Commentary: Painful Times Ahead for DJUSD

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This is what we have come to–on Thursday night, the Davis School District, faced with a huge budget cut, put on the table the notion of rolling back teacher salaries by 2 percent. The motion was made by Richard Harris and seconded by Susan Lovenberg.

If the motion had been approved, Mr. Harris would then have asked administrative staff to take a similar temporary pay cut.

The idea purportedly came from one of the PTA presidents, who wondered how many teaching positions could be saved if teachers would agree to forgo their salary increases until after the state budget approval, which is expected to happen sometime in the late summer or early fall.

Richard Harris operated under the belief that up to $1 million would be added to the budget from the state once the agreement is actually reached but by that point it would be too late to do much with the current budget–unless you are dealing with salaries that could be the first thing adjusted once a budget passes.

There is a logic to Richard Harris’ proposal, but the rest of the board Tim Taylor, Gina Daleiden, and Sheila had serious doubts.

One problem was that the idea came forward from a board member rather than either the Davis Teachers Association or the California School Employees Association. In fact, the president of DTA, Tim Paulson told the board that a 1 percent salary rollback had been proposed at a recent meeting but failed without so much as a second. CSEA also had problems with a rollback.

Tim Taylor I think clinched it in my mind:

“If we pass this motion, we’re saying (to employees) ‘Why don’t you step up to this 2 percent?’ We’re not asking this of doctors and lawyers. … We’re asking this of teachers and other staff who we’ll all admit are not paid enough already.”

Sheila Allen examined whether there was even time to pursue such negotiations, but Kevin French indicated that there was not.

For Sheila Allen it became an issue of timing:

“I don’t think we can get the information out to the membership to put the money back into the budget in time so that we can use it. I can’t support this motion tonight.”

In the end, the correct answer probably came from both Sheila Allen and Gina Daleiden–from a practical standpoint, it is not clear that they could have gained sufficient buy-in from the teachers in the amount of time available to contemplate such a decision.

The choices here are quite horrific, at this point in time, it is really not a realistic option. On a philosophical level, I think I have to side with Tim Taylor, himself a lawyer. Asking people who are not paid enough to begin with, to take a pay cut, does not seem a responsible course of action. But then again, cutting positions is not a comforting action either.

In the meantime, the board also delayed the decision on additional pink slips to classified employees, that decision will be made on April 28, 2008 at the very earliest.

It seems to me that the district has taken a lot of options off the table, but at the same time, it seems pretty clear that they still have to make these deep cuts. None of these cuts are going to painless. They already decided that they could not close a school on this kind of notice, which is probably the right decision but it nevertheless puts another $500,000 in cuts back into play.

Hence we have the proposal to cut classified positions. However, now six elementary school principals warn that serious problems will result if school secretaries’ hours are reduced.

Here’s what I have come to the conclusion about watching this process. There has been perennial speculation out there that public schools are run inefficiently, that they waste huge amounts of money. And yet, when push comes to shove and they actually have to make deep and real cuts, they are not able to do it painlessly. To me that’s an indication that there is not nearly as much waste in a school district as people think.

Perhaps there were too many administrators, but even cutting some did not dent the budget and the amount of work performed by the administration, I think is severely underestimated. The additional workload with reduced staff will have consequences.

On a school site itself, who are you going to cut? Teachers? Secretaries? Principals? Other support staff? Each of those carries with it, vital tasks and duties.

When we are talking about cutting salaries for professionals who -most in society acknowledge- get paid too little to begin with, you suddenly realize that the amount of waste in public schools is not nearly what most think it is. We can cut painlessly perhaps on the margins, but once we get into real cuts, there is nothing but pain to go around and that’s why these decisions are so difficult and why the process is taking so long. In the end, we are going to have to make decisions and do things that really hurt–that is the only way to avoid even worse consequences of losing control of the operations of our district.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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156 thoughts on “Commentary: Painful Times Ahead for DJUSD”

  1. Anonymous

    Little “amount of waste?” How about the thousand$ wasted building new elementary schools, remodeling Valley Oak and building a new King School. Thousand$ more wasted by Tahir Ahad. And now these mistakes are to be borne by teachers!!
    What a waste of rational thought to put building/scamming before teaching. Teachers, secretaries, support staff, principals, coaches, all should have the absolute highest budget priorities.

  2. Anonymous

    Little “amount of waste?” How about the thousand$ wasted building new elementary schools, remodeling Valley Oak and building a new King School. Thousand$ more wasted by Tahir Ahad. And now these mistakes are to be borne by teachers!!
    What a waste of rational thought to put building/scamming before teaching. Teachers, secretaries, support staff, principals, coaches, all should have the absolute highest budget priorities.

  3. Anonymous

    Little “amount of waste?” How about the thousand$ wasted building new elementary schools, remodeling Valley Oak and building a new King School. Thousand$ more wasted by Tahir Ahad. And now these mistakes are to be borne by teachers!!
    What a waste of rational thought to put building/scamming before teaching. Teachers, secretaries, support staff, principals, coaches, all should have the absolute highest budget priorities.

  4. Anonymous

    Little “amount of waste?” How about the thousand$ wasted building new elementary schools, remodeling Valley Oak and building a new King School. Thousand$ more wasted by Tahir Ahad. And now these mistakes are to be borne by teachers!!
    What a waste of rational thought to put building/scamming before teaching. Teachers, secretaries, support staff, principals, coaches, all should have the absolute highest budget priorities.

  5. Anonymous

    Let me get this straight…DJUSD, the group of “geniuses” who were selected to manage the hell-hole (otherwise known as Davis High) I had to contend with in my younger years…is struggling and strapped for cash?
    What a shock!
    *laughing uncontrollably*
    Do you mean to say that none of the polyester-clad “land-barons” of Yolo county have offered to raise funds to pay the teachers and staff?
    Could it be a case of rotten karma coming back to bite the entire collective in the *ahem* posterior?
    Let me put it this way: when the high school I transferred to (after I escaped Davis High with my soul barely intact) sends me an alumni newsletter and politely suggests a donation, I give generously.
    But I wouldn’t give one red cent to support the travesty of miseducation that is the DJUSD.

    One word, people: KARMA.

  6. Anonymous

    Let me get this straight…DJUSD, the group of “geniuses” who were selected to manage the hell-hole (otherwise known as Davis High) I had to contend with in my younger years…is struggling and strapped for cash?
    What a shock!
    *laughing uncontrollably*
    Do you mean to say that none of the polyester-clad “land-barons” of Yolo county have offered to raise funds to pay the teachers and staff?
    Could it be a case of rotten karma coming back to bite the entire collective in the *ahem* posterior?
    Let me put it this way: when the high school I transferred to (after I escaped Davis High with my soul barely intact) sends me an alumni newsletter and politely suggests a donation, I give generously.
    But I wouldn’t give one red cent to support the travesty of miseducation that is the DJUSD.

    One word, people: KARMA.

  7. Anonymous

    Let me get this straight…DJUSD, the group of “geniuses” who were selected to manage the hell-hole (otherwise known as Davis High) I had to contend with in my younger years…is struggling and strapped for cash?
    What a shock!
    *laughing uncontrollably*
    Do you mean to say that none of the polyester-clad “land-barons” of Yolo county have offered to raise funds to pay the teachers and staff?
    Could it be a case of rotten karma coming back to bite the entire collective in the *ahem* posterior?
    Let me put it this way: when the high school I transferred to (after I escaped Davis High with my soul barely intact) sends me an alumni newsletter and politely suggests a donation, I give generously.
    But I wouldn’t give one red cent to support the travesty of miseducation that is the DJUSD.

    One word, people: KARMA.

  8. Anonymous

    Let me get this straight…DJUSD, the group of “geniuses” who were selected to manage the hell-hole (otherwise known as Davis High) I had to contend with in my younger years…is struggling and strapped for cash?
    What a shock!
    *laughing uncontrollably*
    Do you mean to say that none of the polyester-clad “land-barons” of Yolo county have offered to raise funds to pay the teachers and staff?
    Could it be a case of rotten karma coming back to bite the entire collective in the *ahem* posterior?
    Let me put it this way: when the high school I transferred to (after I escaped Davis High with my soul barely intact) sends me an alumni newsletter and politely suggests a donation, I give generously.
    But I wouldn’t give one red cent to support the travesty of miseducation that is the DJUSD.

    One word, people: KARMA.

  9. Matt Williams

    anonymous 6:48 AM, that is a very powerful statement. High School years are often painful, mine were as well. What was it that made the school you transferred to so much better than DHS?

  10. Matt Williams

    anonymous 6:48 AM, that is a very powerful statement. High School years are often painful, mine were as well. What was it that made the school you transferred to so much better than DHS?

  11. Matt Williams

    anonymous 6:48 AM, that is a very powerful statement. High School years are often painful, mine were as well. What was it that made the school you transferred to so much better than DHS?

  12. Matt Williams

    anonymous 6:48 AM, that is a very powerful statement. High School years are often painful, mine were as well. What was it that made the school you transferred to so much better than DHS?

  13. wdf

    There is a popular misconception that money to build schools is the same money that can be used legally to pay salaries. It isn’t.

    You can blame Tahir Ahad, but we voted on that bond measure to fund it. We as a public were complacent because times were good. The voters in Davis who didn’t vote on that bond probably share a greater responsibility for their inaction.

    The funding shortfall, outside of the state budget issues, comes from *operating* too many schools, and from the raise granted to the teachers in January. We don’t have the money to pay either.

    Richard Harris voted against the raise in January on the basis that the state economy was clearly not going to favor that kind of funding. He was right.

    The DTA and school board have to share some responsibility in this as well. They wanted the increase, and teachers are always underpaid, but the consequence is that it added their colleagues to the cut list.

    You can blame Tahir and “those administrators”, but it’s all misplaced and misdirected. It will probably delay identifying an appropriate solution.

    If you agree that Davis teachers are underpaid, then you have to give honest consideration to supporting the yet to be submitted emergency parcel tax.

    If you want to blame Tahir and others for all that excess school building, then you really have to accept that another school will have to close. It could be Emerson or another JH, or it could be another elementary school. But we as a community have to share some responsibility (the voting majority having voted to pass the bond).

    DPD is right. There will be painful months ahead, even if DFS and supporting groups come up w/ everything, and even if the state suddenly lessens the pain.

    There is still a “structural deficit” to contend w/, which was emphasized at Thursday’s meeting. It comes from operating too many schools and from the salary/benefits increases for the teachers.

    anonymous 6:48,

    I regret to learn what you experienced at DHS. I concede that the Davis schools are not perfect, but there are many more hellholes in schools in surrounding districts. I have some knowledge of those. I hope that we as a community can improve things. DHS is the only viable high school most of us have for our kids; we have to make it work.

  14. wdf

    There is a popular misconception that money to build schools is the same money that can be used legally to pay salaries. It isn’t.

    You can blame Tahir Ahad, but we voted on that bond measure to fund it. We as a public were complacent because times were good. The voters in Davis who didn’t vote on that bond probably share a greater responsibility for their inaction.

    The funding shortfall, outside of the state budget issues, comes from *operating* too many schools, and from the raise granted to the teachers in January. We don’t have the money to pay either.

    Richard Harris voted against the raise in January on the basis that the state economy was clearly not going to favor that kind of funding. He was right.

    The DTA and school board have to share some responsibility in this as well. They wanted the increase, and teachers are always underpaid, but the consequence is that it added their colleagues to the cut list.

    You can blame Tahir and “those administrators”, but it’s all misplaced and misdirected. It will probably delay identifying an appropriate solution.

    If you agree that Davis teachers are underpaid, then you have to give honest consideration to supporting the yet to be submitted emergency parcel tax.

    If you want to blame Tahir and others for all that excess school building, then you really have to accept that another school will have to close. It could be Emerson or another JH, or it could be another elementary school. But we as a community have to share some responsibility (the voting majority having voted to pass the bond).

    DPD is right. There will be painful months ahead, even if DFS and supporting groups come up w/ everything, and even if the state suddenly lessens the pain.

    There is still a “structural deficit” to contend w/, which was emphasized at Thursday’s meeting. It comes from operating too many schools and from the salary/benefits increases for the teachers.

    anonymous 6:48,

    I regret to learn what you experienced at DHS. I concede that the Davis schools are not perfect, but there are many more hellholes in schools in surrounding districts. I have some knowledge of those. I hope that we as a community can improve things. DHS is the only viable high school most of us have for our kids; we have to make it work.

  15. wdf

    There is a popular misconception that money to build schools is the same money that can be used legally to pay salaries. It isn’t.

    You can blame Tahir Ahad, but we voted on that bond measure to fund it. We as a public were complacent because times were good. The voters in Davis who didn’t vote on that bond probably share a greater responsibility for their inaction.

    The funding shortfall, outside of the state budget issues, comes from *operating* too many schools, and from the raise granted to the teachers in January. We don’t have the money to pay either.

    Richard Harris voted against the raise in January on the basis that the state economy was clearly not going to favor that kind of funding. He was right.

    The DTA and school board have to share some responsibility in this as well. They wanted the increase, and teachers are always underpaid, but the consequence is that it added their colleagues to the cut list.

    You can blame Tahir and “those administrators”, but it’s all misplaced and misdirected. It will probably delay identifying an appropriate solution.

    If you agree that Davis teachers are underpaid, then you have to give honest consideration to supporting the yet to be submitted emergency parcel tax.

    If you want to blame Tahir and others for all that excess school building, then you really have to accept that another school will have to close. It could be Emerson or another JH, or it could be another elementary school. But we as a community have to share some responsibility (the voting majority having voted to pass the bond).

    DPD is right. There will be painful months ahead, even if DFS and supporting groups come up w/ everything, and even if the state suddenly lessens the pain.

    There is still a “structural deficit” to contend w/, which was emphasized at Thursday’s meeting. It comes from operating too many schools and from the salary/benefits increases for the teachers.

    anonymous 6:48,

    I regret to learn what you experienced at DHS. I concede that the Davis schools are not perfect, but there are many more hellholes in schools in surrounding districts. I have some knowledge of those. I hope that we as a community can improve things. DHS is the only viable high school most of us have for our kids; we have to make it work.

  16. wdf

    There is a popular misconception that money to build schools is the same money that can be used legally to pay salaries. It isn’t.

    You can blame Tahir Ahad, but we voted on that bond measure to fund it. We as a public were complacent because times were good. The voters in Davis who didn’t vote on that bond probably share a greater responsibility for their inaction.

    The funding shortfall, outside of the state budget issues, comes from *operating* too many schools, and from the raise granted to the teachers in January. We don’t have the money to pay either.

    Richard Harris voted against the raise in January on the basis that the state economy was clearly not going to favor that kind of funding. He was right.

    The DTA and school board have to share some responsibility in this as well. They wanted the increase, and teachers are always underpaid, but the consequence is that it added their colleagues to the cut list.

    You can blame Tahir and “those administrators”, but it’s all misplaced and misdirected. It will probably delay identifying an appropriate solution.

    If you agree that Davis teachers are underpaid, then you have to give honest consideration to supporting the yet to be submitted emergency parcel tax.

    If you want to blame Tahir and others for all that excess school building, then you really have to accept that another school will have to close. It could be Emerson or another JH, or it could be another elementary school. But we as a community have to share some responsibility (the voting majority having voted to pass the bond).

    DPD is right. There will be painful months ahead, even if DFS and supporting groups come up w/ everything, and even if the state suddenly lessens the pain.

    There is still a “structural deficit” to contend w/, which was emphasized at Thursday’s meeting. It comes from operating too many schools and from the salary/benefits increases for the teachers.

    anonymous 6:48,

    I regret to learn what you experienced at DHS. I concede that the Davis schools are not perfect, but there are many more hellholes in schools in surrounding districts. I have some knowledge of those. I hope that we as a community can improve things. DHS is the only viable high school most of us have for our kids; we have to make it work.

  17. Anonymous

    Every high school is a “hellhole” of one type or another. That’s what makes it high school. Sheesh! Come on! The person who filed that complaint is undoubtedly young and fully entitled to their opinion, but high school is an awkward, trying, and often hurtful stage of life. Get over it. The high school itself, even one like Davis with all its cliques and pampered kids, is rarely the culprit. I leave you with the same advice I give my kids…”Whatever you do, don’t peak in high school!”

  18. Anonymous

    Every high school is a “hellhole” of one type or another. That’s what makes it high school. Sheesh! Come on! The person who filed that complaint is undoubtedly young and fully entitled to their opinion, but high school is an awkward, trying, and often hurtful stage of life. Get over it. The high school itself, even one like Davis with all its cliques and pampered kids, is rarely the culprit. I leave you with the same advice I give my kids…”Whatever you do, don’t peak in high school!”

  19. Anonymous

    Every high school is a “hellhole” of one type or another. That’s what makes it high school. Sheesh! Come on! The person who filed that complaint is undoubtedly young and fully entitled to their opinion, but high school is an awkward, trying, and often hurtful stage of life. Get over it. The high school itself, even one like Davis with all its cliques and pampered kids, is rarely the culprit. I leave you with the same advice I give my kids…”Whatever you do, don’t peak in high school!”

  20. Anonymous

    Every high school is a “hellhole” of one type or another. That’s what makes it high school. Sheesh! Come on! The person who filed that complaint is undoubtedly young and fully entitled to their opinion, but high school is an awkward, trying, and often hurtful stage of life. Get over it. The high school itself, even one like Davis with all its cliques and pampered kids, is rarely the culprit. I leave you with the same advice I give my kids…”Whatever you do, don’t peak in high school!”

  21. Anonymous

    Hey, anybody who puts hellhole in quotes has got to be an authority figure or sleepwalked through their high school years.
    Anyway, the Beatles got the scene right, as far as soul-survival at Davis High, back in the ’60s:

    You’re holding me down, turning me round/
    Filling me up with your rules./
    I’ve got to admit it’s getting better/
    A little better all the time/
    I have to admit it’s getting better/
    It’s getting better since you’ve been mine. —
    Lennon/McCartney

  22. Anonymous

    Hey, anybody who puts hellhole in quotes has got to be an authority figure or sleepwalked through their high school years.
    Anyway, the Beatles got the scene right, as far as soul-survival at Davis High, back in the ’60s:

    You’re holding me down, turning me round/
    Filling me up with your rules./
    I’ve got to admit it’s getting better/
    A little better all the time/
    I have to admit it’s getting better/
    It’s getting better since you’ve been mine. —
    Lennon/McCartney

  23. Anonymous

    Hey, anybody who puts hellhole in quotes has got to be an authority figure or sleepwalked through their high school years.
    Anyway, the Beatles got the scene right, as far as soul-survival at Davis High, back in the ’60s:

    You’re holding me down, turning me round/
    Filling me up with your rules./
    I’ve got to admit it’s getting better/
    A little better all the time/
    I have to admit it’s getting better/
    It’s getting better since you’ve been mine. —
    Lennon/McCartney

  24. Anonymous

    Hey, anybody who puts hellhole in quotes has got to be an authority figure or sleepwalked through their high school years.
    Anyway, the Beatles got the scene right, as far as soul-survival at Davis High, back in the ’60s:

    You’re holding me down, turning me round/
    Filling me up with your rules./
    I’ve got to admit it’s getting better/
    A little better all the time/
    I have to admit it’s getting better/
    It’s getting better since you’ve been mine. —
    Lennon/McCartney

  25. painful times

    Excellent points DPD. Some would suggest that all we need to do is cut the administration, go charter, etc. but the reality is, no matter what happens the budget situation we are in is going to be painful, and is going to mean people who matter to kids are going to lose their jobs.

  26. painful times

    Excellent points DPD. Some would suggest that all we need to do is cut the administration, go charter, etc. but the reality is, no matter what happens the budget situation we are in is going to be painful, and is going to mean people who matter to kids are going to lose their jobs.

  27. painful times

    Excellent points DPD. Some would suggest that all we need to do is cut the administration, go charter, etc. but the reality is, no matter what happens the budget situation we are in is going to be painful, and is going to mean people who matter to kids are going to lose their jobs.

  28. painful times

    Excellent points DPD. Some would suggest that all we need to do is cut the administration, go charter, etc. but the reality is, no matter what happens the budget situation we are in is going to be painful, and is going to mean people who matter to kids are going to lose their jobs.

  29. Black Bart

    When the budget was done last year the cola was 4.5% When the DTA negotiated they did so based on that number. I don’t think DTA got 4.5 % maybe someone could refresh us with the actual number.

    Official inflation is running at 2.3% but for basic needs such as food and gas the numbers are much higher. Now people are trying to blame the teachers for the problems of DJUSD or at least want to balance the budget on their backs. Let us be very clear the teachers aren’t responsible for declining enrollment. The nimby’s are the ones restricting housing and keeping prices too high for young families to afford. The teachers didn’t mismanage the finances of the district, the administration made those mistakes. So why should the teachers pay the price for the folly of the community? Why should we not bring the number of teachers into equilibrium with the number of students? Yes, Davis will lose talented teachers with rare skills and programs will suffer, but this is what happens when you have declining enrollment, a poor economy, mismanagement, and state budget veto power held by a minority that does not believe in taxes. Its bad all around, but, the senior teachers, the ones who have dedicated their lives to this district are the last ones who should be asked to sacrifice. If you want give backs why not lead by example and start with administration?

    The one decent thing I have seen is the Davis Schools Foundation they have done an awesome job of stepping up and leading by example instead of telling others to sacrifice everything but their own sacred cows.

  30. Black Bart

    When the budget was done last year the cola was 4.5% When the DTA negotiated they did so based on that number. I don’t think DTA got 4.5 % maybe someone could refresh us with the actual number.

    Official inflation is running at 2.3% but for basic needs such as food and gas the numbers are much higher. Now people are trying to blame the teachers for the problems of DJUSD or at least want to balance the budget on their backs. Let us be very clear the teachers aren’t responsible for declining enrollment. The nimby’s are the ones restricting housing and keeping prices too high for young families to afford. The teachers didn’t mismanage the finances of the district, the administration made those mistakes. So why should the teachers pay the price for the folly of the community? Why should we not bring the number of teachers into equilibrium with the number of students? Yes, Davis will lose talented teachers with rare skills and programs will suffer, but this is what happens when you have declining enrollment, a poor economy, mismanagement, and state budget veto power held by a minority that does not believe in taxes. Its bad all around, but, the senior teachers, the ones who have dedicated their lives to this district are the last ones who should be asked to sacrifice. If you want give backs why not lead by example and start with administration?

    The one decent thing I have seen is the Davis Schools Foundation they have done an awesome job of stepping up and leading by example instead of telling others to sacrifice everything but their own sacred cows.

  31. Black Bart

    When the budget was done last year the cola was 4.5% When the DTA negotiated they did so based on that number. I don’t think DTA got 4.5 % maybe someone could refresh us with the actual number.

    Official inflation is running at 2.3% but for basic needs such as food and gas the numbers are much higher. Now people are trying to blame the teachers for the problems of DJUSD or at least want to balance the budget on their backs. Let us be very clear the teachers aren’t responsible for declining enrollment. The nimby’s are the ones restricting housing and keeping prices too high for young families to afford. The teachers didn’t mismanage the finances of the district, the administration made those mistakes. So why should the teachers pay the price for the folly of the community? Why should we not bring the number of teachers into equilibrium with the number of students? Yes, Davis will lose talented teachers with rare skills and programs will suffer, but this is what happens when you have declining enrollment, a poor economy, mismanagement, and state budget veto power held by a minority that does not believe in taxes. Its bad all around, but, the senior teachers, the ones who have dedicated their lives to this district are the last ones who should be asked to sacrifice. If you want give backs why not lead by example and start with administration?

    The one decent thing I have seen is the Davis Schools Foundation they have done an awesome job of stepping up and leading by example instead of telling others to sacrifice everything but their own sacred cows.

  32. Black Bart

    When the budget was done last year the cola was 4.5% When the DTA negotiated they did so based on that number. I don’t think DTA got 4.5 % maybe someone could refresh us with the actual number.

    Official inflation is running at 2.3% but for basic needs such as food and gas the numbers are much higher. Now people are trying to blame the teachers for the problems of DJUSD or at least want to balance the budget on their backs. Let us be very clear the teachers aren’t responsible for declining enrollment. The nimby’s are the ones restricting housing and keeping prices too high for young families to afford. The teachers didn’t mismanage the finances of the district, the administration made those mistakes. So why should the teachers pay the price for the folly of the community? Why should we not bring the number of teachers into equilibrium with the number of students? Yes, Davis will lose talented teachers with rare skills and programs will suffer, but this is what happens when you have declining enrollment, a poor economy, mismanagement, and state budget veto power held by a minority that does not believe in taxes. Its bad all around, but, the senior teachers, the ones who have dedicated their lives to this district are the last ones who should be asked to sacrifice. If you want give backs why not lead by example and start with administration?

    The one decent thing I have seen is the Davis Schools Foundation they have done an awesome job of stepping up and leading by example instead of telling others to sacrifice everything but their own sacred cows.

  33. rebecca

    Richard Harris has good ideas. It is too bad for the timming issue.

    Because Doctors and Lawyers pay cut money would not go to schools then it makes sense that teacher’s salary would be cut.

  34. rebecca

    Richard Harris has good ideas. It is too bad for the timming issue.

    Because Doctors and Lawyers pay cut money would not go to schools then it makes sense that teacher’s salary would be cut.

  35. rebecca

    Richard Harris has good ideas. It is too bad for the timming issue.

    Because Doctors and Lawyers pay cut money would not go to schools then it makes sense that teacher’s salary would be cut.

  36. rebecca

    Richard Harris has good ideas. It is too bad for the timming issue.

    Because Doctors and Lawyers pay cut money would not go to schools then it makes sense that teacher’s salary would be cut.

  37. Anonymous

    I’m the Davis High alum who posted the original “hell-hole” comment. During my time there, a student was stabbed in a racially-motivated incident on campus. Racist graffiti peppered the walls, cheerleaders and jocks were lauded and serious academics were essentially ignored.
    Most of the teachers and staff (with few exceptions) were either oblivious or totally insensitive to what was going on.
    The school I transferred to was co-ed, college-prep and private…well-worth the commute and the expense (actually, most of my tuition was covered by an academic grant).
    Leaving Davis for college and the REAL world was my liberating moment. I have no desire to return…ever.
    I’m disgusted—but not particularly surprised—to learn that not much has changed at DHS (re: the Malcolm X poster-removal incident, etc).
    DHS left a bad taste in my mouth, and I think it’s extremely important to tell the truth about what happened there…whether or not anyone cares to hear it.
    I feel deep compassion and empathy for any student of color who has the misfortume of being trapped in the Davis High web.

    Peace.

  38. Anonymous

    I’m the Davis High alum who posted the original “hell-hole” comment. During my time there, a student was stabbed in a racially-motivated incident on campus. Racist graffiti peppered the walls, cheerleaders and jocks were lauded and serious academics were essentially ignored.
    Most of the teachers and staff (with few exceptions) were either oblivious or totally insensitive to what was going on.
    The school I transferred to was co-ed, college-prep and private…well-worth the commute and the expense (actually, most of my tuition was covered by an academic grant).
    Leaving Davis for college and the REAL world was my liberating moment. I have no desire to return…ever.
    I’m disgusted—but not particularly surprised—to learn that not much has changed at DHS (re: the Malcolm X poster-removal incident, etc).
    DHS left a bad taste in my mouth, and I think it’s extremely important to tell the truth about what happened there…whether or not anyone cares to hear it.
    I feel deep compassion and empathy for any student of color who has the misfortume of being trapped in the Davis High web.

    Peace.

  39. Anonymous

    I’m the Davis High alum who posted the original “hell-hole” comment. During my time there, a student was stabbed in a racially-motivated incident on campus. Racist graffiti peppered the walls, cheerleaders and jocks were lauded and serious academics were essentially ignored.
    Most of the teachers and staff (with few exceptions) were either oblivious or totally insensitive to what was going on.
    The school I transferred to was co-ed, college-prep and private…well-worth the commute and the expense (actually, most of my tuition was covered by an academic grant).
    Leaving Davis for college and the REAL world was my liberating moment. I have no desire to return…ever.
    I’m disgusted—but not particularly surprised—to learn that not much has changed at DHS (re: the Malcolm X poster-removal incident, etc).
    DHS left a bad taste in my mouth, and I think it’s extremely important to tell the truth about what happened there…whether or not anyone cares to hear it.
    I feel deep compassion and empathy for any student of color who has the misfortume of being trapped in the Davis High web.

    Peace.

  40. Anonymous

    I’m the Davis High alum who posted the original “hell-hole” comment. During my time there, a student was stabbed in a racially-motivated incident on campus. Racist graffiti peppered the walls, cheerleaders and jocks were lauded and serious academics were essentially ignored.
    Most of the teachers and staff (with few exceptions) were either oblivious or totally insensitive to what was going on.
    The school I transferred to was co-ed, college-prep and private…well-worth the commute and the expense (actually, most of my tuition was covered by an academic grant).
    Leaving Davis for college and the REAL world was my liberating moment. I have no desire to return…ever.
    I’m disgusted—but not particularly surprised—to learn that not much has changed at DHS (re: the Malcolm X poster-removal incident, etc).
    DHS left a bad taste in my mouth, and I think it’s extremely important to tell the truth about what happened there…whether or not anyone cares to hear it.
    I feel deep compassion and empathy for any student of color who has the misfortume of being trapped in the Davis High web.

    Peace.

  41. Anonymous

    “During my time there, a student was stabbed in a racially-motivated incident on campus.”
    Then you are about 40 years old. Why are you still so angry about your high school years? And how can you possibly comment on the current conditions at Davis High School?

  42. Anonymous

    “During my time there, a student was stabbed in a racially-motivated incident on campus.”
    Then you are about 40 years old. Why are you still so angry about your high school years? And how can you possibly comment on the current conditions at Davis High School?

  43. Anonymous

    “During my time there, a student was stabbed in a racially-motivated incident on campus.”
    Then you are about 40 years old. Why are you still so angry about your high school years? And how can you possibly comment on the current conditions at Davis High School?

  44. Anonymous

    “During my time there, a student was stabbed in a racially-motivated incident on campus.”
    Then you are about 40 years old. Why are you still so angry about your high school years? And how can you possibly comment on the current conditions at Davis High School?

  45. Anonymous

    8:55pm…*trying hard not to roll my eyes*
    …as I’ve said, it’s important to make the truth known, whether or not you or anyone else wants to face it.
    Things clearly have NOT improved much at DHS since I was there (I’ve scanned this blog and read many comments from current students & staff…race-relations at DHS are still DISMAL).
    Perhaps a little perspective from the past can inform and improve conditions in the future. If you’re convinced that things are fine and dandy, you’re clearly deluded and I must allow myself a brief eye-roll.

    I am indeed in my early 40’s…how is that relevant?
    My time at DHS was traumatic (for myself and many others).
    I have every right to share my experience and this is clearly the appropriate forum.
    My devotion to quality education and social justice hasn’t wavered over the years.

    And by the way, what on earth bothers you so much about the things I’ve said? Did I hit a nerve?
    Your condescending tone reeks of the nonsense many of us had to tolerate at DHS.
    Is the truth so difficult for you to stomach?
    We who have something to offer, some portion of wisdom & experience, have an obligation to share it.
    I’d like to see an increased number of staff and teachers of color at DHS in the future. It’s crucial to the sense of belonging and self-esteem of all current DHS students of color.
    This is my primary concern.

    Whether or not you approve of my stance—not important to me in the least.

    Have a lovely day.

  46. Anonymous

    8:55pm…*trying hard not to roll my eyes*
    …as I’ve said, it’s important to make the truth known, whether or not you or anyone else wants to face it.
    Things clearly have NOT improved much at DHS since I was there (I’ve scanned this blog and read many comments from current students & staff…race-relations at DHS are still DISMAL).
    Perhaps a little perspective from the past can inform and improve conditions in the future. If you’re convinced that things are fine and dandy, you’re clearly deluded and I must allow myself a brief eye-roll.

    I am indeed in my early 40’s…how is that relevant?
    My time at DHS was traumatic (for myself and many others).
    I have every right to share my experience and this is clearly the appropriate forum.
    My devotion to quality education and social justice hasn’t wavered over the years.

    And by the way, what on earth bothers you so much about the things I’ve said? Did I hit a nerve?
    Your condescending tone reeks of the nonsense many of us had to tolerate at DHS.
    Is the truth so difficult for you to stomach?
    We who have something to offer, some portion of wisdom & experience, have an obligation to share it.
    I’d like to see an increased number of staff and teachers of color at DHS in the future. It’s crucial to the sense of belonging and self-esteem of all current DHS students of color.
    This is my primary concern.

    Whether or not you approve of my stance—not important to me in the least.

    Have a lovely day.

  47. Anonymous

    8:55pm…*trying hard not to roll my eyes*
    …as I’ve said, it’s important to make the truth known, whether or not you or anyone else wants to face it.
    Things clearly have NOT improved much at DHS since I was there (I’ve scanned this blog and read many comments from current students & staff…race-relations at DHS are still DISMAL).
    Perhaps a little perspective from the past can inform and improve conditions in the future. If you’re convinced that things are fine and dandy, you’re clearly deluded and I must allow myself a brief eye-roll.

    I am indeed in my early 40’s…how is that relevant?
    My time at DHS was traumatic (for myself and many others).
    I have every right to share my experience and this is clearly the appropriate forum.
    My devotion to quality education and social justice hasn’t wavered over the years.

    And by the way, what on earth bothers you so much about the things I’ve said? Did I hit a nerve?
    Your condescending tone reeks of the nonsense many of us had to tolerate at DHS.
    Is the truth so difficult for you to stomach?
    We who have something to offer, some portion of wisdom & experience, have an obligation to share it.
    I’d like to see an increased number of staff and teachers of color at DHS in the future. It’s crucial to the sense of belonging and self-esteem of all current DHS students of color.
    This is my primary concern.

    Whether or not you approve of my stance—not important to me in the least.

    Have a lovely day.

  48. Anonymous

    8:55pm…*trying hard not to roll my eyes*
    …as I’ve said, it’s important to make the truth known, whether or not you or anyone else wants to face it.
    Things clearly have NOT improved much at DHS since I was there (I’ve scanned this blog and read many comments from current students & staff…race-relations at DHS are still DISMAL).
    Perhaps a little perspective from the past can inform and improve conditions in the future. If you’re convinced that things are fine and dandy, you’re clearly deluded and I must allow myself a brief eye-roll.

    I am indeed in my early 40’s…how is that relevant?
    My time at DHS was traumatic (for myself and many others).
    I have every right to share my experience and this is clearly the appropriate forum.
    My devotion to quality education and social justice hasn’t wavered over the years.

    And by the way, what on earth bothers you so much about the things I’ve said? Did I hit a nerve?
    Your condescending tone reeks of the nonsense many of us had to tolerate at DHS.
    Is the truth so difficult for you to stomach?
    We who have something to offer, some portion of wisdom & experience, have an obligation to share it.
    I’d like to see an increased number of staff and teachers of color at DHS in the future. It’s crucial to the sense of belonging and self-esteem of all current DHS students of color.
    This is my primary concern.

    Whether or not you approve of my stance—not important to me in the least.

    Have a lovely day.

  49. another opinion

    “Here’s what I have come to the conclusion about watching this process. There has been perennial speculation out there that public schools are run inefficiently, that they waste huge amounts of money. And yet, when push comes to shove and they actually have to make deep and real cuts, they are not able to do it painlessly. To me that’s an indication that there is not nearly as much waste in a school district as people think.”

    Now think about it. The School District/Board allowed too many schools to be built for the available classroom funding. It was known as far back as 1996 (I think that was the year you stated) that we could not support two new schools, but the two new schools were built anyway. What has happened as a result could have been predicted long ago.

    DaVinci High was begun with a grant from the Gates Foundation, but no thought was put into whether funding would be available to run it five years down the road. If you don’t believe that, then ask yourself why the Woodland schools are not laying off teachers, yet the Davis schools are. (Correct me if this is not true, because I want to be sure of what I am claiming.)

    In the King High debacle, Board members could not remember if they had allocated funding or not. They were forced to look at old videotapes of past school board meetings. Talk about gross oversight!

    The current School Board chose to consider closing Emerson, yet admitted the first year it would probably not result in any savings – bc of the need to build portable classrooms due to the shift in demographics. On top of that, it would have caused crowding in the two remaining junior highs and the high school – at a time when enrollment in secondary schools was on the increase. Had the idea to close Emerson been carried out, think of all the money that would have been wasted!

    A parcel tax was to be used to support elementary school kids to grow huge cabbages. We paid Murphy $240,000 to do absolutely nothing for one year. Hundreds of hours in staff time were spent on assisting Valley Oak to become a charter school, and the School Board chucked the Supt’s plan out the window without a qualm.

    Trust me, there is plenty of $$$ wastage in the school system. Pet projects are begun, without a thought as to how to fund them long term. We are crisis managing our Davis schools from year to year, a cute way of making sure only previous School Boards get the blame.

    Excuse me, but IMHO, the buck stops here and now, and rests with the current School Board/District. Wastage is rampant, and I have no doubt taxpayers will be asked to vote for another parcel tax. Don’t be so sure it will pass this time. Remember, the last parcel tax only passed by a 72% margin, unlike the previous 80% margin. Parents are not donating to the Davis Schools Foundation to the extent necessary to make a real dent in the fiscal mess.

    DPD, this is one where I have to disagree there has not been monumental wastage –

    I am not the least bit impressed by the wringing hands of School Board members, who don’t know what to do. The 2% pay cut by teachers/administrators should have been on the table long ago, PRIOR TO THE PINK SLIPS BEING GIVEN OUT. Of course the current teachers will not vote for a decrease of any kind, now that it is known who will be cut and who will not. Besides, teachers are banking on the notion that the budget cuts will not be as awful as anticipated.

  50. another opinion

    “Here’s what I have come to the conclusion about watching this process. There has been perennial speculation out there that public schools are run inefficiently, that they waste huge amounts of money. And yet, when push comes to shove and they actually have to make deep and real cuts, they are not able to do it painlessly. To me that’s an indication that there is not nearly as much waste in a school district as people think.”

    Now think about it. The School District/Board allowed too many schools to be built for the available classroom funding. It was known as far back as 1996 (I think that was the year you stated) that we could not support two new schools, but the two new schools were built anyway. What has happened as a result could have been predicted long ago.

    DaVinci High was begun with a grant from the Gates Foundation, but no thought was put into whether funding would be available to run it five years down the road. If you don’t believe that, then ask yourself why the Woodland schools are not laying off teachers, yet the Davis schools are. (Correct me if this is not true, because I want to be sure of what I am claiming.)

    In the King High debacle, Board members could not remember if they had allocated funding or not. They were forced to look at old videotapes of past school board meetings. Talk about gross oversight!

    The current School Board chose to consider closing Emerson, yet admitted the first year it would probably not result in any savings – bc of the need to build portable classrooms due to the shift in demographics. On top of that, it would have caused crowding in the two remaining junior highs and the high school – at a time when enrollment in secondary schools was on the increase. Had the idea to close Emerson been carried out, think of all the money that would have been wasted!

    A parcel tax was to be used to support elementary school kids to grow huge cabbages. We paid Murphy $240,000 to do absolutely nothing for one year. Hundreds of hours in staff time were spent on assisting Valley Oak to become a charter school, and the School Board chucked the Supt’s plan out the window without a qualm.

    Trust me, there is plenty of $$$ wastage in the school system. Pet projects are begun, without a thought as to how to fund them long term. We are crisis managing our Davis schools from year to year, a cute way of making sure only previous School Boards get the blame.

    Excuse me, but IMHO, the buck stops here and now, and rests with the current School Board/District. Wastage is rampant, and I have no doubt taxpayers will be asked to vote for another parcel tax. Don’t be so sure it will pass this time. Remember, the last parcel tax only passed by a 72% margin, unlike the previous 80% margin. Parents are not donating to the Davis Schools Foundation to the extent necessary to make a real dent in the fiscal mess.

    DPD, this is one where I have to disagree there has not been monumental wastage –

    I am not the least bit impressed by the wringing hands of School Board members, who don’t know what to do. The 2% pay cut by teachers/administrators should have been on the table long ago, PRIOR TO THE PINK SLIPS BEING GIVEN OUT. Of course the current teachers will not vote for a decrease of any kind, now that it is known who will be cut and who will not. Besides, teachers are banking on the notion that the budget cuts will not be as awful as anticipated.

  51. another opinion

    “Here’s what I have come to the conclusion about watching this process. There has been perennial speculation out there that public schools are run inefficiently, that they waste huge amounts of money. And yet, when push comes to shove and they actually have to make deep and real cuts, they are not able to do it painlessly. To me that’s an indication that there is not nearly as much waste in a school district as people think.”

    Now think about it. The School District/Board allowed too many schools to be built for the available classroom funding. It was known as far back as 1996 (I think that was the year you stated) that we could not support two new schools, but the two new schools were built anyway. What has happened as a result could have been predicted long ago.

    DaVinci High was begun with a grant from the Gates Foundation, but no thought was put into whether funding would be available to run it five years down the road. If you don’t believe that, then ask yourself why the Woodland schools are not laying off teachers, yet the Davis schools are. (Correct me if this is not true, because I want to be sure of what I am claiming.)

    In the King High debacle, Board members could not remember if they had allocated funding or not. They were forced to look at old videotapes of past school board meetings. Talk about gross oversight!

    The current School Board chose to consider closing Emerson, yet admitted the first year it would probably not result in any savings – bc of the need to build portable classrooms due to the shift in demographics. On top of that, it would have caused crowding in the two remaining junior highs and the high school – at a time when enrollment in secondary schools was on the increase. Had the idea to close Emerson been carried out, think of all the money that would have been wasted!

    A parcel tax was to be used to support elementary school kids to grow huge cabbages. We paid Murphy $240,000 to do absolutely nothing for one year. Hundreds of hours in staff time were spent on assisting Valley Oak to become a charter school, and the School Board chucked the Supt’s plan out the window without a qualm.

    Trust me, there is plenty of $$$ wastage in the school system. Pet projects are begun, without a thought as to how to fund them long term. We are crisis managing our Davis schools from year to year, a cute way of making sure only previous School Boards get the blame.

    Excuse me, but IMHO, the buck stops here and now, and rests with the current School Board/District. Wastage is rampant, and I have no doubt taxpayers will be asked to vote for another parcel tax. Don’t be so sure it will pass this time. Remember, the last parcel tax only passed by a 72% margin, unlike the previous 80% margin. Parents are not donating to the Davis Schools Foundation to the extent necessary to make a real dent in the fiscal mess.

    DPD, this is one where I have to disagree there has not been monumental wastage –

    I am not the least bit impressed by the wringing hands of School Board members, who don’t know what to do. The 2% pay cut by teachers/administrators should have been on the table long ago, PRIOR TO THE PINK SLIPS BEING GIVEN OUT. Of course the current teachers will not vote for a decrease of any kind, now that it is known who will be cut and who will not. Besides, teachers are banking on the notion that the budget cuts will not be as awful as anticipated.

  52. another opinion

    “Here’s what I have come to the conclusion about watching this process. There has been perennial speculation out there that public schools are run inefficiently, that they waste huge amounts of money. And yet, when push comes to shove and they actually have to make deep and real cuts, they are not able to do it painlessly. To me that’s an indication that there is not nearly as much waste in a school district as people think.”

    Now think about it. The School District/Board allowed too many schools to be built for the available classroom funding. It was known as far back as 1996 (I think that was the year you stated) that we could not support two new schools, but the two new schools were built anyway. What has happened as a result could have been predicted long ago.

    DaVinci High was begun with a grant from the Gates Foundation, but no thought was put into whether funding would be available to run it five years down the road. If you don’t believe that, then ask yourself why the Woodland schools are not laying off teachers, yet the Davis schools are. (Correct me if this is not true, because I want to be sure of what I am claiming.)

    In the King High debacle, Board members could not remember if they had allocated funding or not. They were forced to look at old videotapes of past school board meetings. Talk about gross oversight!

    The current School Board chose to consider closing Emerson, yet admitted the first year it would probably not result in any savings – bc of the need to build portable classrooms due to the shift in demographics. On top of that, it would have caused crowding in the two remaining junior highs and the high school – at a time when enrollment in secondary schools was on the increase. Had the idea to close Emerson been carried out, think of all the money that would have been wasted!

    A parcel tax was to be used to support elementary school kids to grow huge cabbages. We paid Murphy $240,000 to do absolutely nothing for one year. Hundreds of hours in staff time were spent on assisting Valley Oak to become a charter school, and the School Board chucked the Supt’s plan out the window without a qualm.

    Trust me, there is plenty of $$$ wastage in the school system. Pet projects are begun, without a thought as to how to fund them long term. We are crisis managing our Davis schools from year to year, a cute way of making sure only previous School Boards get the blame.

    Excuse me, but IMHO, the buck stops here and now, and rests with the current School Board/District. Wastage is rampant, and I have no doubt taxpayers will be asked to vote for another parcel tax. Don’t be so sure it will pass this time. Remember, the last parcel tax only passed by a 72% margin, unlike the previous 80% margin. Parents are not donating to the Davis Schools Foundation to the extent necessary to make a real dent in the fiscal mess.

    DPD, this is one where I have to disagree there has not been monumental wastage –

    I am not the least bit impressed by the wringing hands of School Board members, who don’t know what to do. The 2% pay cut by teachers/administrators should have been on the table long ago, PRIOR TO THE PINK SLIPS BEING GIVEN OUT. Of course the current teachers will not vote for a decrease of any kind, now that it is known who will be cut and who will not. Besides, teachers are banking on the notion that the budget cuts will not be as awful as anticipated.

  53. Anonymous

    “DaVinci High was begun with a grant from the Gates Foundation, but no thought was put into whether funding would be available to run it five years down the road.”

    This argument makes no sense to me. Please illuminate if there is a point to make. I understand that it takes no extra funding to run DaVinci HS than it takes to run DHS. The principal is part time (also teaches at DVHS) and there is no vice principal. The teachers get paid what other teachers get paid (though probably slightly lower on the seniority scale, so ultimately cheaper to the district).

    “A parcel tax was to be used to support elementary school kids to grow huge cabbages. We paid Murphy $240,000 to do absolutely nothing for one year. Hundreds of hours in staff time were spent on assisting Valley Oak to become a charter school, and the School Board chucked the Supt’s plan out the window without a qualm.”

    I did not like that part of the parcel tax either, but did not find it overwhelmingly troublesome to vote against it. By the way, how much are we talking about for the cabbages? a million $?

    Would you rather we had kept Murphy? If you wanted Murphy to go, then buying out his contract was probably the least painful way to do it.

  54. Anonymous

    “DaVinci High was begun with a grant from the Gates Foundation, but no thought was put into whether funding would be available to run it five years down the road.”

    This argument makes no sense to me. Please illuminate if there is a point to make. I understand that it takes no extra funding to run DaVinci HS than it takes to run DHS. The principal is part time (also teaches at DVHS) and there is no vice principal. The teachers get paid what other teachers get paid (though probably slightly lower on the seniority scale, so ultimately cheaper to the district).

    “A parcel tax was to be used to support elementary school kids to grow huge cabbages. We paid Murphy $240,000 to do absolutely nothing for one year. Hundreds of hours in staff time were spent on assisting Valley Oak to become a charter school, and the School Board chucked the Supt’s plan out the window without a qualm.”

    I did not like that part of the parcel tax either, but did not find it overwhelmingly troublesome to vote against it. By the way, how much are we talking about for the cabbages? a million $?

    Would you rather we had kept Murphy? If you wanted Murphy to go, then buying out his contract was probably the least painful way to do it.

  55. Anonymous

    “DaVinci High was begun with a grant from the Gates Foundation, but no thought was put into whether funding would be available to run it five years down the road.”

    This argument makes no sense to me. Please illuminate if there is a point to make. I understand that it takes no extra funding to run DaVinci HS than it takes to run DHS. The principal is part time (also teaches at DVHS) and there is no vice principal. The teachers get paid what other teachers get paid (though probably slightly lower on the seniority scale, so ultimately cheaper to the district).

    “A parcel tax was to be used to support elementary school kids to grow huge cabbages. We paid Murphy $240,000 to do absolutely nothing for one year. Hundreds of hours in staff time were spent on assisting Valley Oak to become a charter school, and the School Board chucked the Supt’s plan out the window without a qualm.”

    I did not like that part of the parcel tax either, but did not find it overwhelmingly troublesome to vote against it. By the way, how much are we talking about for the cabbages? a million $?

    Would you rather we had kept Murphy? If you wanted Murphy to go, then buying out his contract was probably the least painful way to do it.

  56. Anonymous

    “DaVinci High was begun with a grant from the Gates Foundation, but no thought was put into whether funding would be available to run it five years down the road.”

    This argument makes no sense to me. Please illuminate if there is a point to make. I understand that it takes no extra funding to run DaVinci HS than it takes to run DHS. The principal is part time (also teaches at DVHS) and there is no vice principal. The teachers get paid what other teachers get paid (though probably slightly lower on the seniority scale, so ultimately cheaper to the district).

    “A parcel tax was to be used to support elementary school kids to grow huge cabbages. We paid Murphy $240,000 to do absolutely nothing for one year. Hundreds of hours in staff time were spent on assisting Valley Oak to become a charter school, and the School Board chucked the Supt’s plan out the window without a qualm.”

    I did not like that part of the parcel tax either, but did not find it overwhelmingly troublesome to vote against it. By the way, how much are we talking about for the cabbages? a million $?

    Would you rather we had kept Murphy? If you wanted Murphy to go, then buying out his contract was probably the least painful way to do it.

  57. Anonymous

    DPD is correct, and the fingerpointing is ridiculous. While DJUSD school enrollment dropped slightly over the past two years, it is higher than it was in 2001. Expenditures for school construction and renovation (whether appropriate or not) do not affect the operating budget. And while Davis High School is far from perfect, its problems also do not affect the budget situation.

    DJUSD has a structural budget deficit because the basic costs of running schools (salaries, health benefits, energy costs, etc.) have increased while the state is cutting funding for education. This problem is compounded because DJUSD has a disproportionately high percent of teachers who have many years of experience (and therefore get paid above average teacher salaries).

    The only effective measures we can take to remedy the situation on an ongoing basis are to protest the proposed state cuts to education and to vote for the next parcel tax.

  58. Anonymous

    DPD is correct, and the fingerpointing is ridiculous. While DJUSD school enrollment dropped slightly over the past two years, it is higher than it was in 2001. Expenditures for school construction and renovation (whether appropriate or not) do not affect the operating budget. And while Davis High School is far from perfect, its problems also do not affect the budget situation.

    DJUSD has a structural budget deficit because the basic costs of running schools (salaries, health benefits, energy costs, etc.) have increased while the state is cutting funding for education. This problem is compounded because DJUSD has a disproportionately high percent of teachers who have many years of experience (and therefore get paid above average teacher salaries).

    The only effective measures we can take to remedy the situation on an ongoing basis are to protest the proposed state cuts to education and to vote for the next parcel tax.

  59. Anonymous

    DPD is correct, and the fingerpointing is ridiculous. While DJUSD school enrollment dropped slightly over the past two years, it is higher than it was in 2001. Expenditures for school construction and renovation (whether appropriate or not) do not affect the operating budget. And while Davis High School is far from perfect, its problems also do not affect the budget situation.

    DJUSD has a structural budget deficit because the basic costs of running schools (salaries, health benefits, energy costs, etc.) have increased while the state is cutting funding for education. This problem is compounded because DJUSD has a disproportionately high percent of teachers who have many years of experience (and therefore get paid above average teacher salaries).

    The only effective measures we can take to remedy the situation on an ongoing basis are to protest the proposed state cuts to education and to vote for the next parcel tax.

  60. Anonymous

    DPD is correct, and the fingerpointing is ridiculous. While DJUSD school enrollment dropped slightly over the past two years, it is higher than it was in 2001. Expenditures for school construction and renovation (whether appropriate or not) do not affect the operating budget. And while Davis High School is far from perfect, its problems also do not affect the budget situation.

    DJUSD has a structural budget deficit because the basic costs of running schools (salaries, health benefits, energy costs, etc.) have increased while the state is cutting funding for education. This problem is compounded because DJUSD has a disproportionately high percent of teachers who have many years of experience (and therefore get paid above average teacher salaries).

    The only effective measures we can take to remedy the situation on an ongoing basis are to protest the proposed state cuts to education and to vote for the next parcel tax.

  61. wdf

    “During my time there, a student was stabbed in a racially-motivated incident on campus. Racist graffiti peppered the walls, cheerleaders and jocks were lauded and serious academics were essentially ignored.
    Most of the teachers and staff (with few exceptions) were either oblivious or totally insensitive to what was going on.”

    I think you describe what happened in 1983, about four years into prop 13 cuts and before Davis voted for the first parcel tax.

    That’s the kind of climate you could expect if we don’t do anything. The music program was about 1/4 to a third the size it is now, in terms of percentage of students. Athletic funding was gutted. Morale among teachers was low. We were lucky things weren’t worse. It was a collective community failing of the schools, and you had to live through it.

    I think we have a couple more tools now to do something about this situation — foundation fundraising, parcel tax. Neither existed in 1983.

  62. wdf

    “During my time there, a student was stabbed in a racially-motivated incident on campus. Racist graffiti peppered the walls, cheerleaders and jocks were lauded and serious academics were essentially ignored.
    Most of the teachers and staff (with few exceptions) were either oblivious or totally insensitive to what was going on.”

    I think you describe what happened in 1983, about four years into prop 13 cuts and before Davis voted for the first parcel tax.

    That’s the kind of climate you could expect if we don’t do anything. The music program was about 1/4 to a third the size it is now, in terms of percentage of students. Athletic funding was gutted. Morale among teachers was low. We were lucky things weren’t worse. It was a collective community failing of the schools, and you had to live through it.

    I think we have a couple more tools now to do something about this situation — foundation fundraising, parcel tax. Neither existed in 1983.

  63. wdf

    “During my time there, a student was stabbed in a racially-motivated incident on campus. Racist graffiti peppered the walls, cheerleaders and jocks were lauded and serious academics were essentially ignored.
    Most of the teachers and staff (with few exceptions) were either oblivious or totally insensitive to what was going on.”

    I think you describe what happened in 1983, about four years into prop 13 cuts and before Davis voted for the first parcel tax.

    That’s the kind of climate you could expect if we don’t do anything. The music program was about 1/4 to a third the size it is now, in terms of percentage of students. Athletic funding was gutted. Morale among teachers was low. We were lucky things weren’t worse. It was a collective community failing of the schools, and you had to live through it.

    I think we have a couple more tools now to do something about this situation — foundation fundraising, parcel tax. Neither existed in 1983.

  64. wdf

    “During my time there, a student was stabbed in a racially-motivated incident on campus. Racist graffiti peppered the walls, cheerleaders and jocks were lauded and serious academics were essentially ignored.
    Most of the teachers and staff (with few exceptions) were either oblivious or totally insensitive to what was going on.”

    I think you describe what happened in 1983, about four years into prop 13 cuts and before Davis voted for the first parcel tax.

    That’s the kind of climate you could expect if we don’t do anything. The music program was about 1/4 to a third the size it is now, in terms of percentage of students. Athletic funding was gutted. Morale among teachers was low. We were lucky things weren’t worse. It was a collective community failing of the schools, and you had to live through it.

    I think we have a couple more tools now to do something about this situation — foundation fundraising, parcel tax. Neither existed in 1983.

  65. wdf

    “Black Bart said…
    When the budget was done last year the cola was 4.5% When the DTA negotiated they did so based on that number. I don’t think DTA got 4.5 % maybe someone could refresh us with the actual number.

    Official inflation is running at 2.3% but for basic needs such as food and gas the numbers are much higher. Now people are trying to blame the teachers for the problems of DJUSD or at least want to balance the budget on their backs. Let us be very clear the teachers aren’t responsible for declining enrollment.”

    But the school board approved the contract in January, when it was clear that the economics wouldn’t support it. It is ultimately the responsibility of the school board and staff (under their direction) to manage the finances of the district.

    It isn’t the teachers’ fault for negotiating their contract, although I remember significant protests at school board meetings on the issue.

    I think the number of teachers slated for dismissal is out of proportion to any demonstrated decline in enrollment.

    “Anonymous 1:52 said…
    DPD is correct, and the fingerpointing is ridiculous.”

    True it doesn’t fix things immediately, but a statement like that excuses responsibility and accountability where it should be assigned. How can voters make informed choices w/ out investigating the context for how we got here?

    The school board made a very poor choice in approving the teachers’ contract.

  66. wdf

    “Black Bart said…
    When the budget was done last year the cola was 4.5% When the DTA negotiated they did so based on that number. I don’t think DTA got 4.5 % maybe someone could refresh us with the actual number.

    Official inflation is running at 2.3% but for basic needs such as food and gas the numbers are much higher. Now people are trying to blame the teachers for the problems of DJUSD or at least want to balance the budget on their backs. Let us be very clear the teachers aren’t responsible for declining enrollment.”

    But the school board approved the contract in January, when it was clear that the economics wouldn’t support it. It is ultimately the responsibility of the school board and staff (under their direction) to manage the finances of the district.

    It isn’t the teachers’ fault for negotiating their contract, although I remember significant protests at school board meetings on the issue.

    I think the number of teachers slated for dismissal is out of proportion to any demonstrated decline in enrollment.

    “Anonymous 1:52 said…
    DPD is correct, and the fingerpointing is ridiculous.”

    True it doesn’t fix things immediately, but a statement like that excuses responsibility and accountability where it should be assigned. How can voters make informed choices w/ out investigating the context for how we got here?

    The school board made a very poor choice in approving the teachers’ contract.

  67. wdf

    “Black Bart said…
    When the budget was done last year the cola was 4.5% When the DTA negotiated they did so based on that number. I don’t think DTA got 4.5 % maybe someone could refresh us with the actual number.

    Official inflation is running at 2.3% but for basic needs such as food and gas the numbers are much higher. Now people are trying to blame the teachers for the problems of DJUSD or at least want to balance the budget on their backs. Let us be very clear the teachers aren’t responsible for declining enrollment.”

    But the school board approved the contract in January, when it was clear that the economics wouldn’t support it. It is ultimately the responsibility of the school board and staff (under their direction) to manage the finances of the district.

    It isn’t the teachers’ fault for negotiating their contract, although I remember significant protests at school board meetings on the issue.

    I think the number of teachers slated for dismissal is out of proportion to any demonstrated decline in enrollment.

    “Anonymous 1:52 said…
    DPD is correct, and the fingerpointing is ridiculous.”

    True it doesn’t fix things immediately, but a statement like that excuses responsibility and accountability where it should be assigned. How can voters make informed choices w/ out investigating the context for how we got here?

    The school board made a very poor choice in approving the teachers’ contract.

  68. wdf

    “Black Bart said…
    When the budget was done last year the cola was 4.5% When the DTA negotiated they did so based on that number. I don’t think DTA got 4.5 % maybe someone could refresh us with the actual number.

    Official inflation is running at 2.3% but for basic needs such as food and gas the numbers are much higher. Now people are trying to blame the teachers for the problems of DJUSD or at least want to balance the budget on their backs. Let us be very clear the teachers aren’t responsible for declining enrollment.”

    But the school board approved the contract in January, when it was clear that the economics wouldn’t support it. It is ultimately the responsibility of the school board and staff (under their direction) to manage the finances of the district.

    It isn’t the teachers’ fault for negotiating their contract, although I remember significant protests at school board meetings on the issue.

    I think the number of teachers slated for dismissal is out of proportion to any demonstrated decline in enrollment.

    “Anonymous 1:52 said…
    DPD is correct, and the fingerpointing is ridiculous.”

    True it doesn’t fix things immediately, but a statement like that excuses responsibility and accountability where it should be assigned. How can voters make informed choices w/ out investigating the context for how we got here?

    The school board made a very poor choice in approving the teachers’ contract.

  69. Anonymous

    “The school board made a very poor choice in approving the teachers’ contract.”

    THIS school board made a very poor choice in approving the teachers’ contract. Now who’s on that board? And how fiscally responsible are the individual members of that board?

  70. Anonymous

    “The school board made a very poor choice in approving the teachers’ contract.”

    THIS school board made a very poor choice in approving the teachers’ contract. Now who’s on that board? And how fiscally responsible are the individual members of that board?

  71. Anonymous

    “The school board made a very poor choice in approving the teachers’ contract.”

    THIS school board made a very poor choice in approving the teachers’ contract. Now who’s on that board? And how fiscally responsible are the individual members of that board?

  72. Anonymous

    “The school board made a very poor choice in approving the teachers’ contract.”

    THIS school board made a very poor choice in approving the teachers’ contract. Now who’s on that board? And how fiscally responsible are the individual members of that board?

  73. Anonymous

    The comment from Black Bart regarding NIMBYism hits very close to home. Young families just can’t afford to live here.

    Both my husband and I work for UCD, we rent in Davis and have 2 small children. That is about to change. We have an offer on a home in Woodland that is costing us half of what a home in Davis would. Price aside, what clinched the deal was the ability to get into a good school district and with a lower tax base.

    So Woodland got it right where Davis got it wrong. Could it be because they plan for housing and business expansion? That must really make some of you upset but if you are smart, you will listen and learn something.

    Oh and you just lost 2 more grade school children from your 2008-2009 enrollment.

  74. Anonymous

    The comment from Black Bart regarding NIMBYism hits very close to home. Young families just can’t afford to live here.

    Both my husband and I work for UCD, we rent in Davis and have 2 small children. That is about to change. We have an offer on a home in Woodland that is costing us half of what a home in Davis would. Price aside, what clinched the deal was the ability to get into a good school district and with a lower tax base.

    So Woodland got it right where Davis got it wrong. Could it be because they plan for housing and business expansion? That must really make some of you upset but if you are smart, you will listen and learn something.

    Oh and you just lost 2 more grade school children from your 2008-2009 enrollment.

  75. Anonymous

    The comment from Black Bart regarding NIMBYism hits very close to home. Young families just can’t afford to live here.

    Both my husband and I work for UCD, we rent in Davis and have 2 small children. That is about to change. We have an offer on a home in Woodland that is costing us half of what a home in Davis would. Price aside, what clinched the deal was the ability to get into a good school district and with a lower tax base.

    So Woodland got it right where Davis got it wrong. Could it be because they plan for housing and business expansion? That must really make some of you upset but if you are smart, you will listen and learn something.

    Oh and you just lost 2 more grade school children from your 2008-2009 enrollment.

  76. Anonymous

    The comment from Black Bart regarding NIMBYism hits very close to home. Young families just can’t afford to live here.

    Both my husband and I work for UCD, we rent in Davis and have 2 small children. That is about to change. We have an offer on a home in Woodland that is costing us half of what a home in Davis would. Price aside, what clinched the deal was the ability to get into a good school district and with a lower tax base.

    So Woodland got it right where Davis got it wrong. Could it be because they plan for housing and business expansion? That must really make some of you upset but if you are smart, you will listen and learn something.

    Oh and you just lost 2 more grade school children from your 2008-2009 enrollment.

  77. wdf

    “anonymous 8:51 said…
    The comment from Black Bart regarding NIMBYism hits very close to home. Young families just can’t afford to live here.

    Both my husband and I work for UCD, we rent in Davis and have 2 small children. That is about to change. We have an offer on a home in Woodland that is costing us half of what a home in Davis would. Price aside, what clinched the deal was the ability to get into a good school district and with a lower tax base.”

    “Oh and you just lost 2 more grade school children from your 2008-2009 enrollment.”

    Good point. You are right about what young families face, and you have likely made the correct decision for yourselves.

    But you also have an option that you haven’t mentioned. The DJUSD has started to target UCD employees who live out of town specifically for interdistrict transfers. DJUSD can’t do much about the housing situation in Davis. But a large number of interdistrict transfers are from employees of UCD.

    If Woodland schools fail to satisfy, you can exercise that option if you want.

    Good luck to you.

  78. wdf

    “anonymous 8:51 said…
    The comment from Black Bart regarding NIMBYism hits very close to home. Young families just can’t afford to live here.

    Both my husband and I work for UCD, we rent in Davis and have 2 small children. That is about to change. We have an offer on a home in Woodland that is costing us half of what a home in Davis would. Price aside, what clinched the deal was the ability to get into a good school district and with a lower tax base.”

    “Oh and you just lost 2 more grade school children from your 2008-2009 enrollment.”

    Good point. You are right about what young families face, and you have likely made the correct decision for yourselves.

    But you also have an option that you haven’t mentioned. The DJUSD has started to target UCD employees who live out of town specifically for interdistrict transfers. DJUSD can’t do much about the housing situation in Davis. But a large number of interdistrict transfers are from employees of UCD.

    If Woodland schools fail to satisfy, you can exercise that option if you want.

    Good luck to you.

  79. wdf

    “anonymous 8:51 said…
    The comment from Black Bart regarding NIMBYism hits very close to home. Young families just can’t afford to live here.

    Both my husband and I work for UCD, we rent in Davis and have 2 small children. That is about to change. We have an offer on a home in Woodland that is costing us half of what a home in Davis would. Price aside, what clinched the deal was the ability to get into a good school district and with a lower tax base.”

    “Oh and you just lost 2 more grade school children from your 2008-2009 enrollment.”

    Good point. You are right about what young families face, and you have likely made the correct decision for yourselves.

    But you also have an option that you haven’t mentioned. The DJUSD has started to target UCD employees who live out of town specifically for interdistrict transfers. DJUSD can’t do much about the housing situation in Davis. But a large number of interdistrict transfers are from employees of UCD.

    If Woodland schools fail to satisfy, you can exercise that option if you want.

    Good luck to you.

  80. wdf

    “anonymous 8:51 said…
    The comment from Black Bart regarding NIMBYism hits very close to home. Young families just can’t afford to live here.

    Both my husband and I work for UCD, we rent in Davis and have 2 small children. That is about to change. We have an offer on a home in Woodland that is costing us half of what a home in Davis would. Price aside, what clinched the deal was the ability to get into a good school district and with a lower tax base.”

    “Oh and you just lost 2 more grade school children from your 2008-2009 enrollment.”

    Good point. You are right about what young families face, and you have likely made the correct decision for yourselves.

    But you also have an option that you haven’t mentioned. The DJUSD has started to target UCD employees who live out of town specifically for interdistrict transfers. DJUSD can’t do much about the housing situation in Davis. But a large number of interdistrict transfers are from employees of UCD.

    If Woodland schools fail to satisfy, you can exercise that option if you want.

    Good luck to you.

  81. Richard

    The DJUSD has started to target UCD employees who live out of town specifically for interdistrict transfers. DJUSD can’t do much about the housing situation in Davis. But a large number of interdistrict transfers are from employees of UCD.

    And Davis residents still persist in wondering why people elsewhere around the region consider it elitist?

    –Richard Estes

  82. Richard

    The DJUSD has started to target UCD employees who live out of town specifically for interdistrict transfers. DJUSD can’t do much about the housing situation in Davis. But a large number of interdistrict transfers are from employees of UCD.

    And Davis residents still persist in wondering why people elsewhere around the region consider it elitist?

    –Richard Estes

  83. Richard

    The DJUSD has started to target UCD employees who live out of town specifically for interdistrict transfers. DJUSD can’t do much about the housing situation in Davis. But a large number of interdistrict transfers are from employees of UCD.

    And Davis residents still persist in wondering why people elsewhere around the region consider it elitist?

    –Richard Estes

  84. Richard

    The DJUSD has started to target UCD employees who live out of town specifically for interdistrict transfers. DJUSD can’t do much about the housing situation in Davis. But a large number of interdistrict transfers are from employees of UCD.

    And Davis residents still persist in wondering why people elsewhere around the region consider it elitist?

    –Richard Estes

  85. distrustful

    wdf said: “True it doesn’t fix things immediately, but a statement like that excuses responsibility and accountability where it should be assigned. How can voters make informed choices w/ out investigating the context for how we got here? The school board made a very poor choice in approving the teachers’ contract.”

    But the school board approved the contract in January, when it was clear that the economics wouldn’t support it. It is ultimately the responsibility of the school board and staff (under their direction) to manage the finances of the district.

    It isn’t the teachers’ fault for negotiating their contract, although I remember significant protests at school board meetings on the issue.”

    anonymous 1:52 said: “DPD is correct, and the fingerpointing is ridiculous. While DJUSD school enrollment dropped slightly over the past two years, it is higher than it was in 2001. Expenditures for school construction and renovation (whether appropriate or not) do not affect the operating budget. And while Davis High School is far from perfect, its problems also do not affect the budget situation.”

    This is exactly where you have it wrong and wdf has it right. If the School Board/District approve the building of too many schools, then there will not be enough in the operating budget to run them – which is exactly what happened in DAVIS! As far back as 1996 (I think that was the year), the School Board knew the district could not support two new elementary schools, but built them anyway. Suddenly the shell game began to cover the shortfall, which eventually forced the closure of Valley Oak. Emerson will suffer the same fate if parents and citizens don’t pay attention.

    The blame game is only important in terms of investigating how we got where we are now so it doesn’t happen again; and in terms of determining if the current School Board is making more mistakes, which it has, e.g. the attempt to close Emerson.

    “Oh and you just lost 2 more grade school children from your 2008-2009 enrollment.”

    Parents with kids will desert the ship if the schools in Davis remain in chaos. Why didn’t the current School Board think to ask teachers to forgo their raise temporarily, BEFORE PINK SLIPS WERE GIVEN OUT? I’ll bet you teachers would have considered it, had they not known ahead of time who would be axed! (By the way, I don’t like the idea of putting the burden on teachers for this debacle – it is not a particulary good solution, but it might have saved the day if the administration had been willing to take a similar pay cut.)

    “Let me get this straight…DJUSD, the group of “geniuses” who were selected to manage the hell-hole (otherwise known as Davis High) I had to contend with in my younger years…is struggling and strapped for cash?”

    A lot of us have had bad experiences at DHS. I suspect that might be part of the reason the Davis Schools Foundation is not getting more traction with its dollar-a-day campaign. The other reason is we saw our taxpayer dollars wasted with abandon prior, and have little hope things are really going to change for the better as far as wastage. Trust me, there is a lot of “pork” in the school system. To the blogger who commented how much money would be saved by killing the “growing giant cabbages” program, pennies add up to dollars very quickly.

    Furthermore, after watching the King High debacle and other poor decisions lately, I do not feel the current School Board/District even knows how much money they do or don’t have. If they have to go back to old videotapes to figure it out, or don’t look beneath staff figures on a balance sheet by asking appropriate questions…

  86. distrustful

    wdf said: “True it doesn’t fix things immediately, but a statement like that excuses responsibility and accountability where it should be assigned. How can voters make informed choices w/ out investigating the context for how we got here? The school board made a very poor choice in approving the teachers’ contract.”

    But the school board approved the contract in January, when it was clear that the economics wouldn’t support it. It is ultimately the responsibility of the school board and staff (under their direction) to manage the finances of the district.

    It isn’t the teachers’ fault for negotiating their contract, although I remember significant protests at school board meetings on the issue.”

    anonymous 1:52 said: “DPD is correct, and the fingerpointing is ridiculous. While DJUSD school enrollment dropped slightly over the past two years, it is higher than it was in 2001. Expenditures for school construction and renovation (whether appropriate or not) do not affect the operating budget. And while Davis High School is far from perfect, its problems also do not affect the budget situation.”

    This is exactly where you have it wrong and wdf has it right. If the School Board/District approve the building of too many schools, then there will not be enough in the operating budget to run them – which is exactly what happened in DAVIS! As far back as 1996 (I think that was the year), the School Board knew the district could not support two new elementary schools, but built them anyway. Suddenly the shell game began to cover the shortfall, which eventually forced the closure of Valley Oak. Emerson will suffer the same fate if parents and citizens don’t pay attention.

    The blame game is only important in terms of investigating how we got where we are now so it doesn’t happen again; and in terms of determining if the current School Board is making more mistakes, which it has, e.g. the attempt to close Emerson.

    “Oh and you just lost 2 more grade school children from your 2008-2009 enrollment.”

    Parents with kids will desert the ship if the schools in Davis remain in chaos. Why didn’t the current School Board think to ask teachers to forgo their raise temporarily, BEFORE PINK SLIPS WERE GIVEN OUT? I’ll bet you teachers would have considered it, had they not known ahead of time who would be axed! (By the way, I don’t like the idea of putting the burden on teachers for this debacle – it is not a particulary good solution, but it might have saved the day if the administration had been willing to take a similar pay cut.)

    “Let me get this straight…DJUSD, the group of “geniuses” who were selected to manage the hell-hole (otherwise known as Davis High) I had to contend with in my younger years…is struggling and strapped for cash?”

    A lot of us have had bad experiences at DHS. I suspect that might be part of the reason the Davis Schools Foundation is not getting more traction with its dollar-a-day campaign. The other reason is we saw our taxpayer dollars wasted with abandon prior, and have little hope things are really going to change for the better as far as wastage. Trust me, there is a lot of “pork” in the school system. To the blogger who commented how much money would be saved by killing the “growing giant cabbages” program, pennies add up to dollars very quickly.

    Furthermore, after watching the King High debacle and other poor decisions lately, I do not feel the current School Board/District even knows how much money they do or don’t have. If they have to go back to old videotapes to figure it out, or don’t look beneath staff figures on a balance sheet by asking appropriate questions…

  87. distrustful

    wdf said: “True it doesn’t fix things immediately, but a statement like that excuses responsibility and accountability where it should be assigned. How can voters make informed choices w/ out investigating the context for how we got here? The school board made a very poor choice in approving the teachers’ contract.”

    But the school board approved the contract in January, when it was clear that the economics wouldn’t support it. It is ultimately the responsibility of the school board and staff (under their direction) to manage the finances of the district.

    It isn’t the teachers’ fault for negotiating their contract, although I remember significant protests at school board meetings on the issue.”

    anonymous 1:52 said: “DPD is correct, and the fingerpointing is ridiculous. While DJUSD school enrollment dropped slightly over the past two years, it is higher than it was in 2001. Expenditures for school construction and renovation (whether appropriate or not) do not affect the operating budget. And while Davis High School is far from perfect, its problems also do not affect the budget situation.”

    This is exactly where you have it wrong and wdf has it right. If the School Board/District approve the building of too many schools, then there will not be enough in the operating budget to run them – which is exactly what happened in DAVIS! As far back as 1996 (I think that was the year), the School Board knew the district could not support two new elementary schools, but built them anyway. Suddenly the shell game began to cover the shortfall, which eventually forced the closure of Valley Oak. Emerson will suffer the same fate if parents and citizens don’t pay attention.

    The blame game is only important in terms of investigating how we got where we are now so it doesn’t happen again; and in terms of determining if the current School Board is making more mistakes, which it has, e.g. the attempt to close Emerson.

    “Oh and you just lost 2 more grade school children from your 2008-2009 enrollment.”

    Parents with kids will desert the ship if the schools in Davis remain in chaos. Why didn’t the current School Board think to ask teachers to forgo their raise temporarily, BEFORE PINK SLIPS WERE GIVEN OUT? I’ll bet you teachers would have considered it, had they not known ahead of time who would be axed! (By the way, I don’t like the idea of putting the burden on teachers for this debacle – it is not a particulary good solution, but it might have saved the day if the administration had been willing to take a similar pay cut.)

    “Let me get this straight…DJUSD, the group of “geniuses” who were selected to manage the hell-hole (otherwise known as Davis High) I had to contend with in my younger years…is struggling and strapped for cash?”

    A lot of us have had bad experiences at DHS. I suspect that might be part of the reason the Davis Schools Foundation is not getting more traction with its dollar-a-day campaign. The other reason is we saw our taxpayer dollars wasted with abandon prior, and have little hope things are really going to change for the better as far as wastage. Trust me, there is a lot of “pork” in the school system. To the blogger who commented how much money would be saved by killing the “growing giant cabbages” program, pennies add up to dollars very quickly.

    Furthermore, after watching the King High debacle and other poor decisions lately, I do not feel the current School Board/District even knows how much money they do or don’t have. If they have to go back to old videotapes to figure it out, or don’t look beneath staff figures on a balance sheet by asking appropriate questions…

  88. distrustful

    wdf said: “True it doesn’t fix things immediately, but a statement like that excuses responsibility and accountability where it should be assigned. How can voters make informed choices w/ out investigating the context for how we got here? The school board made a very poor choice in approving the teachers’ contract.”

    But the school board approved the contract in January, when it was clear that the economics wouldn’t support it. It is ultimately the responsibility of the school board and staff (under their direction) to manage the finances of the district.

    It isn’t the teachers’ fault for negotiating their contract, although I remember significant protests at school board meetings on the issue.”

    anonymous 1:52 said: “DPD is correct, and the fingerpointing is ridiculous. While DJUSD school enrollment dropped slightly over the past two years, it is higher than it was in 2001. Expenditures for school construction and renovation (whether appropriate or not) do not affect the operating budget. And while Davis High School is far from perfect, its problems also do not affect the budget situation.”

    This is exactly where you have it wrong and wdf has it right. If the School Board/District approve the building of too many schools, then there will not be enough in the operating budget to run them – which is exactly what happened in DAVIS! As far back as 1996 (I think that was the year), the School Board knew the district could not support two new elementary schools, but built them anyway. Suddenly the shell game began to cover the shortfall, which eventually forced the closure of Valley Oak. Emerson will suffer the same fate if parents and citizens don’t pay attention.

    The blame game is only important in terms of investigating how we got where we are now so it doesn’t happen again; and in terms of determining if the current School Board is making more mistakes, which it has, e.g. the attempt to close Emerson.

    “Oh and you just lost 2 more grade school children from your 2008-2009 enrollment.”

    Parents with kids will desert the ship if the schools in Davis remain in chaos. Why didn’t the current School Board think to ask teachers to forgo their raise temporarily, BEFORE PINK SLIPS WERE GIVEN OUT? I’ll bet you teachers would have considered it, had they not known ahead of time who would be axed! (By the way, I don’t like the idea of putting the burden on teachers for this debacle – it is not a particulary good solution, but it might have saved the day if the administration had been willing to take a similar pay cut.)

    “Let me get this straight…DJUSD, the group of “geniuses” who were selected to manage the hell-hole (otherwise known as Davis High) I had to contend with in my younger years…is struggling and strapped for cash?”

    A lot of us have had bad experiences at DHS. I suspect that might be part of the reason the Davis Schools Foundation is not getting more traction with its dollar-a-day campaign. The other reason is we saw our taxpayer dollars wasted with abandon prior, and have little hope things are really going to change for the better as far as wastage. Trust me, there is a lot of “pork” in the school system. To the blogger who commented how much money would be saved by killing the “growing giant cabbages” program, pennies add up to dollars very quickly.

    Furthermore, after watching the King High debacle and other poor decisions lately, I do not feel the current School Board/District even knows how much money they do or don’t have. If they have to go back to old videotapes to figure it out, or don’t look beneath staff figures on a balance sheet by asking appropriate questions…

  89. Matt Williams

    Anonymous said…

    I’m the Davis High alum who posted the original “hell-hole” comment.

    As the person who asked you to expand on your original post, I want thank you for your candid insight into the reasons why you feel the way you do.

    I’ll never be able to walk in your shoes, only empathize with your feelings and thoughts.

  90. Matt Williams

    Anonymous said…

    I’m the Davis High alum who posted the original “hell-hole” comment.

    As the person who asked you to expand on your original post, I want thank you for your candid insight into the reasons why you feel the way you do.

    I’ll never be able to walk in your shoes, only empathize with your feelings and thoughts.

  91. Matt Williams

    Anonymous said…

    I’m the Davis High alum who posted the original “hell-hole” comment.

    As the person who asked you to expand on your original post, I want thank you for your candid insight into the reasons why you feel the way you do.

    I’ll never be able to walk in your shoes, only empathize with your feelings and thoughts.

  92. Matt Williams

    Anonymous said…

    I’m the Davis High alum who posted the original “hell-hole” comment.

    As the person who asked you to expand on your original post, I want thank you for your candid insight into the reasons why you feel the way you do.

    I’ll never be able to walk in your shoes, only empathize with your feelings and thoughts.

  93. Anonymous

    Richard said:

    “And Davis residents still persist in wondering why people elsewhere around the region consider it elitist?”

    As you stated elsewhere, it’s your decision to live in Sacramento. I’m afraid your e-mail smacks of its own elitism.

    There is nothing wrong with DJUSD trying to work with the university to support mutually beneficial goals–no matter what particular proverbial ax you may want to grind on some particular day. DJUSD wants more students, and the university wants to have its employees to have ties to the community, whatever those ties may be.

    Richard, your post sounds a little personal from my vantage point.

  94. Anonymous

    Richard said:

    “And Davis residents still persist in wondering why people elsewhere around the region consider it elitist?”

    As you stated elsewhere, it’s your decision to live in Sacramento. I’m afraid your e-mail smacks of its own elitism.

    There is nothing wrong with DJUSD trying to work with the university to support mutually beneficial goals–no matter what particular proverbial ax you may want to grind on some particular day. DJUSD wants more students, and the university wants to have its employees to have ties to the community, whatever those ties may be.

    Richard, your post sounds a little personal from my vantage point.

  95. Anonymous

    Richard said:

    “And Davis residents still persist in wondering why people elsewhere around the region consider it elitist?”

    As you stated elsewhere, it’s your decision to live in Sacramento. I’m afraid your e-mail smacks of its own elitism.

    There is nothing wrong with DJUSD trying to work with the university to support mutually beneficial goals–no matter what particular proverbial ax you may want to grind on some particular day. DJUSD wants more students, and the university wants to have its employees to have ties to the community, whatever those ties may be.

    Richard, your post sounds a little personal from my vantage point.

  96. Anonymous

    Richard said:

    “And Davis residents still persist in wondering why people elsewhere around the region consider it elitist?”

    As you stated elsewhere, it’s your decision to live in Sacramento. I’m afraid your e-mail smacks of its own elitism.

    There is nothing wrong with DJUSD trying to work with the university to support mutually beneficial goals–no matter what particular proverbial ax you may want to grind on some particular day. DJUSD wants more students, and the university wants to have its employees to have ties to the community, whatever those ties may be.

    Richard, your post sounds a little personal from my vantage point.

  97. wdf

    “Richard said…
    The DJUSD has started to target UCD employees who live out of town specifically for interdistrict transfers. DJUSD can’t do much about the housing situation in Davis. But a large number of interdistrict transfers are from employees of UCD.

    And Davis residents still persist in wondering why people elsewhere around the region consider it elitist?”

    What’s wrong w/ interdistrict transfers? It isn’t the answer, and it doesn’t solve the problems. I simply made the observation. The district is attempting to serve a group of parents w/ connections to Davis. Maybe not all are interested, and that’s fine.

    These are families (I know three of them) who like what they get in Davis. They don’t seem outwardly elitist to me.

    I think you’re starting to get a little too personal, Richard.

  98. wdf

    “Richard said…
    The DJUSD has started to target UCD employees who live out of town specifically for interdistrict transfers. DJUSD can’t do much about the housing situation in Davis. But a large number of interdistrict transfers are from employees of UCD.

    And Davis residents still persist in wondering why people elsewhere around the region consider it elitist?”

    What’s wrong w/ interdistrict transfers? It isn’t the answer, and it doesn’t solve the problems. I simply made the observation. The district is attempting to serve a group of parents w/ connections to Davis. Maybe not all are interested, and that’s fine.

    These are families (I know three of them) who like what they get in Davis. They don’t seem outwardly elitist to me.

    I think you’re starting to get a little too personal, Richard.

  99. wdf

    “Richard said…
    The DJUSD has started to target UCD employees who live out of town specifically for interdistrict transfers. DJUSD can’t do much about the housing situation in Davis. But a large number of interdistrict transfers are from employees of UCD.

    And Davis residents still persist in wondering why people elsewhere around the region consider it elitist?”

    What’s wrong w/ interdistrict transfers? It isn’t the answer, and it doesn’t solve the problems. I simply made the observation. The district is attempting to serve a group of parents w/ connections to Davis. Maybe not all are interested, and that’s fine.

    These are families (I know three of them) who like what they get in Davis. They don’t seem outwardly elitist to me.

    I think you’re starting to get a little too personal, Richard.

  100. wdf

    “Richard said…
    The DJUSD has started to target UCD employees who live out of town specifically for interdistrict transfers. DJUSD can’t do much about the housing situation in Davis. But a large number of interdistrict transfers are from employees of UCD.

    And Davis residents still persist in wondering why people elsewhere around the region consider it elitist?”

    What’s wrong w/ interdistrict transfers? It isn’t the answer, and it doesn’t solve the problems. I simply made the observation. The district is attempting to serve a group of parents w/ connections to Davis. Maybe not all are interested, and that’s fine.

    These are families (I know three of them) who like what they get in Davis. They don’t seem outwardly elitist to me.

    I think you’re starting to get a little too personal, Richard.

  101. Richard

    Nothing is wrong with interdistrict transfers. In fact, they may constitute a major part of the solution for the challenges faced by the DJUSD. No, the problem is, as I am sure you must really be aware, is that they are restricted to UCD employees who live out of town.

    There are a lot of people who work in Davis, and live elsewhere. Is the District making an outreach to them? Why should interdistrict transfers be limited to UCD employees? Why shouldn’t others who “like what they get in Davis” participate as well? We may come to realize years from now that one of the major factors resulting in the decline of the district was the inability to embrace measures that would have more effectively resolved the district’s financial problems because of the need to ensure that they did not result in demographic changes within the district that existing residents might find discomforting.

    –Richard Estes

  102. Richard

    Nothing is wrong with interdistrict transfers. In fact, they may constitute a major part of the solution for the challenges faced by the DJUSD. No, the problem is, as I am sure you must really be aware, is that they are restricted to UCD employees who live out of town.

    There are a lot of people who work in Davis, and live elsewhere. Is the District making an outreach to them? Why should interdistrict transfers be limited to UCD employees? Why shouldn’t others who “like what they get in Davis” participate as well? We may come to realize years from now that one of the major factors resulting in the decline of the district was the inability to embrace measures that would have more effectively resolved the district’s financial problems because of the need to ensure that they did not result in demographic changes within the district that existing residents might find discomforting.

    –Richard Estes

  103. Richard

    Nothing is wrong with interdistrict transfers. In fact, they may constitute a major part of the solution for the challenges faced by the DJUSD. No, the problem is, as I am sure you must really be aware, is that they are restricted to UCD employees who live out of town.

    There are a lot of people who work in Davis, and live elsewhere. Is the District making an outreach to them? Why should interdistrict transfers be limited to UCD employees? Why shouldn’t others who “like what they get in Davis” participate as well? We may come to realize years from now that one of the major factors resulting in the decline of the district was the inability to embrace measures that would have more effectively resolved the district’s financial problems because of the need to ensure that they did not result in demographic changes within the district that existing residents might find discomforting.

    –Richard Estes

  104. Richard

    Nothing is wrong with interdistrict transfers. In fact, they may constitute a major part of the solution for the challenges faced by the DJUSD. No, the problem is, as I am sure you must really be aware, is that they are restricted to UCD employees who live out of town.

    There are a lot of people who work in Davis, and live elsewhere. Is the District making an outreach to them? Why should interdistrict transfers be limited to UCD employees? Why shouldn’t others who “like what they get in Davis” participate as well? We may come to realize years from now that one of the major factors resulting in the decline of the district was the inability to embrace measures that would have more effectively resolved the district’s financial problems because of the need to ensure that they did not result in demographic changes within the district that existing residents might find discomforting.

    –Richard Estes

  105. Anon

    The transfers are NOT restricted to UCD employees. Anyone can apply for them. The district is just making more of an outreach to UCD employees because, from past experience, those are the families most likely to consider a transfer.

    As for the great idea to ask teachers to take a pay cut… how far are we going to go to lower teacher morale? We’ve already had to listen to suggestions from the board and the superintendent that coaches and extra-curricular advisers will just volunteer for their time-consuming jobs if their pay is eliminated. Now, the attitude seems to be, teachers love their jobs so much that they’ll be willing to work for less! We already lose the best new teachers to Elk Grove and other districts that pay more (especially in benefits). Yes, teachers love our kids but it is also a JOB that they need to pay their bills.

    One more thing: board member Richard Harris misrepresented the PTA letter he quoted when he suggested the pay cut. I saw the letter (it was circulated on the DHS PTA listserv) and it was a list of questions submitted by parents. Out of dozens of questions asking for details about the painful cuts proposed, Harris brought up only the one question about the teacher raise…and then made it sound like the pay cut idea was a PTA proposal! So frustrating…

  106. Anon

    The transfers are NOT restricted to UCD employees. Anyone can apply for them. The district is just making more of an outreach to UCD employees because, from past experience, those are the families most likely to consider a transfer.

    As for the great idea to ask teachers to take a pay cut… how far are we going to go to lower teacher morale? We’ve already had to listen to suggestions from the board and the superintendent that coaches and extra-curricular advisers will just volunteer for their time-consuming jobs if their pay is eliminated. Now, the attitude seems to be, teachers love their jobs so much that they’ll be willing to work for less! We already lose the best new teachers to Elk Grove and other districts that pay more (especially in benefits). Yes, teachers love our kids but it is also a JOB that they need to pay their bills.

    One more thing: board member Richard Harris misrepresented the PTA letter he quoted when he suggested the pay cut. I saw the letter (it was circulated on the DHS PTA listserv) and it was a list of questions submitted by parents. Out of dozens of questions asking for details about the painful cuts proposed, Harris brought up only the one question about the teacher raise…and then made it sound like the pay cut idea was a PTA proposal! So frustrating…

  107. Anon

    The transfers are NOT restricted to UCD employees. Anyone can apply for them. The district is just making more of an outreach to UCD employees because, from past experience, those are the families most likely to consider a transfer.

    As for the great idea to ask teachers to take a pay cut… how far are we going to go to lower teacher morale? We’ve already had to listen to suggestions from the board and the superintendent that coaches and extra-curricular advisers will just volunteer for their time-consuming jobs if their pay is eliminated. Now, the attitude seems to be, teachers love their jobs so much that they’ll be willing to work for less! We already lose the best new teachers to Elk Grove and other districts that pay more (especially in benefits). Yes, teachers love our kids but it is also a JOB that they need to pay their bills.

    One more thing: board member Richard Harris misrepresented the PTA letter he quoted when he suggested the pay cut. I saw the letter (it was circulated on the DHS PTA listserv) and it was a list of questions submitted by parents. Out of dozens of questions asking for details about the painful cuts proposed, Harris brought up only the one question about the teacher raise…and then made it sound like the pay cut idea was a PTA proposal! So frustrating…

  108. Anon

    The transfers are NOT restricted to UCD employees. Anyone can apply for them. The district is just making more of an outreach to UCD employees because, from past experience, those are the families most likely to consider a transfer.

    As for the great idea to ask teachers to take a pay cut… how far are we going to go to lower teacher morale? We’ve already had to listen to suggestions from the board and the superintendent that coaches and extra-curricular advisers will just volunteer for their time-consuming jobs if their pay is eliminated. Now, the attitude seems to be, teachers love their jobs so much that they’ll be willing to work for less! We already lose the best new teachers to Elk Grove and other districts that pay more (especially in benefits). Yes, teachers love our kids but it is also a JOB that they need to pay their bills.

    One more thing: board member Richard Harris misrepresented the PTA letter he quoted when he suggested the pay cut. I saw the letter (it was circulated on the DHS PTA listserv) and it was a list of questions submitted by parents. Out of dozens of questions asking for details about the painful cuts proposed, Harris brought up only the one question about the teacher raise…and then made it sound like the pay cut idea was a PTA proposal! So frustrating…

  109. wdf

    “Richard said…

    No, the problem is, as I am sure you must really be aware, is that they are restricted to UCD employees who live out of town.”

    I am not aware of it being restricted to UCD employees. If it definitely is restricted to UCD employees, then please explain.

    I’ve been sitting through hours of school board meetings, and I know it has been discussed, maybe a month ago, but my attention sometimes isn’t the sharpest, especially a couple of hours into the meeting.

    I can’t imagine that DJUSD is shutting out other businesses. That DJUSD is going out of it’s way to court UCD is probably that UCD is the city’s biggest employer, and UCD may feel an interest in seeing things work for DJUSD, because it adds to their efforts attract new and younger faculty.

  110. wdf

    “Richard said…

    No, the problem is, as I am sure you must really be aware, is that they are restricted to UCD employees who live out of town.”

    I am not aware of it being restricted to UCD employees. If it definitely is restricted to UCD employees, then please explain.

    I’ve been sitting through hours of school board meetings, and I know it has been discussed, maybe a month ago, but my attention sometimes isn’t the sharpest, especially a couple of hours into the meeting.

    I can’t imagine that DJUSD is shutting out other businesses. That DJUSD is going out of it’s way to court UCD is probably that UCD is the city’s biggest employer, and UCD may feel an interest in seeing things work for DJUSD, because it adds to their efforts attract new and younger faculty.

  111. wdf

    “Richard said…

    No, the problem is, as I am sure you must really be aware, is that they are restricted to UCD employees who live out of town.”

    I am not aware of it being restricted to UCD employees. If it definitely is restricted to UCD employees, then please explain.

    I’ve been sitting through hours of school board meetings, and I know it has been discussed, maybe a month ago, but my attention sometimes isn’t the sharpest, especially a couple of hours into the meeting.

    I can’t imagine that DJUSD is shutting out other businesses. That DJUSD is going out of it’s way to court UCD is probably that UCD is the city’s biggest employer, and UCD may feel an interest in seeing things work for DJUSD, because it adds to their efforts attract new and younger faculty.

  112. wdf

    “Richard said…

    No, the problem is, as I am sure you must really be aware, is that they are restricted to UCD employees who live out of town.”

    I am not aware of it being restricted to UCD employees. If it definitely is restricted to UCD employees, then please explain.

    I’ve been sitting through hours of school board meetings, and I know it has been discussed, maybe a month ago, but my attention sometimes isn’t the sharpest, especially a couple of hours into the meeting.

    I can’t imagine that DJUSD is shutting out other businesses. That DJUSD is going out of it’s way to court UCD is probably that UCD is the city’s biggest employer, and UCD may feel an interest in seeing things work for DJUSD, because it adds to their efforts attract new and younger faculty.

  113. Richard

    I think that it would probably be a good idea to expand the promotion to city, county, district employees, and even employers, if they haven’t already done so.

    My suspicion, subject to empirical confirmation, is that demography is running against the district.

    –Richard Estes

  114. Richard

    I think that it would probably be a good idea to expand the promotion to city, county, district employees, and even employers, if they haven’t already done so.

    My suspicion, subject to empirical confirmation, is that demography is running against the district.

    –Richard Estes

  115. Richard

    I think that it would probably be a good idea to expand the promotion to city, county, district employees, and even employers, if they haven’t already done so.

    My suspicion, subject to empirical confirmation, is that demography is running against the district.

    –Richard Estes

  116. Richard

    I think that it would probably be a good idea to expand the promotion to city, county, district employees, and even employers, if they haven’t already done so.

    My suspicion, subject to empirical confirmation, is that demography is running against the district.

    –Richard Estes

  117. Soul Survivor

    To Matt Williams and the others who took the time to read my posts and truly understand where I’m coming from: thank you for your thoughtful input and compassion.

    Perhaps there’s hope for the DJUSD and Davis High after all…if more folks like you become involved in finding progressive and positive solutions.

    Peace.

  118. Soul Survivor

    To Matt Williams and the others who took the time to read my posts and truly understand where I’m coming from: thank you for your thoughtful input and compassion.

    Perhaps there’s hope for the DJUSD and Davis High after all…if more folks like you become involved in finding progressive and positive solutions.

    Peace.

  119. Soul Survivor

    To Matt Williams and the others who took the time to read my posts and truly understand where I’m coming from: thank you for your thoughtful input and compassion.

    Perhaps there’s hope for the DJUSD and Davis High after all…if more folks like you become involved in finding progressive and positive solutions.

    Peace.

  120. Soul Survivor

    To Matt Williams and the others who took the time to read my posts and truly understand where I’m coming from: thank you for your thoughtful input and compassion.

    Perhaps there’s hope for the DJUSD and Davis High after all…if more folks like you become involved in finding progressive and positive solutions.

    Peace.

  121. Palerider

    Inter-district transfers are not specifically restricted to UCD employees, however the UCD inclusion does provide DJUSD with the fig leaf it needs to explain/justify to other school districts why it is “raiding” their districts for students. Since the home district must sign off on the transfer request the UCD designation gives DJUSD a “justification” for accepting the transfer, i.e. it is easier for the student to travel back and forth with the parent, parent is closer for conferences-emergencies, and on and on.

    Ironically, prior to the current enrollment shortfalls Davis had the reputation of being the hardest district to transfer into. Each year a set of appeals would be sent on to the County Supt. of Schools office to see if the decisions to reject intra-district transfer requests could be over-turned on appeal. Now, DJUSD is suffering the ignominy of having to beg, cajole and plead for students from many of the same rural areas whom they used to reject.

    Interestingly enough, as one of my Davis friends likes to point out, these incoming students do dodge the parcel tax that Davis homeowners pay for the schools. So while the ADA accrues to the Davis district, thus representing additional revenue it can be construed that Davis taxpayers are still now subsidizing the education of these out-of-town transfers. Regardless, the desperate search for students tends to overshadow this issue.

  122. Palerider

    Inter-district transfers are not specifically restricted to UCD employees, however the UCD inclusion does provide DJUSD with the fig leaf it needs to explain/justify to other school districts why it is “raiding” their districts for students. Since the home district must sign off on the transfer request the UCD designation gives DJUSD a “justification” for accepting the transfer, i.e. it is easier for the student to travel back and forth with the parent, parent is closer for conferences-emergencies, and on and on.

    Ironically, prior to the current enrollment shortfalls Davis had the reputation of being the hardest district to transfer into. Each year a set of appeals would be sent on to the County Supt. of Schools office to see if the decisions to reject intra-district transfer requests could be over-turned on appeal. Now, DJUSD is suffering the ignominy of having to beg, cajole and plead for students from many of the same rural areas whom they used to reject.

    Interestingly enough, as one of my Davis friends likes to point out, these incoming students do dodge the parcel tax that Davis homeowners pay for the schools. So while the ADA accrues to the Davis district, thus representing additional revenue it can be construed that Davis taxpayers are still now subsidizing the education of these out-of-town transfers. Regardless, the desperate search for students tends to overshadow this issue.

  123. Palerider

    Inter-district transfers are not specifically restricted to UCD employees, however the UCD inclusion does provide DJUSD with the fig leaf it needs to explain/justify to other school districts why it is “raiding” their districts for students. Since the home district must sign off on the transfer request the UCD designation gives DJUSD a “justification” for accepting the transfer, i.e. it is easier for the student to travel back and forth with the parent, parent is closer for conferences-emergencies, and on and on.

    Ironically, prior to the current enrollment shortfalls Davis had the reputation of being the hardest district to transfer into. Each year a set of appeals would be sent on to the County Supt. of Schools office to see if the decisions to reject intra-district transfer requests could be over-turned on appeal. Now, DJUSD is suffering the ignominy of having to beg, cajole and plead for students from many of the same rural areas whom they used to reject.

    Interestingly enough, as one of my Davis friends likes to point out, these incoming students do dodge the parcel tax that Davis homeowners pay for the schools. So while the ADA accrues to the Davis district, thus representing additional revenue it can be construed that Davis taxpayers are still now subsidizing the education of these out-of-town transfers. Regardless, the desperate search for students tends to overshadow this issue.

  124. Palerider

    Inter-district transfers are not specifically restricted to UCD employees, however the UCD inclusion does provide DJUSD with the fig leaf it needs to explain/justify to other school districts why it is “raiding” their districts for students. Since the home district must sign off on the transfer request the UCD designation gives DJUSD a “justification” for accepting the transfer, i.e. it is easier for the student to travel back and forth with the parent, parent is closer for conferences-emergencies, and on and on.

    Ironically, prior to the current enrollment shortfalls Davis had the reputation of being the hardest district to transfer into. Each year a set of appeals would be sent on to the County Supt. of Schools office to see if the decisions to reject intra-district transfer requests could be over-turned on appeal. Now, DJUSD is suffering the ignominy of having to beg, cajole and plead for students from many of the same rural areas whom they used to reject.

    Interestingly enough, as one of my Davis friends likes to point out, these incoming students do dodge the parcel tax that Davis homeowners pay for the schools. So while the ADA accrues to the Davis district, thus representing additional revenue it can be construed that Davis taxpayers are still now subsidizing the education of these out-of-town transfers. Regardless, the desperate search for students tends to overshadow this issue.

  125. wdf

    “Interestingly enough, as one of my Davis friends likes to point out, these incoming students do dodge the parcel tax that Davis homeowners pay for the schools. So while the ADA accrues to the Davis district, thus representing additional revenue it can be construed that Davis taxpayers are still now subsidizing the education of these out-of-town transfers. Regardless, the desperate search for students tends to overshadow this issue.”

    Interesting point. But one thing that does give me and others confidence in the Davis school system is that the Davis electorate views public education as an asset to the point where they will pass/renew parcel taxes, and I think the parcel tax does make a difference in the quality of education.

    So ultimately I think it has the potential, though not the guarantee, of attracting interdistrict transfers.

  126. wdf

    “Interestingly enough, as one of my Davis friends likes to point out, these incoming students do dodge the parcel tax that Davis homeowners pay for the schools. So while the ADA accrues to the Davis district, thus representing additional revenue it can be construed that Davis taxpayers are still now subsidizing the education of these out-of-town transfers. Regardless, the desperate search for students tends to overshadow this issue.”

    Interesting point. But one thing that does give me and others confidence in the Davis school system is that the Davis electorate views public education as an asset to the point where they will pass/renew parcel taxes, and I think the parcel tax does make a difference in the quality of education.

    So ultimately I think it has the potential, though not the guarantee, of attracting interdistrict transfers.

  127. wdf

    “Interestingly enough, as one of my Davis friends likes to point out, these incoming students do dodge the parcel tax that Davis homeowners pay for the schools. So while the ADA accrues to the Davis district, thus representing additional revenue it can be construed that Davis taxpayers are still now subsidizing the education of these out-of-town transfers. Regardless, the desperate search for students tends to overshadow this issue.”

    Interesting point. But one thing that does give me and others confidence in the Davis school system is that the Davis electorate views public education as an asset to the point where they will pass/renew parcel taxes, and I think the parcel tax does make a difference in the quality of education.

    So ultimately I think it has the potential, though not the guarantee, of attracting interdistrict transfers.

  128. wdf

    “Interestingly enough, as one of my Davis friends likes to point out, these incoming students do dodge the parcel tax that Davis homeowners pay for the schools. So while the ADA accrues to the Davis district, thus representing additional revenue it can be construed that Davis taxpayers are still now subsidizing the education of these out-of-town transfers. Regardless, the desperate search for students tends to overshadow this issue.”

    Interesting point. But one thing that does give me and others confidence in the Davis school system is that the Davis electorate views public education as an asset to the point where they will pass/renew parcel taxes, and I think the parcel tax does make a difference in the quality of education.

    So ultimately I think it has the potential, though not the guarantee, of attracting interdistrict transfers.

  129. Richard

    Inter-district transfers are not specifically restricted to UCD employees, however the UCD inclusion does provide DJUSD with the fig leaf it needs to explain/justify to other school districts why it is “raiding” their districts for students. Since the home district must sign off on the transfer request the UCD designation gives DJUSD a “justification” for accepting the transfer, i.e. it is easier for the student to travel back and forth with the parent, parent is closer for conferences-emergencies, and on and on.

    I would assume that parents who work for the city and city employers could make the same claim?

    –Richard

  130. Richard

    Inter-district transfers are not specifically restricted to UCD employees, however the UCD inclusion does provide DJUSD with the fig leaf it needs to explain/justify to other school districts why it is “raiding” their districts for students. Since the home district must sign off on the transfer request the UCD designation gives DJUSD a “justification” for accepting the transfer, i.e. it is easier for the student to travel back and forth with the parent, parent is closer for conferences-emergencies, and on and on.

    I would assume that parents who work for the city and city employers could make the same claim?

    –Richard

  131. Richard

    Inter-district transfers are not specifically restricted to UCD employees, however the UCD inclusion does provide DJUSD with the fig leaf it needs to explain/justify to other school districts why it is “raiding” their districts for students. Since the home district must sign off on the transfer request the UCD designation gives DJUSD a “justification” for accepting the transfer, i.e. it is easier for the student to travel back and forth with the parent, parent is closer for conferences-emergencies, and on and on.

    I would assume that parents who work for the city and city employers could make the same claim?

    –Richard

  132. Richard

    Inter-district transfers are not specifically restricted to UCD employees, however the UCD inclusion does provide DJUSD with the fig leaf it needs to explain/justify to other school districts why it is “raiding” their districts for students. Since the home district must sign off on the transfer request the UCD designation gives DJUSD a “justification” for accepting the transfer, i.e. it is easier for the student to travel back and forth with the parent, parent is closer for conferences-emergencies, and on and on.

    I would assume that parents who work for the city and city employers could make the same claim?

    –Richard

  133. djusd parent

    My understanding from a previous board meeting is that the interdistrict transfers are not limited at all. Anyone can apply. The outreach to UCD staff is easier because of the employee listserves and the newspaper. I believe the idea of advertising in neighboring community newpapers was rejected because they thought it would be bad form when other districts are experiencing their own issues.

    But, all interdistrict transfers are not equal. Even if the DJUSD says they are open to taking more kids, those kids have to come in the grade levels that we need kids. So, if you have a 3rd grader, your application could still be rejected if that third grader is going to push the district over the 20 to 1 class size reduction. The other scenario that I have heard is that people from outside Davis apply for interdistrict transfers requesting a specific school, and those can not always be accomodated. If a parent works downtown or at UCD and wants their child at North or Willet for instance, but the only place available is at Pioneer that may not be workable.

    Interdistrict transfers are more complicated than just opening the doors in April and letting everyone in.

  134. djusd parent

    My understanding from a previous board meeting is that the interdistrict transfers are not limited at all. Anyone can apply. The outreach to UCD staff is easier because of the employee listserves and the newspaper. I believe the idea of advertising in neighboring community newpapers was rejected because they thought it would be bad form when other districts are experiencing their own issues.

    But, all interdistrict transfers are not equal. Even if the DJUSD says they are open to taking more kids, those kids have to come in the grade levels that we need kids. So, if you have a 3rd grader, your application could still be rejected if that third grader is going to push the district over the 20 to 1 class size reduction. The other scenario that I have heard is that people from outside Davis apply for interdistrict transfers requesting a specific school, and those can not always be accomodated. If a parent works downtown or at UCD and wants their child at North or Willet for instance, but the only place available is at Pioneer that may not be workable.

    Interdistrict transfers are more complicated than just opening the doors in April and letting everyone in.

  135. djusd parent

    My understanding from a previous board meeting is that the interdistrict transfers are not limited at all. Anyone can apply. The outreach to UCD staff is easier because of the employee listserves and the newspaper. I believe the idea of advertising in neighboring community newpapers was rejected because they thought it would be bad form when other districts are experiencing their own issues.

    But, all interdistrict transfers are not equal. Even if the DJUSD says they are open to taking more kids, those kids have to come in the grade levels that we need kids. So, if you have a 3rd grader, your application could still be rejected if that third grader is going to push the district over the 20 to 1 class size reduction. The other scenario that I have heard is that people from outside Davis apply for interdistrict transfers requesting a specific school, and those can not always be accomodated. If a parent works downtown or at UCD and wants their child at North or Willet for instance, but the only place available is at Pioneer that may not be workable.

    Interdistrict transfers are more complicated than just opening the doors in April and letting everyone in.

  136. djusd parent

    My understanding from a previous board meeting is that the interdistrict transfers are not limited at all. Anyone can apply. The outreach to UCD staff is easier because of the employee listserves and the newspaper. I believe the idea of advertising in neighboring community newpapers was rejected because they thought it would be bad form when other districts are experiencing their own issues.

    But, all interdistrict transfers are not equal. Even if the DJUSD says they are open to taking more kids, those kids have to come in the grade levels that we need kids. So, if you have a 3rd grader, your application could still be rejected if that third grader is going to push the district over the 20 to 1 class size reduction. The other scenario that I have heard is that people from outside Davis apply for interdistrict transfers requesting a specific school, and those can not always be accomodated. If a parent works downtown or at UCD and wants their child at North or Willet for instance, but the only place available is at Pioneer that may not be workable.

    Interdistrict transfers are more complicated than just opening the doors in April and letting everyone in.

  137. Palerider

    The point about the parcel tax was simply that that door swings both ways. Yes, it could be seen as a positive but others can see it, and do, as a negative because they are basically subsidizing the educations of kids who don’t live here.

    And yes, employees of other orgs such as the City could make the same claims about inter-district transfers. Regardless, it is and will remain a politically sensitive issue for DJUSD with other districts. It could even be that other districts will try and erect more roadblocks to prevent or hamper such transfers if they start to look like a trend.

  138. Palerider

    The point about the parcel tax was simply that that door swings both ways. Yes, it could be seen as a positive but others can see it, and do, as a negative because they are basically subsidizing the educations of kids who don’t live here.

    And yes, employees of other orgs such as the City could make the same claims about inter-district transfers. Regardless, it is and will remain a politically sensitive issue for DJUSD with other districts. It could even be that other districts will try and erect more roadblocks to prevent or hamper such transfers if they start to look like a trend.

  139. Palerider

    The point about the parcel tax was simply that that door swings both ways. Yes, it could be seen as a positive but others can see it, and do, as a negative because they are basically subsidizing the educations of kids who don’t live here.

    And yes, employees of other orgs such as the City could make the same claims about inter-district transfers. Regardless, it is and will remain a politically sensitive issue for DJUSD with other districts. It could even be that other districts will try and erect more roadblocks to prevent or hamper such transfers if they start to look like a trend.

  140. Palerider

    The point about the parcel tax was simply that that door swings both ways. Yes, it could be seen as a positive but others can see it, and do, as a negative because they are basically subsidizing the educations of kids who don’t live here.

    And yes, employees of other orgs such as the City could make the same claims about inter-district transfers. Regardless, it is and will remain a politically sensitive issue for DJUSD with other districts. It could even be that other districts will try and erect more roadblocks to prevent or hamper such transfers if they start to look like a trend.

  141. Anonymous

    From: New To Davis
    What a bunch of idiots comment here. And to the person who thinks that Woodland has a great school system, you’re in for a rude awakening.
    Woodland school system has a huge number of sons and daughters of illegal mexican immigrants. A large portion of their kids are “Gang Bangers”. The parents country of origin, mexico, did not educate them and the parents cannot teach their children, history,math,geography or English. Hence you have children who have parents who do not or cannot participate in their education and the children fail.
    The participation of parents in the education of children is the most critical aspect in a childs education. The Davis school system has almost a 90% rate of college attendance for it’s HS School graduates. Do yourself a favor and look up the Woodland School system stats. It has one of the poorest stats for college attendance and scholastic achievement in Northern California.

  142. Anonymous

    From: New To Davis
    What a bunch of idiots comment here. And to the person who thinks that Woodland has a great school system, you’re in for a rude awakening.
    Woodland school system has a huge number of sons and daughters of illegal mexican immigrants. A large portion of their kids are “Gang Bangers”. The parents country of origin, mexico, did not educate them and the parents cannot teach their children, history,math,geography or English. Hence you have children who have parents who do not or cannot participate in their education and the children fail.
    The participation of parents in the education of children is the most critical aspect in a childs education. The Davis school system has almost a 90% rate of college attendance for it’s HS School graduates. Do yourself a favor and look up the Woodland School system stats. It has one of the poorest stats for college attendance and scholastic achievement in Northern California.

  143. Anonymous

    From: New To Davis
    What a bunch of idiots comment here. And to the person who thinks that Woodland has a great school system, you’re in for a rude awakening.
    Woodland school system has a huge number of sons and daughters of illegal mexican immigrants. A large portion of their kids are “Gang Bangers”. The parents country of origin, mexico, did not educate them and the parents cannot teach their children, history,math,geography or English. Hence you have children who have parents who do not or cannot participate in their education and the children fail.
    The participation of parents in the education of children is the most critical aspect in a childs education. The Davis school system has almost a 90% rate of college attendance for it’s HS School graduates. Do yourself a favor and look up the Woodland School system stats. It has one of the poorest stats for college attendance and scholastic achievement in Northern California.

  144. Anonymous

    From: New To Davis
    What a bunch of idiots comment here. And to the person who thinks that Woodland has a great school system, you’re in for a rude awakening.
    Woodland school system has a huge number of sons and daughters of illegal mexican immigrants. A large portion of their kids are “Gang Bangers”. The parents country of origin, mexico, did not educate them and the parents cannot teach their children, history,math,geography or English. Hence you have children who have parents who do not or cannot participate in their education and the children fail.
    The participation of parents in the education of children is the most critical aspect in a childs education. The Davis school system has almost a 90% rate of college attendance for it’s HS School graduates. Do yourself a favor and look up the Woodland School system stats. It has one of the poorest stats for college attendance and scholastic achievement in Northern California.

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