Commentary: Okay we get it, Don’t Cut Music

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Yesterday I made a phone call to one of the school board members on an unrelated matter. She asked if I was calling to tell her not to cut the music program. I said no somewhat jokingly but quickly added, but you shouldn’t cut the music program.

It was then that it was clear that the school board had been flooded with calls on the matter. The view was find us a way to save money or something else to cut.

The problem with cutting $4 million is that you are going to cut programs that are good, that are necessary, that people love. How do you not?

While it was refreshing to see cuts to upper administration in the form of Ginni Davis among other cuts backs in the district office, there are not enough employees there, not enough expenditure to account for much more than symbolic cuts.

A few comments.

I thought Richard Harris was out of line suggesting to teachers that they should give back part of their cost of living increase. Especially the way he in which he went about doing it. He is going to have to learn a bit more diplomatic, even when he raises valid points. I also thought he had some interesting ideas about how to save some money that the district ought to look into.

I spoke to someone about the climate coordinator position, they agreed that the position needed to be saved and seemed to believe there would probably a way to get categorical money to fund the position. There is simply too much progress that would be lost if they had to scrap this position. I understand we could say the same for fifty other positions, but this one is at least not hugely expensive.

One of the points of real concern is the shape of the district’s budget even without declining enrollment and the ensuing statewide budget cuts. For the last perhaps four years, the district has been eating into their reserves. Now to clarify, this is not the state mandated 3% reserve, as a board member explained to me that money might as well not exist. But the district also maintains its own reserve.

What happened is that under the previous CBO, they used one-time monies to fund ongoing programs. Worse yet is that the district and board really were not told this was the case. Basically as it was explained to me, the district would get these one-time monies on a consistent basis so it would look like ongoing money but the same revenue source was not consistent. Over time some of these monies would decline or fall off which put the district into the red in these areas. The district began eating into the reserves the last few years, they have now figured out why that has occurred but it has left them around $1.5 million in the hole. More on this in the future.

As I said earlier, the amount of money we are talking about is painful. It is interesting that this discussion really did not occur during the campaign for Measure Q. I’m not sure how the public would have responded if they knew that even passing Measure Q they we would be looking at this much in budget cuts. Even without state cuts, the district is still looking at $2.5 million.

As I stated before, the governor’s budget is appalling and it puts school districts across the state in dire straights. Similar levels of cuts are expected in other districts from what I have been told. A lot of these cuts will be reversed during the budget process but when you have a March 15 deadline, when the budget is probably not going to be signed until October, it just puts everyone in a bad position from a budget standpoint.

With softer cuts from the state and best prior fiscal management, we could have landed much softer. Particularly if we still had that reserve in place.

I think the district and schools need to look into perhaps non-traditional sources for revenue to help sponsor programs like music. I agreed with every said last night by the multitudes of students, teachers, and parents. It breaks my heart to watch students up there in tears some of them, asking the district to save the music program. The district should be proud with the level of articulateness of their students. This is a horrible thing to have happen.

So I agree with the board. I do not want to hear one program played off against another. One person’s heartache and pain for another does not work for me here. I want to hear out-of-the-box solutions to cutting money but also finding some alternative revenue so that we can at least save some of the programs.

I also want to reiterate a point. The best thing about what the district is doing is that they have cut a key position from the upper administration. They may cut some salaries. They are going to reorganize some of those departments. The employees who remain will likely have more responsibilities. Whatever you want to say about the operations of DJUSD, on this score they have done the right thing.

There are fortunately not three votes it appears to increase administrator salaries as Board member Susan Lovenburg suggested. In my view, I have nothing against administrators, they work hard and they do good things most of them. But you do not raise salaries of upper management during times of budget cuts. You do not tie raises of administrators to those of teachers. That is unethical. So I applaud the district and the board for being more ethical and considerate than the UC Board of Regents.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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144 thoughts on “Commentary: Okay we get it, Don’t Cut Music”

  1. DJUSD parent

    For a school board member to suggest that the teaching staff ‘give back’ their COLA is disappointing. How much was the COLA that the teachers were finally given? ONE PERCENT on the salary scale and ONE PERCENT on the benefits? (which is already bad to begin with) And they had to fight for it! Way to encourage your teaching staff – your FRONTLINES on the education front.

    $4 million is a lot of money to have to trim off the budget. There are going to be painful decision to make. The reality is DJUSD needs to look at preserving programs that benefit the majority of the students and reassessing those that do not.

    The music program benefits not only the student population but the community at large. Suggesting cuts at the elementary level would be devastating to the secondary programs in the future (i.e. feeder programs). Hundreds of students participate in the music programs our district offers.

    I believe that a real significant look at GATE needs to happen. When one looks at the small population that benefits from a program that targets a small part of our student body, how can we justify preserving GATE and cutting elementary music, librarians, and the Climate Coordinator???? Surely one can easily see that library and music programs touch ALL students, but GATE hits only the SPECIAL FEW.

    Oh yeah – the GATE kids are the ones with the parents who won’t accept anything less. Once again, the voices of the few are the loudest.

    DJUSD please stop catering to the special interests of the loud minority and recognize the greater need to affect positive change for all students. GATE, while it has its merits, is a SPECIAL PROGRAM that impacts a small percentage of our student population.

    But I guess you can’t elminate a program that caters to the wealthy and powerful ‘white and Asian’ families in Davis. On the other hand, it’s much easier to say ‘adios’ to a Climate Coordinator who is assigned to improve socio-economic, race, and diversity issues in our district. Or music, which allows participants from all backgrounds and educational abilities. Or librarians, who can reach out to all students through literature and the power of stories.

    GATE. Can we seriously re-think this?

  2. DJUSD parent

    For a school board member to suggest that the teaching staff ‘give back’ their COLA is disappointing. How much was the COLA that the teachers were finally given? ONE PERCENT on the salary scale and ONE PERCENT on the benefits? (which is already bad to begin with) And they had to fight for it! Way to encourage your teaching staff – your FRONTLINES on the education front.

    $4 million is a lot of money to have to trim off the budget. There are going to be painful decision to make. The reality is DJUSD needs to look at preserving programs that benefit the majority of the students and reassessing those that do not.

    The music program benefits not only the student population but the community at large. Suggesting cuts at the elementary level would be devastating to the secondary programs in the future (i.e. feeder programs). Hundreds of students participate in the music programs our district offers.

    I believe that a real significant look at GATE needs to happen. When one looks at the small population that benefits from a program that targets a small part of our student body, how can we justify preserving GATE and cutting elementary music, librarians, and the Climate Coordinator???? Surely one can easily see that library and music programs touch ALL students, but GATE hits only the SPECIAL FEW.

    Oh yeah – the GATE kids are the ones with the parents who won’t accept anything less. Once again, the voices of the few are the loudest.

    DJUSD please stop catering to the special interests of the loud minority and recognize the greater need to affect positive change for all students. GATE, while it has its merits, is a SPECIAL PROGRAM that impacts a small percentage of our student population.

    But I guess you can’t elminate a program that caters to the wealthy and powerful ‘white and Asian’ families in Davis. On the other hand, it’s much easier to say ‘adios’ to a Climate Coordinator who is assigned to improve socio-economic, race, and diversity issues in our district. Or music, which allows participants from all backgrounds and educational abilities. Or librarians, who can reach out to all students through literature and the power of stories.

    GATE. Can we seriously re-think this?

  3. DJUSD parent

    For a school board member to suggest that the teaching staff ‘give back’ their COLA is disappointing. How much was the COLA that the teachers were finally given? ONE PERCENT on the salary scale and ONE PERCENT on the benefits? (which is already bad to begin with) And they had to fight for it! Way to encourage your teaching staff – your FRONTLINES on the education front.

    $4 million is a lot of money to have to trim off the budget. There are going to be painful decision to make. The reality is DJUSD needs to look at preserving programs that benefit the majority of the students and reassessing those that do not.

    The music program benefits not only the student population but the community at large. Suggesting cuts at the elementary level would be devastating to the secondary programs in the future (i.e. feeder programs). Hundreds of students participate in the music programs our district offers.

    I believe that a real significant look at GATE needs to happen. When one looks at the small population that benefits from a program that targets a small part of our student body, how can we justify preserving GATE and cutting elementary music, librarians, and the Climate Coordinator???? Surely one can easily see that library and music programs touch ALL students, but GATE hits only the SPECIAL FEW.

    Oh yeah – the GATE kids are the ones with the parents who won’t accept anything less. Once again, the voices of the few are the loudest.

    DJUSD please stop catering to the special interests of the loud minority and recognize the greater need to affect positive change for all students. GATE, while it has its merits, is a SPECIAL PROGRAM that impacts a small percentage of our student population.

    But I guess you can’t elminate a program that caters to the wealthy and powerful ‘white and Asian’ families in Davis. On the other hand, it’s much easier to say ‘adios’ to a Climate Coordinator who is assigned to improve socio-economic, race, and diversity issues in our district. Or music, which allows participants from all backgrounds and educational abilities. Or librarians, who can reach out to all students through literature and the power of stories.

    GATE. Can we seriously re-think this?

  4. DJUSD parent

    For a school board member to suggest that the teaching staff ‘give back’ their COLA is disappointing. How much was the COLA that the teachers were finally given? ONE PERCENT on the salary scale and ONE PERCENT on the benefits? (which is already bad to begin with) And they had to fight for it! Way to encourage your teaching staff – your FRONTLINES on the education front.

    $4 million is a lot of money to have to trim off the budget. There are going to be painful decision to make. The reality is DJUSD needs to look at preserving programs that benefit the majority of the students and reassessing those that do not.

    The music program benefits not only the student population but the community at large. Suggesting cuts at the elementary level would be devastating to the secondary programs in the future (i.e. feeder programs). Hundreds of students participate in the music programs our district offers.

    I believe that a real significant look at GATE needs to happen. When one looks at the small population that benefits from a program that targets a small part of our student body, how can we justify preserving GATE and cutting elementary music, librarians, and the Climate Coordinator???? Surely one can easily see that library and music programs touch ALL students, but GATE hits only the SPECIAL FEW.

    Oh yeah – the GATE kids are the ones with the parents who won’t accept anything less. Once again, the voices of the few are the loudest.

    DJUSD please stop catering to the special interests of the loud minority and recognize the greater need to affect positive change for all students. GATE, while it has its merits, is a SPECIAL PROGRAM that impacts a small percentage of our student population.

    But I guess you can’t elminate a program that caters to the wealthy and powerful ‘white and Asian’ families in Davis. On the other hand, it’s much easier to say ‘adios’ to a Climate Coordinator who is assigned to improve socio-economic, race, and diversity issues in our district. Or music, which allows participants from all backgrounds and educational abilities. Or librarians, who can reach out to all students through literature and the power of stories.

    GATE. Can we seriously re-think this?

  5. been through this before

    Have the parents who call about the music program suggest where they think the cuts should be done. Which program should be cut?

    GATE is easy. These are the kids who will do well in any situation – the way that it is run now. The true GATE kids, the ones that struggle in a regular program, are not being served and are often pushed out of the high-achieving, competitive environment of the current GATE program. But I don’t know how cutting GATE will save money as these kids will have to be taught one way or another.

    I believe that Sports will take a big hit. Student Services – secretaries, counselors, librarians, vice principals, etc. – will take a huge hit. The music program will have to shoulder some of the cuts.

  6. been through this before

    Have the parents who call about the music program suggest where they think the cuts should be done. Which program should be cut?

    GATE is easy. These are the kids who will do well in any situation – the way that it is run now. The true GATE kids, the ones that struggle in a regular program, are not being served and are often pushed out of the high-achieving, competitive environment of the current GATE program. But I don’t know how cutting GATE will save money as these kids will have to be taught one way or another.

    I believe that Sports will take a big hit. Student Services – secretaries, counselors, librarians, vice principals, etc. – will take a huge hit. The music program will have to shoulder some of the cuts.

  7. been through this before

    Have the parents who call about the music program suggest where they think the cuts should be done. Which program should be cut?

    GATE is easy. These are the kids who will do well in any situation – the way that it is run now. The true GATE kids, the ones that struggle in a regular program, are not being served and are often pushed out of the high-achieving, competitive environment of the current GATE program. But I don’t know how cutting GATE will save money as these kids will have to be taught one way or another.

    I believe that Sports will take a big hit. Student Services – secretaries, counselors, librarians, vice principals, etc. – will take a huge hit. The music program will have to shoulder some of the cuts.

  8. been through this before

    Have the parents who call about the music program suggest where they think the cuts should be done. Which program should be cut?

    GATE is easy. These are the kids who will do well in any situation – the way that it is run now. The true GATE kids, the ones that struggle in a regular program, are not being served and are often pushed out of the high-achieving, competitive environment of the current GATE program. But I don’t know how cutting GATE will save money as these kids will have to be taught one way or another.

    I believe that Sports will take a big hit. Student Services – secretaries, counselors, librarians, vice principals, etc. – will take a huge hit. The music program will have to shoulder some of the cuts.

  9. don shor

    It is frustrating watching school districts go through this process based on the budget figures from the governor’s office, since his proposed budget is not going to be enacted.
    The Dixon school district is debating really deep cuts due to real malfeasance by their administration. In Modesto last week, the school board meeting was halted by the fire marshall and had to be cancelled. It is possible that the political mood is such that targeted tax increases (which I hope would be across the board, rather than just directed at the wealthy) could pass with the electorate.

    The Sac Bee had the legislative analyst’s proposed alternative yesterday:
    http://www.sacbee.com/111/story/727787.html

    Even without new taxes, the actual shortfall to the schools would likely be about half what is currently being discussed.

    All enrichment programs have merit. Their value should not, in my view, be based on how many students participate, nor in which demographic profile those students represent. Music, debate, sports, art, GATE, special ed — each has value to some students. GATE is very important to the students who make use of it, just as is Special Ed. As a parent whose kids were in both, I consider them comparable in terms of their value. The first reply on this thread is an unfortunate case of singling out one such program based on the background and “class” of its participants. That is what we DO NOT need in this discussion. Indeed, djusd parent’s post is blatantly racist.

    So cuts need to be distributed equally. Fewer teachers, larger classroom sizes, deferred maintenance and equipment purchases, slower opening of the new schools, are the way cuts will have to be made. Then, if the public sees the district making a good faith effort — here and statewide — local and state tax increases might succeed.

  10. don shor

    It is frustrating watching school districts go through this process based on the budget figures from the governor’s office, since his proposed budget is not going to be enacted.
    The Dixon school district is debating really deep cuts due to real malfeasance by their administration. In Modesto last week, the school board meeting was halted by the fire marshall and had to be cancelled. It is possible that the political mood is such that targeted tax increases (which I hope would be across the board, rather than just directed at the wealthy) could pass with the electorate.

    The Sac Bee had the legislative analyst’s proposed alternative yesterday:
    http://www.sacbee.com/111/story/727787.html

    Even without new taxes, the actual shortfall to the schools would likely be about half what is currently being discussed.

    All enrichment programs have merit. Their value should not, in my view, be based on how many students participate, nor in which demographic profile those students represent. Music, debate, sports, art, GATE, special ed — each has value to some students. GATE is very important to the students who make use of it, just as is Special Ed. As a parent whose kids were in both, I consider them comparable in terms of their value. The first reply on this thread is an unfortunate case of singling out one such program based on the background and “class” of its participants. That is what we DO NOT need in this discussion. Indeed, djusd parent’s post is blatantly racist.

    So cuts need to be distributed equally. Fewer teachers, larger classroom sizes, deferred maintenance and equipment purchases, slower opening of the new schools, are the way cuts will have to be made. Then, if the public sees the district making a good faith effort — here and statewide — local and state tax increases might succeed.

  11. don shor

    It is frustrating watching school districts go through this process based on the budget figures from the governor’s office, since his proposed budget is not going to be enacted.
    The Dixon school district is debating really deep cuts due to real malfeasance by their administration. In Modesto last week, the school board meeting was halted by the fire marshall and had to be cancelled. It is possible that the political mood is such that targeted tax increases (which I hope would be across the board, rather than just directed at the wealthy) could pass with the electorate.

    The Sac Bee had the legislative analyst’s proposed alternative yesterday:
    http://www.sacbee.com/111/story/727787.html

    Even without new taxes, the actual shortfall to the schools would likely be about half what is currently being discussed.

    All enrichment programs have merit. Their value should not, in my view, be based on how many students participate, nor in which demographic profile those students represent. Music, debate, sports, art, GATE, special ed — each has value to some students. GATE is very important to the students who make use of it, just as is Special Ed. As a parent whose kids were in both, I consider them comparable in terms of their value. The first reply on this thread is an unfortunate case of singling out one such program based on the background and “class” of its participants. That is what we DO NOT need in this discussion. Indeed, djusd parent’s post is blatantly racist.

    So cuts need to be distributed equally. Fewer teachers, larger classroom sizes, deferred maintenance and equipment purchases, slower opening of the new schools, are the way cuts will have to be made. Then, if the public sees the district making a good faith effort — here and statewide — local and state tax increases might succeed.

  12. don shor

    It is frustrating watching school districts go through this process based on the budget figures from the governor’s office, since his proposed budget is not going to be enacted.
    The Dixon school district is debating really deep cuts due to real malfeasance by their administration. In Modesto last week, the school board meeting was halted by the fire marshall and had to be cancelled. It is possible that the political mood is such that targeted tax increases (which I hope would be across the board, rather than just directed at the wealthy) could pass with the electorate.

    The Sac Bee had the legislative analyst’s proposed alternative yesterday:
    http://www.sacbee.com/111/story/727787.html

    Even without new taxes, the actual shortfall to the schools would likely be about half what is currently being discussed.

    All enrichment programs have merit. Their value should not, in my view, be based on how many students participate, nor in which demographic profile those students represent. Music, debate, sports, art, GATE, special ed — each has value to some students. GATE is very important to the students who make use of it, just as is Special Ed. As a parent whose kids were in both, I consider them comparable in terms of their value. The first reply on this thread is an unfortunate case of singling out one such program based on the background and “class” of its participants. That is what we DO NOT need in this discussion. Indeed, djusd parent’s post is blatantly racist.

    So cuts need to be distributed equally. Fewer teachers, larger classroom sizes, deferred maintenance and equipment purchases, slower opening of the new schools, are the way cuts will have to be made. Then, if the public sees the district making a good faith effort — here and statewide — local and state tax increases might succeed.

  13. FRW

    I’m not a GATE parent.
    There’s a problem with cutting GATE: it won’t save the district any money. The big expense of that program is the salary for the co-ordinator. The board has already proposed to consolidate that position with spec. ed coordinator or student services co-ordinator.
    Four million in cuts isn’t ging to happen by trimming this class, cutting this program, consolidating this position.
    Four million is closing and consolidating the elementary schools, closing one of the junior highs,eliminating administrators, staff, and teachers,AND cutting programs and classes.

  14. Mike Hart

    Squabbling over a smaller pie is a tedious waste of time… make a bigger pie.

    Import students from outside of Davis and charge them for the privilige of attending “Davis Schools”. So many people have the impression that Davis Schools are special- give them the opportunity to breathe the rarified air of brilliance in Davis.

    Have them write a big check, just like a private school to come to Davis. Keep Valley Oak open with these commuter kids. Kids that don’t want to go to school in Woodland, West Sac or Dixon.

    Think this is nuts? Ask a parent who wants to give their child a better chance at education.

    Think that this is against the spirit of public education or some school code? So what? Figure out a way to make it work. It would keep all of our schools open and reduce the pressure on schools outside of Davis that are swamped with students from massive new developments.

    Think of it as the “Full Employment Act for Davis Teachers”.

  15. FRW

    I’m not a GATE parent.
    There’s a problem with cutting GATE: it won’t save the district any money. The big expense of that program is the salary for the co-ordinator. The board has already proposed to consolidate that position with spec. ed coordinator or student services co-ordinator.
    Four million in cuts isn’t ging to happen by trimming this class, cutting this program, consolidating this position.
    Four million is closing and consolidating the elementary schools, closing one of the junior highs,eliminating administrators, staff, and teachers,AND cutting programs and classes.

  16. Mike Hart

    Squabbling over a smaller pie is a tedious waste of time… make a bigger pie.

    Import students from outside of Davis and charge them for the privilige of attending “Davis Schools”. So many people have the impression that Davis Schools are special- give them the opportunity to breathe the rarified air of brilliance in Davis.

    Have them write a big check, just like a private school to come to Davis. Keep Valley Oak open with these commuter kids. Kids that don’t want to go to school in Woodland, West Sac or Dixon.

    Think this is nuts? Ask a parent who wants to give their child a better chance at education.

    Think that this is against the spirit of public education or some school code? So what? Figure out a way to make it work. It would keep all of our schools open and reduce the pressure on schools outside of Davis that are swamped with students from massive new developments.

    Think of it as the “Full Employment Act for Davis Teachers”.

  17. FRW

    I’m not a GATE parent.
    There’s a problem with cutting GATE: it won’t save the district any money. The big expense of that program is the salary for the co-ordinator. The board has already proposed to consolidate that position with spec. ed coordinator or student services co-ordinator.
    Four million in cuts isn’t ging to happen by trimming this class, cutting this program, consolidating this position.
    Four million is closing and consolidating the elementary schools, closing one of the junior highs,eliminating administrators, staff, and teachers,AND cutting programs and classes.

  18. Mike Hart

    Squabbling over a smaller pie is a tedious waste of time… make a bigger pie.

    Import students from outside of Davis and charge them for the privilige of attending “Davis Schools”. So many people have the impression that Davis Schools are special- give them the opportunity to breathe the rarified air of brilliance in Davis.

    Have them write a big check, just like a private school to come to Davis. Keep Valley Oak open with these commuter kids. Kids that don’t want to go to school in Woodland, West Sac or Dixon.

    Think this is nuts? Ask a parent who wants to give their child a better chance at education.

    Think that this is against the spirit of public education or some school code? So what? Figure out a way to make it work. It would keep all of our schools open and reduce the pressure on schools outside of Davis that are swamped with students from massive new developments.

    Think of it as the “Full Employment Act for Davis Teachers”.

  19. FRW

    I’m not a GATE parent.
    There’s a problem with cutting GATE: it won’t save the district any money. The big expense of that program is the salary for the co-ordinator. The board has already proposed to consolidate that position with spec. ed coordinator or student services co-ordinator.
    Four million in cuts isn’t ging to happen by trimming this class, cutting this program, consolidating this position.
    Four million is closing and consolidating the elementary schools, closing one of the junior highs,eliminating administrators, staff, and teachers,AND cutting programs and classes.

  20. Mike Hart

    Squabbling over a smaller pie is a tedious waste of time… make a bigger pie.

    Import students from outside of Davis and charge them for the privilige of attending “Davis Schools”. So many people have the impression that Davis Schools are special- give them the opportunity to breathe the rarified air of brilliance in Davis.

    Have them write a big check, just like a private school to come to Davis. Keep Valley Oak open with these commuter kids. Kids that don’t want to go to school in Woodland, West Sac or Dixon.

    Think this is nuts? Ask a parent who wants to give their child a better chance at education.

    Think that this is against the spirit of public education or some school code? So what? Figure out a way to make it work. It would keep all of our schools open and reduce the pressure on schools outside of Davis that are swamped with students from massive new developments.

    Think of it as the “Full Employment Act for Davis Teachers”.

  21. Mike M.

    Don Shor: FYI. Deffered maintenance and the slowing down or stopping of facilities project wont affect the DJUSD General Fund Budget. Those monies all come from restricted funds that can only be used for those types of projects (sadley not for sports, music or teachers).

    I agree every programs will have to share the burden equally.

  22. Mike M.

    Don Shor: FYI. Deffered maintenance and the slowing down or stopping of facilities project wont affect the DJUSD General Fund Budget. Those monies all come from restricted funds that can only be used for those types of projects (sadley not for sports, music or teachers).

    I agree every programs will have to share the burden equally.

  23. Mike M.

    Don Shor: FYI. Deffered maintenance and the slowing down or stopping of facilities project wont affect the DJUSD General Fund Budget. Those monies all come from restricted funds that can only be used for those types of projects (sadley not for sports, music or teachers).

    I agree every programs will have to share the burden equally.

  24. Mike M.

    Don Shor: FYI. Deffered maintenance and the slowing down or stopping of facilities project wont affect the DJUSD General Fund Budget. Those monies all come from restricted funds that can only be used for those types of projects (sadley not for sports, music or teachers).

    I agree every programs will have to share the burden equally.

  25. frw

    This board knew about the one time money used for on going programs. Kelty Jones made certain the board knew that the way they were budgeting would leave them with a $1.5 million dollar deficit this year. I attended a board meeting last year and heard her warn the board about this very issue.
    This board can’t claim ignorance of that.
    Site/facilities money is a separate fund from general expense money and can’t be mixed for obvious reasons. Any savings made by trimming sites and facilities can’t fund programs. DJUSD has the $4.5 million from MME in its coffers right now and can’t use it to ease this crisis.
    It is illegal to charge inter district transfers tuition to attend the DJUSD. DJUSD is a public school. DJUSD can’t even require transfers to pay the parcel tax as a condition for attending Davis schools.

  26. frw

    This board knew about the one time money used for on going programs. Kelty Jones made certain the board knew that the way they were budgeting would leave them with a $1.5 million dollar deficit this year. I attended a board meeting last year and heard her warn the board about this very issue.
    This board can’t claim ignorance of that.
    Site/facilities money is a separate fund from general expense money and can’t be mixed for obvious reasons. Any savings made by trimming sites and facilities can’t fund programs. DJUSD has the $4.5 million from MME in its coffers right now and can’t use it to ease this crisis.
    It is illegal to charge inter district transfers tuition to attend the DJUSD. DJUSD is a public school. DJUSD can’t even require transfers to pay the parcel tax as a condition for attending Davis schools.

  27. frw

    This board knew about the one time money used for on going programs. Kelty Jones made certain the board knew that the way they were budgeting would leave them with a $1.5 million dollar deficit this year. I attended a board meeting last year and heard her warn the board about this very issue.
    This board can’t claim ignorance of that.
    Site/facilities money is a separate fund from general expense money and can’t be mixed for obvious reasons. Any savings made by trimming sites and facilities can’t fund programs. DJUSD has the $4.5 million from MME in its coffers right now and can’t use it to ease this crisis.
    It is illegal to charge inter district transfers tuition to attend the DJUSD. DJUSD is a public school. DJUSD can’t even require transfers to pay the parcel tax as a condition for attending Davis schools.

  28. frw

    This board knew about the one time money used for on going programs. Kelty Jones made certain the board knew that the way they were budgeting would leave them with a $1.5 million dollar deficit this year. I attended a board meeting last year and heard her warn the board about this very issue.
    This board can’t claim ignorance of that.
    Site/facilities money is a separate fund from general expense money and can’t be mixed for obvious reasons. Any savings made by trimming sites and facilities can’t fund programs. DJUSD has the $4.5 million from MME in its coffers right now and can’t use it to ease this crisis.
    It is illegal to charge inter district transfers tuition to attend the DJUSD. DJUSD is a public school. DJUSD can’t even require transfers to pay the parcel tax as a condition for attending Davis schools.

  29. Varzil the Good

    My kids are GATE-identified but haven’t gotten any serious benefit from the simple “GATE core” arrangement. They and their fellow students perceive the GATE classes as no different from non-GATE except “you get more homework, read one more book, and do a project”.

    As someone else noted, the program isn’t actually aimed at the kids whose intelligence and gifts leave them bored and struggling in the “normal” program.

    HOWEVER, GATE works well for many students, and I can’t see any cost savings in cutting it. I mean, if they’re not in a GATE class they’ll be in another class, right? So what’s saved?

  30. Varzil the Good

    My kids are GATE-identified but haven’t gotten any serious benefit from the simple “GATE core” arrangement. They and their fellow students perceive the GATE classes as no different from non-GATE except “you get more homework, read one more book, and do a project”.

    As someone else noted, the program isn’t actually aimed at the kids whose intelligence and gifts leave them bored and struggling in the “normal” program.

    HOWEVER, GATE works well for many students, and I can’t see any cost savings in cutting it. I mean, if they’re not in a GATE class they’ll be in another class, right? So what’s saved?

  31. Varzil the Good

    My kids are GATE-identified but haven’t gotten any serious benefit from the simple “GATE core” arrangement. They and their fellow students perceive the GATE classes as no different from non-GATE except “you get more homework, read one more book, and do a project”.

    As someone else noted, the program isn’t actually aimed at the kids whose intelligence and gifts leave them bored and struggling in the “normal” program.

    HOWEVER, GATE works well for many students, and I can’t see any cost savings in cutting it. I mean, if they’re not in a GATE class they’ll be in another class, right? So what’s saved?

  32. Varzil the Good

    My kids are GATE-identified but haven’t gotten any serious benefit from the simple “GATE core” arrangement. They and their fellow students perceive the GATE classes as no different from non-GATE except “you get more homework, read one more book, and do a project”.

    As someone else noted, the program isn’t actually aimed at the kids whose intelligence and gifts leave them bored and struggling in the “normal” program.

    HOWEVER, GATE works well for many students, and I can’t see any cost savings in cutting it. I mean, if they’re not in a GATE class they’ll be in another class, right? So what’s saved?

  33. ouch

    I wonder whether another supplemental parcel tax would pass. There is no way to cut $4 million without a lot of pain. If you save the music program (a very worthwhile thing to do), you just have to cut somewhere else.

  34. ouch

    I wonder whether another supplemental parcel tax would pass. There is no way to cut $4 million without a lot of pain. If you save the music program (a very worthwhile thing to do), you just have to cut somewhere else.

  35. ouch

    I wonder whether another supplemental parcel tax would pass. There is no way to cut $4 million without a lot of pain. If you save the music program (a very worthwhile thing to do), you just have to cut somewhere else.

  36. ouch

    I wonder whether another supplemental parcel tax would pass. There is no way to cut $4 million without a lot of pain. If you save the music program (a very worthwhile thing to do), you just have to cut somewhere else.

  37. Parent

    Varzil asked, “So what’s saved?” GATE cost is mostly for the GATE coordinator and GATE psychologist. The district gets $60,000 per year from the state and the cost is about $200,000 so $160,000 comes from “instructional improvement” funds. Don’t know what that $160,000 would be used for if not GATE. There may or may not be more efficiency in scheduling if GATE were integrated rather than self contained.

  38. Parent

    Varzil asked, “So what’s saved?” GATE cost is mostly for the GATE coordinator and GATE psychologist. The district gets $60,000 per year from the state and the cost is about $200,000 so $160,000 comes from “instructional improvement” funds. Don’t know what that $160,000 would be used for if not GATE. There may or may not be more efficiency in scheduling if GATE were integrated rather than self contained.

  39. Parent

    Varzil asked, “So what’s saved?” GATE cost is mostly for the GATE coordinator and GATE psychologist. The district gets $60,000 per year from the state and the cost is about $200,000 so $160,000 comes from “instructional improvement” funds. Don’t know what that $160,000 would be used for if not GATE. There may or may not be more efficiency in scheduling if GATE were integrated rather than self contained.

  40. Parent

    Varzil asked, “So what’s saved?” GATE cost is mostly for the GATE coordinator and GATE psychologist. The district gets $60,000 per year from the state and the cost is about $200,000 so $160,000 comes from “instructional improvement” funds. Don’t know what that $160,000 would be used for if not GATE. There may or may not be more efficiency in scheduling if GATE were integrated rather than self contained.

  41. hopefulparent

    “I believe that a real significant look at ESL needs to happen. When one looks at the small population that benefits from a program that targets a small part of our student body, how can we justify preserving ESL and cutting elementary music, librarians, and the Climate Coordinator???? Surely one can easily see that library and music programs touch ALL students, but ESL hits only the SPECIAL FEW.

    Oh yeah – the ESL kids are the ones with the parents who won’t accept anything less. Once again, the voices of the few are the loudest.

    DJUSD please stop catering to the special interests of the loud minority and recognize the greater need to affect positive change for all students. ESL, while it has its merits, is a SPECIAL PROGRAM that impacts a small percentage of our student population.”

    Sounds absurd doesn’t it?

    The fact of the matter is GATE, ESL, Spanish Immersion, music, sports, and choir (to name a few) are all special ed programs that are targeted to those who need them. I bet that during their K-12 education every single child in the DJUSD system uses several of these so called “special interest” programs. I agree with Don that monetary reductions should be made across the board equally for all programs.

  42. hopefulparent

    “I believe that a real significant look at ESL needs to happen. When one looks at the small population that benefits from a program that targets a small part of our student body, how can we justify preserving ESL and cutting elementary music, librarians, and the Climate Coordinator???? Surely one can easily see that library and music programs touch ALL students, but ESL hits only the SPECIAL FEW.

    Oh yeah – the ESL kids are the ones with the parents who won’t accept anything less. Once again, the voices of the few are the loudest.

    DJUSD please stop catering to the special interests of the loud minority and recognize the greater need to affect positive change for all students. ESL, while it has its merits, is a SPECIAL PROGRAM that impacts a small percentage of our student population.”

    Sounds absurd doesn’t it?

    The fact of the matter is GATE, ESL, Spanish Immersion, music, sports, and choir (to name a few) are all special ed programs that are targeted to those who need them. I bet that during their K-12 education every single child in the DJUSD system uses several of these so called “special interest” programs. I agree with Don that monetary reductions should be made across the board equally for all programs.

  43. hopefulparent

    “I believe that a real significant look at ESL needs to happen. When one looks at the small population that benefits from a program that targets a small part of our student body, how can we justify preserving ESL and cutting elementary music, librarians, and the Climate Coordinator???? Surely one can easily see that library and music programs touch ALL students, but ESL hits only the SPECIAL FEW.

    Oh yeah – the ESL kids are the ones with the parents who won’t accept anything less. Once again, the voices of the few are the loudest.

    DJUSD please stop catering to the special interests of the loud minority and recognize the greater need to affect positive change for all students. ESL, while it has its merits, is a SPECIAL PROGRAM that impacts a small percentage of our student population.”

    Sounds absurd doesn’t it?

    The fact of the matter is GATE, ESL, Spanish Immersion, music, sports, and choir (to name a few) are all special ed programs that are targeted to those who need them. I bet that during their K-12 education every single child in the DJUSD system uses several of these so called “special interest” programs. I agree with Don that monetary reductions should be made across the board equally for all programs.

  44. hopefulparent

    “I believe that a real significant look at ESL needs to happen. When one looks at the small population that benefits from a program that targets a small part of our student body, how can we justify preserving ESL and cutting elementary music, librarians, and the Climate Coordinator???? Surely one can easily see that library and music programs touch ALL students, but ESL hits only the SPECIAL FEW.

    Oh yeah – the ESL kids are the ones with the parents who won’t accept anything less. Once again, the voices of the few are the loudest.

    DJUSD please stop catering to the special interests of the loud minority and recognize the greater need to affect positive change for all students. ESL, while it has its merits, is a SPECIAL PROGRAM that impacts a small percentage of our student population.”

    Sounds absurd doesn’t it?

    The fact of the matter is GATE, ESL, Spanish Immersion, music, sports, and choir (to name a few) are all special ed programs that are targeted to those who need them. I bet that during their K-12 education every single child in the DJUSD system uses several of these so called “special interest” programs. I agree with Don that monetary reductions should be made across the board equally for all programs.

  45. Seen It Before

    Been there, done this. I told my children the first hit with respect to school budget cuts would be music and art programs, just as has happened in past years. What else is new?

    Let’s do some serious thinking here. Why do we need Da Vinci High School? It only serves 60 students. You have to go to a special meeting to have explained exactly what this new school is. I still don’t get it.

    It is not necessary to have three vice principals at the high school. If it is required, it is because the principal is not doing his job.

    Why are we paying a Supt. $240,000 for sitting on his hands and doing nothing, while we pay Hammond $190,000 at the same time? How about all administrators taking a 10% across the board pay cut?

    And what of Measure Q? Are we going to use it to institute “innovative nutrition programs” and “reduce class sizes”, as we cut existing programs and increase class sizes by reducing faculty?

    Program is being pitted against program, now that the fiscal mismanagement over the years has come home to roost. Perhaps the public will begin to understand why we need to start charter schools, that have parents and teachers in each facility making the fiscal decisions instead of the inept and corrupt school district/board.

    I suspect you could toss out most of the high paid administration, and not feel any pain. They have obviously been asleep at the switch to have left us in this financial predicament. The cost cutting should begin directly at the top – first and foremost.

    How about some parental and student input into this process? Betcha the school district/board would never allow that. Why not? Because the administrative staffing will essentially remain the same, while cuts are made at the program level.

    I would like to see a concise list of positions/programs at all levels, and a chance for parents and students to weigh in on where they think the cuts should be. I’ll bet you my bottom dollar (pun intended) the public would choose differently from the administration/school board. Lovenberg’s attempt to raise administrative salaries gives a good indication of how mercenary the hearts of the school district/board are.

    Wait until you hear about some of the things with respect to the school board/district that have gone on with taxpayer dollars! I suspect revelations are on their way and the public will find them shocking.

  46. Seen It Before

    Been there, done this. I told my children the first hit with respect to school budget cuts would be music and art programs, just as has happened in past years. What else is new?

    Let’s do some serious thinking here. Why do we need Da Vinci High School? It only serves 60 students. You have to go to a special meeting to have explained exactly what this new school is. I still don’t get it.

    It is not necessary to have three vice principals at the high school. If it is required, it is because the principal is not doing his job.

    Why are we paying a Supt. $240,000 for sitting on his hands and doing nothing, while we pay Hammond $190,000 at the same time? How about all administrators taking a 10% across the board pay cut?

    And what of Measure Q? Are we going to use it to institute “innovative nutrition programs” and “reduce class sizes”, as we cut existing programs and increase class sizes by reducing faculty?

    Program is being pitted against program, now that the fiscal mismanagement over the years has come home to roost. Perhaps the public will begin to understand why we need to start charter schools, that have parents and teachers in each facility making the fiscal decisions instead of the inept and corrupt school district/board.

    I suspect you could toss out most of the high paid administration, and not feel any pain. They have obviously been asleep at the switch to have left us in this financial predicament. The cost cutting should begin directly at the top – first and foremost.

    How about some parental and student input into this process? Betcha the school district/board would never allow that. Why not? Because the administrative staffing will essentially remain the same, while cuts are made at the program level.

    I would like to see a concise list of positions/programs at all levels, and a chance for parents and students to weigh in on where they think the cuts should be. I’ll bet you my bottom dollar (pun intended) the public would choose differently from the administration/school board. Lovenberg’s attempt to raise administrative salaries gives a good indication of how mercenary the hearts of the school district/board are.

    Wait until you hear about some of the things with respect to the school board/district that have gone on with taxpayer dollars! I suspect revelations are on their way and the public will find them shocking.

  47. Seen It Before

    Been there, done this. I told my children the first hit with respect to school budget cuts would be music and art programs, just as has happened in past years. What else is new?

    Let’s do some serious thinking here. Why do we need Da Vinci High School? It only serves 60 students. You have to go to a special meeting to have explained exactly what this new school is. I still don’t get it.

    It is not necessary to have three vice principals at the high school. If it is required, it is because the principal is not doing his job.

    Why are we paying a Supt. $240,000 for sitting on his hands and doing nothing, while we pay Hammond $190,000 at the same time? How about all administrators taking a 10% across the board pay cut?

    And what of Measure Q? Are we going to use it to institute “innovative nutrition programs” and “reduce class sizes”, as we cut existing programs and increase class sizes by reducing faculty?

    Program is being pitted against program, now that the fiscal mismanagement over the years has come home to roost. Perhaps the public will begin to understand why we need to start charter schools, that have parents and teachers in each facility making the fiscal decisions instead of the inept and corrupt school district/board.

    I suspect you could toss out most of the high paid administration, and not feel any pain. They have obviously been asleep at the switch to have left us in this financial predicament. The cost cutting should begin directly at the top – first and foremost.

    How about some parental and student input into this process? Betcha the school district/board would never allow that. Why not? Because the administrative staffing will essentially remain the same, while cuts are made at the program level.

    I would like to see a concise list of positions/programs at all levels, and a chance for parents and students to weigh in on where they think the cuts should be. I’ll bet you my bottom dollar (pun intended) the public would choose differently from the administration/school board. Lovenberg’s attempt to raise administrative salaries gives a good indication of how mercenary the hearts of the school district/board are.

    Wait until you hear about some of the things with respect to the school board/district that have gone on with taxpayer dollars! I suspect revelations are on their way and the public will find them shocking.

  48. Seen It Before

    Been there, done this. I told my children the first hit with respect to school budget cuts would be music and art programs, just as has happened in past years. What else is new?

    Let’s do some serious thinking here. Why do we need Da Vinci High School? It only serves 60 students. You have to go to a special meeting to have explained exactly what this new school is. I still don’t get it.

    It is not necessary to have three vice principals at the high school. If it is required, it is because the principal is not doing his job.

    Why are we paying a Supt. $240,000 for sitting on his hands and doing nothing, while we pay Hammond $190,000 at the same time? How about all administrators taking a 10% across the board pay cut?

    And what of Measure Q? Are we going to use it to institute “innovative nutrition programs” and “reduce class sizes”, as we cut existing programs and increase class sizes by reducing faculty?

    Program is being pitted against program, now that the fiscal mismanagement over the years has come home to roost. Perhaps the public will begin to understand why we need to start charter schools, that have parents and teachers in each facility making the fiscal decisions instead of the inept and corrupt school district/board.

    I suspect you could toss out most of the high paid administration, and not feel any pain. They have obviously been asleep at the switch to have left us in this financial predicament. The cost cutting should begin directly at the top – first and foremost.

    How about some parental and student input into this process? Betcha the school district/board would never allow that. Why not? Because the administrative staffing will essentially remain the same, while cuts are made at the program level.

    I would like to see a concise list of positions/programs at all levels, and a chance for parents and students to weigh in on where they think the cuts should be. I’ll bet you my bottom dollar (pun intended) the public would choose differently from the administration/school board. Lovenberg’s attempt to raise administrative salaries gives a good indication of how mercenary the hearts of the school district/board are.

    Wait until you hear about some of the things with respect to the school board/district that have gone on with taxpayer dollars! I suspect revelations are on their way and the public will find them shocking.

  49. sigh

    Do facts matter at all?

    Why do we need Da Vinci High School? It only serves 60 students.
    Wrong. It is around 250 right now. Check out its home page.

    Why are we paying a Supt. $240,000 for sitting on his hands and doing nothing, while we pay Hammond $190,000 at the same time?
    Wrong again. Paying Murphy ended already, but people are still talking about it.

    How about some parental and student input into this process? Betcha the school district/board would never allow that.
    Wrong yet again. The board has requested that the staff create a specific plan for community input.

  50. sigh

    Do facts matter at all?

    Why do we need Da Vinci High School? It only serves 60 students.
    Wrong. It is around 250 right now. Check out its home page.

    Why are we paying a Supt. $240,000 for sitting on his hands and doing nothing, while we pay Hammond $190,000 at the same time?
    Wrong again. Paying Murphy ended already, but people are still talking about it.

    How about some parental and student input into this process? Betcha the school district/board would never allow that.
    Wrong yet again. The board has requested that the staff create a specific plan for community input.

  51. sigh

    Do facts matter at all?

    Why do we need Da Vinci High School? It only serves 60 students.
    Wrong. It is around 250 right now. Check out its home page.

    Why are we paying a Supt. $240,000 for sitting on his hands and doing nothing, while we pay Hammond $190,000 at the same time?
    Wrong again. Paying Murphy ended already, but people are still talking about it.

    How about some parental and student input into this process? Betcha the school district/board would never allow that.
    Wrong yet again. The board has requested that the staff create a specific plan for community input.

  52. sigh

    Do facts matter at all?

    Why do we need Da Vinci High School? It only serves 60 students.
    Wrong. It is around 250 right now. Check out its home page.

    Why are we paying a Supt. $240,000 for sitting on his hands and doing nothing, while we pay Hammond $190,000 at the same time?
    Wrong again. Paying Murphy ended already, but people are still talking about it.

    How about some parental and student input into this process? Betcha the school district/board would never allow that.
    Wrong yet again. The board has requested that the staff create a specific plan for community input.

  53. Doug Paul Davis

    On Murphy, I believe they are paying him until the end of this school year. So they are still paying him but it does not factor into the budget for next year. That was a one-time payment. Was it justified? Stay tuned to the Vanguard on Sunday, and you can decide for yourself.

  54. Doug Paul Davis

    On Murphy, I believe they are paying him until the end of this school year. So they are still paying him but it does not factor into the budget for next year. That was a one-time payment. Was it justified? Stay tuned to the Vanguard on Sunday, and you can decide for yourself.

  55. Doug Paul Davis

    On Murphy, I believe they are paying him until the end of this school year. So they are still paying him but it does not factor into the budget for next year. That was a one-time payment. Was it justified? Stay tuned to the Vanguard on Sunday, and you can decide for yourself.

  56. Doug Paul Davis

    On Murphy, I believe they are paying him until the end of this school year. So they are still paying him but it does not factor into the budget for next year. That was a one-time payment. Was it justified? Stay tuned to the Vanguard on Sunday, and you can decide for yourself.

  57. music parent

    “Seen It Before said…
    Been there, done this. I told my children the first hit with respect to school budget cuts would be music and art programs, just as has happened in past years. What else is new?

    Let’s do some serious thinking here. Why do we need Da Vinci High School? It only serves 60 students. You have to go to a special meeting to have explained exactly what this new school is. I still don’t get it.

    etc.”

    No disrespect, but you may want to attend a school board meeting. You make some good philosphical points (the nutrition component of Measure Q, for instance, doesn’t seem as important when dealing w/ these kinds of budget cuts), but other the things that you claim (about Da Vinci having 60 students, and community input) were actually discussed in some detail last night.

  58. music parent

    “Seen It Before said…
    Been there, done this. I told my children the first hit with respect to school budget cuts would be music and art programs, just as has happened in past years. What else is new?

    Let’s do some serious thinking here. Why do we need Da Vinci High School? It only serves 60 students. You have to go to a special meeting to have explained exactly what this new school is. I still don’t get it.

    etc.”

    No disrespect, but you may want to attend a school board meeting. You make some good philosphical points (the nutrition component of Measure Q, for instance, doesn’t seem as important when dealing w/ these kinds of budget cuts), but other the things that you claim (about Da Vinci having 60 students, and community input) were actually discussed in some detail last night.

  59. music parent

    “Seen It Before said…
    Been there, done this. I told my children the first hit with respect to school budget cuts would be music and art programs, just as has happened in past years. What else is new?

    Let’s do some serious thinking here. Why do we need Da Vinci High School? It only serves 60 students. You have to go to a special meeting to have explained exactly what this new school is. I still don’t get it.

    etc.”

    No disrespect, but you may want to attend a school board meeting. You make some good philosphical points (the nutrition component of Measure Q, for instance, doesn’t seem as important when dealing w/ these kinds of budget cuts), but other the things that you claim (about Da Vinci having 60 students, and community input) were actually discussed in some detail last night.

  60. music parent

    “Seen It Before said…
    Been there, done this. I told my children the first hit with respect to school budget cuts would be music and art programs, just as has happened in past years. What else is new?

    Let’s do some serious thinking here. Why do we need Da Vinci High School? It only serves 60 students. You have to go to a special meeting to have explained exactly what this new school is. I still don’t get it.

    etc.”

    No disrespect, but you may want to attend a school board meeting. You make some good philosphical points (the nutrition component of Measure Q, for instance, doesn’t seem as important when dealing w/ these kinds of budget cuts), but other the things that you claim (about Da Vinci having 60 students, and community input) were actually discussed in some detail last night.

  61. Anonymous

    Does anyone have facts and figures?

    I think there are about 8,600 students so the shortfall is roughly $500 per student. One solution – parents step up and donate roughly $500 for each of their students.

    Also if there are 8,600 students there must be about 350 teachers – how many non teachers are there?

    California spends about $8000 per student – how much is spent in Davis? I would guess $9000 (should be spending 10% more than that) and that means the shortfall is about 5.5%.

    If parents are not willing to fill the void then 5.5% of the staff must find other work and 2-3 schools must close. These are real people that are going to be affected and the students will lose out also.

    I would like to hear what the parents are willing to do personally to solve the problem.

  62. Anonymous

    Does anyone have facts and figures?

    I think there are about 8,600 students so the shortfall is roughly $500 per student. One solution – parents step up and donate roughly $500 for each of their students.

    Also if there are 8,600 students there must be about 350 teachers – how many non teachers are there?

    California spends about $8000 per student – how much is spent in Davis? I would guess $9000 (should be spending 10% more than that) and that means the shortfall is about 5.5%.

    If parents are not willing to fill the void then 5.5% of the staff must find other work and 2-3 schools must close. These are real people that are going to be affected and the students will lose out also.

    I would like to hear what the parents are willing to do personally to solve the problem.

  63. Anonymous

    Does anyone have facts and figures?

    I think there are about 8,600 students so the shortfall is roughly $500 per student. One solution – parents step up and donate roughly $500 for each of their students.

    Also if there are 8,600 students there must be about 350 teachers – how many non teachers are there?

    California spends about $8000 per student – how much is spent in Davis? I would guess $9000 (should be spending 10% more than that) and that means the shortfall is about 5.5%.

    If parents are not willing to fill the void then 5.5% of the staff must find other work and 2-3 schools must close. These are real people that are going to be affected and the students will lose out also.

    I would like to hear what the parents are willing to do personally to solve the problem.

  64. Anonymous

    Does anyone have facts and figures?

    I think there are about 8,600 students so the shortfall is roughly $500 per student. One solution – parents step up and donate roughly $500 for each of their students.

    Also if there are 8,600 students there must be about 350 teachers – how many non teachers are there?

    California spends about $8000 per student – how much is spent in Davis? I would guess $9000 (should be spending 10% more than that) and that means the shortfall is about 5.5%.

    If parents are not willing to fill the void then 5.5% of the staff must find other work and 2-3 schools must close. These are real people that are going to be affected and the students will lose out also.

    I would like to hear what the parents are willing to do personally to solve the problem.

  65. music parent

    anonymous 12:30 said

    “California spends about $8000 per student – how much is spent in Davis? I would guess $9000 (should be spending 10% more than that) and that means the shortfall is about 5.5%.”

    I don’t have current figures, but I think your figures are a little off the mark, unless you have very current info that I lack.

    Last time I checked last October, it was $7,493 and the state average was $7,521, and the Palo Alto district was $12,218 per student per year.

  66. music parent

    anonymous 12:30 said

    “California spends about $8000 per student – how much is spent in Davis? I would guess $9000 (should be spending 10% more than that) and that means the shortfall is about 5.5%.”

    I don’t have current figures, but I think your figures are a little off the mark, unless you have very current info that I lack.

    Last time I checked last October, it was $7,493 and the state average was $7,521, and the Palo Alto district was $12,218 per student per year.

  67. music parent

    anonymous 12:30 said

    “California spends about $8000 per student – how much is spent in Davis? I would guess $9000 (should be spending 10% more than that) and that means the shortfall is about 5.5%.”

    I don’t have current figures, but I think your figures are a little off the mark, unless you have very current info that I lack.

    Last time I checked last October, it was $7,493 and the state average was $7,521, and the Palo Alto district was $12,218 per student per year.

  68. music parent

    anonymous 12:30 said

    “California spends about $8000 per student – how much is spent in Davis? I would guess $9000 (should be spending 10% more than that) and that means the shortfall is about 5.5%.”

    I don’t have current figures, but I think your figures are a little off the mark, unless you have very current info that I lack.

    Last time I checked last October, it was $7,493 and the state average was $7,521, and the Palo Alto district was $12,218 per student per year.

  69. Soumy Nona

    The Enterprise and the DSHS PTA email sent to the DSHS parents said today that one of the cost saving options would be to convert the high school to grades 9-12. I was outside the meeting chambers last night and would like to know how this would work. If a Jr. High were closed, sadly assume this would be Emerson, how would all students fit into the HS? Are there THAT many classes at the HS that are not at capacity (my senior’s classes are all crowded) which could be filled by 9th graders? How would this save money?

  70. Soumy Nona

    The Enterprise and the DSHS PTA email sent to the DSHS parents said today that one of the cost saving options would be to convert the high school to grades 9-12. I was outside the meeting chambers last night and would like to know how this would work. If a Jr. High were closed, sadly assume this would be Emerson, how would all students fit into the HS? Are there THAT many classes at the HS that are not at capacity (my senior’s classes are all crowded) which could be filled by 9th graders? How would this save money?

  71. Soumy Nona

    The Enterprise and the DSHS PTA email sent to the DSHS parents said today that one of the cost saving options would be to convert the high school to grades 9-12. I was outside the meeting chambers last night and would like to know how this would work. If a Jr. High were closed, sadly assume this would be Emerson, how would all students fit into the HS? Are there THAT many classes at the HS that are not at capacity (my senior’s classes are all crowded) which could be filled by 9th graders? How would this save money?

  72. Soumy Nona

    The Enterprise and the DSHS PTA email sent to the DSHS parents said today that one of the cost saving options would be to convert the high school to grades 9-12. I was outside the meeting chambers last night and would like to know how this would work. If a Jr. High were closed, sadly assume this would be Emerson, how would all students fit into the HS? Are there THAT many classes at the HS that are not at capacity (my senior’s classes are all crowded) which could be filled by 9th graders? How would this save money?

  73. Anonymous

    DPD,

    You didn’t report as the Enterprise did that Trustee Harris suggested sending every teacher in the district a pink slip!

    What purpose would this serve when you know you are going to have thousands of kids in the fall? All this would do is make teachers start looking for new jobs before April Fools Day. Maybe he is thinking he can soften up the Davis Teachers Association for give backs or maybe he is just talking without thinking it through at all.

    As for music education, there is all sorts of evidence that students who participate in music programs do better in school on average than students that don’t. I always thought this is because they learn self discipline through practice. Of course the loss of all these other things have their own costs in educational outcomes as well. The result will be that the Davis schools we die the death of a thousand cuts. My one unanswered question remains why don’t they allow interdistrict transfers to lessen the blows from these cuts? I have not heard a logical argument against interdistrict transfers yet. Can anybody explain to me the logic behind the intransigence?

  74. Anonymous

    DPD,

    You didn’t report as the Enterprise did that Trustee Harris suggested sending every teacher in the district a pink slip!

    What purpose would this serve when you know you are going to have thousands of kids in the fall? All this would do is make teachers start looking for new jobs before April Fools Day. Maybe he is thinking he can soften up the Davis Teachers Association for give backs or maybe he is just talking without thinking it through at all.

    As for music education, there is all sorts of evidence that students who participate in music programs do better in school on average than students that don’t. I always thought this is because they learn self discipline through practice. Of course the loss of all these other things have their own costs in educational outcomes as well. The result will be that the Davis schools we die the death of a thousand cuts. My one unanswered question remains why don’t they allow interdistrict transfers to lessen the blows from these cuts? I have not heard a logical argument against interdistrict transfers yet. Can anybody explain to me the logic behind the intransigence?

  75. Anonymous

    DPD,

    You didn’t report as the Enterprise did that Trustee Harris suggested sending every teacher in the district a pink slip!

    What purpose would this serve when you know you are going to have thousands of kids in the fall? All this would do is make teachers start looking for new jobs before April Fools Day. Maybe he is thinking he can soften up the Davis Teachers Association for give backs or maybe he is just talking without thinking it through at all.

    As for music education, there is all sorts of evidence that students who participate in music programs do better in school on average than students that don’t. I always thought this is because they learn self discipline through practice. Of course the loss of all these other things have their own costs in educational outcomes as well. The result will be that the Davis schools we die the death of a thousand cuts. My one unanswered question remains why don’t they allow interdistrict transfers to lessen the blows from these cuts? I have not heard a logical argument against interdistrict transfers yet. Can anybody explain to me the logic behind the intransigence?

  76. Anonymous

    DPD,

    You didn’t report as the Enterprise did that Trustee Harris suggested sending every teacher in the district a pink slip!

    What purpose would this serve when you know you are going to have thousands of kids in the fall? All this would do is make teachers start looking for new jobs before April Fools Day. Maybe he is thinking he can soften up the Davis Teachers Association for give backs or maybe he is just talking without thinking it through at all.

    As for music education, there is all sorts of evidence that students who participate in music programs do better in school on average than students that don’t. I always thought this is because they learn self discipline through practice. Of course the loss of all these other things have their own costs in educational outcomes as well. The result will be that the Davis schools we die the death of a thousand cuts. My one unanswered question remains why don’t they allow interdistrict transfers to lessen the blows from these cuts? I have not heard a logical argument against interdistrict transfers yet. Can anybody explain to me the logic behind the intransigence?

  77. FRW

    Aside from Harris’ ill-conceived suggestion to fire all the teachers, there was Tim Taylor’s outrage at the DTA rep’s question regarding just how much money the district had spent on outside consultants and attorneys when they had charter experts on staff. Taylor blustered that they had no choice because it was a “six figure issue” for the district. Last time I knew, charter law stated that the cost of the charter school to the district was not criterion for turning down the charter. G. Daleiden asked that question of the district attorney several different ways at a board meeting I attended. Each time the answer was no, impact on district finances can’t legally figure into the considerations.
    Taylor’s statement makes it obvious that this was the only criterion considered in the board’s vote.
    How much did the district pay Yarnell for advice they disregarded?
    He’s not even a charter law attorney, he’s an employment law attorney.
    And they want the teachers to give back their COLA!

  78. FRW

    Aside from Harris’ ill-conceived suggestion to fire all the teachers, there was Tim Taylor’s outrage at the DTA rep’s question regarding just how much money the district had spent on outside consultants and attorneys when they had charter experts on staff. Taylor blustered that they had no choice because it was a “six figure issue” for the district. Last time I knew, charter law stated that the cost of the charter school to the district was not criterion for turning down the charter. G. Daleiden asked that question of the district attorney several different ways at a board meeting I attended. Each time the answer was no, impact on district finances can’t legally figure into the considerations.
    Taylor’s statement makes it obvious that this was the only criterion considered in the board’s vote.
    How much did the district pay Yarnell for advice they disregarded?
    He’s not even a charter law attorney, he’s an employment law attorney.
    And they want the teachers to give back their COLA!

  79. FRW

    Aside from Harris’ ill-conceived suggestion to fire all the teachers, there was Tim Taylor’s outrage at the DTA rep’s question regarding just how much money the district had spent on outside consultants and attorneys when they had charter experts on staff. Taylor blustered that they had no choice because it was a “six figure issue” for the district. Last time I knew, charter law stated that the cost of the charter school to the district was not criterion for turning down the charter. G. Daleiden asked that question of the district attorney several different ways at a board meeting I attended. Each time the answer was no, impact on district finances can’t legally figure into the considerations.
    Taylor’s statement makes it obvious that this was the only criterion considered in the board’s vote.
    How much did the district pay Yarnell for advice they disregarded?
    He’s not even a charter law attorney, he’s an employment law attorney.
    And they want the teachers to give back their COLA!

  80. FRW

    Aside from Harris’ ill-conceived suggestion to fire all the teachers, there was Tim Taylor’s outrage at the DTA rep’s question regarding just how much money the district had spent on outside consultants and attorneys when they had charter experts on staff. Taylor blustered that they had no choice because it was a “six figure issue” for the district. Last time I knew, charter law stated that the cost of the charter school to the district was not criterion for turning down the charter. G. Daleiden asked that question of the district attorney several different ways at a board meeting I attended. Each time the answer was no, impact on district finances can’t legally figure into the considerations.
    Taylor’s statement makes it obvious that this was the only criterion considered in the board’s vote.
    How much did the district pay Yarnell for advice they disregarded?
    He’s not even a charter law attorney, he’s an employment law attorney.
    And they want the teachers to give back their COLA!

  81. Anonymous

    Fire them all? Of course! Look, some teachers and staff leave every year for different reasons. The DJUSD merely doesn’t fill their positions in the fall. But why wait for attrition when you can just fire them all and hire all new at the bottom of the pay scale?
    Harris is a genius!

  82. Anonymous

    Fire them all? Of course! Look, some teachers and staff leave every year for different reasons. The DJUSD merely doesn’t fill their positions in the fall. But why wait for attrition when you can just fire them all and hire all new at the bottom of the pay scale?
    Harris is a genius!

  83. Anonymous

    Fire them all? Of course! Look, some teachers and staff leave every year for different reasons. The DJUSD merely doesn’t fill their positions in the fall. But why wait for attrition when you can just fire them all and hire all new at the bottom of the pay scale?
    Harris is a genius!

  84. Anonymous

    Fire them all? Of course! Look, some teachers and staff leave every year for different reasons. The DJUSD merely doesn’t fill their positions in the fall. But why wait for attrition when you can just fire them all and hire all new at the bottom of the pay scale?
    Harris is a genius!

  85. Anonymous

    A look at the data at:

    http://www.ed-data.k12.ca.us/Navigation/fsTwoPanel.asp?bottom=%2Fprofile%2Easp%3Flevel%3D06%26reportNumber%3D16

    for DJUSD shows that Davis is overfunded by local revenue (i.e. parcel taxes) by 258% of the state average. In contrast, Davis is underfunded by Federal and other State revenue by 50% and 60% respectively. In dollar amounts this underfunding is about 8 million dollars. Instead of asking the community for more tax money why isn’t the administration pursuing this underfunding of the district from the State and Feds?

  86. Anonymous

    A look at the data at:

    http://www.ed-data.k12.ca.us/Navigation/fsTwoPanel.asp?bottom=%2Fprofile%2Easp%3Flevel%3D06%26reportNumber%3D16

    for DJUSD shows that Davis is overfunded by local revenue (i.e. parcel taxes) by 258% of the state average. In contrast, Davis is underfunded by Federal and other State revenue by 50% and 60% respectively. In dollar amounts this underfunding is about 8 million dollars. Instead of asking the community for more tax money why isn’t the administration pursuing this underfunding of the district from the State and Feds?

  87. Anonymous

    A look at the data at:

    http://www.ed-data.k12.ca.us/Navigation/fsTwoPanel.asp?bottom=%2Fprofile%2Easp%3Flevel%3D06%26reportNumber%3D16

    for DJUSD shows that Davis is overfunded by local revenue (i.e. parcel taxes) by 258% of the state average. In contrast, Davis is underfunded by Federal and other State revenue by 50% and 60% respectively. In dollar amounts this underfunding is about 8 million dollars. Instead of asking the community for more tax money why isn’t the administration pursuing this underfunding of the district from the State and Feds?

  88. Anonymous

    A look at the data at:

    http://www.ed-data.k12.ca.us/Navigation/fsTwoPanel.asp?bottom=%2Fprofile%2Easp%3Flevel%3D06%26reportNumber%3D16

    for DJUSD shows that Davis is overfunded by local revenue (i.e. parcel taxes) by 258% of the state average. In contrast, Davis is underfunded by Federal and other State revenue by 50% and 60% respectively. In dollar amounts this underfunding is about 8 million dollars. Instead of asking the community for more tax money why isn’t the administration pursuing this underfunding of the district from the State and Feds?

  89. music parent

    “Anonymous (11:58) said…
    Somebody ought to “fire” Richard Harris for his insulting suggestions to teachers. Way to inspire morale and spirit.”

    I don’t think Harris’ idea (firing all teachers) is appropriate, but I don’t fault him for brainstorming out loud to think of alternatives. I have come up with plenty of stupid ideas while brainstorming. The beauty of our democracy is that there are other board members and district staff to give him and others a sanity check on ideas that really won’t work.

  90. music parent

    “Anonymous (11:58) said…
    Somebody ought to “fire” Richard Harris for his insulting suggestions to teachers. Way to inspire morale and spirit.”

    I don’t think Harris’ idea (firing all teachers) is appropriate, but I don’t fault him for brainstorming out loud to think of alternatives. I have come up with plenty of stupid ideas while brainstorming. The beauty of our democracy is that there are other board members and district staff to give him and others a sanity check on ideas that really won’t work.

  91. music parent

    “Anonymous (11:58) said…
    Somebody ought to “fire” Richard Harris for his insulting suggestions to teachers. Way to inspire morale and spirit.”

    I don’t think Harris’ idea (firing all teachers) is appropriate, but I don’t fault him for brainstorming out loud to think of alternatives. I have come up with plenty of stupid ideas while brainstorming. The beauty of our democracy is that there are other board members and district staff to give him and others a sanity check on ideas that really won’t work.

  92. music parent

    “Anonymous (11:58) said…
    Somebody ought to “fire” Richard Harris for his insulting suggestions to teachers. Way to inspire morale and spirit.”

    I don’t think Harris’ idea (firing all teachers) is appropriate, but I don’t fault him for brainstorming out loud to think of alternatives. I have come up with plenty of stupid ideas while brainstorming. The beauty of our democracy is that there are other board members and district staff to give him and others a sanity check on ideas that really won’t work.

  93. 無名 - wu ming

    as a community, davis has enough money to make up most of whatever shortfall we’re looking at, if they’re willing. bake sale, parcel tax, whatever, we’ve got the resources. what we really need to do as a community is to have an honest discussion about what people are willing to pay for and what they aren’t, and then dig deep and do what needs to be done to make the budget work.

    statewide, it’s a much bigger problem, but driven by the same sort of structural budget problems. one thing the governor’s not even discussing is the possibility of increasing taxes to meet critical budgetary needs. granted, without a 2/3 supermajority in the state government necessary to overrule the monomanaically antitax CA republican party, he’s got a strong bargaining position there. but still, there’s this whole air of “we can’t do anything but cut,” which is just ridiculous.

    you can’t have effective government, or effective education on the cheap. you get what you pay for, by and large.

    if we’re going to cut salaries, though, we ought to start with the highest ones and work our way down. and fire the consultants right up front, so that we can focus our resources on retaining the people who actually teach our children.

  94. 無名 - wu ming

    as a community, davis has enough money to make up most of whatever shortfall we’re looking at, if they’re willing. bake sale, parcel tax, whatever, we’ve got the resources. what we really need to do as a community is to have an honest discussion about what people are willing to pay for and what they aren’t, and then dig deep and do what needs to be done to make the budget work.

    statewide, it’s a much bigger problem, but driven by the same sort of structural budget problems. one thing the governor’s not even discussing is the possibility of increasing taxes to meet critical budgetary needs. granted, without a 2/3 supermajority in the state government necessary to overrule the monomanaically antitax CA republican party, he’s got a strong bargaining position there. but still, there’s this whole air of “we can’t do anything but cut,” which is just ridiculous.

    you can’t have effective government, or effective education on the cheap. you get what you pay for, by and large.

    if we’re going to cut salaries, though, we ought to start with the highest ones and work our way down. and fire the consultants right up front, so that we can focus our resources on retaining the people who actually teach our children.

  95. 無名 - wu ming

    as a community, davis has enough money to make up most of whatever shortfall we’re looking at, if they’re willing. bake sale, parcel tax, whatever, we’ve got the resources. what we really need to do as a community is to have an honest discussion about what people are willing to pay for and what they aren’t, and then dig deep and do what needs to be done to make the budget work.

    statewide, it’s a much bigger problem, but driven by the same sort of structural budget problems. one thing the governor’s not even discussing is the possibility of increasing taxes to meet critical budgetary needs. granted, without a 2/3 supermajority in the state government necessary to overrule the monomanaically antitax CA republican party, he’s got a strong bargaining position there. but still, there’s this whole air of “we can’t do anything but cut,” which is just ridiculous.

    you can’t have effective government, or effective education on the cheap. you get what you pay for, by and large.

    if we’re going to cut salaries, though, we ought to start with the highest ones and work our way down. and fire the consultants right up front, so that we can focus our resources on retaining the people who actually teach our children.

  96. 無名 - wu ming

    as a community, davis has enough money to make up most of whatever shortfall we’re looking at, if they’re willing. bake sale, parcel tax, whatever, we’ve got the resources. what we really need to do as a community is to have an honest discussion about what people are willing to pay for and what they aren’t, and then dig deep and do what needs to be done to make the budget work.

    statewide, it’s a much bigger problem, but driven by the same sort of structural budget problems. one thing the governor’s not even discussing is the possibility of increasing taxes to meet critical budgetary needs. granted, without a 2/3 supermajority in the state government necessary to overrule the monomanaically antitax CA republican party, he’s got a strong bargaining position there. but still, there’s this whole air of “we can’t do anything but cut,” which is just ridiculous.

    you can’t have effective government, or effective education on the cheap. you get what you pay for, by and large.

    if we’re going to cut salaries, though, we ought to start with the highest ones and work our way down. and fire the consultants right up front, so that we can focus our resources on retaining the people who actually teach our children.

  97. djusd parent

    While I disagree with Richard Harris’ proposal to pink slip all of the teachers, I think it is important to understand what he was proposing. The DJUSD is going to have to cut certificated positions. In order to do that within the DTA contract, the teachers who may be impacted need to be notified on or before 3/15. Therefore the BOE will need to identify which programs they are targetting for cuts before that date. Ultimately, this will limit their flexibility as the budget building process goes forward. For instance, if they do not pink slip upper division language teachers on 3/15, then they can not decide to cut Chinese 6 or German 5 (I do not even know if these exist) in May. Richard Harris’ suggestion to give every teacher a pink slip only gives the BOE more time and continued flexibility to build the new, reduced budget.

    One of the things that has made me crazy as I watch the machinations of the BOE and the reactions in the community is a lack of tolerance for scrutiny. Especially in these dire economic times, any program or proposal should be able to withstand scrutiny. I really appreciate it when the BOE members ask tough questions of whoever has come before them– whether it is district staff, the teachers, the charter people. In my opinion that is what we elected them to do.

    If you were unable to attend or watch the meeting on Thursday, then you missed a wonderful example of how the process should work. Richard Harris suggested that the DTA give up their 1% salary increase as a way to help with the current budget problems. He has questioned the prudence of the new contract in light of what is now happening. It seems a ridiculous request, but it is an idea. Tim Paulson, DTA president, responded without getting emotional or insulted, he simply said “Bring it to us during the next negotiation.” He was probably thinking, “It will be a cold day in…”, but he handled it in a completely professional way. He understands that EVERYTHING needs to be on the table for cuts right now.

    Hard questions are going to need to be asked during the next few months of this budget process, and I think we need to be able to hear them. We need to be able to hear some of our favorite programs scrutinized and questioned so that even the programs that are preserved are as efficient and well run as possible.

  98. djusd parent

    While I disagree with Richard Harris’ proposal to pink slip all of the teachers, I think it is important to understand what he was proposing. The DJUSD is going to have to cut certificated positions. In order to do that within the DTA contract, the teachers who may be impacted need to be notified on or before 3/15. Therefore the BOE will need to identify which programs they are targetting for cuts before that date. Ultimately, this will limit their flexibility as the budget building process goes forward. For instance, if they do not pink slip upper division language teachers on 3/15, then they can not decide to cut Chinese 6 or German 5 (I do not even know if these exist) in May. Richard Harris’ suggestion to give every teacher a pink slip only gives the BOE more time and continued flexibility to build the new, reduced budget.

    One of the things that has made me crazy as I watch the machinations of the BOE and the reactions in the community is a lack of tolerance for scrutiny. Especially in these dire economic times, any program or proposal should be able to withstand scrutiny. I really appreciate it when the BOE members ask tough questions of whoever has come before them– whether it is district staff, the teachers, the charter people. In my opinion that is what we elected them to do.

    If you were unable to attend or watch the meeting on Thursday, then you missed a wonderful example of how the process should work. Richard Harris suggested that the DTA give up their 1% salary increase as a way to help with the current budget problems. He has questioned the prudence of the new contract in light of what is now happening. It seems a ridiculous request, but it is an idea. Tim Paulson, DTA president, responded without getting emotional or insulted, he simply said “Bring it to us during the next negotiation.” He was probably thinking, “It will be a cold day in…”, but he handled it in a completely professional way. He understands that EVERYTHING needs to be on the table for cuts right now.

    Hard questions are going to need to be asked during the next few months of this budget process, and I think we need to be able to hear them. We need to be able to hear some of our favorite programs scrutinized and questioned so that even the programs that are preserved are as efficient and well run as possible.

  99. djusd parent

    While I disagree with Richard Harris’ proposal to pink slip all of the teachers, I think it is important to understand what he was proposing. The DJUSD is going to have to cut certificated positions. In order to do that within the DTA contract, the teachers who may be impacted need to be notified on or before 3/15. Therefore the BOE will need to identify which programs they are targetting for cuts before that date. Ultimately, this will limit their flexibility as the budget building process goes forward. For instance, if they do not pink slip upper division language teachers on 3/15, then they can not decide to cut Chinese 6 or German 5 (I do not even know if these exist) in May. Richard Harris’ suggestion to give every teacher a pink slip only gives the BOE more time and continued flexibility to build the new, reduced budget.

    One of the things that has made me crazy as I watch the machinations of the BOE and the reactions in the community is a lack of tolerance for scrutiny. Especially in these dire economic times, any program or proposal should be able to withstand scrutiny. I really appreciate it when the BOE members ask tough questions of whoever has come before them– whether it is district staff, the teachers, the charter people. In my opinion that is what we elected them to do.

    If you were unable to attend or watch the meeting on Thursday, then you missed a wonderful example of how the process should work. Richard Harris suggested that the DTA give up their 1% salary increase as a way to help with the current budget problems. He has questioned the prudence of the new contract in light of what is now happening. It seems a ridiculous request, but it is an idea. Tim Paulson, DTA president, responded without getting emotional or insulted, he simply said “Bring it to us during the next negotiation.” He was probably thinking, “It will be a cold day in…”, but he handled it in a completely professional way. He understands that EVERYTHING needs to be on the table for cuts right now.

    Hard questions are going to need to be asked during the next few months of this budget process, and I think we need to be able to hear them. We need to be able to hear some of our favorite programs scrutinized and questioned so that even the programs that are preserved are as efficient and well run as possible.

  100. djusd parent

    While I disagree with Richard Harris’ proposal to pink slip all of the teachers, I think it is important to understand what he was proposing. The DJUSD is going to have to cut certificated positions. In order to do that within the DTA contract, the teachers who may be impacted need to be notified on or before 3/15. Therefore the BOE will need to identify which programs they are targetting for cuts before that date. Ultimately, this will limit their flexibility as the budget building process goes forward. For instance, if they do not pink slip upper division language teachers on 3/15, then they can not decide to cut Chinese 6 or German 5 (I do not even know if these exist) in May. Richard Harris’ suggestion to give every teacher a pink slip only gives the BOE more time and continued flexibility to build the new, reduced budget.

    One of the things that has made me crazy as I watch the machinations of the BOE and the reactions in the community is a lack of tolerance for scrutiny. Especially in these dire economic times, any program or proposal should be able to withstand scrutiny. I really appreciate it when the BOE members ask tough questions of whoever has come before them– whether it is district staff, the teachers, the charter people. In my opinion that is what we elected them to do.

    If you were unable to attend or watch the meeting on Thursday, then you missed a wonderful example of how the process should work. Richard Harris suggested that the DTA give up their 1% salary increase as a way to help with the current budget problems. He has questioned the prudence of the new contract in light of what is now happening. It seems a ridiculous request, but it is an idea. Tim Paulson, DTA president, responded without getting emotional or insulted, he simply said “Bring it to us during the next negotiation.” He was probably thinking, “It will be a cold day in…”, but he handled it in a completely professional way. He understands that EVERYTHING needs to be on the table for cuts right now.

    Hard questions are going to need to be asked during the next few months of this budget process, and I think we need to be able to hear them. We need to be able to hear some of our favorite programs scrutinized and questioned so that even the programs that are preserved are as efficient and well run as possible.

  101. another parent

    Sort of reiterating the comment above…

    Pink slips don’t mean the teachers are fired. They serve notice that the district may lay them off. If the district doesn’t give a pink slip they are not legally able to do the layoff. With the need to cut $4 million, giving out more pink slips rather than fewer just keeps the board’s options open through the public input period.

  102. another parent

    Sort of reiterating the comment above…

    Pink slips don’t mean the teachers are fired. They serve notice that the district may lay them off. If the district doesn’t give a pink slip they are not legally able to do the layoff. With the need to cut $4 million, giving out more pink slips rather than fewer just keeps the board’s options open through the public input period.

  103. another parent

    Sort of reiterating the comment above…

    Pink slips don’t mean the teachers are fired. They serve notice that the district may lay them off. If the district doesn’t give a pink slip they are not legally able to do the layoff. With the need to cut $4 million, giving out more pink slips rather than fewer just keeps the board’s options open through the public input period.

  104. another parent

    Sort of reiterating the comment above…

    Pink slips don’t mean the teachers are fired. They serve notice that the district may lay them off. If the district doesn’t give a pink slip they are not legally able to do the layoff. With the need to cut $4 million, giving out more pink slips rather than fewer just keeps the board’s options open through the public input period.

  105. Anonymous

    Notification of the possibility of being laid-off legally needs to be given in good faith. Obviously DJUSD is not going to lay off all the teachers so legally DJUSD cannot put them all on notice. To do so would guarantee a lawsuit which would hemorrhage yet more money from the district. This proposal from Harris does not show that he is exploring all options, as has been suggested, but rather shows how a lobbyist approaches achieving their single-minded goal at the expense of any in their way. Watch him. He is intent on raiding this district and handing over taxpayer money to his developer friends in the guise of “greening” the schools rather than finding ways to preserve what we already have.

  106. Anonymous

    Notification of the possibility of being laid-off legally needs to be given in good faith. Obviously DJUSD is not going to lay off all the teachers so legally DJUSD cannot put them all on notice. To do so would guarantee a lawsuit which would hemorrhage yet more money from the district. This proposal from Harris does not show that he is exploring all options, as has been suggested, but rather shows how a lobbyist approaches achieving their single-minded goal at the expense of any in their way. Watch him. He is intent on raiding this district and handing over taxpayer money to his developer friends in the guise of “greening” the schools rather than finding ways to preserve what we already have.

  107. Anonymous

    Notification of the possibility of being laid-off legally needs to be given in good faith. Obviously DJUSD is not going to lay off all the teachers so legally DJUSD cannot put them all on notice. To do so would guarantee a lawsuit which would hemorrhage yet more money from the district. This proposal from Harris does not show that he is exploring all options, as has been suggested, but rather shows how a lobbyist approaches achieving their single-minded goal at the expense of any in their way. Watch him. He is intent on raiding this district and handing over taxpayer money to his developer friends in the guise of “greening” the schools rather than finding ways to preserve what we already have.

  108. Anonymous

    Notification of the possibility of being laid-off legally needs to be given in good faith. Obviously DJUSD is not going to lay off all the teachers so legally DJUSD cannot put them all on notice. To do so would guarantee a lawsuit which would hemorrhage yet more money from the district. This proposal from Harris does not show that he is exploring all options, as has been suggested, but rather shows how a lobbyist approaches achieving their single-minded goal at the expense of any in their way. Watch him. He is intent on raiding this district and handing over taxpayer money to his developer friends in the guise of “greening” the schools rather than finding ways to preserve what we already have.

  109. Anonymous

    I wanted to respond to Mike Hart’s suggestion to recruit students from surrounding towns. If there was ever an example of the egotism and “it’s all about me” attitude that Davis is sometimes accused of, Mike exemplifies it. Rob the surrounding communities so Davis benefits without any regard to how it impacts the other towns? Arrogance be thy name!

  110. Anonymous

    I wanted to respond to Mike Hart’s suggestion to recruit students from surrounding towns. If there was ever an example of the egotism and “it’s all about me” attitude that Davis is sometimes accused of, Mike exemplifies it. Rob the surrounding communities so Davis benefits without any regard to how it impacts the other towns? Arrogance be thy name!

  111. Anonymous

    I wanted to respond to Mike Hart’s suggestion to recruit students from surrounding towns. If there was ever an example of the egotism and “it’s all about me” attitude that Davis is sometimes accused of, Mike exemplifies it. Rob the surrounding communities so Davis benefits without any regard to how it impacts the other towns? Arrogance be thy name!

  112. Anonymous

    I wanted to respond to Mike Hart’s suggestion to recruit students from surrounding towns. If there was ever an example of the egotism and “it’s all about me” attitude that Davis is sometimes accused of, Mike exemplifies it. Rob the surrounding communities so Davis benefits without any regard to how it impacts the other towns? Arrogance be thy name!

  113. Anonymous

    Why is it that whenever there is a budget crisis, someone inevitably calls on the person or persons at the top to have their pay cut when it would have a miniscule impact on the budget? Sometimes the folks at the top should take a pay cut to be in solidarity with other staff but to propose it as some sort of an insightful grasp of the budget is laughable, at best.

  114. Anonymous

    Why is it that whenever there is a budget crisis, someone inevitably calls on the person or persons at the top to have their pay cut when it would have a miniscule impact on the budget? Sometimes the folks at the top should take a pay cut to be in solidarity with other staff but to propose it as some sort of an insightful grasp of the budget is laughable, at best.

  115. Anonymous

    Why is it that whenever there is a budget crisis, someone inevitably calls on the person or persons at the top to have their pay cut when it would have a miniscule impact on the budget? Sometimes the folks at the top should take a pay cut to be in solidarity with other staff but to propose it as some sort of an insightful grasp of the budget is laughable, at best.

  116. Anonymous

    Why is it that whenever there is a budget crisis, someone inevitably calls on the person or persons at the top to have their pay cut when it would have a miniscule impact on the budget? Sometimes the folks at the top should take a pay cut to be in solidarity with other staff but to propose it as some sort of an insightful grasp of the budget is laughable, at best.

  117. Anonymous

    Dear 10:29 anon,

    Why is it arrogance to open up the district and let people bring their kids in by choice? There could be any number of reasons why someone might want to send their kids to school in Davis. If part of the problem is overcapacity due to declining enrollment why not use the extra capacity to open up opportunities in a district with a track record of successful outcomes for students? Why is it arrogant to do so?

  118. Anonymous

    Dear 10:29 anon,

    Why is it arrogance to open up the district and let people bring their kids in by choice? There could be any number of reasons why someone might want to send their kids to school in Davis. If part of the problem is overcapacity due to declining enrollment why not use the extra capacity to open up opportunities in a district with a track record of successful outcomes for students? Why is it arrogant to do so?

  119. Anonymous

    Dear 10:29 anon,

    Why is it arrogance to open up the district and let people bring their kids in by choice? There could be any number of reasons why someone might want to send their kids to school in Davis. If part of the problem is overcapacity due to declining enrollment why not use the extra capacity to open up opportunities in a district with a track record of successful outcomes for students? Why is it arrogant to do so?

  120. Anonymous

    Dear 10:29 anon,

    Why is it arrogance to open up the district and let people bring their kids in by choice? There could be any number of reasons why someone might want to send their kids to school in Davis. If part of the problem is overcapacity due to declining enrollment why not use the extra capacity to open up opportunities in a district with a track record of successful outcomes for students? Why is it arrogant to do so?

  121. Parent 6

    Folks who are still confused about inter-district transfers, including anon “bring their kids in by choice?” It is not a parents’ choice if their kids are in a public school. Their current district has to release them to Davis, giving up revenue. Neighboring districts are worse off than ours. They are unlikely to release their kids to Davis.

  122. Parent 6

    Folks who are still confused about inter-district transfers, including anon “bring their kids in by choice?” It is not a parents’ choice if their kids are in a public school. Their current district has to release them to Davis, giving up revenue. Neighboring districts are worse off than ours. They are unlikely to release their kids to Davis.

  123. Parent 6

    Folks who are still confused about inter-district transfers, including anon “bring their kids in by choice?” It is not a parents’ choice if their kids are in a public school. Their current district has to release them to Davis, giving up revenue. Neighboring districts are worse off than ours. They are unlikely to release their kids to Davis.

  124. Parent 6

    Folks who are still confused about inter-district transfers, including anon “bring their kids in by choice?” It is not a parents’ choice if their kids are in a public school. Their current district has to release them to Davis, giving up revenue. Neighboring districts are worse off than ours. They are unlikely to release their kids to Davis.

  125. Anonymous

    Dixon is in bad shape but Woodland is not. People keep making this argument that we are doing the other districts dirty work keeping them out so that they won’t have their request to transfer denied by their home district. If they don’t want to release them make them say it. Many people who work at the university live in surrounding districts so to say that they would all refused to release their students is quite a presumption especially because I don’t know of a single district that has specifically said no to students wanting to leave.

  126. Anonymous

    Dixon is in bad shape but Woodland is not. People keep making this argument that we are doing the other districts dirty work keeping them out so that they won’t have their request to transfer denied by their home district. If they don’t want to release them make them say it. Many people who work at the university live in surrounding districts so to say that they would all refused to release their students is quite a presumption especially because I don’t know of a single district that has specifically said no to students wanting to leave.

  127. Anonymous

    Dixon is in bad shape but Woodland is not. People keep making this argument that we are doing the other districts dirty work keeping them out so that they won’t have their request to transfer denied by their home district. If they don’t want to release them make them say it. Many people who work at the university live in surrounding districts so to say that they would all refused to release their students is quite a presumption especially because I don’t know of a single district that has specifically said no to students wanting to leave.

  128. Anonymous

    Dixon is in bad shape but Woodland is not. People keep making this argument that we are doing the other districts dirty work keeping them out so that they won’t have their request to transfer denied by their home district. If they don’t want to release them make them say it. Many people who work at the university live in surrounding districts so to say that they would all refused to release their students is quite a presumption especially because I don’t know of a single district that has specifically said no to students wanting to leave.

  129. #1

    ” been through this before said…

    Have the parents who call about the music program suggest where they think the cuts should be done. Which program should be cut?”

    Yes. Cut kindergarten. If the kindergarten activists complain, then make them suggest where cuts should be made.

    This is a stupid argument.

  130. #1

    ” been through this before said…

    Have the parents who call about the music program suggest where they think the cuts should be done. Which program should be cut?”

    Yes. Cut kindergarten. If the kindergarten activists complain, then make them suggest where cuts should be made.

    This is a stupid argument.

  131. #1

    ” been through this before said…

    Have the parents who call about the music program suggest where they think the cuts should be done. Which program should be cut?”

    Yes. Cut kindergarten. If the kindergarten activists complain, then make them suggest where cuts should be made.

    This is a stupid argument.

  132. #1

    ” been through this before said…

    Have the parents who call about the music program suggest where they think the cuts should be done. Which program should be cut?”

    Yes. Cut kindergarten. If the kindergarten activists complain, then make them suggest where cuts should be made.

    This is a stupid argument.

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