Davis School Board Votes to Keep Three Junior Highs

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After long discussion over the last several weeks, the Davis School Board voted by a 3-2 vote to keep three juniors and keep the secondary schools in the same current configuration with Davis High School remaining a 10-12 program and DaVinci High School remaining on the Davis High School campus.

Gina Daleiden in her dissenting vote made it clear that the vote was not necessarily on the substance of the issue, but due to the fact that the vote was not tied to corresponding budget cuts. The same is true from Tim Taylor’s vote as well.

In addition, the school board voted to keep hire three Principals to fill the vacancy at three elementary schools.

Earlier in the evening Superintendent James Hammond made a radical suggestion of offering to save the district over $100,000 by performing a duel role of Principal at an Elementary School while at the same time continuing to serve as the district’s superintendent.

Gina Daleiden would say that “this is one time we need to save James, from James.” Arguing that the situation was not feasible from a workload standpoint. She also suggested there would be a potential conflict to have the Superintendent of the District tied to one elementary school site.

The board would vote by a 4-1 margin to take this option off the table with Tim Taylor dissenting.

Commentary

I am pleased that Emerson Junior High is remaining open. It is a vital school in West Davis and while there are upgrades needed to the campus, it is only the fifth oldest campus in the school district. The building itself has a number of desirable features that lead me to want to preserve it as a vital Junior High.

That said there are a number of aspects of this particular vote that I am uncomfortable with, even as I am pleased with the outcome.

First, the fact that it was not tied to additional cuts, means that there remains more work to be done. The district has to meet a threshold in order to meet its budgetary requirements or it risks the county taking over its operations.

Second, I think Gina Daleiden’s concern is quickly dismissed with regards to the cut of teachers and programs. Something has to be sacrificed in order to keep Emerson open and that might be more teachers or more programs. I hope we can find creative ways to do this, but if we do not, we need to recognize what this means for teachers and programs in the district.

Third, and this is probably my biggest concern–Richard Harris and Susan Lovenburg were two of the strongest proponents of closing Valley Oak and denying the charter. The stated reason was fiscal cost. Now, they have been the ringleaders to keep Emerson open which presents its own problems with fiscal cost. That does not sit well with me. To use the phrase of some on the board, this has become a sacred cow to these board members.

At least Sheila Allen was consistent on this issue–she voted to keep them all open. I would agree with her on both issues. Gina Daleiden and Tim Taylor were consistent as well, opting for fiscal prudence on both issues. While I disagree with them, I can respect their decisions.

However, I really need to understand the decision that Susan Lovenburg and Richard Harris made–the differentiation that they took. Does that differentiation amount to a rationalization or is there an actual tangible and clear reason that distinguishes the closing of Valley Oak from the maintenance of Emerson.

All of that said, keeping Emerson open is the right thing to do. The other choices were not good educational choices for the students involved. They required creating an overly crowded Davis High Campus, they required moving DaVinci students away from their logical location, and there was not a compelling demographic or attendance issue to necessitate this move. In short, the move was only made for the purposes of saving money. At this time that might be reason enough, but I still think you need to bear in mind educational considerations. I am not opposed to a 9-12 high school–I attended one myself. There are strong reasons to do it which is why the majority of the state has 9-12 high schools. However, there are also reasons not to do it, it keeps 9th graders in a better situation socially.

However, removing this option from the table now forces the district to look at other areas for cuts.

Everyone applauds the efforts of the Davis Schools Foundation. I am big supporter as well. They have raised $250,000 for the district which is wonderful, but it is less than one-tenth of the way to their goal and I just do not see them at this point getting anywhere near that goal.

I do not say this to bring people down, but we also must face reality. Parcel tax relief will not come until 2009. The Davis Schools Foundation is only going to help offset some of the worst cuts. The state may provide some relief but that will also come after the budget for next year is set in stone. The long and the short of it, is that we have dodged another school closure, but we are going to have to brace for a major hit, there is no way around it.

Finally, the demographic forecast shows that we will stabilize after this year. That means that declining enrollment will not have an ongoing impact of forcing additional steep budget cuts. Those who believe the solution to this is more growth need to look at a lot more closely at faster growth and larger cities–these cities have no escaped the problems of the budget nor are their schools doing better than ours. We need solid land use and growth policies in this city, but those should not be based on school enrollment priorities. The voters in this city have made a choice to support their schools vastly with parcel tax money while choosing to grow their city closely. People who think we can have better with faster growth policies might want to also consider what would happen if those new residents vote to cut off the parcel tax. In short, be careful what you wish for and plan wisely.

In the end, we are all in this together–the amount of civic spirit I have seen from students, teachers, and parents is amazing. We need to learn from this however–the lesson is the cost of complacency. Just four months ago there was so little interest in the school elections and now schools are all that are on people’s minds. We need to focus our attention on these issues when we are not facing severe cutbacks. We must remain attentive and aware so that these types of things do not sneak up on us in the future.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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128 thoughts on “Davis School Board Votes to Keep Three Junior Highs”

  1. davismom

    While I support the idea of keeping Emerson open, I’m really concerned about where these additional cuts are coming from. It is easy to dismiss these cuts as just being some additional teachers and programs, but once you’ve officially laid these teachers off you’ve lost them. They’ve got to start looking for other jobs if they’ve got any sort of bills to pay. Well I guess we’ll all just keep our fingers crossed and hope that the May reviseds come back with a happier scenario than what we are facing now.

  2. davismom

    While I support the idea of keeping Emerson open, I’m really concerned about where these additional cuts are coming from. It is easy to dismiss these cuts as just being some additional teachers and programs, but once you’ve officially laid these teachers off you’ve lost them. They’ve got to start looking for other jobs if they’ve got any sort of bills to pay. Well I guess we’ll all just keep our fingers crossed and hope that the May reviseds come back with a happier scenario than what we are facing now.

  3. davismom

    While I support the idea of keeping Emerson open, I’m really concerned about where these additional cuts are coming from. It is easy to dismiss these cuts as just being some additional teachers and programs, but once you’ve officially laid these teachers off you’ve lost them. They’ve got to start looking for other jobs if they’ve got any sort of bills to pay. Well I guess we’ll all just keep our fingers crossed and hope that the May reviseds come back with a happier scenario than what we are facing now.

  4. davismom

    While I support the idea of keeping Emerson open, I’m really concerned about where these additional cuts are coming from. It is easy to dismiss these cuts as just being some additional teachers and programs, but once you’ve officially laid these teachers off you’ve lost them. They’ve got to start looking for other jobs if they’ve got any sort of bills to pay. Well I guess we’ll all just keep our fingers crossed and hope that the May reviseds come back with a happier scenario than what we are facing now.

  5. Anonymous

    At this point I would like to see Emerson families and supporters launch a massive campaign to support and donate to the Davis Schools Foundation. Keeping Emerson open in spite of low enrollment there means that the district needs to cut $600,000 more in programs, teachers and support staff affecting every student in the district.

    Is Emerson willing to launch a big campaign to get their families to donate to Davis Schools Foundation? Are they willing to donate proceeds from their upcoming carnival to the Davis Schools Foundation?

    Losing elementary librarians, science, music, and about 70 secondary teachers and numerous programs is bad enough. What else it the district going to have to cut now to keep Emerson open?

    This also really reduces the likely hood of many lower seniority teachers being called back, including Da Vinci and Montessori and GATE teachers, and many excellent teachers in regular neighborhood programs.

  6. Anonymous

    At this point I would like to see Emerson families and supporters launch a massive campaign to support and donate to the Davis Schools Foundation. Keeping Emerson open in spite of low enrollment there means that the district needs to cut $600,000 more in programs, teachers and support staff affecting every student in the district.

    Is Emerson willing to launch a big campaign to get their families to donate to Davis Schools Foundation? Are they willing to donate proceeds from their upcoming carnival to the Davis Schools Foundation?

    Losing elementary librarians, science, music, and about 70 secondary teachers and numerous programs is bad enough. What else it the district going to have to cut now to keep Emerson open?

    This also really reduces the likely hood of many lower seniority teachers being called back, including Da Vinci and Montessori and GATE teachers, and many excellent teachers in regular neighborhood programs.

  7. Anonymous

    At this point I would like to see Emerson families and supporters launch a massive campaign to support and donate to the Davis Schools Foundation. Keeping Emerson open in spite of low enrollment there means that the district needs to cut $600,000 more in programs, teachers and support staff affecting every student in the district.

    Is Emerson willing to launch a big campaign to get their families to donate to Davis Schools Foundation? Are they willing to donate proceeds from their upcoming carnival to the Davis Schools Foundation?

    Losing elementary librarians, science, music, and about 70 secondary teachers and numerous programs is bad enough. What else it the district going to have to cut now to keep Emerson open?

    This also really reduces the likely hood of many lower seniority teachers being called back, including Da Vinci and Montessori and GATE teachers, and many excellent teachers in regular neighborhood programs.

  8. Anonymous

    At this point I would like to see Emerson families and supporters launch a massive campaign to support and donate to the Davis Schools Foundation. Keeping Emerson open in spite of low enrollment there means that the district needs to cut $600,000 more in programs, teachers and support staff affecting every student in the district.

    Is Emerson willing to launch a big campaign to get their families to donate to Davis Schools Foundation? Are they willing to donate proceeds from their upcoming carnival to the Davis Schools Foundation?

    Losing elementary librarians, science, music, and about 70 secondary teachers and numerous programs is bad enough. What else it the district going to have to cut now to keep Emerson open?

    This also really reduces the likely hood of many lower seniority teachers being called back, including Da Vinci and Montessori and GATE teachers, and many excellent teachers in regular neighborhood programs.

  9. Black Bart

    Why should anyone believe the projections on enrollment and the authors of the study even pointed out that the numbers could change after a few years. Further the past projections have been way off the mark leading to many of the over capacity problems that currently exist.

    As for Harris and Lovenburg the consistancy is to protect the schools in the new parts of Davis where they live. Valley Oak was a threat to Koramatsu but Emerson is not a threat to the new Junior high.

    At the end of all of this it would be interesting to see how many Davis teachers end up working in Woodland a place that has built housing in the last few years.

  10. Black Bart

    Why should anyone believe the projections on enrollment and the authors of the study even pointed out that the numbers could change after a few years. Further the past projections have been way off the mark leading to many of the over capacity problems that currently exist.

    As for Harris and Lovenburg the consistancy is to protect the schools in the new parts of Davis where they live. Valley Oak was a threat to Koramatsu but Emerson is not a threat to the new Junior high.

    At the end of all of this it would be interesting to see how many Davis teachers end up working in Woodland a place that has built housing in the last few years.

  11. Black Bart

    Why should anyone believe the projections on enrollment and the authors of the study even pointed out that the numbers could change after a few years. Further the past projections have been way off the mark leading to many of the over capacity problems that currently exist.

    As for Harris and Lovenburg the consistancy is to protect the schools in the new parts of Davis where they live. Valley Oak was a threat to Koramatsu but Emerson is not a threat to the new Junior high.

    At the end of all of this it would be interesting to see how many Davis teachers end up working in Woodland a place that has built housing in the last few years.

  12. Black Bart

    Why should anyone believe the projections on enrollment and the authors of the study even pointed out that the numbers could change after a few years. Further the past projections have been way off the mark leading to many of the over capacity problems that currently exist.

    As for Harris and Lovenburg the consistancy is to protect the schools in the new parts of Davis where they live. Valley Oak was a threat to Koramatsu but Emerson is not a threat to the new Junior high.

    At the end of all of this it would be interesting to see how many Davis teachers end up working in Woodland a place that has built housing in the last few years.

  13. Anonymous

    “Gina Daleiden in her dissenting vote made it clear that the vote was not necessarily on the substance of the issue but due to the fact that the vote was not tied to any way to vote for it.”

    Authorship and clarity at its DPD finest!

  14. Anonymous

    “Gina Daleiden in her dissenting vote made it clear that the vote was not necessarily on the substance of the issue but due to the fact that the vote was not tied to any way to vote for it.”

    Authorship and clarity at its DPD finest!

  15. Anonymous

    “Gina Daleiden in her dissenting vote made it clear that the vote was not necessarily on the substance of the issue but due to the fact that the vote was not tied to any way to vote for it.”

    Authorship and clarity at its DPD finest!

  16. Anonymous

    “Gina Daleiden in her dissenting vote made it clear that the vote was not necessarily on the substance of the issue but due to the fact that the vote was not tied to any way to vote for it.”

    Authorship and clarity at its DPD finest!

  17. closing emerson

    You compare the decision of board members to close Valley Oak with their decision to save Emerson. I think the different decision here has a lot more to do with the very different amount of time devoted to the questions than to personal issues of board members.

    The time spent considering the impacts of closing Emerson was very short. Furthermore, the time available to staff to reconcile the effects of a closure — all those decisions and work that staff would have to do such as where to put the students and teachers, what to do with existing materials, etc. etc. — was really not adequate for this spring/summer.

    That’s not to say the decision might not be made next year, but there needs to be adequate time for consideration and work.

    It’s really unfortunate that previous boards decided to build multiple unnecessary schools and now we are paying the price.

  18. closing emerson

    You compare the decision of board members to close Valley Oak with their decision to save Emerson. I think the different decision here has a lot more to do with the very different amount of time devoted to the questions than to personal issues of board members.

    The time spent considering the impacts of closing Emerson was very short. Furthermore, the time available to staff to reconcile the effects of a closure — all those decisions and work that staff would have to do such as where to put the students and teachers, what to do with existing materials, etc. etc. — was really not adequate for this spring/summer.

    That’s not to say the decision might not be made next year, but there needs to be adequate time for consideration and work.

    It’s really unfortunate that previous boards decided to build multiple unnecessary schools and now we are paying the price.

  19. closing emerson

    You compare the decision of board members to close Valley Oak with their decision to save Emerson. I think the different decision here has a lot more to do with the very different amount of time devoted to the questions than to personal issues of board members.

    The time spent considering the impacts of closing Emerson was very short. Furthermore, the time available to staff to reconcile the effects of a closure — all those decisions and work that staff would have to do such as where to put the students and teachers, what to do with existing materials, etc. etc. — was really not adequate for this spring/summer.

    That’s not to say the decision might not be made next year, but there needs to be adequate time for consideration and work.

    It’s really unfortunate that previous boards decided to build multiple unnecessary schools and now we are paying the price.

  20. closing emerson

    You compare the decision of board members to close Valley Oak with their decision to save Emerson. I think the different decision here has a lot more to do with the very different amount of time devoted to the questions than to personal issues of board members.

    The time spent considering the impacts of closing Emerson was very short. Furthermore, the time available to staff to reconcile the effects of a closure — all those decisions and work that staff would have to do such as where to put the students and teachers, what to do with existing materials, etc. etc. — was really not adequate for this spring/summer.

    That’s not to say the decision might not be made next year, but there needs to be adequate time for consideration and work.

    It’s really unfortunate that previous boards decided to build multiple unnecessary schools and now we are paying the price.

  21. Anonymous

    Emerson may still close, but only after due time to research it. Basically, next year we will be right back here again. I think this is a classic case of putting off the unpleasant. If Emerson doesn’t eventually close, the rest of the programs in the district must be sacrificed. Also, teachers are now going to lose their jobs for sure, and this is, no matter how much people wish to deny it, in part because the community is unwilling to pay the price for their refusal to grow. Moving the
    9th grade to the high school is also a poor band aid, plus it is unsound. The high schools that have 9-12 almost always combine this with middle schools of 6-8, NOT 7-8. This is because otherwise 7-8 significantly loses its connectiveness, and is seen a merely a temporary stop-over. PLUS, the kids would have tiny junior high student bodies (400-450 avg.), and then would be moved to an enourmously crowded high school. DO NOT undervalue how much that will impact kids.

  22. Anonymous

    Emerson may still close, but only after due time to research it. Basically, next year we will be right back here again. I think this is a classic case of putting off the unpleasant. If Emerson doesn’t eventually close, the rest of the programs in the district must be sacrificed. Also, teachers are now going to lose their jobs for sure, and this is, no matter how much people wish to deny it, in part because the community is unwilling to pay the price for their refusal to grow. Moving the
    9th grade to the high school is also a poor band aid, plus it is unsound. The high schools that have 9-12 almost always combine this with middle schools of 6-8, NOT 7-8. This is because otherwise 7-8 significantly loses its connectiveness, and is seen a merely a temporary stop-over. PLUS, the kids would have tiny junior high student bodies (400-450 avg.), and then would be moved to an enourmously crowded high school. DO NOT undervalue how much that will impact kids.

  23. Anonymous

    Emerson may still close, but only after due time to research it. Basically, next year we will be right back here again. I think this is a classic case of putting off the unpleasant. If Emerson doesn’t eventually close, the rest of the programs in the district must be sacrificed. Also, teachers are now going to lose their jobs for sure, and this is, no matter how much people wish to deny it, in part because the community is unwilling to pay the price for their refusal to grow. Moving the
    9th grade to the high school is also a poor band aid, plus it is unsound. The high schools that have 9-12 almost always combine this with middle schools of 6-8, NOT 7-8. This is because otherwise 7-8 significantly loses its connectiveness, and is seen a merely a temporary stop-over. PLUS, the kids would have tiny junior high student bodies (400-450 avg.), and then would be moved to an enourmously crowded high school. DO NOT undervalue how much that will impact kids.

  24. Anonymous

    Emerson may still close, but only after due time to research it. Basically, next year we will be right back here again. I think this is a classic case of putting off the unpleasant. If Emerson doesn’t eventually close, the rest of the programs in the district must be sacrificed. Also, teachers are now going to lose their jobs for sure, and this is, no matter how much people wish to deny it, in part because the community is unwilling to pay the price for their refusal to grow. Moving the
    9th grade to the high school is also a poor band aid, plus it is unsound. The high schools that have 9-12 almost always combine this with middle schools of 6-8, NOT 7-8. This is because otherwise 7-8 significantly loses its connectiveness, and is seen a merely a temporary stop-over. PLUS, the kids would have tiny junior high student bodies (400-450 avg.), and then would be moved to an enourmously crowded high school. DO NOT undervalue how much that will impact kids.

  25. Anonymous

    “The high schools that have 9-12 almost always combine this with middle schools of 6-8, NOT 7-8. ”

    Where is the statistic backing this up? As a kid I transfered schools in the 9th grade, both school districts in different areas of California had a 7-8, 9-12configuration. I’d hazard a guess that there a still a fair number of school districts out there doing the same.

  26. Anonymous

    “The high schools that have 9-12 almost always combine this with middle schools of 6-8, NOT 7-8. ”

    Where is the statistic backing this up? As a kid I transfered schools in the 9th grade, both school districts in different areas of California had a 7-8, 9-12configuration. I’d hazard a guess that there a still a fair number of school districts out there doing the same.

  27. Anonymous

    “The high schools that have 9-12 almost always combine this with middle schools of 6-8, NOT 7-8. ”

    Where is the statistic backing this up? As a kid I transfered schools in the 9th grade, both school districts in different areas of California had a 7-8, 9-12configuration. I’d hazard a guess that there a still a fair number of school districts out there doing the same.

  28. Anonymous

    “The high schools that have 9-12 almost always combine this with middle schools of 6-8, NOT 7-8. ”

    Where is the statistic backing this up? As a kid I transfered schools in the 9th grade, both school districts in different areas of California had a 7-8, 9-12configuration. I’d hazard a guess that there a still a fair number of school districts out there doing the same.

  29. Anon

    I watched the meeting on TV until midnight. Only Daleiden and Taylor seemed to “get it.” They both pointed out that we keep taking items OFF the cut list (elementary principals, secondary reorganization) but are not putting anything back ON the list. It was Sheila Allen, I believe, who said something like “Maybe we’ll get more money after the May revise.” Well, if we do get more money, that money should be earmarked for restoring some of the 110 teacher positions the board so blithely cut a month ago. Please don’t ask Davis families to pay for teachers through the Foundation while the district uses new monies to pay for administrators or other needs.

  30. Anon

    I watched the meeting on TV until midnight. Only Daleiden and Taylor seemed to “get it.” They both pointed out that we keep taking items OFF the cut list (elementary principals, secondary reorganization) but are not putting anything back ON the list. It was Sheila Allen, I believe, who said something like “Maybe we’ll get more money after the May revise.” Well, if we do get more money, that money should be earmarked for restoring some of the 110 teacher positions the board so blithely cut a month ago. Please don’t ask Davis families to pay for teachers through the Foundation while the district uses new monies to pay for administrators or other needs.

  31. Anon

    I watched the meeting on TV until midnight. Only Daleiden and Taylor seemed to “get it.” They both pointed out that we keep taking items OFF the cut list (elementary principals, secondary reorganization) but are not putting anything back ON the list. It was Sheila Allen, I believe, who said something like “Maybe we’ll get more money after the May revise.” Well, if we do get more money, that money should be earmarked for restoring some of the 110 teacher positions the board so blithely cut a month ago. Please don’t ask Davis families to pay for teachers through the Foundation while the district uses new monies to pay for administrators or other needs.

  32. Anon

    I watched the meeting on TV until midnight. Only Daleiden and Taylor seemed to “get it.” They both pointed out that we keep taking items OFF the cut list (elementary principals, secondary reorganization) but are not putting anything back ON the list. It was Sheila Allen, I believe, who said something like “Maybe we’ll get more money after the May revise.” Well, if we do get more money, that money should be earmarked for restoring some of the 110 teacher positions the board so blithely cut a month ago. Please don’t ask Davis families to pay for teachers through the Foundation while the district uses new monies to pay for administrators or other needs.

  33. Not just Emersons shoulders

    I believe that closing Emerson while it is upgraded or torn down and rebuilt is reasonable and inevitable. Why not now when there is also a financial need for it?

    I still think my earlier suggested plan of moving Cezar Chavez to Valley Oak, moving North Davis to Cezar Chavez, move DaVinci to North Davis, closing Emerson, moving 9th graders to DHS, 7-8 to Harper and Holmes, rebuild Emerson, move 7-8 to Emerson & Holmes, open second 9-12 High School at Harper would be a good plan that could eventually establish a strong neighborhood school basis for the District, save money through this crisis and work to build a good program for our kids. We need to look to the future.

  34. Not just Emersons shoulders

    I believe that closing Emerson while it is upgraded or torn down and rebuilt is reasonable and inevitable. Why not now when there is also a financial need for it?

    I still think my earlier suggested plan of moving Cezar Chavez to Valley Oak, moving North Davis to Cezar Chavez, move DaVinci to North Davis, closing Emerson, moving 9th graders to DHS, 7-8 to Harper and Holmes, rebuild Emerson, move 7-8 to Emerson & Holmes, open second 9-12 High School at Harper would be a good plan that could eventually establish a strong neighborhood school basis for the District, save money through this crisis and work to build a good program for our kids. We need to look to the future.

  35. Not just Emersons shoulders

    I believe that closing Emerson while it is upgraded or torn down and rebuilt is reasonable and inevitable. Why not now when there is also a financial need for it?

    I still think my earlier suggested plan of moving Cezar Chavez to Valley Oak, moving North Davis to Cezar Chavez, move DaVinci to North Davis, closing Emerson, moving 9th graders to DHS, 7-8 to Harper and Holmes, rebuild Emerson, move 7-8 to Emerson & Holmes, open second 9-12 High School at Harper would be a good plan that could eventually establish a strong neighborhood school basis for the District, save money through this crisis and work to build a good program for our kids. We need to look to the future.

  36. Not just Emersons shoulders

    I believe that closing Emerson while it is upgraded or torn down and rebuilt is reasonable and inevitable. Why not now when there is also a financial need for it?

    I still think my earlier suggested plan of moving Cezar Chavez to Valley Oak, moving North Davis to Cezar Chavez, move DaVinci to North Davis, closing Emerson, moving 9th graders to DHS, 7-8 to Harper and Holmes, rebuild Emerson, move 7-8 to Emerson & Holmes, open second 9-12 High School at Harper would be a good plan that could eventually establish a strong neighborhood school basis for the District, save money through this crisis and work to build a good program for our kids. We need to look to the future.

  37. Doug Paul Davis

    Anon:

    I agree with part of what you said–but not all of it. I don’t think an Elementary School Principal is comparable to an administrator in the district office. I don’t really see how a school would run effectively without a full-time on-site Principal. The only reason that was even on the table is that three are retiring, it was not in the initial list of cuts. But I agree with the rest of what you are saying.

  38. Doug Paul Davis

    Anon:

    I agree with part of what you said–but not all of it. I don’t think an Elementary School Principal is comparable to an administrator in the district office. I don’t really see how a school would run effectively without a full-time on-site Principal. The only reason that was even on the table is that three are retiring, it was not in the initial list of cuts. But I agree with the rest of what you are saying.

  39. Doug Paul Davis

    Anon:

    I agree with part of what you said–but not all of it. I don’t think an Elementary School Principal is comparable to an administrator in the district office. I don’t really see how a school would run effectively without a full-time on-site Principal. The only reason that was even on the table is that three are retiring, it was not in the initial list of cuts. But I agree with the rest of what you are saying.

  40. Doug Paul Davis

    Anon:

    I agree with part of what you said–but not all of it. I don’t think an Elementary School Principal is comparable to an administrator in the district office. I don’t really see how a school would run effectively without a full-time on-site Principal. The only reason that was even on the table is that three are retiring, it was not in the initial list of cuts. But I agree with the rest of what you are saying.

  41. trying to figure it out

    Not just Emerson’s shoulders:

    That is a complicated plan. Does Davis really need 3 high schools, if DaVinci is moved to North Davis and another new high school is established at Harper?

  42. trying to figure it out

    Not just Emerson’s shoulders:

    That is a complicated plan. Does Davis really need 3 high schools, if DaVinci is moved to North Davis and another new high school is established at Harper?

  43. trying to figure it out

    Not just Emerson’s shoulders:

    That is a complicated plan. Does Davis really need 3 high schools, if DaVinci is moved to North Davis and another new high school is established at Harper?

  44. trying to figure it out

    Not just Emerson’s shoulders:

    That is a complicated plan. Does Davis really need 3 high schools, if DaVinci is moved to North Davis and another new high school is established at Harper?

  45. Anon

    I agree that every elementary school principal is needed. What a liability if someone was not on site when an emergency happened!
    That was a last minute idea to find the money to keep Emerson open. So, with that (appropriately) off the table, what are we going to do that can add up to $500 K? And, keep in mind, every dollar that we spend to keep Emerson open is a dollar that we could have spent to buy back a science teacher, a librarian, an English teacher, etc.
    I am mostly frustrated with Emerson supporters (on and off the board) who pretend like this doesn’t have a price tag. The money cannot be “found”…the money is coming out of funds that could be used to give our children quality teachers and programs.
    And, for the record, in the end I did think it was right to keep Emerson open…mostly because the fight over that was distracting us from the bigger issue of classroom cuts. I hope the board and district staff give the same effort to trying to prevent those cuts as they did to keeping Emerson open.

  46. Anon

    I agree that every elementary school principal is needed. What a liability if someone was not on site when an emergency happened!
    That was a last minute idea to find the money to keep Emerson open. So, with that (appropriately) off the table, what are we going to do that can add up to $500 K? And, keep in mind, every dollar that we spend to keep Emerson open is a dollar that we could have spent to buy back a science teacher, a librarian, an English teacher, etc.
    I am mostly frustrated with Emerson supporters (on and off the board) who pretend like this doesn’t have a price tag. The money cannot be “found”…the money is coming out of funds that could be used to give our children quality teachers and programs.
    And, for the record, in the end I did think it was right to keep Emerson open…mostly because the fight over that was distracting us from the bigger issue of classroom cuts. I hope the board and district staff give the same effort to trying to prevent those cuts as they did to keeping Emerson open.

  47. Anon

    I agree that every elementary school principal is needed. What a liability if someone was not on site when an emergency happened!
    That was a last minute idea to find the money to keep Emerson open. So, with that (appropriately) off the table, what are we going to do that can add up to $500 K? And, keep in mind, every dollar that we spend to keep Emerson open is a dollar that we could have spent to buy back a science teacher, a librarian, an English teacher, etc.
    I am mostly frustrated with Emerson supporters (on and off the board) who pretend like this doesn’t have a price tag. The money cannot be “found”…the money is coming out of funds that could be used to give our children quality teachers and programs.
    And, for the record, in the end I did think it was right to keep Emerson open…mostly because the fight over that was distracting us from the bigger issue of classroom cuts. I hope the board and district staff give the same effort to trying to prevent those cuts as they did to keeping Emerson open.

  48. Anon

    I agree that every elementary school principal is needed. What a liability if someone was not on site when an emergency happened!
    That was a last minute idea to find the money to keep Emerson open. So, with that (appropriately) off the table, what are we going to do that can add up to $500 K? And, keep in mind, every dollar that we spend to keep Emerson open is a dollar that we could have spent to buy back a science teacher, a librarian, an English teacher, etc.
    I am mostly frustrated with Emerson supporters (on and off the board) who pretend like this doesn’t have a price tag. The money cannot be “found”…the money is coming out of funds that could be used to give our children quality teachers and programs.
    And, for the record, in the end I did think it was right to keep Emerson open…mostly because the fight over that was distracting us from the bigger issue of classroom cuts. I hope the board and district staff give the same effort to trying to prevent those cuts as they did to keeping Emerson open.

  49. Anonymous

    The question that keeps on coming back for me is where are they going to come up with this additional $600,000 that is needed? Is this merely a reserve cushion that they can ignore for a year or is this real money that we need to cut or the county is going to take over?

  50. Anonymous

    The question that keeps on coming back for me is where are they going to come up with this additional $600,000 that is needed? Is this merely a reserve cushion that they can ignore for a year or is this real money that we need to cut or the county is going to take over?

  51. Anonymous

    The question that keeps on coming back for me is where are they going to come up with this additional $600,000 that is needed? Is this merely a reserve cushion that they can ignore for a year or is this real money that we need to cut or the county is going to take over?

  52. Anonymous

    The question that keeps on coming back for me is where are they going to come up with this additional $600,000 that is needed? Is this merely a reserve cushion that they can ignore for a year or is this real money that we need to cut or the county is going to take over?

  53. New wrinkle

    I’m going to throw a new wrinkle into the mix. I just got an eyeful when visiting Pioneer High School in Woodland for the first time today. It is a beautiful new high school, made of brick, with a separate gym and a separate theater. The campus is huge, built directly across the street from a brand new shopping center.

    What I want to know is how does Woodland rate a fancy high school, and Davis doesn’t? If you don’t believe me, go and see it for yourself. It will make you absolutely green with envy. To get there, take 113 as if you are going to Woodland Mall. Take the Gibson Road exit, but turn right instead of left. Turn right again at Pioneer Ave. Pioneer High School is basically at the intersection of Gibson Rd. and Pioneer Ave.

    I have to really start wondering about decisions that have been made concerning our schools over the years. I remember DPD reporting on a comment Hammond made, about how shabby Davis schools look. You will see what Hammond means when you take a gander at Pioneer High. Something is very, very wrong here.

    Which brings to mind another inconsistency that doesn’t make sense to me. King High got a brand new brick building, to house how many kids? I believe it is 60. Is this correct? Can anyone verify this for me? Why an entire brick building to house only a relatively few kids, while we house other students in a dilapidated high school. Most of Davis High is made up of low slung huts. Many of our elementary schools look like beach shacks. I’m telling you, you have got to go see Pioneer High School. It is shocking…it will blow your mind!

    Then someone told me that Jim Provenza mentioned that one school in Davis that was recently built had a no bid contract on it. Provenza indicated he was the only Board member who expressed any concern, and voted against it. We know that at least one too many elementary schools were built, which caused the closure of Valley Oak. And remember, the School Board claimed declining enrollment, yet now insists enrollment will be level the next few years. Do you ever get the feeling there is voodoo economics going on here?

    Hammond grandstanding by offering to become an elementary school principal? What, is he going to take over five other positions to make up the $600,000 shortfall? I agree with some other comments here, this is not necessarily over for Emerson, its inevitable closure just postponed. And how many real administrators are going to get pink slipped, versus teachers and librarians?

    The anemic showing for the Davis School Foundation does not bode well for another parcel tax either. And can you blame the public for not wanting to fork over more money, after the last parcel tax was not used for what was promised?

    DPD, with his investigative reporting, has shown us one of the biggest problems. The School Board has approved the formation of schools from facilities funding (Karamatsu, Marguerite Montgomery, Harper) or grant money (DaVinci), when it does not necessarily have the money to run them. When questioned about the wisdom of those decisions, we always got the same answer – facilities money is different from money to run classrooms, as if that was any kind of justification.

    Developers are driving the decisionmaking with respect to our schools, promising them when building new housing. But did they get the OK from the School Board when making such promises? Or was the School Board just expected to somehow fund whatever schools were built. Remember, Wolk and Thompson went to bat for Marguerite Montgomery, to get a refund after the fact. But could we afford the money it would cost to run it. The answer is a resounding NO, NO, NO!

    As for Lovenberg and Harris, their political goose was cooked over the closing of Valley Oak. They were not about to make that same mistake again. Daleidan’s vote does not impress me in the least. This School Board, along with past ones, have not done their homework. The hope is that the Davis School Foundation is going to bail us out of all this mess. Not going to happen – no way. But it is not reasonable to expect it to. Even if we could have raised the $4.5 million shortfall this year, what about next year and the year after that? What happens when developers promise another school, and it is built despite a lack of funding to support it? How much can the public be expected to fork over year after year because the School Board/District refuses to be fiscally responsible?

    I agree with DPD – it is our complacency that has landed us in the soup. Emerson parents stood up, as did Valley Oak folks. The difference is Emerson parents had the luxury of hindsight, whereas Valley Oak folks did not. School closure is a horrible way to balance the budget. Wrest control away from the School Board, and hand it back to the parents and teachers by going charter. It may be the only way to save our schools, teachers, and students…otherwise, what next? Cut more teachers? Cut more programs? Crowd schools more?

  54. New wrinkle

    I’m going to throw a new wrinkle into the mix. I just got an eyeful when visiting Pioneer High School in Woodland for the first time today. It is a beautiful new high school, made of brick, with a separate gym and a separate theater. The campus is huge, built directly across the street from a brand new shopping center.

    What I want to know is how does Woodland rate a fancy high school, and Davis doesn’t? If you don’t believe me, go and see it for yourself. It will make you absolutely green with envy. To get there, take 113 as if you are going to Woodland Mall. Take the Gibson Road exit, but turn right instead of left. Turn right again at Pioneer Ave. Pioneer High School is basically at the intersection of Gibson Rd. and Pioneer Ave.

    I have to really start wondering about decisions that have been made concerning our schools over the years. I remember DPD reporting on a comment Hammond made, about how shabby Davis schools look. You will see what Hammond means when you take a gander at Pioneer High. Something is very, very wrong here.

    Which brings to mind another inconsistency that doesn’t make sense to me. King High got a brand new brick building, to house how many kids? I believe it is 60. Is this correct? Can anyone verify this for me? Why an entire brick building to house only a relatively few kids, while we house other students in a dilapidated high school. Most of Davis High is made up of low slung huts. Many of our elementary schools look like beach shacks. I’m telling you, you have got to go see Pioneer High School. It is shocking…it will blow your mind!

    Then someone told me that Jim Provenza mentioned that one school in Davis that was recently built had a no bid contract on it. Provenza indicated he was the only Board member who expressed any concern, and voted against it. We know that at least one too many elementary schools were built, which caused the closure of Valley Oak. And remember, the School Board claimed declining enrollment, yet now insists enrollment will be level the next few years. Do you ever get the feeling there is voodoo economics going on here?

    Hammond grandstanding by offering to become an elementary school principal? What, is he going to take over five other positions to make up the $600,000 shortfall? I agree with some other comments here, this is not necessarily over for Emerson, its inevitable closure just postponed. And how many real administrators are going to get pink slipped, versus teachers and librarians?

    The anemic showing for the Davis School Foundation does not bode well for another parcel tax either. And can you blame the public for not wanting to fork over more money, after the last parcel tax was not used for what was promised?

    DPD, with his investigative reporting, has shown us one of the biggest problems. The School Board has approved the formation of schools from facilities funding (Karamatsu, Marguerite Montgomery, Harper) or grant money (DaVinci), when it does not necessarily have the money to run them. When questioned about the wisdom of those decisions, we always got the same answer – facilities money is different from money to run classrooms, as if that was any kind of justification.

    Developers are driving the decisionmaking with respect to our schools, promising them when building new housing. But did they get the OK from the School Board when making such promises? Or was the School Board just expected to somehow fund whatever schools were built. Remember, Wolk and Thompson went to bat for Marguerite Montgomery, to get a refund after the fact. But could we afford the money it would cost to run it. The answer is a resounding NO, NO, NO!

    As for Lovenberg and Harris, their political goose was cooked over the closing of Valley Oak. They were not about to make that same mistake again. Daleidan’s vote does not impress me in the least. This School Board, along with past ones, have not done their homework. The hope is that the Davis School Foundation is going to bail us out of all this mess. Not going to happen – no way. But it is not reasonable to expect it to. Even if we could have raised the $4.5 million shortfall this year, what about next year and the year after that? What happens when developers promise another school, and it is built despite a lack of funding to support it? How much can the public be expected to fork over year after year because the School Board/District refuses to be fiscally responsible?

    I agree with DPD – it is our complacency that has landed us in the soup. Emerson parents stood up, as did Valley Oak folks. The difference is Emerson parents had the luxury of hindsight, whereas Valley Oak folks did not. School closure is a horrible way to balance the budget. Wrest control away from the School Board, and hand it back to the parents and teachers by going charter. It may be the only way to save our schools, teachers, and students…otherwise, what next? Cut more teachers? Cut more programs? Crowd schools more?

  55. New wrinkle

    I’m going to throw a new wrinkle into the mix. I just got an eyeful when visiting Pioneer High School in Woodland for the first time today. It is a beautiful new high school, made of brick, with a separate gym and a separate theater. The campus is huge, built directly across the street from a brand new shopping center.

    What I want to know is how does Woodland rate a fancy high school, and Davis doesn’t? If you don’t believe me, go and see it for yourself. It will make you absolutely green with envy. To get there, take 113 as if you are going to Woodland Mall. Take the Gibson Road exit, but turn right instead of left. Turn right again at Pioneer Ave. Pioneer High School is basically at the intersection of Gibson Rd. and Pioneer Ave.

    I have to really start wondering about decisions that have been made concerning our schools over the years. I remember DPD reporting on a comment Hammond made, about how shabby Davis schools look. You will see what Hammond means when you take a gander at Pioneer High. Something is very, very wrong here.

    Which brings to mind another inconsistency that doesn’t make sense to me. King High got a brand new brick building, to house how many kids? I believe it is 60. Is this correct? Can anyone verify this for me? Why an entire brick building to house only a relatively few kids, while we house other students in a dilapidated high school. Most of Davis High is made up of low slung huts. Many of our elementary schools look like beach shacks. I’m telling you, you have got to go see Pioneer High School. It is shocking…it will blow your mind!

    Then someone told me that Jim Provenza mentioned that one school in Davis that was recently built had a no bid contract on it. Provenza indicated he was the only Board member who expressed any concern, and voted against it. We know that at least one too many elementary schools were built, which caused the closure of Valley Oak. And remember, the School Board claimed declining enrollment, yet now insists enrollment will be level the next few years. Do you ever get the feeling there is voodoo economics going on here?

    Hammond grandstanding by offering to become an elementary school principal? What, is he going to take over five other positions to make up the $600,000 shortfall? I agree with some other comments here, this is not necessarily over for Emerson, its inevitable closure just postponed. And how many real administrators are going to get pink slipped, versus teachers and librarians?

    The anemic showing for the Davis School Foundation does not bode well for another parcel tax either. And can you blame the public for not wanting to fork over more money, after the last parcel tax was not used for what was promised?

    DPD, with his investigative reporting, has shown us one of the biggest problems. The School Board has approved the formation of schools from facilities funding (Karamatsu, Marguerite Montgomery, Harper) or grant money (DaVinci), when it does not necessarily have the money to run them. When questioned about the wisdom of those decisions, we always got the same answer – facilities money is different from money to run classrooms, as if that was any kind of justification.

    Developers are driving the decisionmaking with respect to our schools, promising them when building new housing. But did they get the OK from the School Board when making such promises? Or was the School Board just expected to somehow fund whatever schools were built. Remember, Wolk and Thompson went to bat for Marguerite Montgomery, to get a refund after the fact. But could we afford the money it would cost to run it. The answer is a resounding NO, NO, NO!

    As for Lovenberg and Harris, their political goose was cooked over the closing of Valley Oak. They were not about to make that same mistake again. Daleidan’s vote does not impress me in the least. This School Board, along with past ones, have not done their homework. The hope is that the Davis School Foundation is going to bail us out of all this mess. Not going to happen – no way. But it is not reasonable to expect it to. Even if we could have raised the $4.5 million shortfall this year, what about next year and the year after that? What happens when developers promise another school, and it is built despite a lack of funding to support it? How much can the public be expected to fork over year after year because the School Board/District refuses to be fiscally responsible?

    I agree with DPD – it is our complacency that has landed us in the soup. Emerson parents stood up, as did Valley Oak folks. The difference is Emerson parents had the luxury of hindsight, whereas Valley Oak folks did not. School closure is a horrible way to balance the budget. Wrest control away from the School Board, and hand it back to the parents and teachers by going charter. It may be the only way to save our schools, teachers, and students…otherwise, what next? Cut more teachers? Cut more programs? Crowd schools more?

  56. New wrinkle

    I’m going to throw a new wrinkle into the mix. I just got an eyeful when visiting Pioneer High School in Woodland for the first time today. It is a beautiful new high school, made of brick, with a separate gym and a separate theater. The campus is huge, built directly across the street from a brand new shopping center.

    What I want to know is how does Woodland rate a fancy high school, and Davis doesn’t? If you don’t believe me, go and see it for yourself. It will make you absolutely green with envy. To get there, take 113 as if you are going to Woodland Mall. Take the Gibson Road exit, but turn right instead of left. Turn right again at Pioneer Ave. Pioneer High School is basically at the intersection of Gibson Rd. and Pioneer Ave.

    I have to really start wondering about decisions that have been made concerning our schools over the years. I remember DPD reporting on a comment Hammond made, about how shabby Davis schools look. You will see what Hammond means when you take a gander at Pioneer High. Something is very, very wrong here.

    Which brings to mind another inconsistency that doesn’t make sense to me. King High got a brand new brick building, to house how many kids? I believe it is 60. Is this correct? Can anyone verify this for me? Why an entire brick building to house only a relatively few kids, while we house other students in a dilapidated high school. Most of Davis High is made up of low slung huts. Many of our elementary schools look like beach shacks. I’m telling you, you have got to go see Pioneer High School. It is shocking…it will blow your mind!

    Then someone told me that Jim Provenza mentioned that one school in Davis that was recently built had a no bid contract on it. Provenza indicated he was the only Board member who expressed any concern, and voted against it. We know that at least one too many elementary schools were built, which caused the closure of Valley Oak. And remember, the School Board claimed declining enrollment, yet now insists enrollment will be level the next few years. Do you ever get the feeling there is voodoo economics going on here?

    Hammond grandstanding by offering to become an elementary school principal? What, is he going to take over five other positions to make up the $600,000 shortfall? I agree with some other comments here, this is not necessarily over for Emerson, its inevitable closure just postponed. And how many real administrators are going to get pink slipped, versus teachers and librarians?

    The anemic showing for the Davis School Foundation does not bode well for another parcel tax either. And can you blame the public for not wanting to fork over more money, after the last parcel tax was not used for what was promised?

    DPD, with his investigative reporting, has shown us one of the biggest problems. The School Board has approved the formation of schools from facilities funding (Karamatsu, Marguerite Montgomery, Harper) or grant money (DaVinci), when it does not necessarily have the money to run them. When questioned about the wisdom of those decisions, we always got the same answer – facilities money is different from money to run classrooms, as if that was any kind of justification.

    Developers are driving the decisionmaking with respect to our schools, promising them when building new housing. But did they get the OK from the School Board when making such promises? Or was the School Board just expected to somehow fund whatever schools were built. Remember, Wolk and Thompson went to bat for Marguerite Montgomery, to get a refund after the fact. But could we afford the money it would cost to run it. The answer is a resounding NO, NO, NO!

    As for Lovenberg and Harris, their political goose was cooked over the closing of Valley Oak. They were not about to make that same mistake again. Daleidan’s vote does not impress me in the least. This School Board, along with past ones, have not done their homework. The hope is that the Davis School Foundation is going to bail us out of all this mess. Not going to happen – no way. But it is not reasonable to expect it to. Even if we could have raised the $4.5 million shortfall this year, what about next year and the year after that? What happens when developers promise another school, and it is built despite a lack of funding to support it? How much can the public be expected to fork over year after year because the School Board/District refuses to be fiscally responsible?

    I agree with DPD – it is our complacency that has landed us in the soup. Emerson parents stood up, as did Valley Oak folks. The difference is Emerson parents had the luxury of hindsight, whereas Valley Oak folks did not. School closure is a horrible way to balance the budget. Wrest control away from the School Board, and hand it back to the parents and teachers by going charter. It may be the only way to save our schools, teachers, and students…otherwise, what next? Cut more teachers? Cut more programs? Crowd schools more?

  57. school daze

    “As for Lovenberg and Harris, their political goose was cooked over the closing of Valley Oak. They were not about to make that same mistake again.”

    They were not even on the board when that decision was made. They both ran on a platform of supporting the decision and were elected, UNLIKE the two candidates who ran on a platform of opposing it, Schelen and Spector. So it’s not clear what you are talking about here.

    You are right about Pioneer, but have you seen Woodland’s other, older high school – Woodland High? Go check that out and have your mind blown in the completely opposite direction. It looks like a prison. No joke. It’s made up entirely of separate “blocks” with no windows. It’s the most frightening school architecture I’ve seen in my life. The juvenile detention facility in Sacramento is far nicer looking.

  58. school daze

    “As for Lovenberg and Harris, their political goose was cooked over the closing of Valley Oak. They were not about to make that same mistake again.”

    They were not even on the board when that decision was made. They both ran on a platform of supporting the decision and were elected, UNLIKE the two candidates who ran on a platform of opposing it, Schelen and Spector. So it’s not clear what you are talking about here.

    You are right about Pioneer, but have you seen Woodland’s other, older high school – Woodland High? Go check that out and have your mind blown in the completely opposite direction. It looks like a prison. No joke. It’s made up entirely of separate “blocks” with no windows. It’s the most frightening school architecture I’ve seen in my life. The juvenile detention facility in Sacramento is far nicer looking.

  59. school daze

    “As for Lovenberg and Harris, their political goose was cooked over the closing of Valley Oak. They were not about to make that same mistake again.”

    They were not even on the board when that decision was made. They both ran on a platform of supporting the decision and were elected, UNLIKE the two candidates who ran on a platform of opposing it, Schelen and Spector. So it’s not clear what you are talking about here.

    You are right about Pioneer, but have you seen Woodland’s other, older high school – Woodland High? Go check that out and have your mind blown in the completely opposite direction. It looks like a prison. No joke. It’s made up entirely of separate “blocks” with no windows. It’s the most frightening school architecture I’ve seen in my life. The juvenile detention facility in Sacramento is far nicer looking.

  60. school daze

    “As for Lovenberg and Harris, their political goose was cooked over the closing of Valley Oak. They were not about to make that same mistake again.”

    They were not even on the board when that decision was made. They both ran on a platform of supporting the decision and were elected, UNLIKE the two candidates who ran on a platform of opposing it, Schelen and Spector. So it’s not clear what you are talking about here.

    You are right about Pioneer, but have you seen Woodland’s other, older high school – Woodland High? Go check that out and have your mind blown in the completely opposite direction. It looks like a prison. No joke. It’s made up entirely of separate “blocks” with no windows. It’s the most frightening school architecture I’ve seen in my life. The juvenile detention facility in Sacramento is far nicer looking.

  61. Go live in Woodland then

    Pioneer High has a HUGE gang problem. Woodland High is currently the calmer of the two schools in Woodland. The building does not make the school. We have a fairly nice High School – Davis High. We have consistently higher rates of graduation, higher rates of students going on to college, higher test scores, low drop out rates. So again, the building does not make the school. Last year, two Woodland teens shot a student on the sidewalk in front of the school, right across the street from the brand new shopping center, right in front of the new buildings. There are fights every week at Pioneer High School. Again, the building does not make the school. Pioneer has had three principals in as many years. Again, the building does not make the school.

    What Woodland has that Davis could have – two high schools of about 1500-1600 students each. We could do that with making Harper a High School. Then you’d have your bright new High School that you think our students deserve. The portable buildings at DHS could be removed.

    King High has 84 students currently in one building roughly the size of the portable it replaced. This new building replaced one large portable that was purchased over 35 years ago for that school. I think 35 years in the same portable building is sufficient time for this school to wait for a permanent building. The need has been there for a long time, but the community built elementary school after elementary school first.

    We had a chance to really fix Davis High School, but, remember, we voted down that bond. Instead, we waited another year or two and voted for something smaller and more piecemeal. The Blue & White Foundation has been fundraising forever, it seems, to fix the football stadium, put lights on the soccer field, etc. But support is only slowly coming along for this. The community is just not that interested or feels other projects are more important.

    It is not the administration. It’s us and our priorities.

  62. Go live in Woodland then

    Pioneer High has a HUGE gang problem. Woodland High is currently the calmer of the two schools in Woodland. The building does not make the school. We have a fairly nice High School – Davis High. We have consistently higher rates of graduation, higher rates of students going on to college, higher test scores, low drop out rates. So again, the building does not make the school. Last year, two Woodland teens shot a student on the sidewalk in front of the school, right across the street from the brand new shopping center, right in front of the new buildings. There are fights every week at Pioneer High School. Again, the building does not make the school. Pioneer has had three principals in as many years. Again, the building does not make the school.

    What Woodland has that Davis could have – two high schools of about 1500-1600 students each. We could do that with making Harper a High School. Then you’d have your bright new High School that you think our students deserve. The portable buildings at DHS could be removed.

    King High has 84 students currently in one building roughly the size of the portable it replaced. This new building replaced one large portable that was purchased over 35 years ago for that school. I think 35 years in the same portable building is sufficient time for this school to wait for a permanent building. The need has been there for a long time, but the community built elementary school after elementary school first.

    We had a chance to really fix Davis High School, but, remember, we voted down that bond. Instead, we waited another year or two and voted for something smaller and more piecemeal. The Blue & White Foundation has been fundraising forever, it seems, to fix the football stadium, put lights on the soccer field, etc. But support is only slowly coming along for this. The community is just not that interested or feels other projects are more important.

    It is not the administration. It’s us and our priorities.

  63. Go live in Woodland then

    Pioneer High has a HUGE gang problem. Woodland High is currently the calmer of the two schools in Woodland. The building does not make the school. We have a fairly nice High School – Davis High. We have consistently higher rates of graduation, higher rates of students going on to college, higher test scores, low drop out rates. So again, the building does not make the school. Last year, two Woodland teens shot a student on the sidewalk in front of the school, right across the street from the brand new shopping center, right in front of the new buildings. There are fights every week at Pioneer High School. Again, the building does not make the school. Pioneer has had three principals in as many years. Again, the building does not make the school.

    What Woodland has that Davis could have – two high schools of about 1500-1600 students each. We could do that with making Harper a High School. Then you’d have your bright new High School that you think our students deserve. The portable buildings at DHS could be removed.

    King High has 84 students currently in one building roughly the size of the portable it replaced. This new building replaced one large portable that was purchased over 35 years ago for that school. I think 35 years in the same portable building is sufficient time for this school to wait for a permanent building. The need has been there for a long time, but the community built elementary school after elementary school first.

    We had a chance to really fix Davis High School, but, remember, we voted down that bond. Instead, we waited another year or two and voted for something smaller and more piecemeal. The Blue & White Foundation has been fundraising forever, it seems, to fix the football stadium, put lights on the soccer field, etc. But support is only slowly coming along for this. The community is just not that interested or feels other projects are more important.

    It is not the administration. It’s us and our priorities.

  64. Go live in Woodland then

    Pioneer High has a HUGE gang problem. Woodland High is currently the calmer of the two schools in Woodland. The building does not make the school. We have a fairly nice High School – Davis High. We have consistently higher rates of graduation, higher rates of students going on to college, higher test scores, low drop out rates. So again, the building does not make the school. Last year, two Woodland teens shot a student on the sidewalk in front of the school, right across the street from the brand new shopping center, right in front of the new buildings. There are fights every week at Pioneer High School. Again, the building does not make the school. Pioneer has had three principals in as many years. Again, the building does not make the school.

    What Woodland has that Davis could have – two high schools of about 1500-1600 students each. We could do that with making Harper a High School. Then you’d have your bright new High School that you think our students deserve. The portable buildings at DHS could be removed.

    King High has 84 students currently in one building roughly the size of the portable it replaced. This new building replaced one large portable that was purchased over 35 years ago for that school. I think 35 years in the same portable building is sufficient time for this school to wait for a permanent building. The need has been there for a long time, but the community built elementary school after elementary school first.

    We had a chance to really fix Davis High School, but, remember, we voted down that bond. Instead, we waited another year or two and voted for something smaller and more piecemeal. The Blue & White Foundation has been fundraising forever, it seems, to fix the football stadium, put lights on the soccer field, etc. But support is only slowly coming along for this. The community is just not that interested or feels other projects are more important.

    It is not the administration. It’s us and our priorities.

  65. go live in Woodland then

    Also, the Sacramento Juvenile facility is not “nice looking” – it is hell. I believe that each and everyone of the kids in that facility would absolutely love Woodland High as an alternative.

  66. go live in Woodland then

    Also, the Sacramento Juvenile facility is not “nice looking” – it is hell. I believe that each and everyone of the kids in that facility would absolutely love Woodland High as an alternative.

  67. go live in Woodland then

    Also, the Sacramento Juvenile facility is not “nice looking” – it is hell. I believe that each and everyone of the kids in that facility would absolutely love Woodland High as an alternative.

  68. go live in Woodland then

    Also, the Sacramento Juvenile facility is not “nice looking” – it is hell. I believe that each and everyone of the kids in that facility would absolutely love Woodland High as an alternative.

  69. Anonymous

    I honestly have no problem with shutting down Emerson. I live pretty much next door to it, but have biked to Holmes every possible day, including many in the rain. Also, I can say as a DHS student that Emerson undoubtedly has the reputation among students for being a “stoner school” as well as a having a disciplinary system that makes Stalin look like a softie. The main concern of parents apparently is getting their kids to Holmes, but I see absolutely no issue with kids getting a little more excersise in this time of ever-growing waistlines. As for the safety, I, who am not exacty a model biker, have never seen or gotten into a bike-car accident. The small sacrifice of some extra excersise is a trifle compared to what cutting $600,000 would do to our district.

  70. Anonymous

    I honestly have no problem with shutting down Emerson. I live pretty much next door to it, but have biked to Holmes every possible day, including many in the rain. Also, I can say as a DHS student that Emerson undoubtedly has the reputation among students for being a “stoner school” as well as a having a disciplinary system that makes Stalin look like a softie. The main concern of parents apparently is getting their kids to Holmes, but I see absolutely no issue with kids getting a little more excersise in this time of ever-growing waistlines. As for the safety, I, who am not exacty a model biker, have never seen or gotten into a bike-car accident. The small sacrifice of some extra excersise is a trifle compared to what cutting $600,000 would do to our district.

  71. Anonymous

    I honestly have no problem with shutting down Emerson. I live pretty much next door to it, but have biked to Holmes every possible day, including many in the rain. Also, I can say as a DHS student that Emerson undoubtedly has the reputation among students for being a “stoner school” as well as a having a disciplinary system that makes Stalin look like a softie. The main concern of parents apparently is getting their kids to Holmes, but I see absolutely no issue with kids getting a little more excersise in this time of ever-growing waistlines. As for the safety, I, who am not exacty a model biker, have never seen or gotten into a bike-car accident. The small sacrifice of some extra excersise is a trifle compared to what cutting $600,000 would do to our district.

  72. Anonymous

    I honestly have no problem with shutting down Emerson. I live pretty much next door to it, but have biked to Holmes every possible day, including many in the rain. Also, I can say as a DHS student that Emerson undoubtedly has the reputation among students for being a “stoner school” as well as a having a disciplinary system that makes Stalin look like a softie. The main concern of parents apparently is getting their kids to Holmes, but I see absolutely no issue with kids getting a little more excersise in this time of ever-growing waistlines. As for the safety, I, who am not exacty a model biker, have never seen or gotten into a bike-car accident. The small sacrifice of some extra excersise is a trifle compared to what cutting $600,000 would do to our district.

  73. Black Bart

    I recently was in a meeting with the Superintendent of Woodland Joint Unified School District where she announced no teacher layoffs this year. One first year teacher expressed his thanks that the axe did not fall.

    The Superintendent gave the credit to the Chief Budget Officer for WJUSD claiming the CBO’s efforts over her 18 year tenure has left the district in good financial shape.

    When I heard this I couldn’t help but think of DPD’s coverage of the nonsense in the CBO’s office in Davis. So it turns out that leadership does matter.

    As for all those negative things people have said about Woodland schools many of the differences with success rates can be attributed to the educational level of the parents and nothing more. Other things, like the drop out rates which are not all that different between the two districts, are more representative of the writers biases then they are of anything else. Still I think you are going to see improvement in the Woodland schools in the coming years as the reforms made by the current trustees and administration start to show up. Additionally, hiring the best pink slipped teachers as openings occur will help too.

    Finally the snobby tone of some of the comments about the Woodland schools reminds me of the time the kids in Davis were losing to Woodland and the Davis kids started chanting “That’s alright, that’s ok, you’re going to work for us one day.” (Of course in multicultural California this may not be true)As we like to say in education the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.

  74. Black Bart

    I recently was in a meeting with the Superintendent of Woodland Joint Unified School District where she announced no teacher layoffs this year. One first year teacher expressed his thanks that the axe did not fall.

    The Superintendent gave the credit to the Chief Budget Officer for WJUSD claiming the CBO’s efforts over her 18 year tenure has left the district in good financial shape.

    When I heard this I couldn’t help but think of DPD’s coverage of the nonsense in the CBO’s office in Davis. So it turns out that leadership does matter.

    As for all those negative things people have said about Woodland schools many of the differences with success rates can be attributed to the educational level of the parents and nothing more. Other things, like the drop out rates which are not all that different between the two districts, are more representative of the writers biases then they are of anything else. Still I think you are going to see improvement in the Woodland schools in the coming years as the reforms made by the current trustees and administration start to show up. Additionally, hiring the best pink slipped teachers as openings occur will help too.

    Finally the snobby tone of some of the comments about the Woodland schools reminds me of the time the kids in Davis were losing to Woodland and the Davis kids started chanting “That’s alright, that’s ok, you’re going to work for us one day.” (Of course in multicultural California this may not be true)As we like to say in education the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.

  75. Black Bart

    I recently was in a meeting with the Superintendent of Woodland Joint Unified School District where she announced no teacher layoffs this year. One first year teacher expressed his thanks that the axe did not fall.

    The Superintendent gave the credit to the Chief Budget Officer for WJUSD claiming the CBO’s efforts over her 18 year tenure has left the district in good financial shape.

    When I heard this I couldn’t help but think of DPD’s coverage of the nonsense in the CBO’s office in Davis. So it turns out that leadership does matter.

    As for all those negative things people have said about Woodland schools many of the differences with success rates can be attributed to the educational level of the parents and nothing more. Other things, like the drop out rates which are not all that different between the two districts, are more representative of the writers biases then they are of anything else. Still I think you are going to see improvement in the Woodland schools in the coming years as the reforms made by the current trustees and administration start to show up. Additionally, hiring the best pink slipped teachers as openings occur will help too.

    Finally the snobby tone of some of the comments about the Woodland schools reminds me of the time the kids in Davis were losing to Woodland and the Davis kids started chanting “That’s alright, that’s ok, you’re going to work for us one day.” (Of course in multicultural California this may not be true)As we like to say in education the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.

  76. Black Bart

    I recently was in a meeting with the Superintendent of Woodland Joint Unified School District where she announced no teacher layoffs this year. One first year teacher expressed his thanks that the axe did not fall.

    The Superintendent gave the credit to the Chief Budget Officer for WJUSD claiming the CBO’s efforts over her 18 year tenure has left the district in good financial shape.

    When I heard this I couldn’t help but think of DPD’s coverage of the nonsense in the CBO’s office in Davis. So it turns out that leadership does matter.

    As for all those negative things people have said about Woodland schools many of the differences with success rates can be attributed to the educational level of the parents and nothing more. Other things, like the drop out rates which are not all that different between the two districts, are more representative of the writers biases then they are of anything else. Still I think you are going to see improvement in the Woodland schools in the coming years as the reforms made by the current trustees and administration start to show up. Additionally, hiring the best pink slipped teachers as openings occur will help too.

    Finally the snobby tone of some of the comments about the Woodland schools reminds me of the time the kids in Davis were losing to Woodland and the Davis kids started chanting “That’s alright, that’s ok, you’re going to work for us one day.” (Of course in multicultural California this may not be true)As we like to say in education the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.

  77. #1

    “Black Bart said…
    I recently was in a meeting with the Superintendent of Woodland Joint Unified School District where she announced no teacher layoffs this year. One first year teacher expressed his thanks that the axe did not fall.”

    I am happy for Woodland that things are not as bad there.

    But I understand, from discussions w/ a teacher friend who works there, that there aren’t as many course offerings and “frills” in Woodland schools — elementary science teachers? large array of foreign languages? credentialed librarians.

    Maybe once all those wonderful course offerings get cut back, then we’ll be on solid financial footing, and just like Woodland!

  78. #1

    “Black Bart said…
    I recently was in a meeting with the Superintendent of Woodland Joint Unified School District where she announced no teacher layoffs this year. One first year teacher expressed his thanks that the axe did not fall.”

    I am happy for Woodland that things are not as bad there.

    But I understand, from discussions w/ a teacher friend who works there, that there aren’t as many course offerings and “frills” in Woodland schools — elementary science teachers? large array of foreign languages? credentialed librarians.

    Maybe once all those wonderful course offerings get cut back, then we’ll be on solid financial footing, and just like Woodland!

  79. #1

    “Black Bart said…
    I recently was in a meeting with the Superintendent of Woodland Joint Unified School District where she announced no teacher layoffs this year. One first year teacher expressed his thanks that the axe did not fall.”

    I am happy for Woodland that things are not as bad there.

    But I understand, from discussions w/ a teacher friend who works there, that there aren’t as many course offerings and “frills” in Woodland schools — elementary science teachers? large array of foreign languages? credentialed librarians.

    Maybe once all those wonderful course offerings get cut back, then we’ll be on solid financial footing, and just like Woodland!

  80. #1

    “Black Bart said…
    I recently was in a meeting with the Superintendent of Woodland Joint Unified School District where she announced no teacher layoffs this year. One first year teacher expressed his thanks that the axe did not fall.”

    I am happy for Woodland that things are not as bad there.

    But I understand, from discussions w/ a teacher friend who works there, that there aren’t as many course offerings and “frills” in Woodland schools — elementary science teachers? large array of foreign languages? credentialed librarians.

    Maybe once all those wonderful course offerings get cut back, then we’ll be on solid financial footing, and just like Woodland!

  81. Anonymous

    “New wrinkle is incorrect in saying: “…after the last parcel tax was not used for what was promised?” What is your evidence of that? The parcel tax is being spent exactly as promised. It’s simply not enough. The budget would be much worse without it..

  82. Anonymous

    “New wrinkle is incorrect in saying: “…after the last parcel tax was not used for what was promised?” What is your evidence of that? The parcel tax is being spent exactly as promised. It’s simply not enough. The budget would be much worse without it..

  83. Anonymous

    “New wrinkle is incorrect in saying: “…after the last parcel tax was not used for what was promised?” What is your evidence of that? The parcel tax is being spent exactly as promised. It’s simply not enough. The budget would be much worse without it..

  84. Anonymous

    “New wrinkle is incorrect in saying: “…after the last parcel tax was not used for what was promised?” What is your evidence of that? The parcel tax is being spent exactly as promised. It’s simply not enough. The budget would be much worse without it..

  85. Anonymous

    I’m glad Emerson is going to remain open too. Schools should not be closed absent extreme and compelling circumstances (like plummeting enrollment). The Education Code states this clearly which is why it mandates a transparent process requiring neighborhood involvment. Moreover, it’s a bread and butter issue with many collateral effects. The spectre of kids in West Davis being too fat is nothing more than a dark fantasy with no bearing on reality. It’s also a “red herring”, and actually sounds alot like a grumpy old man whining post-facto about walking thru snowdrifts when he was 10 to get to school. The DJUSD school district will limp along until the passage of the next school bond in November (better call Freddie Oakley soon, hint, hint), and the school board with Hammond at it’s helm can go about exercising some crowd control when vocal minorities cry for yet another special program, or expansion of an existing one. That would be a refreshing change from the pattern of unjustifiable capitulation we’ve seen for some time and a good start at getting “in front” of foreseeable problems.

  86. Anonymous

    I’m glad Emerson is going to remain open too. Schools should not be closed absent extreme and compelling circumstances (like plummeting enrollment). The Education Code states this clearly which is why it mandates a transparent process requiring neighborhood involvment. Moreover, it’s a bread and butter issue with many collateral effects. The spectre of kids in West Davis being too fat is nothing more than a dark fantasy with no bearing on reality. It’s also a “red herring”, and actually sounds alot like a grumpy old man whining post-facto about walking thru snowdrifts when he was 10 to get to school. The DJUSD school district will limp along until the passage of the next school bond in November (better call Freddie Oakley soon, hint, hint), and the school board with Hammond at it’s helm can go about exercising some crowd control when vocal minorities cry for yet another special program, or expansion of an existing one. That would be a refreshing change from the pattern of unjustifiable capitulation we’ve seen for some time and a good start at getting “in front” of foreseeable problems.

  87. Anonymous

    I’m glad Emerson is going to remain open too. Schools should not be closed absent extreme and compelling circumstances (like plummeting enrollment). The Education Code states this clearly which is why it mandates a transparent process requiring neighborhood involvment. Moreover, it’s a bread and butter issue with many collateral effects. The spectre of kids in West Davis being too fat is nothing more than a dark fantasy with no bearing on reality. It’s also a “red herring”, and actually sounds alot like a grumpy old man whining post-facto about walking thru snowdrifts when he was 10 to get to school. The DJUSD school district will limp along until the passage of the next school bond in November (better call Freddie Oakley soon, hint, hint), and the school board with Hammond at it’s helm can go about exercising some crowd control when vocal minorities cry for yet another special program, or expansion of an existing one. That would be a refreshing change from the pattern of unjustifiable capitulation we’ve seen for some time and a good start at getting “in front” of foreseeable problems.

  88. Anonymous

    I’m glad Emerson is going to remain open too. Schools should not be closed absent extreme and compelling circumstances (like plummeting enrollment). The Education Code states this clearly which is why it mandates a transparent process requiring neighborhood involvment. Moreover, it’s a bread and butter issue with many collateral effects. The spectre of kids in West Davis being too fat is nothing more than a dark fantasy with no bearing on reality. It’s also a “red herring”, and actually sounds alot like a grumpy old man whining post-facto about walking thru snowdrifts when he was 10 to get to school. The DJUSD school district will limp along until the passage of the next school bond in November (better call Freddie Oakley soon, hint, hint), and the school board with Hammond at it’s helm can go about exercising some crowd control when vocal minorities cry for yet another special program, or expansion of an existing one. That would be a refreshing change from the pattern of unjustifiable capitulation we’ve seen for some time and a good start at getting “in front” of foreseeable problems.

  89. Anonymous

    Shouldn’t we be concerned that the school board seems to be banking on the promise that private fundraising via Davis Schools Foundation is going to bail them out? And there seems to be a lot of hope for the Budget May Revise. What if these wishes don’t come true?

    Keeping Emerson open is fine, but where is that other $600,000 going to come from?

  90. Anonymous

    Shouldn’t we be concerned that the school board seems to be banking on the promise that private fundraising via Davis Schools Foundation is going to bail them out? And there seems to be a lot of hope for the Budget May Revise. What if these wishes don’t come true?

    Keeping Emerson open is fine, but where is that other $600,000 going to come from?

  91. Anonymous

    Shouldn’t we be concerned that the school board seems to be banking on the promise that private fundraising via Davis Schools Foundation is going to bail them out? And there seems to be a lot of hope for the Budget May Revise. What if these wishes don’t come true?

    Keeping Emerson open is fine, but where is that other $600,000 going to come from?

  92. Anonymous

    Shouldn’t we be concerned that the school board seems to be banking on the promise that private fundraising via Davis Schools Foundation is going to bail them out? And there seems to be a lot of hope for the Budget May Revise. What if these wishes don’t come true?

    Keeping Emerson open is fine, but where is that other $600,000 going to come from?

  93. #1

    “Anonymous said…
    Shouldn’t we be concerned that the school board seems to be banking on the promise that private fundraising via Davis Schools Foundation is going to bail them out? And there seems to be a lot of hope for the Budget May Revise. What if these wishes don’t come true?

    Keeping Emerson open is fine, but where is that other $600,000 going to come from?”

    That’s a good point. But I also think there were a number of families who were feeling a little too anxious w/ the uncertainties of reorganization to donate to DSF.

    This decision may keep the focus a little more on fundraising for the teacher cuts.

  94. #1

    “Anonymous said…
    Shouldn’t we be concerned that the school board seems to be banking on the promise that private fundraising via Davis Schools Foundation is going to bail them out? And there seems to be a lot of hope for the Budget May Revise. What if these wishes don’t come true?

    Keeping Emerson open is fine, but where is that other $600,000 going to come from?”

    That’s a good point. But I also think there were a number of families who were feeling a little too anxious w/ the uncertainties of reorganization to donate to DSF.

    This decision may keep the focus a little more on fundraising for the teacher cuts.

  95. #1

    “Anonymous said…
    Shouldn’t we be concerned that the school board seems to be banking on the promise that private fundraising via Davis Schools Foundation is going to bail them out? And there seems to be a lot of hope for the Budget May Revise. What if these wishes don’t come true?

    Keeping Emerson open is fine, but where is that other $600,000 going to come from?”

    That’s a good point. But I also think there were a number of families who were feeling a little too anxious w/ the uncertainties of reorganization to donate to DSF.

    This decision may keep the focus a little more on fundraising for the teacher cuts.

  96. #1

    “Anonymous said…
    Shouldn’t we be concerned that the school board seems to be banking on the promise that private fundraising via Davis Schools Foundation is going to bail them out? And there seems to be a lot of hope for the Budget May Revise. What if these wishes don’t come true?

    Keeping Emerson open is fine, but where is that other $600,000 going to come from?”

    That’s a good point. But I also think there were a number of families who were feeling a little too anxious w/ the uncertainties of reorganization to donate to DSF.

    This decision may keep the focus a little more on fundraising for the teacher cuts.

  97. Anonymous

    6:44 PM
    “Pioneer High has a HUGE gang problem. Woodland High is currently the calmer of the two schools in Woodland. The building does not make the school. We have a fairly nice High School – Davis High. We have consistently higher rates of graduation, higher rates of students going on to college, higher test scores, low drop out rates. So again, the building does not make the school. Last year, two Woodland teens shot a student on the sidewalk in front of the school, right across the street from the brand new shopping center, right in front of the new buildings. There are fights every week at Pioneer High School. Again, the building does not make the school. Pioneer has had three principals in as many years. Again, the building does not make the school.”

    Wow! Scary. Does the fact that this is untrue matter at all? Yes, Pioneer has a gang problem. It’s principally because Woodland is a diverse community. Davis is not. No, no one was shot across from the school. But Pioneer High School is safe and they are on top of the gang problem. There are not fights every week. And yes, Davis educational attainment is higher. Why wouldn’t it be with your demographics and the education levels in the town?

    Still, all in all, my kids go to schools with kids from different cultures and they’re learning to live in a diverse community. It’s a shame that you can’t say the same…

  98. Anonymous

    6:44 PM
    “Pioneer High has a HUGE gang problem. Woodland High is currently the calmer of the two schools in Woodland. The building does not make the school. We have a fairly nice High School – Davis High. We have consistently higher rates of graduation, higher rates of students going on to college, higher test scores, low drop out rates. So again, the building does not make the school. Last year, two Woodland teens shot a student on the sidewalk in front of the school, right across the street from the brand new shopping center, right in front of the new buildings. There are fights every week at Pioneer High School. Again, the building does not make the school. Pioneer has had three principals in as many years. Again, the building does not make the school.”

    Wow! Scary. Does the fact that this is untrue matter at all? Yes, Pioneer has a gang problem. It’s principally because Woodland is a diverse community. Davis is not. No, no one was shot across from the school. But Pioneer High School is safe and they are on top of the gang problem. There are not fights every week. And yes, Davis educational attainment is higher. Why wouldn’t it be with your demographics and the education levels in the town?

    Still, all in all, my kids go to schools with kids from different cultures and they’re learning to live in a diverse community. It’s a shame that you can’t say the same…

  99. Anonymous

    6:44 PM
    “Pioneer High has a HUGE gang problem. Woodland High is currently the calmer of the two schools in Woodland. The building does not make the school. We have a fairly nice High School – Davis High. We have consistently higher rates of graduation, higher rates of students going on to college, higher test scores, low drop out rates. So again, the building does not make the school. Last year, two Woodland teens shot a student on the sidewalk in front of the school, right across the street from the brand new shopping center, right in front of the new buildings. There are fights every week at Pioneer High School. Again, the building does not make the school. Pioneer has had three principals in as many years. Again, the building does not make the school.”

    Wow! Scary. Does the fact that this is untrue matter at all? Yes, Pioneer has a gang problem. It’s principally because Woodland is a diverse community. Davis is not. No, no one was shot across from the school. But Pioneer High School is safe and they are on top of the gang problem. There are not fights every week. And yes, Davis educational attainment is higher. Why wouldn’t it be with your demographics and the education levels in the town?

    Still, all in all, my kids go to schools with kids from different cultures and they’re learning to live in a diverse community. It’s a shame that you can’t say the same…

  100. Anonymous

    6:44 PM
    “Pioneer High has a HUGE gang problem. Woodland High is currently the calmer of the two schools in Woodland. The building does not make the school. We have a fairly nice High School – Davis High. We have consistently higher rates of graduation, higher rates of students going on to college, higher test scores, low drop out rates. So again, the building does not make the school. Last year, two Woodland teens shot a student on the sidewalk in front of the school, right across the street from the brand new shopping center, right in front of the new buildings. There are fights every week at Pioneer High School. Again, the building does not make the school. Pioneer has had three principals in as many years. Again, the building does not make the school.”

    Wow! Scary. Does the fact that this is untrue matter at all? Yes, Pioneer has a gang problem. It’s principally because Woodland is a diverse community. Davis is not. No, no one was shot across from the school. But Pioneer High School is safe and they are on top of the gang problem. There are not fights every week. And yes, Davis educational attainment is higher. Why wouldn’t it be with your demographics and the education levels in the town?

    Still, all in all, my kids go to schools with kids from different cultures and they’re learning to live in a diverse community. It’s a shame that you can’t say the same…

  101. Anonymous

    One of the perpatrators in the Pioneer High shooting, the one that was an adult got a very long sentence. I think it is important to note that the criminal justice system is not going to tolerate conduct of that nature. If you think Davis is soehow insulated from youth violence you are living in never never land. Just thank god that the kid who brought the shotgun to Davis High didn’t shoot anyone.

  102. Anonymous

    One of the perpatrators in the Pioneer High shooting, the one that was an adult got a very long sentence. I think it is important to note that the criminal justice system is not going to tolerate conduct of that nature. If you think Davis is soehow insulated from youth violence you are living in never never land. Just thank god that the kid who brought the shotgun to Davis High didn’t shoot anyone.

  103. Anonymous

    One of the perpatrators in the Pioneer High shooting, the one that was an adult got a very long sentence. I think it is important to note that the criminal justice system is not going to tolerate conduct of that nature. If you think Davis is soehow insulated from youth violence you are living in never never land. Just thank god that the kid who brought the shotgun to Davis High didn’t shoot anyone.

  104. Anonymous

    One of the perpatrators in the Pioneer High shooting, the one that was an adult got a very long sentence. I think it is important to note that the criminal justice system is not going to tolerate conduct of that nature. If you think Davis is soehow insulated from youth violence you are living in never never land. Just thank god that the kid who brought the shotgun to Davis High didn’t shoot anyone.

  105. Anonymous

    There has never been a Pioneer High shooting! Never! It did not occur! It is not factual! A shooting occurred several blocks away on Pioneer Avenue! Stop repeating things that are untrue!
    Good grief!

  106. Anonymous

    There has never been a Pioneer High shooting! Never! It did not occur! It is not factual! A shooting occurred several blocks away on Pioneer Avenue! Stop repeating things that are untrue!
    Good grief!

  107. Anonymous

    There has never been a Pioneer High shooting! Never! It did not occur! It is not factual! A shooting occurred several blocks away on Pioneer Avenue! Stop repeating things that are untrue!
    Good grief!

  108. Anonymous

    There has never been a Pioneer High shooting! Never! It did not occur! It is not factual! A shooting occurred several blocks away on Pioneer Avenue! Stop repeating things that are untrue!
    Good grief!

  109. Anonymous

    It was several blocks away. It may have been in a school zone because of the proximity of a neighboring elementary school. The point is that it had no connection to Pioneer High School!

    Sadly enough, and tragically enough, since some of you apparently need perspective, it might be wise to reflect, when you are casting aspersions on other communities that there is only one record of a high school fatality in direct connection to a high school campus in this county and it did not occur in Woodland or Winter or West Sacramento. We should all vow that regardless of where we live we never want that tragedy repeated again. Anywhere.

  110. Anonymous

    It was several blocks away. It may have been in a school zone because of the proximity of a neighboring elementary school. The point is that it had no connection to Pioneer High School!

    Sadly enough, and tragically enough, since some of you apparently need perspective, it might be wise to reflect, when you are casting aspersions on other communities that there is only one record of a high school fatality in direct connection to a high school campus in this county and it did not occur in Woodland or Winter or West Sacramento. We should all vow that regardless of where we live we never want that tragedy repeated again. Anywhere.

  111. Anonymous

    It was several blocks away. It may have been in a school zone because of the proximity of a neighboring elementary school. The point is that it had no connection to Pioneer High School!

    Sadly enough, and tragically enough, since some of you apparently need perspective, it might be wise to reflect, when you are casting aspersions on other communities that there is only one record of a high school fatality in direct connection to a high school campus in this county and it did not occur in Woodland or Winter or West Sacramento. We should all vow that regardless of where we live we never want that tragedy repeated again. Anywhere.

  112. Anonymous

    It was several blocks away. It may have been in a school zone because of the proximity of a neighboring elementary school. The point is that it had no connection to Pioneer High School!

    Sadly enough, and tragically enough, since some of you apparently need perspective, it might be wise to reflect, when you are casting aspersions on other communities that there is only one record of a high school fatality in direct connection to a high school campus in this county and it did not occur in Woodland or Winter or West Sacramento. We should all vow that regardless of where we live we never want that tragedy repeated again. Anywhere.

  113. wdf

    DPD said from commentary:
    “Third, and this is probably my biggest concern–Richard Harris and Susan Lovenburg were two of the strongest proponents of closing Valley Oak and denying the charter. The stated reason was fiscal cost. Now, they have been the ringleaders to keep Emerson open which presents its own problems with fiscal cost. That does not sit well with me.”

    I don’t think it is inconsistent in the way you suggest. Whether or not you agree w/ the conclusion, there was all kinds of reflection and input on the ultimate decision to close VO. The school board directed district staff to look into various secondary configurations at the March 3 school board meeting. There wasn’t much input.

    The scenarios we were left w/, if implemented, would probably have caused some loss of money owing to a rushed decision, unintended consequences, excess stress/workload on district staff, etc.

    The schoolboard and district lose credibility if they don’t get the decision right. Having to go back and fixed a botched decision just looks bad, and is a potential waste of money.

    I think Lovenberg has a careful, methodical temperament than to make a decision on little input and consideration. The VO decision had been months in the works, so even if the decision didn’t happen on her watch, she had plenty to take in all the input as it was happening.

  114. wdf

    DPD said from commentary:
    “Third, and this is probably my biggest concern–Richard Harris and Susan Lovenburg were two of the strongest proponents of closing Valley Oak and denying the charter. The stated reason was fiscal cost. Now, they have been the ringleaders to keep Emerson open which presents its own problems with fiscal cost. That does not sit well with me.”

    I don’t think it is inconsistent in the way you suggest. Whether or not you agree w/ the conclusion, there was all kinds of reflection and input on the ultimate decision to close VO. The school board directed district staff to look into various secondary configurations at the March 3 school board meeting. There wasn’t much input.

    The scenarios we were left w/, if implemented, would probably have caused some loss of money owing to a rushed decision, unintended consequences, excess stress/workload on district staff, etc.

    The schoolboard and district lose credibility if they don’t get the decision right. Having to go back and fixed a botched decision just looks bad, and is a potential waste of money.

    I think Lovenberg has a careful, methodical temperament than to make a decision on little input and consideration. The VO decision had been months in the works, so even if the decision didn’t happen on her watch, she had plenty to take in all the input as it was happening.

  115. wdf

    DPD said from commentary:
    “Third, and this is probably my biggest concern–Richard Harris and Susan Lovenburg were two of the strongest proponents of closing Valley Oak and denying the charter. The stated reason was fiscal cost. Now, they have been the ringleaders to keep Emerson open which presents its own problems with fiscal cost. That does not sit well with me.”

    I don’t think it is inconsistent in the way you suggest. Whether or not you agree w/ the conclusion, there was all kinds of reflection and input on the ultimate decision to close VO. The school board directed district staff to look into various secondary configurations at the March 3 school board meeting. There wasn’t much input.

    The scenarios we were left w/, if implemented, would probably have caused some loss of money owing to a rushed decision, unintended consequences, excess stress/workload on district staff, etc.

    The schoolboard and district lose credibility if they don’t get the decision right. Having to go back and fixed a botched decision just looks bad, and is a potential waste of money.

    I think Lovenberg has a careful, methodical temperament than to make a decision on little input and consideration. The VO decision had been months in the works, so even if the decision didn’t happen on her watch, she had plenty to take in all the input as it was happening.

  116. wdf

    DPD said from commentary:
    “Third, and this is probably my biggest concern–Richard Harris and Susan Lovenburg were two of the strongest proponents of closing Valley Oak and denying the charter. The stated reason was fiscal cost. Now, they have been the ringleaders to keep Emerson open which presents its own problems with fiscal cost. That does not sit well with me.”

    I don’t think it is inconsistent in the way you suggest. Whether or not you agree w/ the conclusion, there was all kinds of reflection and input on the ultimate decision to close VO. The school board directed district staff to look into various secondary configurations at the March 3 school board meeting. There wasn’t much input.

    The scenarios we were left w/, if implemented, would probably have caused some loss of money owing to a rushed decision, unintended consequences, excess stress/workload on district staff, etc.

    The schoolboard and district lose credibility if they don’t get the decision right. Having to go back and fixed a botched decision just looks bad, and is a potential waste of money.

    I think Lovenberg has a careful, methodical temperament than to make a decision on little input and consideration. The VO decision had been months in the works, so even if the decision didn’t happen on her watch, she had plenty to take in all the input as it was happening.

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