problem out in the rural areas is not tree roots, but irrigation. Farmers tend to flood their fields and that gets on the asphalt and really damages the roads and road shoulders. Yet, because they have political power, the county doesn’t make them pay for the damage they cause.

  22. Rich Rifkin

    wu,

    I’ve been told by two civil engineers that the bigger problem out in the rural areas is not tree roots, but irrigation. Farmers tend to flood their fields and that gets on the asphalt and really damages the roads and road shoulders. Yet, because they have political power, the county doesn’t make them pay for the damage they cause.

  23. Rich Rifkin

    wu,

    I’ve been told by two civil engineers that the bigger problem out in the rural areas is not tree roots, but irrigation. Farmers tend to flood their fields and that gets on the asphalt and really damages the roads and road shoulders. Yet, because they have political power, the county doesn’t make them pay for the damage they cause.

  24. Rich Rifkin

    wu,

    I’ve been told by two civil engineers that the bigger problem out in the rural areas is not tree roots, but irrigation. Farmers tend to flood their fields and that gets on the asphalt and really damages the roads and road shoulders. Yet, because they have political power, the county doesn’t make them pay for the damage they cause.

  25. 無名 - wu ming

    that’s probably true, i was thinking primarily about the path from russel blvd out towards winters, that goes past a line of olive trees right before it peters out.

    generally, concrete wears better than asphalt, and has the added bonus of not being oil based, for future maintainance costs. of course, concrete has its own global warming and commodity crunch problem.

  26. 無名 - wu ming

    that’s probably true, i was thinking primarily about the path from russel blvd out towards winters, that goes past a line of olive trees right before it peters out.

    generally, concrete wears better than asphalt, and has the added bonus of not being oil based, for future maintainance costs. of course, concrete has its own global warming and commodity crunch problem.

  27. 無名 - wu ming

    that’s probably true, i was thinking primarily about the path from russel blvd out towards winters, that goes past a line of olive trees right before it peters out.

    generally, concrete wears better than asphalt, and has the added bonus of not being oil based, for future maintainance costs. of course, concrete has its own global warming and commodity crunch problem.

  28. 無名 - wu ming

    that’s probably true, i was thinking primarily about the path from russel blvd out towards winters, that goes past a line of olive trees right before it peters out.

    generally, concrete wears better than asphalt, and has the added bonus of not being oil based, for future maintainance costs. of course, concrete has its own global warming and commodity crunch problem.

  29. one less car

    wuhoo- about freakin’ time on the bike path. Matt Rexroad- i’m generally surprised how much i agree with you. feel free to move to davis.

    the sad part is that someone had to die to put it on peoples radar. why it wasn’t considered earlier is beyond me. something tells me people who comment on this blog drive cars too much. its davis people- the agriculture is gone, our only identity left is biking. please ride more often, and try the county roads- you’ll see why this is needed.

    or wait until gas is 10.00 a gallon or spend your entire savings on a prius, the ‘new volvo’ of davis.

  30. one less car

    wuhoo- about freakin’ time on the bike path. Matt Rexroad- i’m generally surprised how much i agree with you. feel free to move to davis.

    the sad part is that someone had to die to put it on peoples radar. why it wasn’t considered earlier is beyond me. something tells me people who comment on this blog drive cars too much. its davis people- the agriculture is gone, our only identity left is biking. please ride more often, and try the county roads- you’ll see why this is needed.

    or wait until gas is 10.00 a gallon or spend your entire savings on a prius, the ‘new volvo’ of davis.

  31. one less car

    wuhoo- about freakin’ time on the bike path. Matt Rexroad- i’m generally surprised how much i agree with you. feel free to move to davis.

    the sad part is that someone had to die to put it on peoples radar. why it wasn’t considered earlier is beyond me. something tells me people who comment on this blog drive cars too much. its davis people- the agriculture is gone, our only identity left is biking. please ride more often, and try the county roads- you’ll see why this is needed.

    or wait until gas is 10.00 a gallon or spend your entire savings on a prius, the ‘new volvo’ of davis.

  32. one less car

    wuhoo- about freakin’ time on the bike path. Matt Rexroad- i’m generally surprised how much i agree with you. feel free to move to davis.

    the sad part is that someone had to die to put it on peoples radar. why it wasn’t considered earlier is beyond me. something tells me people who comment on this blog drive cars too much. its davis people- the agriculture is gone, our only identity left is biking. please ride more often, and try the county roads- you’ll see why this is needed.

    or wait until gas is 10.00 a gallon or spend your entire savings on a prius, the ‘new volvo’ of davis.

Leave a Reply

X Close

Newsletter Sign-Up

X Close

Monthly Subscriber Sign-Up

Enter the maximum amount you want to pay each month
$ USD
Sign up for