Hundreds of Students March To Save Their Schools

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Around 300 people, primarily students from three different schools, gathered at the Community Park yesterday afternoon in Davis and marched down to Central Park and Farmer’s Market in support of the Davis Schools Foundation Dollar-a-Day Campaign.

The event was organized by the Blue and White Foundation, an alumni group for Davis High School.

The event brought out a good number of students, some parents, and a few community leaders including four of the school board members, three city council members, and a few candidates.

The Hanlees Auto Group announced they are donating $30,000 as a community challenge match–meaning that the community must raise $30,000 over five days culminating on Sunday, April 20, 2008. If they do that, Hanlees will match the community with a $30,000 donation of their own.

It was also mentioned that an anonymous donor has given the Davis Schools Foundation $100,000. The Davis Schools Foundation is trying to raise up to $3.8 million by mid-May in order to help off-set expected cuts to teachers and programs in the district.

With the recent donations, it seems like that the schools foundation has raised close to, if not exceeding, $300,000 to date. That would be a great sum, but also unfortunately well short of the amount of money needed to make a serious dent into the district’s budget deficit.

Joining the rally and leading the students in cheers was Davis Superintendent James Hammond, who expressed his admiration at the way in which the community has rallied in support of the schools.

Two weeks ago the Davis School board made the decision to keep Emerson Junior High School open for another year and to maintain the current configuration for the secondary schools. While that decision was welcome relief for many students and parents in the district, the problem remains as to how to find the cuts necessary to balance the budget.

Unfortunately it appears that the school may stay open at the expense of fifteen additional positions. Last month, the district issued around 112 layoff notices to teachers and administrators. Tonight they may cut fifteen more positions. These layoffs would cut support staff positions that would save the district around $515,000 or roughly the amount of money they would have saved by closing Emerson Junior High.

At this point it appears that the only immediate relief would come from efforts from the Davis Schools Foundation to raise money to offset these cuts. While their efforts are valiant and the community has stepped up, to date the money raised pales in comparison to the budget crisis the district faces.

If you wish to donate to the Davis Schools Foundation, you can do so by logging on to http://davisschoolsfoundation.org

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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84 thoughts on “Hundreds of Students March To Save Their Schools”

  1. Supporter

    While I support the efforts to raise money to save teachers and schools, in the end it is not the way to ultimately solve school district problems or the financial crisis. As DPD pointed out, there was rampant corruption in the school district, along with the trend to allow developers to decide whether or not we need a new school. Current district policies are far short of cleaning up the mess. What you are seeing, in handling this crisis, is a systemic problem that has been coming to a head for years.

    Emerson will be slated for closure next year if parents are not vigilant. I encourage all parents to stay very involved in what is going on. In fact I would demand that a citizen review board be formed to oversee things. Do not trust the School Board or District to make good decisions. They are clueless as to what to do, e.g. the attempt to close Emerson that was staved off by parental involvement. My hope is we can still save Emerson and Valley Oak – if necessary by going charter. How about having that same citizen review board explore supporting charter schools…

  2. Supporter

    While I support the efforts to raise money to save teachers and schools, in the end it is not the way to ultimately solve school district problems or the financial crisis. As DPD pointed out, there was rampant corruption in the school district, along with the trend to allow developers to decide whether or not we need a new school. Current district policies are far short of cleaning up the mess. What you are seeing, in handling this crisis, is a systemic problem that has been coming to a head for years.

    Emerson will be slated for closure next year if parents are not vigilant. I encourage all parents to stay very involved in what is going on. In fact I would demand that a citizen review board be formed to oversee things. Do not trust the School Board or District to make good decisions. They are clueless as to what to do, e.g. the attempt to close Emerson that was staved off by parental involvement. My hope is we can still save Emerson and Valley Oak – if necessary by going charter. How about having that same citizen review board explore supporting charter schools…

  3. Supporter

    While I support the efforts to raise money to save teachers and schools, in the end it is not the way to ultimately solve school district problems or the financial crisis. As DPD pointed out, there was rampant corruption in the school district, along with the trend to allow developers to decide whether or not we need a new school. Current district policies are far short of cleaning up the mess. What you are seeing, in handling this crisis, is a systemic problem that has been coming to a head for years.

    Emerson will be slated for closure next year if parents are not vigilant. I encourage all parents to stay very involved in what is going on. In fact I would demand that a citizen review board be formed to oversee things. Do not trust the School Board or District to make good decisions. They are clueless as to what to do, e.g. the attempt to close Emerson that was staved off by parental involvement. My hope is we can still save Emerson and Valley Oak – if necessary by going charter. How about having that same citizen review board explore supporting charter schools…

  4. Supporter

    While I support the efforts to raise money to save teachers and schools, in the end it is not the way to ultimately solve school district problems or the financial crisis. As DPD pointed out, there was rampant corruption in the school district, along with the trend to allow developers to decide whether or not we need a new school. Current district policies are far short of cleaning up the mess. What you are seeing, in handling this crisis, is a systemic problem that has been coming to a head for years.

    Emerson will be slated for closure next year if parents are not vigilant. I encourage all parents to stay very involved in what is going on. In fact I would demand that a citizen review board be formed to oversee things. Do not trust the School Board or District to make good decisions. They are clueless as to what to do, e.g. the attempt to close Emerson that was staved off by parental involvement. My hope is we can still save Emerson and Valley Oak – if necessary by going charter. How about having that same citizen review board explore supporting charter schools…

  5. wdf

    What is the difference between a citizen review board, and the school board, a group of Davis citizens elected by the Davis electorate?

    What would make you sure that an appointed citizen review board would support your position on charter schools?

    If a citizen review board made a contrary conclusion to your position, would you then conclude that the citizen review board was also clueless and should also not be trusted to make good decisions?

    Seems like there is a precedent in this with the Best Uses Task Force Committee.

  6. wdf

    What is the difference between a citizen review board, and the school board, a group of Davis citizens elected by the Davis electorate?

    What would make you sure that an appointed citizen review board would support your position on charter schools?

    If a citizen review board made a contrary conclusion to your position, would you then conclude that the citizen review board was also clueless and should also not be trusted to make good decisions?

    Seems like there is a precedent in this with the Best Uses Task Force Committee.

  7. wdf

    What is the difference between a citizen review board, and the school board, a group of Davis citizens elected by the Davis electorate?

    What would make you sure that an appointed citizen review board would support your position on charter schools?

    If a citizen review board made a contrary conclusion to your position, would you then conclude that the citizen review board was also clueless and should also not be trusted to make good decisions?

    Seems like there is a precedent in this with the Best Uses Task Force Committee.

  8. wdf

    What is the difference between a citizen review board, and the school board, a group of Davis citizens elected by the Davis electorate?

    What would make you sure that an appointed citizen review board would support your position on charter schools?

    If a citizen review board made a contrary conclusion to your position, would you then conclude that the citizen review board was also clueless and should also not be trusted to make good decisions?

    Seems like there is a precedent in this with the Best Uses Task Force Committee.

  9. Christine

    The distrust of the school board is based on the very reason we should trust them; we elect them. However, no one in Davis gets elected to anything without money. Some people like Lamar Heysteck get grass roots support, but my experience of 30 years in this town is that the developers get to everybody sooner or later. Davis is a small enough community that most of us know many of the developers personally and can vouch for them as perfectly nice people. It is difficult to receive financial support from someone you are on friendly terms with and then be completely resistant to hearing a skilled argument for their case. “Build a school! We’ll donate the land, funding is available, everyone will be happy, etc, etc.”

    A ‘watchdog’ group would have a different purpose, but it is a reactive solution. What happened over the past ten years is now in the past. I do trust Sheila Allen and some of the other school board members to be much more alert to these kinds of predicaments in the future.

  10. Christine

    The distrust of the school board is based on the very reason we should trust them; we elect them. However, no one in Davis gets elected to anything without money. Some people like Lamar Heysteck get grass roots support, but my experience of 30 years in this town is that the developers get to everybody sooner or later. Davis is a small enough community that most of us know many of the developers personally and can vouch for them as perfectly nice people. It is difficult to receive financial support from someone you are on friendly terms with and then be completely resistant to hearing a skilled argument for their case. “Build a school! We’ll donate the land, funding is available, everyone will be happy, etc, etc.”

    A ‘watchdog’ group would have a different purpose, but it is a reactive solution. What happened over the past ten years is now in the past. I do trust Sheila Allen and some of the other school board members to be much more alert to these kinds of predicaments in the future.

  11. Christine

    The distrust of the school board is based on the very reason we should trust them; we elect them. However, no one in Davis gets elected to anything without money. Some people like Lamar Heysteck get grass roots support, but my experience of 30 years in this town is that the developers get to everybody sooner or later. Davis is a small enough community that most of us know many of the developers personally and can vouch for them as perfectly nice people. It is difficult to receive financial support from someone you are on friendly terms with and then be completely resistant to hearing a skilled argument for their case. “Build a school! We’ll donate the land, funding is available, everyone will be happy, etc, etc.”

    A ‘watchdog’ group would have a different purpose, but it is a reactive solution. What happened over the past ten years is now in the past. I do trust Sheila Allen and some of the other school board members to be much more alert to these kinds of predicaments in the future.

  12. Christine

    The distrust of the school board is based on the very reason we should trust them; we elect them. However, no one in Davis gets elected to anything without money. Some people like Lamar Heysteck get grass roots support, but my experience of 30 years in this town is that the developers get to everybody sooner or later. Davis is a small enough community that most of us know many of the developers personally and can vouch for them as perfectly nice people. It is difficult to receive financial support from someone you are on friendly terms with and then be completely resistant to hearing a skilled argument for their case. “Build a school! We’ll donate the land, funding is available, everyone will be happy, etc, etc.”

    A ‘watchdog’ group would have a different purpose, but it is a reactive solution. What happened over the past ten years is now in the past. I do trust Sheila Allen and some of the other school board members to be much more alert to these kinds of predicaments in the future.

  13. relief on the horizon

    We seem to have little trouble with closing schools that are mainly for the “other”,after all, they are not really part of or connected to US. The majority of voters will accept tax increases now that the “pain” is hitting home and not just reserved for those “other”. Tax increases directed towards those earning over $200,00- $250,000 are on the political horizon. Clinton and Obama are advocating increasing social security pay-ins and recinding tax cuts for those earning more than $200,000 This kind of idea has been extensively researched and found attractive to the majority of voters. Something similar will be part of our California tax picture.

  14. relief on the horizon

    We seem to have little trouble with closing schools that are mainly for the “other”,after all, they are not really part of or connected to US. The majority of voters will accept tax increases now that the “pain” is hitting home and not just reserved for those “other”. Tax increases directed towards those earning over $200,00- $250,000 are on the political horizon. Clinton and Obama are advocating increasing social security pay-ins and recinding tax cuts for those earning more than $200,000 This kind of idea has been extensively researched and found attractive to the majority of voters. Something similar will be part of our California tax picture.

  15. relief on the horizon

    We seem to have little trouble with closing schools that are mainly for the “other”,after all, they are not really part of or connected to US. The majority of voters will accept tax increases now that the “pain” is hitting home and not just reserved for those “other”. Tax increases directed towards those earning over $200,00- $250,000 are on the political horizon. Clinton and Obama are advocating increasing social security pay-ins and recinding tax cuts for those earning more than $200,000 This kind of idea has been extensively researched and found attractive to the majority of voters. Something similar will be part of our California tax picture.

  16. relief on the horizon

    We seem to have little trouble with closing schools that are mainly for the “other”,after all, they are not really part of or connected to US. The majority of voters will accept tax increases now that the “pain” is hitting home and not just reserved for those “other”. Tax increases directed towards those earning over $200,00- $250,000 are on the political horizon. Clinton and Obama are advocating increasing social security pay-ins and recinding tax cuts for those earning more than $200,000 This kind of idea has been extensively researched and found attractive to the majority of voters. Something similar will be part of our California tax picture.

  17. Rich Rifkin

    “Some people like Lamar Heysteck get grass roots support, but my experience of 30 years in this town is that the developers get to everybody sooner or later.”

    I don’t know if you saw my column yesterday, Christine. It dealt with who is funding the candidates for city council.

    There is only one large interest pumping large amounts of money — tens of thousands of dollars — into the candidates: the firefighters union. No one else.

    The Davis real estate developers are pikers in comparison. I counted 5 contributions to Sydney Vergis, 5 to Stephen Souza, 0 to Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald*, 0 to Sue Greenwald, and approximately 10 to Don Saylor.**

    I haven’t analyzed the backgrounds of all of the contributors to the candidates, but my rough estimation in looking down the rosters of contributors is that only “retired” and “city of Davis firefighter” have given in large numbers.

    Cecilia has received a good number from people who are tied to labor unions. However, those unions are not helping her in order to buy influence over City of Davis contracts. Rather, I presume they are giving her money because they are friends of hers.

    As I pointed out in my piece, not one single employee from the City of Davis has given any money to any candidate, other than the firefighters.

    * One of Cecilia’s contributors is listed as an “investor.” I don’t think that means in real estate.

    ** It’s hard to tell with some of the folks. They may be listed as architects and hence involved in development, but are not developers at all. One of Saylor’s contributors is Mary Jo Streng, a homemaker in Fair Oaks, CA. I counted her, because I am sure she is a part of the Streng Bros. family.

  18. Rich Rifkin

    “Some people like Lamar Heysteck get grass roots support, but my experience of 30 years in this town is that the developers get to everybody sooner or later.”

    I don’t know if you saw my column yesterday, Christine. It dealt with who is funding the candidates for city council.

    There is only one large interest pumping large amounts of money — tens of thousands of dollars — into the candidates: the firefighters union. No one else.

    The Davis real estate developers are pikers in comparison. I counted 5 contributions to Sydney Vergis, 5 to Stephen Souza, 0 to Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald*, 0 to Sue Greenwald, and approximately 10 to Don Saylor.**

    I haven’t analyzed the backgrounds of all of the contributors to the candidates, but my rough estimation in looking down the rosters of contributors is that only “retired” and “city of Davis firefighter” have given in large numbers.

    Cecilia has received a good number from people who are tied to labor unions. However, those unions are not helping her in order to buy influence over City of Davis contracts. Rather, I presume they are giving her money because they are friends of hers.

    As I pointed out in my piece, not one single employee from the City of Davis has given any money to any candidate, other than the firefighters.

    * One of Cecilia’s contributors is listed as an “investor.” I don’t think that means in real estate.

    ** It’s hard to tell with some of the folks. They may be listed as architects and hence involved in development, but are not developers at all. One of Saylor’s contributors is Mary Jo Streng, a homemaker in Fair Oaks, CA. I counted her, because I am sure she is a part of the Streng Bros. family.

  19. Rich Rifkin

    “Some people like Lamar Heysteck get grass roots support, but my experience of 30 years in this town is that the developers get to everybody sooner or later.”

    I don’t know if you saw my column yesterday, Christine. It dealt with who is funding the candidates for city council.

    There is only one large interest pumping large amounts of money — tens of thousands of dollars — into the candidates: the firefighters union. No one else.

    The Davis real estate developers are pikers in comparison. I counted 5 contributions to Sydney Vergis, 5 to Stephen Souza, 0 to Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald*, 0 to Sue Greenwald, and approximately 10 to Don Saylor.**

    I haven’t analyzed the backgrounds of all of the contributors to the candidates, but my rough estimation in looking down the rosters of contributors is that only “retired” and “city of Davis firefighter” have given in large numbers.

    Cecilia has received a good number from people who are tied to labor unions. However, those unions are not helping her in order to buy influence over City of Davis contracts. Rather, I presume they are giving her money because they are friends of hers.

    As I pointed out in my piece, not one single employee from the City of Davis has given any money to any candidate, other than the firefighters.

    * One of Cecilia’s contributors is listed as an “investor.” I don’t think that means in real estate.

    ** It’s hard to tell with some of the folks. They may be listed as architects and hence involved in development, but are not developers at all. One of Saylor’s contributors is Mary Jo Streng, a homemaker in Fair Oaks, CA. I counted her, because I am sure she is a part of the Streng Bros. family.

  20. Rich Rifkin

    “Some people like Lamar Heysteck get grass roots support, but my experience of 30 years in this town is that the developers get to everybody sooner or later.”

    I don’t know if you saw my column yesterday, Christine. It dealt with who is funding the candidates for city council.

    There is only one large interest pumping large amounts of money — tens of thousands of dollars — into the candidates: the firefighters union. No one else.

    The Davis real estate developers are pikers in comparison. I counted 5 contributions to Sydney Vergis, 5 to Stephen Souza, 0 to Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald*, 0 to Sue Greenwald, and approximately 10 to Don Saylor.**

    I haven’t analyzed the backgrounds of all of the contributors to the candidates, but my rough estimation in looking down the rosters of contributors is that only “retired” and “city of Davis firefighter” have given in large numbers.

    Cecilia has received a good number from people who are tied to labor unions. However, those unions are not helping her in order to buy influence over City of Davis contracts. Rather, I presume they are giving her money because they are friends of hers.

    As I pointed out in my piece, not one single employee from the City of Davis has given any money to any candidate, other than the firefighters.

    * One of Cecilia’s contributors is listed as an “investor.” I don’t think that means in real estate.

    ** It’s hard to tell with some of the folks. They may be listed as architects and hence involved in development, but are not developers at all. One of Saylor’s contributors is Mary Jo Streng, a homemaker in Fair Oaks, CA. I counted her, because I am sure she is a part of the Streng Bros. family.

  21. ol timer

    Rifkin makes this claim during every Council election campaign. Developer interests make their contribution in their own name and this adds up to a relatively small list of the maximum $100 contribution. The rest of the comes from cronies, business associates, employees and are not easily identified as coming from developer interests; you can also include the families of the above-mentioned. Getting a council majority that will do their bidding can result in VERY BIG BUCKS for developer interests. Do you really think that they do not try and game the system as much as possible with their deep-pockets?(can’t anyone write “retired” from what?) This is well-known to all who have followed Davis local politics for some time except, it seems, Richard Rifkin.

  22. ol timer

    Rifkin makes this claim during every Council election campaign. Developer interests make their contribution in their own name and this adds up to a relatively small list of the maximum $100 contribution. The rest of the comes from cronies, business associates, employees and are not easily identified as coming from developer interests; you can also include the families of the above-mentioned. Getting a council majority that will do their bidding can result in VERY BIG BUCKS for developer interests. Do you really think that they do not try and game the system as much as possible with their deep-pockets?(can’t anyone write “retired” from what?) This is well-known to all who have followed Davis local politics for some time except, it seems, Richard Rifkin.

  23. ol timer

    Rifkin makes this claim during every Council election campaign. Developer interests make their contribution in their own name and this adds up to a relatively small list of the maximum $100 contribution. The rest of the comes from cronies, business associates, employees and are not easily identified as coming from developer interests; you can also include the families of the above-mentioned. Getting a council majority that will do their bidding can result in VERY BIG BUCKS for developer interests. Do you really think that they do not try and game the system as much as possible with their deep-pockets?(can’t anyone write “retired” from what?) This is well-known to all who have followed Davis local politics for some time except, it seems, Richard Rifkin.

  24. ol timer

    Rifkin makes this claim during every Council election campaign. Developer interests make their contribution in their own name and this adds up to a relatively small list of the maximum $100 contribution. The rest of the comes from cronies, business associates, employees and are not easily identified as coming from developer interests; you can also include the families of the above-mentioned. Getting a council majority that will do their bidding can result in VERY BIG BUCKS for developer interests. Do you really think that they do not try and game the system as much as possible with their deep-pockets?(can’t anyone write “retired” from what?) This is well-known to all who have followed Davis local politics for some time except, it seems, Richard Rifkin.

  25. supporter

    “Developer interests make their contribution in their own name and this adds up to a relatively small list of the maximum $100 contribution. The rest of the comes from cronies, business associates, employees and are not easily identified as coming from developer interests; you can also include the families of the above-mentioned. Getting a council majority that will do their bidding can result in VERY BIG BUCKS for developer interests. Do you really think that they do not try and game the system as much as possible with their deep-pockets?(can’t anyone write “retired” from what?) This is well-known to all who have followed Davis local politics for some time”

    Amen! Exactly my point, and now the spillover of that corruption has hit our school system.

    “The distrust of the school board is based on the very reason we should trust them; we elect them. However, no one in Davis gets elected to anything without money. Some people like Lamar Heysteck get grass roots support, but my experience of 30 years in this town is that the developers get to everybody sooner or later. Davis is a small enough community that most of us know many of the developers personally and can vouch for them as perfectly nice people. It is difficult to receive financial support from someone you are on friendly terms with and then be completely resistant to hearing a skilled argument for their case. “Build a school! We’ll donate the land, funding is available, everyone will be happy, etc, etc.””

    Yep!!!

    “A ‘watchdog’ group would have a different purpose, but it is a reactive solution. What happened over the past ten years is now in the past. I do trust Sheila Allen and some of the other school board members to be much more alert to these kinds of predicaments in the future.”

    A ‘watchdog’ group (I like that wording – it is exactly what I have in mind) is exactly what is needed, chosen much like a grand jury. Draw them randomly from a pool of folks who would like to be part of it; or from parents and teachers. They don’t have to meet that often or for that long. In fact it is more important that they meet when something like the closure of Valley Oak or Emerson comes down the pike. I really can’t figure why some people think the past is in the past, when schools are being slated for closure NOW. Bad decisions by the School Board are being made as we speak, and more are slated to be made in the future. You might feel differently if your neighborhood school is the next one slated for closure; or teachers in a favored subject for your child at your school are slated for a pink slip.

    “Seems like there is a precedent in this with the Best Uses Task Force Committee.”

    Yes, except for the method of choosing the members, who were hand picked friends of the School Board/District.

    Hey, if anyone has a better idea, I am all ears. But if you think the pain is over after this year, think again. Davis schools are in a real crisis, because they built too many schools with not enough money to support them. In consequence the domino effect is taking place. Valley Oak was the first to fall, but trust me, more school closures are on the horizon if parents and citizens do not remain vigilent. If there is not some sort of oversight, the School Board is free to do exactly what it wants – which often means saving new schools in their districts, while closing schools in someone else’s district.

  26. supporter

    “Developer interests make their contribution in their own name and this adds up to a relatively small list of the maximum $100 contribution. The rest of the comes from cronies, business associates, employees and are not easily identified as coming from developer interests; you can also include the families of the above-mentioned. Getting a council majority that will do their bidding can result in VERY BIG BUCKS for developer interests. Do you really think that they do not try and game the system as much as possible with their deep-pockets?(can’t anyone write “retired” from what?) This is well-known to all who have followed Davis local politics for some time”

    Amen! Exactly my point, and now the spillover of that corruption has hit our school system.

    “The distrust of the school board is based on the very reason we should trust them; we elect them. However, no one in Davis gets elected to anything without money. Some people like Lamar Heysteck get grass roots support, but my experience of 30 years in this town is that the developers get to everybody sooner or later. Davis is a small enough community that most of us know many of the developers personally and can vouch for them as perfectly nice people. It is difficult to receive financial support from someone you are on friendly terms with and then be completely resistant to hearing a skilled argument for their case. “Build a school! We’ll donate the land, funding is available, everyone will be happy, etc, etc.””

    Yep!!!

    “A ‘watchdog’ group would have a different purpose, but it is a reactive solution. What happened over the past ten years is now in the past. I do trust Sheila Allen and some of the other school board members to be much more alert to these kinds of predicaments in the future.”

    A ‘watchdog’ group (I like that wording – it is exactly what I have in mind) is exactly what is needed, chosen much like a grand jury. Draw them randomly from a pool of folks who would like to be part of it; or from parents and teachers. They don’t have to meet that often or for that long. In fact it is more important that they meet when something like the closure of Valley Oak or Emerson comes down the pike. I really can’t figure why some people think the past is in the past, when schools are being slated for closure NOW. Bad decisions by the School Board are being made as we speak, and more are slated to be made in the future. You might feel differently if your neighborhood school is the next one slated for closure; or teachers in a favored subject for your child at your school are slated for a pink slip.

    “Seems like there is a precedent in this with the Best Uses Task Force Committee.”

    Yes, except for the method of choosing the members, who were hand picked friends of the School Board/District.

    Hey, if anyone has a better idea, I am all ears. But if you think the pain is over after this year, think again. Davis schools are in a real crisis, because they built too many schools with not enough money to support them. In consequence the domino effect is taking place. Valley Oak was the first to fall, but trust me, more school closures are on the horizon if parents and citizens do not remain vigilent. If there is not some sort of oversight, the School Board is free to do exactly what it wants – which often means saving new schools in their districts, while closing schools in someone else’s district.

  27. supporter

    “Developer interests make their contribution in their own name and this adds up to a relatively small list of the maximum $100 contribution. The rest of the comes from cronies, business associates, employees and are not easily identified as coming from developer interests; you can also include the families of the above-mentioned. Getting a council majority that will do their bidding can result in VERY BIG BUCKS for developer interests. Do you really think that they do not try and game the system as much as possible with their deep-pockets?(can’t anyone write “retired” from what?) This is well-known to all who have followed Davis local politics for some time”

    Amen! Exactly my point, and now the spillover of that corruption has hit our school system.

    “The distrust of the school board is based on the very reason we should trust them; we elect them. However, no one in Davis gets elected to anything without money. Some people like Lamar Heysteck get grass roots support, but my experience of 30 years in this town is that the developers get to everybody sooner or later. Davis is a small enough community that most of us know many of the developers personally and can vouch for them as perfectly nice people. It is difficult to receive financial support from someone you are on friendly terms with and then be completely resistant to hearing a skilled argument for their case. “Build a school! We’ll donate the land, funding is available, everyone will be happy, etc, etc.””

    Yep!!!

    “A ‘watchdog’ group would have a different purpose, but it is a reactive solution. What happened over the past ten years is now in the past. I do trust Sheila Allen and some of the other school board members to be much more alert to these kinds of predicaments in the future.”

    A ‘watchdog’ group (I like that wording – it is exactly what I have in mind) is exactly what is needed, chosen much like a grand jury. Draw them randomly from a pool of folks who would like to be part of it; or from parents and teachers. They don’t have to meet that often or for that long. In fact it is more important that they meet when something like the closure of Valley Oak or Emerson comes down the pike. I really can’t figure why some people think the past is in the past, when schools are being slated for closure NOW. Bad decisions by the School Board are being made as we speak, and more are slated to be made in the future. You might feel differently if your neighborhood school is the next one slated for closure; or teachers in a favored subject for your child at your school are slated for a pink slip.

    “Seems like there is a precedent in this with the Best Uses Task Force Committee.”

    Yes, except for the method of choosing the members, who were hand picked friends of the School Board/District.

    Hey, if anyone has a better idea, I am all ears. But if you think the pain is over after this year, think again. Davis schools are in a real crisis, because they built too many schools with not enough money to support them. In consequence the domino effect is taking place. Valley Oak was the first to fall, but trust me, more school closures are on the horizon if parents and citizens do not remain vigilent. If there is not some sort of oversight, the School Board is free to do exactly what it wants – which often means saving new schools in their districts, while closing schools in someone else’s district.

  28. supporter

    “Developer interests make their contribution in their own name and this adds up to a relatively small list of the maximum $100 contribution. The rest of the comes from cronies, business associates, employees and are not easily identified as coming from developer interests; you can also include the families of the above-mentioned. Getting a council majority that will do their bidding can result in VERY BIG BUCKS for developer interests. Do you really think that they do not try and game the system as much as possible with their deep-pockets?(can’t anyone write “retired” from what?) This is well-known to all who have followed Davis local politics for some time”

    Amen! Exactly my point, and now the spillover of that corruption has hit our school system.

    “The distrust of the school board is based on the very reason we should trust them; we elect them. However, no one in Davis gets elected to anything without money. Some people like Lamar Heysteck get grass roots support, but my experience of 30 years in this town is that the developers get to everybody sooner or later. Davis is a small enough community that most of us know many of the developers personally and can vouch for them as perfectly nice people. It is difficult to receive financial support from someone you are on friendly terms with and then be completely resistant to hearing a skilled argument for their case. “Build a school! We’ll donate the land, funding is available, everyone will be happy, etc, etc.””

    Yep!!!

    “A ‘watchdog’ group would have a different purpose, but it is a reactive solution. What happened over the past ten years is now in the past. I do trust Sheila Allen and some of the other school board members to be much more alert to these kinds of predicaments in the future.”

    A ‘watchdog’ group (I like that wording – it is exactly what I have in mind) is exactly what is needed, chosen much like a grand jury. Draw them randomly from a pool of folks who would like to be part of it; or from parents and teachers. They don’t have to meet that often or for that long. In fact it is more important that they meet when something like the closure of Valley Oak or Emerson comes down the pike. I really can’t figure why some people think the past is in the past, when schools are being slated for closure NOW. Bad decisions by the School Board are being made as we speak, and more are slated to be made in the future. You might feel differently if your neighborhood school is the next one slated for closure; or teachers in a favored subject for your child at your school are slated for a pink slip.

    “Seems like there is a precedent in this with the Best Uses Task Force Committee.”

    Yes, except for the method of choosing the members, who were hand picked friends of the School Board/District.

    Hey, if anyone has a better idea, I am all ears. But if you think the pain is over after this year, think again. Davis schools are in a real crisis, because they built too many schools with not enough money to support them. In consequence the domino effect is taking place. Valley Oak was the first to fall, but trust me, more school closures are on the horizon if parents and citizens do not remain vigilent. If there is not some sort of oversight, the School Board is free to do exactly what it wants – which often means saving new schools in their districts, while closing schools in someone else’s district.

  29. 無名 - wu ming

    every person in davis will get between 3 and 600 dollars pretty soon as part of the rather feeble attempt by congress to look like they’re doing something for the recession. if every household in davis that wasn’t flat broke chose to pass that check on to the school district, the district would have no crisis.

    and walking around davis, there is no way that most people are anywhere near so strapped that they cannot afford to do so.

    thus, the logical conclusion is that davisites are all talk and no action when it comes to their loudly proclaimed commitment to education. frauds and liars, quite frankly. this could be ended overnight, if it mattered to people, just by passing that government check over.

  30. 無名 - wu ming

    every person in davis will get between 3 and 600 dollars pretty soon as part of the rather feeble attempt by congress to look like they’re doing something for the recession. if every household in davis that wasn’t flat broke chose to pass that check on to the school district, the district would have no crisis.

    and walking around davis, there is no way that most people are anywhere near so strapped that they cannot afford to do so.

    thus, the logical conclusion is that davisites are all talk and no action when it comes to their loudly proclaimed commitment to education. frauds and liars, quite frankly. this could be ended overnight, if it mattered to people, just by passing that government check over.

  31. 無名 - wu ming

    every person in davis will get between 3 and 600 dollars pretty soon as part of the rather feeble attempt by congress to look like they’re doing something for the recession. if every household in davis that wasn’t flat broke chose to pass that check on to the school district, the district would have no crisis.

    and walking around davis, there is no way that most people are anywhere near so strapped that they cannot afford to do so.

    thus, the logical conclusion is that davisites are all talk and no action when it comes to their loudly proclaimed commitment to education. frauds and liars, quite frankly. this could be ended overnight, if it mattered to people, just by passing that government check over.

  32. 無名 - wu ming

    every person in davis will get between 3 and 600 dollars pretty soon as part of the rather feeble attempt by congress to look like they’re doing something for the recession. if every household in davis that wasn’t flat broke chose to pass that check on to the school district, the district would have no crisis.

    and walking around davis, there is no way that most people are anywhere near so strapped that they cannot afford to do so.

    thus, the logical conclusion is that davisites are all talk and no action when it comes to their loudly proclaimed commitment to education. frauds and liars, quite frankly. this could be ended overnight, if it mattered to people, just by passing that government check over.

  33. Anonymous

    I will donate to DSF only if I can be assured that the school board will not see the generosity of the citizens of Davis as a sign that they can put yet another “tax and spend” parcel tax on the ballot. I want to reward positive behavior from the school board, not be compelled to reward negative behavior.

  34. Anonymous

    I will donate to DSF only if I can be assured that the school board will not see the generosity of the citizens of Davis as a sign that they can put yet another “tax and spend” parcel tax on the ballot. I want to reward positive behavior from the school board, not be compelled to reward negative behavior.

  35. Anonymous

    I will donate to DSF only if I can be assured that the school board will not see the generosity of the citizens of Davis as a sign that they can put yet another “tax and spend” parcel tax on the ballot. I want to reward positive behavior from the school board, not be compelled to reward negative behavior.

  36. Anonymous

    I will donate to DSF only if I can be assured that the school board will not see the generosity of the citizens of Davis as a sign that they can put yet another “tax and spend” parcel tax on the ballot. I want to reward positive behavior from the school board, not be compelled to reward negative behavior.

  37. Robin

    The Davis schools are in trouble primarily because salaries and costs have gone up while the state’s funding is going down. The admittedly gross mismanagement of the past (past district employees under a completely different Board) is a minor factor in today’s fiscal crisis. Numerous school districts across the state are in trouble, and thousands of school employees are being laid off state-wide. The problem is that the state is refusing to adequately fund education.

  38. Robin

    The Davis schools are in trouble primarily because salaries and costs have gone up while the state’s funding is going down. The admittedly gross mismanagement of the past (past district employees under a completely different Board) is a minor factor in today’s fiscal crisis. Numerous school districts across the state are in trouble, and thousands of school employees are being laid off state-wide. The problem is that the state is refusing to adequately fund education.

  39. Robin

    The Davis schools are in trouble primarily because salaries and costs have gone up while the state’s funding is going down. The admittedly gross mismanagement of the past (past district employees under a completely different Board) is a minor factor in today’s fiscal crisis. Numerous school districts across the state are in trouble, and thousands of school employees are being laid off state-wide. The problem is that the state is refusing to adequately fund education.

  40. Robin

    The Davis schools are in trouble primarily because salaries and costs have gone up while the state’s funding is going down. The admittedly gross mismanagement of the past (past district employees under a completely different Board) is a minor factor in today’s fiscal crisis. Numerous school districts across the state are in trouble, and thousands of school employees are being laid off state-wide. The problem is that the state is refusing to adequately fund education.

  41. #1

    “Anonymous, 7:52, said…
    I will donate to DSF only if I can be assured that the school board will not see the generosity of the citizens of Davis as a sign that they can put yet another “tax and spend” parcel tax on the ballot. I want to reward positive behavior from the school board, not be compelled to reward negative behavior.”

    Well said!! Amen! They’re going to take all that money and spend it on more teachers and programs. What a waste!! I hate the way Davisites think education is so important that they will spend more money on it. So many other school districts in the US get by with spending less money on education. Why can’t Davis?

    We need folks like you on the school board.

  42. #1

    “Anonymous, 7:52, said…
    I will donate to DSF only if I can be assured that the school board will not see the generosity of the citizens of Davis as a sign that they can put yet another “tax and spend” parcel tax on the ballot. I want to reward positive behavior from the school board, not be compelled to reward negative behavior.”

    Well said!! Amen! They’re going to take all that money and spend it on more teachers and programs. What a waste!! I hate the way Davisites think education is so important that they will spend more money on it. So many other school districts in the US get by with spending less money on education. Why can’t Davis?

    We need folks like you on the school board.

  43. #1

    “Anonymous, 7:52, said…
    I will donate to DSF only if I can be assured that the school board will not see the generosity of the citizens of Davis as a sign that they can put yet another “tax and spend” parcel tax on the ballot. I want to reward positive behavior from the school board, not be compelled to reward negative behavior.”

    Well said!! Amen! They’re going to take all that money and spend it on more teachers and programs. What a waste!! I hate the way Davisites think education is so important that they will spend more money on it. So many other school districts in the US get by with spending less money on education. Why can’t Davis?

    We need folks like you on the school board.

  44. #1

    “Anonymous, 7:52, said…
    I will donate to DSF only if I can be assured that the school board will not see the generosity of the citizens of Davis as a sign that they can put yet another “tax and spend” parcel tax on the ballot. I want to reward positive behavior from the school board, not be compelled to reward negative behavior.”

    Well said!! Amen! They’re going to take all that money and spend it on more teachers and programs. What a waste!! I hate the way Davisites think education is so important that they will spend more money on it. So many other school districts in the US get by with spending less money on education. Why can’t Davis?

    We need folks like you on the school board.

  45. wdf

    “supporter said…

    Yes, except for the method of choosing the members, who were hand picked friends of the School Board/District.”

    Well, you suggest something like cronyism. Can you suggest an alternative? Taking it to a very specific level, I think Tim Taylor appointed Bob Schelen to be on the Measure Q oversight committee. Schelen ran for school board (and lost) on the position in support of the VO charter school, and perhaps to find a way to keep VOE open. Tim Taylor was pretty adamant in his decision to close VO not support the charter school. But Schelen shows up to nearly every school board meeting. Obviously this gentleman cares about the schools, and he was appointed to this committee. Is this an example of a bad choice? If not, could you offer one that is a bad choice?

    “Hey, if anyone has a better idea, I am all ears. But if you think the pain is over after this year, think again. Davis schools are in a real crisis, because they built too many schools with not enough money to support them. In consequence the domino effect is taking place. Valley Oak was the first to fall, but trust me, more school closures are on the horizon if parents and citizens do not remain vigilent. If there is not some sort of oversight, the School Board is free to do exactly what it wants – which often means saving new schools in their districts, while closing schools in someone else’s district.”

    You point out that we (as a community because we voted and passed that bond measure) have made the mistake of building more schools than we can support. I agree w/ you, there. But your position suggests that the solution is to close only the new schools that were built.

    To me Korematsu (the very newest) makes sense as a school to have, given the gegraphic distribution of Davis residents and where elementaries are located. Why is it imperative to close Korematsu over an older school?

    You almost seem to say that we (Davis parents and citizens) should be vigilent to keep all the schools open, even though it was a poor choice to build in the first place.

  46. wdf

    “supporter said…

    Yes, except for the method of choosing the members, who were hand picked friends of the School Board/District.”

    Well, you suggest something like cronyism. Can you suggest an alternative? Taking it to a very specific level, I think Tim Taylor appointed Bob Schelen to be on the Measure Q oversight committee. Schelen ran for school board (and lost) on the position in support of the VO charter school, and perhaps to find a way to keep VOE open. Tim Taylor was pretty adamant in his decision to close VO not support the charter school. But Schelen shows up to nearly every school board meeting. Obviously this gentleman cares about the schools, and he was appointed to this committee. Is this an example of a bad choice? If not, could you offer one that is a bad choice?

    “Hey, if anyone has a better idea, I am all ears. But if you think the pain is over after this year, think again. Davis schools are in a real crisis, because they built too many schools with not enough money to support them. In consequence the domino effect is taking place. Valley Oak was the first to fall, but trust me, more school closures are on the horizon if parents and citizens do not remain vigilent. If there is not some sort of oversight, the School Board is free to do exactly what it wants – which often means saving new schools in their districts, while closing schools in someone else’s district.”

    You point out that we (as a community because we voted and passed that bond measure) have made the mistake of building more schools than we can support. I agree w/ you, there. But your position suggests that the solution is to close only the new schools that were built.

    To me Korematsu (the very newest) makes sense as a school to have, given the gegraphic distribution of Davis residents and where elementaries are located. Why is it imperative to close Korematsu over an older school?

    You almost seem to say that we (Davis parents and citizens) should be vigilent to keep all the schools open, even though it was a poor choice to build in the first place.

  47. wdf

    “supporter said…

    Yes, except for the method of choosing the members, who were hand picked friends of the School Board/District.”

    Well, you suggest something like cronyism. Can you suggest an alternative? Taking it to a very specific level, I think Tim Taylor appointed Bob Schelen to be on the Measure Q oversight committee. Schelen ran for school board (and lost) on the position in support of the VO charter school, and perhaps to find a way to keep VOE open. Tim Taylor was pretty adamant in his decision to close VO not support the charter school. But Schelen shows up to nearly every school board meeting. Obviously this gentleman cares about the schools, and he was appointed to this committee. Is this an example of a bad choice? If not, could you offer one that is a bad choice?

    “Hey, if anyone has a better idea, I am all ears. But if you think the pain is over after this year, think again. Davis schools are in a real crisis, because they built too many schools with not enough money to support them. In consequence the domino effect is taking place. Valley Oak was the first to fall, but trust me, more school closures are on the horizon if parents and citizens do not remain vigilent. If there is not some sort of oversight, the School Board is free to do exactly what it wants – which often means saving new schools in their districts, while closing schools in someone else’s district.”

    You point out that we (as a community because we voted and passed that bond measure) have made the mistake of building more schools than we can support. I agree w/ you, there. But your position suggests that the solution is to close only the new schools that were built.

    To me Korematsu (the very newest) makes sense as a school to have, given the gegraphic distribution of Davis residents and where elementaries are located. Why is it imperative to close Korematsu over an older school?

    You almost seem to say that we (Davis parents and citizens) should be vigilent to keep all the schools open, even though it was a poor choice to build in the first place.

  48. wdf

    “supporter said…

    Yes, except for the method of choosing the members, who were hand picked friends of the School Board/District.”

    Well, you suggest something like cronyism. Can you suggest an alternative? Taking it to a very specific level, I think Tim Taylor appointed Bob Schelen to be on the Measure Q oversight committee. Schelen ran for school board (and lost) on the position in support of the VO charter school, and perhaps to find a way to keep VOE open. Tim Taylor was pretty adamant in his decision to close VO not support the charter school. But Schelen shows up to nearly every school board meeting. Obviously this gentleman cares about the schools, and he was appointed to this committee. Is this an example of a bad choice? If not, could you offer one that is a bad choice?

    “Hey, if anyone has a better idea, I am all ears. But if you think the pain is over after this year, think again. Davis schools are in a real crisis, because they built too many schools with not enough money to support them. In consequence the domino effect is taking place. Valley Oak was the first to fall, but trust me, more school closures are on the horizon if parents and citizens do not remain vigilent. If there is not some sort of oversight, the School Board is free to do exactly what it wants – which often means saving new schools in their districts, while closing schools in someone else’s district.”

    You point out that we (as a community because we voted and passed that bond measure) have made the mistake of building more schools than we can support. I agree w/ you, there. But your position suggests that the solution is to close only the new schools that were built.

    To me Korematsu (the very newest) makes sense as a school to have, given the gegraphic distribution of Davis residents and where elementaries are located. Why is it imperative to close Korematsu over an older school?

    You almost seem to say that we (Davis parents and citizens) should be vigilent to keep all the schools open, even though it was a poor choice to build in the first place.

  49. supporter

    “You point out that we (as a community because we voted and passed that bond measure) have made the mistake of building more schools than we can support. I agree w/ you, there. But your position suggests that the solution is to close only the new schools that were built.”

    No, I am suggesting that in the future, the School Board/City Council should make sure there is enough money to run a school before deciding to build it. Too often in the past, there has been a real disconnect between building houses and building schools, when it seems the two are very much related. Same goes for building schools and running schools.

    If a builder/developer promises homeowners a new school, the City Council/School Board should have ordinances in place prior that require sufficient funding be available to run the new school before any such promises are made by a developer. A citizens oversight committee might be helpful here, to make sure the powers that be keep honest in this regard.

    Secondly, I want an oversight committee to make darn sure no school presently in existence is closed, especially if it has been in existence for some time and been successful. Last one opened should be the first one closed, not last one opened is last one closed. Emerson serves an entire section of town. To close it would crowd the two middle schools left as well as the high school. Juxtaposed against that scenrio, to close a newer elementary school makes a heck of a lot more sense. But you will never see that happen – because the newer schools are in the neighborhoods of current School Board members. Heaven forbid the value of their homes should go down!

  50. supporter

    “You point out that we (as a community because we voted and passed that bond measure) have made the mistake of building more schools than we can support. I agree w/ you, there. But your position suggests that the solution is to close only the new schools that were built.”

    No, I am suggesting that in the future, the School Board/City Council should make sure there is enough money to run a school before deciding to build it. Too often in the past, there has been a real disconnect between building houses and building schools, when it seems the two are very much related. Same goes for building schools and running schools.

    If a builder/developer promises homeowners a new school, the City Council/School Board should have ordinances in place prior that require sufficient funding be available to run the new school before any such promises are made by a developer. A citizens oversight committee might be helpful here, to make sure the powers that be keep honest in this regard.

    Secondly, I want an oversight committee to make darn sure no school presently in existence is closed, especially if it has been in existence for some time and been successful. Last one opened should be the first one closed, not last one opened is last one closed. Emerson serves an entire section of town. To close it would crowd the two middle schools left as well as the high school. Juxtaposed against that scenrio, to close a newer elementary school makes a heck of a lot more sense. But you will never see that happen – because the newer schools are in the neighborhoods of current School Board members. Heaven forbid the value of their homes should go down!

  51. supporter

    “You point out that we (as a community because we voted and passed that bond measure) have made the mistake of building more schools than we can support. I agree w/ you, there. But your position suggests that the solution is to close only the new schools that were built.”

    No, I am suggesting that in the future, the School Board/City Council should make sure there is enough money to run a school before deciding to build it. Too often in the past, there has been a real disconnect between building houses and building schools, when it seems the two are very much related. Same goes for building schools and running schools.

    If a builder/developer promises homeowners a new school, the City Council/School Board should have ordinances in place prior that require sufficient funding be available to run the new school before any such promises are made by a developer. A citizens oversight committee might be helpful here, to make sure the powers that be keep honest in this regard.

    Secondly, I want an oversight committee to make darn sure no school presently in existence is closed, especially if it has been in existence for some time and been successful. Last one opened should be the first one closed, not last one opened is last one closed. Emerson serves an entire section of town. To close it would crowd the two middle schools left as well as the high school. Juxtaposed against that scenrio, to close a newer elementary school makes a heck of a lot more sense. But you will never see that happen – because the newer schools are in the neighborhoods of current School Board members. Heaven forbid the value of their homes should go down!

  52. supporter

    “You point out that we (as a community because we voted and passed that bond measure) have made the mistake of building more schools than we can support. I agree w/ you, there. But your position suggests that the solution is to close only the new schools that were built.”

    No, I am suggesting that in the future, the School Board/City Council should make sure there is enough money to run a school before deciding to build it. Too often in the past, there has been a real disconnect between building houses and building schools, when it seems the two are very much related. Same goes for building schools and running schools.

    If a builder/developer promises homeowners a new school, the City Council/School Board should have ordinances in place prior that require sufficient funding be available to run the new school before any such promises are made by a developer. A citizens oversight committee might be helpful here, to make sure the powers that be keep honest in this regard.

    Secondly, I want an oversight committee to make darn sure no school presently in existence is closed, especially if it has been in existence for some time and been successful. Last one opened should be the first one closed, not last one opened is last one closed. Emerson serves an entire section of town. To close it would crowd the two middle schools left as well as the high school. Juxtaposed against that scenrio, to close a newer elementary school makes a heck of a lot more sense. But you will never see that happen – because the newer schools are in the neighborhoods of current School Board members. Heaven forbid the value of their homes should go down!

  53. Anonymous

    To supporter:

    First, who’s going to staff all these new “watch dog” committees? Laid-off employees?

    Second, you don’t simply impose inventory control (FIFO, LIFO) to determine which school to shut down. It’s a complicated process with numerous variables.

    Under your scheme, the oldest school in the midst of a retirement community would stay open versus a newer school in the middle of a new development with affordable housing and younger children.

    You can disagree with Emerson, and you can disagree with Valley Oak. But you can’t impose your clear-cut rules in lieu of thought, analysis, and comparison–no matter how nice it sounds.

  54. Anonymous

    To supporter:

    First, who’s going to staff all these new “watch dog” committees? Laid-off employees?

    Second, you don’t simply impose inventory control (FIFO, LIFO) to determine which school to shut down. It’s a complicated process with numerous variables.

    Under your scheme, the oldest school in the midst of a retirement community would stay open versus a newer school in the middle of a new development with affordable housing and younger children.

    You can disagree with Emerson, and you can disagree with Valley Oak. But you can’t impose your clear-cut rules in lieu of thought, analysis, and comparison–no matter how nice it sounds.

  55. Anonymous

    To supporter:

    First, who’s going to staff all these new “watch dog” committees? Laid-off employees?

    Second, you don’t simply impose inventory control (FIFO, LIFO) to determine which school to shut down. It’s a complicated process with numerous variables.

    Under your scheme, the oldest school in the midst of a retirement community would stay open versus a newer school in the middle of a new development with affordable housing and younger children.

    You can disagree with Emerson, and you can disagree with Valley Oak. But you can’t impose your clear-cut rules in lieu of thought, analysis, and comparison–no matter how nice it sounds.

  56. Anonymous

    To supporter:

    First, who’s going to staff all these new “watch dog” committees? Laid-off employees?

    Second, you don’t simply impose inventory control (FIFO, LIFO) to determine which school to shut down. It’s a complicated process with numerous variables.

    Under your scheme, the oldest school in the midst of a retirement community would stay open versus a newer school in the middle of a new development with affordable housing and younger children.

    You can disagree with Emerson, and you can disagree with Valley Oak. But you can’t impose your clear-cut rules in lieu of thought, analysis, and comparison–no matter how nice it sounds.

  57. Anonymous

    “the newer schools are in the neighborhoods of current School Board members.”

    Only Sheila Allen. I believe all other Board members live in older neighborhoods.

  58. Anonymous

    “the newer schools are in the neighborhoods of current School Board members.”

    Only Sheila Allen. I believe all other Board members live in older neighborhoods.

  59. Anonymous

    “the newer schools are in the neighborhoods of current School Board members.”

    Only Sheila Allen. I believe all other Board members live in older neighborhoods.

  60. Anonymous

    “the newer schools are in the neighborhoods of current School Board members.”

    Only Sheila Allen. I believe all other Board members live in older neighborhoods.

  61. wdf

    “”the newer schools are in the neighborhoods of current School Board members.”

    Only Sheila Allen. I believe all other Board members live in older neighborhoods.”

    And Sheila was the one current board member who voted to keep Valley Oak open, so it doesn’t exactly fit what “supporter” proposed.

  62. wdf

    “”the newer schools are in the neighborhoods of current School Board members.”

    Only Sheila Allen. I believe all other Board members live in older neighborhoods.”

    And Sheila was the one current board member who voted to keep Valley Oak open, so it doesn’t exactly fit what “supporter” proposed.

  63. wdf

    “”the newer schools are in the neighborhoods of current School Board members.”

    Only Sheila Allen. I believe all other Board members live in older neighborhoods.”

    And Sheila was the one current board member who voted to keep Valley Oak open, so it doesn’t exactly fit what “supporter” proposed.

  64. wdf

    “”the newer schools are in the neighborhoods of current School Board members.”

    Only Sheila Allen. I believe all other Board members live in older neighborhoods.”

    And Sheila was the one current board member who voted to keep Valley Oak open, so it doesn’t exactly fit what “supporter” proposed.

  65. Anonymous

    #1,

    We already voted in a tax to fund the wonderful programs that make Davis so “special” and then we find out that we don’t even have the money to keep schools open. Where are the priorities? If the school board can’t figure out that funding the necessities is more important than the funding the frills then something is seriously wrong. The Davis electorate is being hoodwinked with bread and ciruses while the empire is falling apart at the seams. You are seeing the results of the school boards actions in the low amount of donations to DSF. The value of a “Davis education” will plummet much faster with two overcrowded junior highs and underpaid teachers then from a lack of enrichment programs.

  66. Anonymous

    #1,

    We already voted in a tax to fund the wonderful programs that make Davis so “special” and then we find out that we don’t even have the money to keep schools open. Where are the priorities? If the school board can’t figure out that funding the necessities is more important than the funding the frills then something is seriously wrong. The Davis electorate is being hoodwinked with bread and ciruses while the empire is falling apart at the seams. You are seeing the results of the school boards actions in the low amount of donations to DSF. The value of a “Davis education” will plummet much faster with two overcrowded junior highs and underpaid teachers then from a lack of enrichment programs.

  67. Anonymous

    #1,

    We already voted in a tax to fund the wonderful programs that make Davis so “special” and then we find out that we don’t even have the money to keep schools open. Where are the priorities? If the school board can’t figure out that funding the necessities is more important than the funding the frills then something is seriously wrong. The Davis electorate is being hoodwinked with bread and ciruses while the empire is falling apart at the seams. You are seeing the results of the school boards actions in the low amount of donations to DSF. The value of a “Davis education” will plummet much faster with two overcrowded junior highs and underpaid teachers then from a lack of enrichment programs.

  68. Anonymous

    #1,

    We already voted in a tax to fund the wonderful programs that make Davis so “special” and then we find out that we don’t even have the money to keep schools open. Where are the priorities? If the school board can’t figure out that funding the necessities is more important than the funding the frills then something is seriously wrong. The Davis electorate is being hoodwinked with bread and ciruses while the empire is falling apart at the seams. You are seeing the results of the school boards actions in the low amount of donations to DSF. The value of a “Davis education” will plummet much faster with two overcrowded junior highs and underpaid teachers then from a lack of enrichment programs.

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