Mayor Greenwald Joins Councilmember Heystek in Support of Sodexho Workers

Share:

On Monday April 14, 2008, Davis Mayor Sue Greenwald wrote a letter to UC Davis Chancellor Larry Vanderhoef, making public her “support of Sodexho workers’ requests.”

Greenwald has met with Sodexho workers over the past two years and chose to make her support public now as she and City Councilmember Lamar Heystek have begun taking public actions for a Living Wage City Ordinance.

Mayor Sue Greenwald in a letter to Chancellor Vanderhoef wrote:

“I feel strongly that if the University truly believes in its ‘Principals of Community’ ethic it would treat all of its workers with the respect and equity that they are due.”

She goes on to once again point out that:

“UC Davis is the only UC campus which does not include its food workers as part of its community.”

Mayor Greenwald called on the Chancellor to recognize the Sodexho workers’ requests for the “same benefits and wages as the University food services employees, as well as union representation.”

Meanwhile a Senate Committee on Tuesday approved legislation to ensure that the University of California contracts with responsible businesses and that there is a competitive bidding process every three years. In addition, the University of California (UC) Responsible Contracting Act requires the University to maintain a centralized database of contracts that is available for public review at each campus.

Senator Leland Yee (D-San Francisco/San Mateo) introduced the measure as a result of numerous reports of UC’s deficient and non-transparent contract bidding process. It was recently uncovered that a UC Santa Barbara contractor violated wage and hour laws. For more than a decade, UC Davis has failed to put out to a bid contract for food services. In fact, the same food service company has held the contract for over thirty years.

Senator Yee said:

“SB 1596 will ensure that the University contracts with responsible entities, workers are protected, and the taxpayers’ and students’ dollars are being wisely spent. It is imperative that UC has a competitive environment where bidding is fair, transparency and accountable to the people of California.”

Senator Yee in his comments singled out UC Davis:

“It is unacceptable that UC Davis has contracted with the same campus food service company for decades without putting the contract out to bid. The cost to taxpayers and students as a result of this policy is immeasurable.”

According to a Press Release from AFSCME 3299:

“Recently, UC Santa Barbara awarded a low-bid contract to provide painting services on campus. Unfortunately, the contractor declared bankruptcy and the employees were unable to cash their paychecks for painting services they had already provided the University. Wages owed to workers included approximately $90,000. SB 1596 is expected to prevent such events from happening in the future.”

Lakesha Harrison President of AFSCME 3299 said:

“The passage of SB 1596 is crucial to ensuring the fundamental right of the public to have access to information and providing greater oversight of the University. The bill will ensure that questionable practices, like at UC Davis where Sodexo has had the contract with the university for over 3 decades with no competitive bidding in over 10 years, would be put to an end. The bill will also ensure that contractors are responsible so that Californians receive quality services at the best costs.”

While the bill was passed out of committee, it remains a long way from passage into law.

SB 1596 will also ensure competition by requiring all contracts be limited to three years terms and that upon completion of the term, the University shall solicit bids through a competitive bidding process. The would avoid a repeat of what happened with UC Davis in 2004, when the University announced a six year extension with Sodexho at the same time the university announced a multi-million dollar investment in the campus by the same contractor. This despite growing public scrutiny at that time into the food service contract.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

Share:

About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

Related posts

120 thoughts on “Mayor Greenwald Joins Councilmember Heystek in Support of Sodexho Workers”

  1. Black Bart

    What took her so long? I guess better late thaen never. What about living wages where has her leadership been on that? Of course she doesn’t need to work for a living so she probably never gave it much thought.

  2. Black Bart

    What took her so long? I guess better late thaen never. What about living wages where has her leadership been on that? Of course she doesn’t need to work for a living so she probably never gave it much thought.

  3. Black Bart

    What took her so long? I guess better late thaen never. What about living wages where has her leadership been on that? Of course she doesn’t need to work for a living so she probably never gave it much thought.

  4. Black Bart

    What took her so long? I guess better late thaen never. What about living wages where has her leadership been on that? Of course she doesn’t need to work for a living so she probably never gave it much thought.

  5. Richard

    Cheap shots against people who support your cause aren’t a very effective style of politics, and, in this instance, suggests that it is no longer political for you, but personal.

    –Richard Estes

  6. Richard

    Cheap shots against people who support your cause aren’t a very effective style of politics, and, in this instance, suggests that it is no longer political for you, but personal.

    –Richard Estes

  7. Richard

    Cheap shots against people who support your cause aren’t a very effective style of politics, and, in this instance, suggests that it is no longer political for you, but personal.

    –Richard Estes

  8. Richard

    Cheap shots against people who support your cause aren’t a very effective style of politics, and, in this instance, suggests that it is no longer political for you, but personal.

    –Richard Estes

  9. Sue Greenwald

    Why I took so long was explained in my letter.

    Below is the relevant excerpt:

    “…I feel uncomfortable complaining of actions of others, of which we as a city, are guilty.

    Over the years, in labor negotiations, I have always argued for a more progressive pay structure. I have always argued that we should show restraint in our salary and benefit increases to our management and to our workers who are paid at a management pay level, in order to be fair and more generous to our other workers and, in particular, those who make the least.

    (In fact, fair wages for our lower paid worker would cost very, very little compared to the routine increases we have been giving to our management and highest paid workers).

    In short, in our own city pay structure, I have always advocated for a more progressive total compensation package.

    Unfortunately, I have always been in the minority. During the last two years, I have met with Sodexho workers. I have explained to them that I am very sympathetic and support their cause, but I did not have the majority support of the City Council to resolve this similar labor issue with the City. I told them that I would have to at least make attempts to get our own house in order before writing to you.

    While I have been arguing and fighting for a progressive pay structure for many years, Councilmember Lamar Heystek brought the living wage ordinance to the City Council. I was the only member who supported him.

    When our landscaping and janitorial contracts came up for renewal, Lamar and I insisted that the contracts contain a minimum $13.11 per hour wage. I was adamant about this.

    Lamar and I lost even this modest motion. But because we are now at least taking public action, rather than carrying on the fight behind closed doors during labor negotiations, I feel a little more comfortable writing to you in support of the Sodexho workers’ requests.”

  10. Sue Greenwald

    Why I took so long was explained in my letter.

    Below is the relevant excerpt:

    “…I feel uncomfortable complaining of actions of others, of which we as a city, are guilty.

    Over the years, in labor negotiations, I have always argued for a more progressive pay structure. I have always argued that we should show restraint in our salary and benefit increases to our management and to our workers who are paid at a management pay level, in order to be fair and more generous to our other workers and, in particular, those who make the least.

    (In fact, fair wages for our lower paid worker would cost very, very little compared to the routine increases we have been giving to our management and highest paid workers).

    In short, in our own city pay structure, I have always advocated for a more progressive total compensation package.

    Unfortunately, I have always been in the minority. During the last two years, I have met with Sodexho workers. I have explained to them that I am very sympathetic and support their cause, but I did not have the majority support of the City Council to resolve this similar labor issue with the City. I told them that I would have to at least make attempts to get our own house in order before writing to you.

    While I have been arguing and fighting for a progressive pay structure for many years, Councilmember Lamar Heystek brought the living wage ordinance to the City Council. I was the only member who supported him.

    When our landscaping and janitorial contracts came up for renewal, Lamar and I insisted that the contracts contain a minimum $13.11 per hour wage. I was adamant about this.

    Lamar and I lost even this modest motion. But because we are now at least taking public action, rather than carrying on the fight behind closed doors during labor negotiations, I feel a little more comfortable writing to you in support of the Sodexho workers’ requests.”

  11. Sue Greenwald

    Why I took so long was explained in my letter.

    Below is the relevant excerpt:

    “…I feel uncomfortable complaining of actions of others, of which we as a city, are guilty.

    Over the years, in labor negotiations, I have always argued for a more progressive pay structure. I have always argued that we should show restraint in our salary and benefit increases to our management and to our workers who are paid at a management pay level, in order to be fair and more generous to our other workers and, in particular, those who make the least.

    (In fact, fair wages for our lower paid worker would cost very, very little compared to the routine increases we have been giving to our management and highest paid workers).

    In short, in our own city pay structure, I have always advocated for a more progressive total compensation package.

    Unfortunately, I have always been in the minority. During the last two years, I have met with Sodexho workers. I have explained to them that I am very sympathetic and support their cause, but I did not have the majority support of the City Council to resolve this similar labor issue with the City. I told them that I would have to at least make attempts to get our own house in order before writing to you.

    While I have been arguing and fighting for a progressive pay structure for many years, Councilmember Lamar Heystek brought the living wage ordinance to the City Council. I was the only member who supported him.

    When our landscaping and janitorial contracts came up for renewal, Lamar and I insisted that the contracts contain a minimum $13.11 per hour wage. I was adamant about this.

    Lamar and I lost even this modest motion. But because we are now at least taking public action, rather than carrying on the fight behind closed doors during labor negotiations, I feel a little more comfortable writing to you in support of the Sodexho workers’ requests.”

  12. Sue Greenwald

    Why I took so long was explained in my letter.

    Below is the relevant excerpt:

    “…I feel uncomfortable complaining of actions of others, of which we as a city, are guilty.

    Over the years, in labor negotiations, I have always argued for a more progressive pay structure. I have always argued that we should show restraint in our salary and benefit increases to our management and to our workers who are paid at a management pay level, in order to be fair and more generous to our other workers and, in particular, those who make the least.

    (In fact, fair wages for our lower paid worker would cost very, very little compared to the routine increases we have been giving to our management and highest paid workers).

    In short, in our own city pay structure, I have always advocated for a more progressive total compensation package.

    Unfortunately, I have always been in the minority. During the last two years, I have met with Sodexho workers. I have explained to them that I am very sympathetic and support their cause, but I did not have the majority support of the City Council to resolve this similar labor issue with the City. I told them that I would have to at least make attempts to get our own house in order before writing to you.

    While I have been arguing and fighting for a progressive pay structure for many years, Councilmember Lamar Heystek brought the living wage ordinance to the City Council. I was the only member who supported him.

    When our landscaping and janitorial contracts came up for renewal, Lamar and I insisted that the contracts contain a minimum $13.11 per hour wage. I was adamant about this.

    Lamar and I lost even this modest motion. But because we are now at least taking public action, rather than carrying on the fight behind closed doors during labor negotiations, I feel a little more comfortable writing to you in support of the Sodexho workers’ requests.”

  13. Sue Greenwald

    Why I took so long was explained in my letter.

    Below is the relevant excerpt:

    “…I feel uncomfortable complaining of actions of others, of which we as a city, are guilty.

    Over the years, in labor negotiations, I have always argued for a more progressive pay structure. I have always argued that we should show restraint in our salary and benefit increases to our management and to our workers who are paid at a management pay level, in order to be fair and more generous to our other workers and, in particular, those who make the least.

    (In fact, fair wages for our lower paid worker would cost very, very little compared to the routine increases we have been giving to our management and highest paid workers).

    In short, in our own city pay structure, I have always advocated for a more progressive total compensation package.

    Unfortunately, I have always been in the minority. During the last two years, I have met with Sodexho workers. I have explained to them that I am very sympathetic and support their cause, but I did not have the majority support of the City Council to resolve this similar labor issue with the City. I told them that I would have to at least make attempts to get our own house in order before writing to you.

    While I have been arguing and fighting for a progressive pay structure for many years, Councilmember Lamar Heystek brought the living wage ordinance to the City Council. I was the only member who supported him.

    When our landscaping and janitorial contracts came up for renewal, Lamar and I insisted that the contracts contain a minimum $13.11 per hour wage. I was adamant about this.

    Lamar and I lost even this modest motion. But because we are now at least taking public action, rather than carrying on the fight behind closed doors during labor negotiations, I feel a little more comfortable writing to you in support of the Sodexho workers’ requests.”

  14. Sue Greenwald

    Why I took so long was explained in my letter.

    Below is the relevant excerpt:

    “…I feel uncomfortable complaining of actions of others, of which we as a city, are guilty.

    Over the years, in labor negotiations, I have always argued for a more progressive pay structure. I have always argued that we should show restraint in our salary and benefit increases to our management and to our workers who are paid at a management pay level, in order to be fair and more generous to our other workers and, in particular, those who make the least.

    (In fact, fair wages for our lower paid worker would cost very, very little compared to the routine increases we have been giving to our management and highest paid workers).

    In short, in our own city pay structure, I have always advocated for a more progressive total compensation package.

    Unfortunately, I have always been in the minority. During the last two years, I have met with Sodexho workers. I have explained to them that I am very sympathetic and support their cause, but I did not have the majority support of the City Council to resolve this similar labor issue with the City. I told them that I would have to at least make attempts to get our own house in order before writing to you.

    While I have been arguing and fighting for a progressive pay structure for many years, Councilmember Lamar Heystek brought the living wage ordinance to the City Council. I was the only member who supported him.

    When our landscaping and janitorial contracts came up for renewal, Lamar and I insisted that the contracts contain a minimum $13.11 per hour wage. I was adamant about this.

    Lamar and I lost even this modest motion. But because we are now at least taking public action, rather than carrying on the fight behind closed doors during labor negotiations, I feel a little more comfortable writing to you in support of the Sodexho workers’ requests.”

  15. Sue Greenwald

    Why I took so long was explained in my letter.

    Below is the relevant excerpt:

    “…I feel uncomfortable complaining of actions of others, of which we as a city, are guilty.

    Over the years, in labor negotiations, I have always argued for a more progressive pay structure. I have always argued that we should show restraint in our salary and benefit increases to our management and to our workers who are paid at a management pay level, in order to be fair and more generous to our other workers and, in particular, those who make the least.

    (In fact, fair wages for our lower paid worker would cost very, very little compared to the routine increases we have been giving to our management and highest paid workers).

    In short, in our own city pay structure, I have always advocated for a more progressive total compensation package.

    Unfortunately, I have always been in the minority. During the last two years, I have met with Sodexho workers. I have explained to them that I am very sympathetic and support their cause, but I did not have the majority support of the City Council to resolve this similar labor issue with the City. I told them that I would have to at least make attempts to get our own house in order before writing to you.

    While I have been arguing and fighting for a progressive pay structure for many years, Councilmember Lamar Heystek brought the living wage ordinance to the City Council. I was the only member who supported him.

    When our landscaping and janitorial contracts came up for renewal, Lamar and I insisted that the contracts contain a minimum $13.11 per hour wage. I was adamant about this.

    Lamar and I lost even this modest motion. But because we are now at least taking public action, rather than carrying on the fight behind closed doors during labor negotiations, I feel a little more comfortable writing to you in support of the Sodexho workers’ requests.”

  16. Sue Greenwald

    Why I took so long was explained in my letter.

    Below is the relevant excerpt:

    “…I feel uncomfortable complaining of actions of others, of which we as a city, are guilty.

    Over the years, in labor negotiations, I have always argued for a more progressive pay structure. I have always argued that we should show restraint in our salary and benefit increases to our management and to our workers who are paid at a management pay level, in order to be fair and more generous to our other workers and, in particular, those who make the least.

    (In fact, fair wages for our lower paid worker would cost very, very little compared to the routine increases we have been giving to our management and highest paid workers).

    In short, in our own city pay structure, I have always advocated for a more progressive total compensation package.

    Unfortunately, I have always been in the minority. During the last two years, I have met with Sodexho workers. I have explained to them that I am very sympathetic and support their cause, but I did not have the majority support of the City Council to resolve this similar labor issue with the City. I told them that I would have to at least make attempts to get our own house in order before writing to you.

    While I have been arguing and fighting for a progressive pay structure for many years, Councilmember Lamar Heystek brought the living wage ordinance to the City Council. I was the only member who supported him.

    When our landscaping and janitorial contracts came up for renewal, Lamar and I insisted that the contracts contain a minimum $13.11 per hour wage. I was adamant about this.

    Lamar and I lost even this modest motion. But because we are now at least taking public action, rather than carrying on the fight behind closed doors during labor negotiations, I feel a little more comfortable writing to you in support of the Sodexho workers’ requests.”

  17. Davis Renter

    Good to see the Mayor come out in support. Perhaps it will shine some light on the faux progressives running for office.

    The insult to injury with this whole Sodexho thing is that food has become quite inedible. As an alumnus and long time employee I have experienced UCD go from innovative, inexpensive, and tasty (when the Coffee House was University – owned and student managed) to the worst food in the system, comparable to (yes, Sodexho provides institutional foods to both)airport and prison food. Even the corporate fast food (like Taco Bell and Carl’s) is much worse on campus than in town. (And one might find that concept difficult.)

    Oh they say that it’s still “student – run” but that’s like saying the local MacDonald’s and Starbucks are “student – run”. They are run on campus with the worst corporate objectives by people who have no say. Since the main reason university management went to outside sourcing was to save the money on wages and insurance, perhaps it’s time to go back to the previous system of University ownership.

  18. Davis Renter

    Good to see the Mayor come out in support. Perhaps it will shine some light on the faux progressives running for office.

    The insult to injury with this whole Sodexho thing is that food has become quite inedible. As an alumnus and long time employee I have experienced UCD go from innovative, inexpensive, and tasty (when the Coffee House was University – owned and student managed) to the worst food in the system, comparable to (yes, Sodexho provides institutional foods to both)airport and prison food. Even the corporate fast food (like Taco Bell and Carl’s) is much worse on campus than in town. (And one might find that concept difficult.)

    Oh they say that it’s still “student – run” but that’s like saying the local MacDonald’s and Starbucks are “student – run”. They are run on campus with the worst corporate objectives by people who have no say. Since the main reason university management went to outside sourcing was to save the money on wages and insurance, perhaps it’s time to go back to the previous system of University ownership.

  19. Davis Renter

    Good to see the Mayor come out in support. Perhaps it will shine some light on the faux progressives running for office.

    The insult to injury with this whole Sodexho thing is that food has become quite inedible. As an alumnus and long time employee I have experienced UCD go from innovative, inexpensive, and tasty (when the Coffee House was University – owned and student managed) to the worst food in the system, comparable to (yes, Sodexho provides institutional foods to both)airport and prison food. Even the corporate fast food (like Taco Bell and Carl’s) is much worse on campus than in town. (And one might find that concept difficult.)

    Oh they say that it’s still “student – run” but that’s like saying the local MacDonald’s and Starbucks are “student – run”. They are run on campus with the worst corporate objectives by people who have no say. Since the main reason university management went to outside sourcing was to save the money on wages and insurance, perhaps it’s time to go back to the previous system of University ownership.

  20. Davis Renter

    Good to see the Mayor come out in support. Perhaps it will shine some light on the faux progressives running for office.

    The insult to injury with this whole Sodexho thing is that food has become quite inedible. As an alumnus and long time employee I have experienced UCD go from innovative, inexpensive, and tasty (when the Coffee House was University – owned and student managed) to the worst food in the system, comparable to (yes, Sodexho provides institutional foods to both)airport and prison food. Even the corporate fast food (like Taco Bell and Carl’s) is much worse on campus than in town. (And one might find that concept difficult.)

    Oh they say that it’s still “student – run” but that’s like saying the local MacDonald’s and Starbucks are “student – run”. They are run on campus with the worst corporate objectives by people who have no say. Since the main reason university management went to outside sourcing was to save the money on wages and insurance, perhaps it’s time to go back to the previous system of University ownership.

  21. Anonymous

    Greenwald’s excuse for dithering because of city employee issues makes no sense. That would be like Assemblywoman Wolk saying she wouldn’t take a position because legislative employees aren’t unionized. (Wolk came out in support of Sodexo workers long ago.)

  22. Anonymous

    Greenwald’s excuse for dithering because of city employee issues makes no sense. That would be like Assemblywoman Wolk saying she wouldn’t take a position because legislative employees aren’t unionized. (Wolk came out in support of Sodexo workers long ago.)

  23. Anonymous

    Greenwald’s excuse for dithering because of city employee issues makes no sense. That would be like Assemblywoman Wolk saying she wouldn’t take a position because legislative employees aren’t unionized. (Wolk came out in support of Sodexo workers long ago.)

  24. Anonymous

    Greenwald’s excuse for dithering because of city employee issues makes no sense. That would be like Assemblywoman Wolk saying she wouldn’t take a position because legislative employees aren’t unionized. (Wolk came out in support of Sodexo workers long ago.)

  25. Doug Paul Davis

    Actually it makes a lot more sense than you think. For example, when the living wage issue re-emerged this year, I happened to be sitting next to a university official and he made the point that it was hypocritical for the city to be lecturing the university on the issue of Sodexho when the city is just as guilty with their own employees. The point was not lost on the university. At the very least it gives the university an excuse not to pay serious attention to the city.

    Moreover, the Mayor’s letter gives the Sodexho movement a bit of a shot of adrenaline right before a criticial decision by the university.

  26. Doug Paul Davis

    Actually it makes a lot more sense than you think. For example, when the living wage issue re-emerged this year, I happened to be sitting next to a university official and he made the point that it was hypocritical for the city to be lecturing the university on the issue of Sodexho when the city is just as guilty with their own employees. The point was not lost on the university. At the very least it gives the university an excuse not to pay serious attention to the city.

    Moreover, the Mayor’s letter gives the Sodexho movement a bit of a shot of adrenaline right before a criticial decision by the university.

  27. Doug Paul Davis

    Actually it makes a lot more sense than you think. For example, when the living wage issue re-emerged this year, I happened to be sitting next to a university official and he made the point that it was hypocritical for the city to be lecturing the university on the issue of Sodexho when the city is just as guilty with their own employees. The point was not lost on the university. At the very least it gives the university an excuse not to pay serious attention to the city.

    Moreover, the Mayor’s letter gives the Sodexho movement a bit of a shot of adrenaline right before a criticial decision by the university.

  28. Doug Paul Davis

    Actually it makes a lot more sense than you think. For example, when the living wage issue re-emerged this year, I happened to be sitting next to a university official and he made the point that it was hypocritical for the city to be lecturing the university on the issue of Sodexho when the city is just as guilty with their own employees. The point was not lost on the university. At the very least it gives the university an excuse not to pay serious attention to the city.

    Moreover, the Mayor’s letter gives the Sodexho movement a bit of a shot of adrenaline right before a criticial decision by the university.

  29. Black Bart

    Sue’s coming on board now is like Russia declaring war on Japan after Hiroshima. On a local level I would compare her late coming out, because it is not a city issue, to Don Saylor not voting on a resolution against the war in Iraq because it wasn’t a city issue.

    As for Richard defending his ex-landlady it seems he is violating his own criticism of Davis politics, that personal relationships are more important than policy. Richard maybe you would have stayed in Davis when you bought your home if the mayors nimby policies didn’t price you out.
    So personal oh well, mea culpa mea culpa mea culpa. Benedict can you hear me?

  30. Black Bart

    Sue’s coming on board now is like Russia declaring war on Japan after Hiroshima. On a local level I would compare her late coming out, because it is not a city issue, to Don Saylor not voting on a resolution against the war in Iraq because it wasn’t a city issue.

    As for Richard defending his ex-landlady it seems he is violating his own criticism of Davis politics, that personal relationships are more important than policy. Richard maybe you would have stayed in Davis when you bought your home if the mayors nimby policies didn’t price you out.
    So personal oh well, mea culpa mea culpa mea culpa. Benedict can you hear me?

  31. Black Bart

    Sue’s coming on board now is like Russia declaring war on Japan after Hiroshima. On a local level I would compare her late coming out, because it is not a city issue, to Don Saylor not voting on a resolution against the war in Iraq because it wasn’t a city issue.

    As for Richard defending his ex-landlady it seems he is violating his own criticism of Davis politics, that personal relationships are more important than policy. Richard maybe you would have stayed in Davis when you bought your home if the mayors nimby policies didn’t price you out.
    So personal oh well, mea culpa mea culpa mea culpa. Benedict can you hear me?

  32. Black Bart

    Sue’s coming on board now is like Russia declaring war on Japan after Hiroshima. On a local level I would compare her late coming out, because it is not a city issue, to Don Saylor not voting on a resolution against the war in Iraq because it wasn’t a city issue.

    As for Richard defending his ex-landlady it seems he is violating his own criticism of Davis politics, that personal relationships are more important than policy. Richard maybe you would have stayed in Davis when you bought your home if the mayors nimby policies didn’t price you out.
    So personal oh well, mea culpa mea culpa mea culpa. Benedict can you hear me?

  33. Sue Greenwald

    I had absolutely no idea this was coming, but the timing is amazing. These negotiations are definitely top secret, and I am not in the Chancellor’s inner circle, to say the least.

    Clearly, it was my letter pushed them over the top. (Joking, of course.)

  34. Sue Greenwald

    I had absolutely no idea this was coming, but the timing is amazing. These negotiations are definitely top secret, and I am not in the Chancellor’s inner circle, to say the least.

    Clearly, it was my letter pushed them over the top. (Joking, of course.)

  35. Sue Greenwald

    I had absolutely no idea this was coming, but the timing is amazing. These negotiations are definitely top secret, and I am not in the Chancellor’s inner circle, to say the least.

    Clearly, it was my letter pushed them over the top. (Joking, of course.)

  36. Sue Greenwald

    I had absolutely no idea this was coming, but the timing is amazing. These negotiations are definitely top secret, and I am not in the Chancellor’s inner circle, to say the least.

    Clearly, it was my letter pushed them over the top. (Joking, of course.)

  37. Doug Paul Davis

    A few points to be made:

    The Mayor did not send me a press release on this, AFSCME 3299, so it was not an effort at grandstanding on her part. To the best of my knowledge she sent the letter to the chancellor and copied the AFSCME coordinator on it.

    I have been in contact with AFSCME all afternoon. No one knew this was coming down today and no one knew what they were going to decide.

    I will have a full story in the morning, the sense I get is that they are mostly happy but the nine month timeline is a bit steep especially for some of the workers.

  38. Doug Paul Davis

    A few points to be made:

    The Mayor did not send me a press release on this, AFSCME 3299, so it was not an effort at grandstanding on her part. To the best of my knowledge she sent the letter to the chancellor and copied the AFSCME coordinator on it.

    I have been in contact with AFSCME all afternoon. No one knew this was coming down today and no one knew what they were going to decide.

    I will have a full story in the morning, the sense I get is that they are mostly happy but the nine month timeline is a bit steep especially for some of the workers.

  39. Doug Paul Davis

    A few points to be made:

    The Mayor did not send me a press release on this, AFSCME 3299, so it was not an effort at grandstanding on her part. To the best of my knowledge she sent the letter to the chancellor and copied the AFSCME coordinator on it.

    I have been in contact with AFSCME all afternoon. No one knew this was coming down today and no one knew what they were going to decide.

    I will have a full story in the morning, the sense I get is that they are mostly happy but the nine month timeline is a bit steep especially for some of the workers.

  40. Doug Paul Davis

    A few points to be made:

    The Mayor did not send me a press release on this, AFSCME 3299, so it was not an effort at grandstanding on her part. To the best of my knowledge she sent the letter to the chancellor and copied the AFSCME coordinator on it.

    I have been in contact with AFSCME all afternoon. No one knew this was coming down today and no one knew what they were going to decide.

    I will have a full story in the morning, the sense I get is that they are mostly happy but the nine month timeline is a bit steep especially for some of the workers.

  41. CB

    If you follow city council meetings at all, you know that Sue always speaks out for workers’ rights and for their fair and honest treatment. Unfortunately, she is consistently in the council minority on these issues. You should consider this carefully when you think of voting for any of the other incumbents currently running for city council. You may criticize the fact that Sue only contacted the university now, but where were her fellow council candidates on this issue? Nowhere to be found.

  42. CB

    If you follow city council meetings at all, you know that Sue always speaks out for workers’ rights and for their fair and honest treatment. Unfortunately, she is consistently in the council minority on these issues. You should consider this carefully when you think of voting for any of the other incumbents currently running for city council. You may criticize the fact that Sue only contacted the university now, but where were her fellow council candidates on this issue? Nowhere to be found.

  43. CB

    If you follow city council meetings at all, you know that Sue always speaks out for workers’ rights and for their fair and honest treatment. Unfortunately, she is consistently in the council minority on these issues. You should consider this carefully when you think of voting for any of the other incumbents currently running for city council. You may criticize the fact that Sue only contacted the university now, but where were her fellow council candidates on this issue? Nowhere to be found.

  44. CB

    If you follow city council meetings at all, you know that Sue always speaks out for workers’ rights and for their fair and honest treatment. Unfortunately, she is consistently in the council minority on these issues. You should consider this carefully when you think of voting for any of the other incumbents currently running for city council. You may criticize the fact that Sue only contacted the university now, but where were her fellow council candidates on this issue? Nowhere to be found.

  45. Slow Learner

    I wasn’t particularly engaged in this issue. I did not like the disruption the demonstrations caused, when some students were made late to exams. I did not like the fact that food prices for students were raised when Sodexho workers were given additional benefits/wage increases. I have always felt campus food services should be student run rather than contracted out if at all possible. Students need the work and experience.

    Nevertheless, I applaud all who put this issue on the front burner, and made things change, including Lamar and Sue, although I DO NOT APPROVE OF CIVIL DISOBIENCE (BREAKING THE LAW). I suspect UCD caved in when word got out that serious legislation was wending its way through CA’s Capitol Hill – it is called damage control. UCD is hoping the legislation will now go away…they have been publicly embarrassed.

    My hope is Sodexho will fade away altogether, the students will take things over entirely, and run the food services more efficiently and produce better food. At my old alma mater back East, the students actually made ice cream from milk obtained via the dairy cows raised on campus! Ooooooh it was delicioso! Is something like that being done at UCD? How about producing some UCD cheese to go with the new wine students will be producing. Let’s get cracking, and push to have students run the entire operation! I cannot believe business majors wouldn’t love a crack at starting a campus business…and any profits can be plowed back into the program by reducing food prices for students!

  46. Slow Learner

    I wasn’t particularly engaged in this issue. I did not like the disruption the demonstrations caused, when some students were made late to exams. I did not like the fact that food prices for students were raised when Sodexho workers were given additional benefits/wage increases. I have always felt campus food services should be student run rather than contracted out if at all possible. Students need the work and experience.

    Nevertheless, I applaud all who put this issue on the front burner, and made things change, including Lamar and Sue, although I DO NOT APPROVE OF CIVIL DISOBIENCE (BREAKING THE LAW). I suspect UCD caved in when word got out that serious legislation was wending its way through CA’s Capitol Hill – it is called damage control. UCD is hoping the legislation will now go away…they have been publicly embarrassed.

    My hope is Sodexho will fade away altogether, the students will take things over entirely, and run the food services more efficiently and produce better food. At my old alma mater back East, the students actually made ice cream from milk obtained via the dairy cows raised on campus! Ooooooh it was delicioso! Is something like that being done at UCD? How about producing some UCD cheese to go with the new wine students will be producing. Let’s get cracking, and push to have students run the entire operation! I cannot believe business majors wouldn’t love a crack at starting a campus business…and any profits can be plowed back into the program by reducing food prices for students!

  47. Slow Learner

    I wasn’t particularly engaged in this issue. I did not like the disruption the demonstrations caused, when some students were made late to exams. I did not like the fact that food prices for students were raised when Sodexho workers were given additional benefits/wage increases. I have always felt campus food services should be student run rather than contracted out if at all possible. Students need the work and experience.

    Nevertheless, I applaud all who put this issue on the front burner, and made things change, including Lamar and Sue, although I DO NOT APPROVE OF CIVIL DISOBIENCE (BREAKING THE LAW). I suspect UCD caved in when word got out that serious legislation was wending its way through CA’s Capitol Hill – it is called damage control. UCD is hoping the legislation will now go away…they have been publicly embarrassed.

    My hope is Sodexho will fade away altogether, the students will take things over entirely, and run the food services more efficiently and produce better food. At my old alma mater back East, the students actually made ice cream from milk obtained via the dairy cows raised on campus! Ooooooh it was delicioso! Is something like that being done at UCD? How about producing some UCD cheese to go with the new wine students will be producing. Let’s get cracking, and push to have students run the entire operation! I cannot believe business majors wouldn’t love a crack at starting a campus business…and any profits can be plowed back into the program by reducing food prices for students!

  48. Slow Learner

    I wasn’t particularly engaged in this issue. I did not like the disruption the demonstrations caused, when some students were made late to exams. I did not like the fact that food prices for students were raised when Sodexho workers were given additional benefits/wage increases. I have always felt campus food services should be student run rather than contracted out if at all possible. Students need the work and experience.

    Nevertheless, I applaud all who put this issue on the front burner, and made things change, including Lamar and Sue, although I DO NOT APPROVE OF CIVIL DISOBIENCE (BREAKING THE LAW). I suspect UCD caved in when word got out that serious legislation was wending its way through CA’s Capitol Hill – it is called damage control. UCD is hoping the legislation will now go away…they have been publicly embarrassed.

    My hope is Sodexho will fade away altogether, the students will take things over entirely, and run the food services more efficiently and produce better food. At my old alma mater back East, the students actually made ice cream from milk obtained via the dairy cows raised on campus! Ooooooh it was delicioso! Is something like that being done at UCD? How about producing some UCD cheese to go with the new wine students will be producing. Let’s get cracking, and push to have students run the entire operation! I cannot believe business majors wouldn’t love a crack at starting a campus business…and any profits can be plowed back into the program by reducing food prices for students!

  49. pleased with the good news

    Anonymous 2:01 PM said

    “Wolk came out in support of Sodexo workers long ago.”

    She did, but it was somewhat of a lukewarm support. She should have been the one sponsoring the current bill under consideration. Instead, it is a Senator from the Bay Area who is sponsoring the bill.

    Good job Lamar and Sue. We need people on council who are not afraid to speak up and do the right thing.

  50. pleased with the good news

    Anonymous 2:01 PM said

    “Wolk came out in support of Sodexo workers long ago.”

    She did, but it was somewhat of a lukewarm support. She should have been the one sponsoring the current bill under consideration. Instead, it is a Senator from the Bay Area who is sponsoring the bill.

    Good job Lamar and Sue. We need people on council who are not afraid to speak up and do the right thing.

  51. pleased with the good news

    Anonymous 2:01 PM said

    “Wolk came out in support of Sodexo workers long ago.”

    She did, but it was somewhat of a lukewarm support. She should have been the one sponsoring the current bill under consideration. Instead, it is a Senator from the Bay Area who is sponsoring the bill.

    Good job Lamar and Sue. We need people on council who are not afraid to speak up and do the right thing.

  52. pleased with the good news

    Anonymous 2:01 PM said

    “Wolk came out in support of Sodexo workers long ago.”

    She did, but it was somewhat of a lukewarm support. She should have been the one sponsoring the current bill under consideration. Instead, it is a Senator from the Bay Area who is sponsoring the bill.

    Good job Lamar and Sue. We need people on council who are not afraid to speak up and do the right thing.

  53. Richard

    As for Richard defending his ex-landlady it seems he is violating his own criticism of Davis politics, that personal relationships are more important than policy. Richard maybe you would have stayed in Davis when you bought your home if the mayors nimby policies didn’t price you out. So personal oh well, mea culpa mea culpa mea culpa. Benedict can you hear me?

    Sometimes people just rush through doors to prove your point. Obviously, it is quite personal for you.

    I like my house in Sacramento, and I like my neighborhood, and having grown up in the more cosmopolitan urban environment here, I like it more than Davis.

    Ron Glick gave me some sage political advice several years ago. No matter how much you like or dislike a particular politician, you should always praise them when they support your cause.

    It’s good advice, and black bart probably understood it as well several years ago, and he would be well advised to remember it. Unless, of course, black bart doesn’t really care about Sodexho workers, but does enjoy acting as if he does to bash Sue Greenwald.

  54. Richard

    As for Richard defending his ex-landlady it seems he is violating his own criticism of Davis politics, that personal relationships are more important than policy. Richard maybe you would have stayed in Davis when you bought your home if the mayors nimby policies didn’t price you out. So personal oh well, mea culpa mea culpa mea culpa. Benedict can you hear me?

    Sometimes people just rush through doors to prove your point. Obviously, it is quite personal for you.

    I like my house in Sacramento, and I like my neighborhood, and having grown up in the more cosmopolitan urban environment here, I like it more than Davis.

    Ron Glick gave me some sage political advice several years ago. No matter how much you like or dislike a particular politician, you should always praise them when they support your cause.

    It’s good advice, and black bart probably understood it as well several years ago, and he would be well advised to remember it. Unless, of course, black bart doesn’t really care about Sodexho workers, but does enjoy acting as if he does to bash Sue Greenwald.

  55. Richard

    As for Richard defending his ex-landlady it seems he is violating his own criticism of Davis politics, that personal relationships are more important than policy. Richard maybe you would have stayed in Davis when you bought your home if the mayors nimby policies didn’t price you out. So personal oh well, mea culpa mea culpa mea culpa. Benedict can you hear me?

    Sometimes people just rush through doors to prove your point. Obviously, it is quite personal for you.

    I like my house in Sacramento, and I like my neighborhood, and having grown up in the more cosmopolitan urban environment here, I like it more than Davis.

    Ron Glick gave me some sage political advice several years ago. No matter how much you like or dislike a particular politician, you should always praise them when they support your cause.

    It’s good advice, and black bart probably understood it as well several years ago, and he would be well advised to remember it. Unless, of course, black bart doesn’t really care about Sodexho workers, but does enjoy acting as if he does to bash Sue Greenwald.

  56. Richard

    As for Richard defending his ex-landlady it seems he is violating his own criticism of Davis politics, that personal relationships are more important than policy. Richard maybe you would have stayed in Davis when you bought your home if the mayors nimby policies didn’t price you out. So personal oh well, mea culpa mea culpa mea culpa. Benedict can you hear me?

    Sometimes people just rush through doors to prove your point. Obviously, it is quite personal for you.

    I like my house in Sacramento, and I like my neighborhood, and having grown up in the more cosmopolitan urban environment here, I like it more than Davis.

    Ron Glick gave me some sage political advice several years ago. No matter how much you like or dislike a particular politician, you should always praise them when they support your cause.

    It’s good advice, and black bart probably understood it as well several years ago, and he would be well advised to remember it. Unless, of course, black bart doesn’t really care about Sodexho workers, but does enjoy acting as if he does to bash Sue Greenwald.

  57. 無名 - wu ming

    that’s fantastic news about the UCD food service workers. long since overdue, and a bit foot-dragging with the time of the transition period, but a welcome change nonetheless.

  58. 無名 - wu ming

    that’s fantastic news about the UCD food service workers. long since overdue, and a bit foot-dragging with the time of the transition period, but a welcome change nonetheless.

  59. 無名 - wu ming

    that’s fantastic news about the UCD food service workers. long since overdue, and a bit foot-dragging with the time of the transition period, but a welcome change nonetheless.

  60. 無名 - wu ming

    that’s fantastic news about the UCD food service workers. long since overdue, and a bit foot-dragging with the time of the transition period, but a welcome change nonetheless.

  61. Black Bart

    The mayor came too late to the party for her to take any credit on Sodexo workers. Now Lamar has been there all along and Assemblymember Wolk was there some time ago so I don’t see how coming out, coincidentally on the same day as the University finally capitulates, is worthy of praise.

    One of the mayors criticisms of Don Saylor is that he will vote against his views if he knows the vote will go against him and he will look bad being on the losing side. Doesn’t this have the same feel? Maybe her support of the Sodexo workers is belatedly genuine but it just seems like it took her a long time to come out.

    Of course I would have more respect for her if she had been supportive of the Sodexo workers back when you had them on your radio show Richard. You have shown those workers more support by putting them on the radio, back when it really mattered, than anything the mayor can do at this late date.

    Let’s give the credit where it is really due, to the workers and labor organizers and alternative media that worked this issue all along instead of praising the mayor who facetiouly wants to claim her letter broke the camels back. What is particularly annoying is that she does this without recognizing the people who did work so hard.

    Finally, is it too much to suggest that maybe her new found support for the Sodexo workers coming during her own re-election campaign might not be anything more than a self-serving ploy for votes. I just hope that organized labor can see it for what it is. I bet they can and maybe that is why they are supporting a Greenwald, Cecilia Greenwald, who has supported the Sodexo workers from the very start.

  62. Black Bart

    The mayor came too late to the party for her to take any credit on Sodexo workers. Now Lamar has been there all along and Assemblymember Wolk was there some time ago so I don’t see how coming out, coincidentally on the same day as the University finally capitulates, is worthy of praise.

    One of the mayors criticisms of Don Saylor is that he will vote against his views if he knows the vote will go against him and he will look bad being on the losing side. Doesn’t this have the same feel? Maybe her support of the Sodexo workers is belatedly genuine but it just seems like it took her a long time to come out.

    Of course I would have more respect for her if she had been supportive of the Sodexo workers back when you had them on your radio show Richard. You have shown those workers more support by putting them on the radio, back when it really mattered, than anything the mayor can do at this late date.

    Let’s give the credit where it is really due, to the workers and labor organizers and alternative media that worked this issue all along instead of praising the mayor who facetiouly wants to claim her letter broke the camels back. What is particularly annoying is that she does this without recognizing the people who did work so hard.

    Finally, is it too much to suggest that maybe her new found support for the Sodexo workers coming during her own re-election campaign might not be anything more than a self-serving ploy for votes. I just hope that organized labor can see it for what it is. I bet they can and maybe that is why they are supporting a Greenwald, Cecilia Greenwald, who has supported the Sodexo workers from the very start.

  63. Black Bart

    The mayor came too late to the party for her to take any credit on Sodexo workers. Now Lamar has been there all along and Assemblymember Wolk was there some time ago so I don’t see how coming out, coincidentally on the same day as the University finally capitulates, is worthy of praise.

    One of the mayors criticisms of Don Saylor is that he will vote against his views if he knows the vote will go against him and he will look bad being on the losing side. Doesn’t this have the same feel? Maybe her support of the Sodexo workers is belatedly genuine but it just seems like it took her a long time to come out.

    Of course I would have more respect for her if she had been supportive of the Sodexo workers back when you had them on your radio show Richard. You have shown those workers more support by putting them on the radio, back when it really mattered, than anything the mayor can do at this late date.

    Let’s give the credit where it is really due, to the workers and labor organizers and alternative media that worked this issue all along instead of praising the mayor who facetiouly wants to claim her letter broke the camels back. What is particularly annoying is that she does this without recognizing the people who did work so hard.

    Finally, is it too much to suggest that maybe her new found support for the Sodexo workers coming during her own re-election campaign might not be anything more than a self-serving ploy for votes. I just hope that organized labor can see it for what it is. I bet they can and maybe that is why they are supporting a Greenwald, Cecilia Greenwald, who has supported the Sodexo workers from the very start.

  64. Black Bart

    The mayor came too late to the party for her to take any credit on Sodexo workers. Now Lamar has been there all along and Assemblymember Wolk was there some time ago so I don’t see how coming out, coincidentally on the same day as the University finally capitulates, is worthy of praise.

    One of the mayors criticisms of Don Saylor is that he will vote against his views if he knows the vote will go against him and he will look bad being on the losing side. Doesn’t this have the same feel? Maybe her support of the Sodexo workers is belatedly genuine but it just seems like it took her a long time to come out.

    Of course I would have more respect for her if she had been supportive of the Sodexo workers back when you had them on your radio show Richard. You have shown those workers more support by putting them on the radio, back when it really mattered, than anything the mayor can do at this late date.

    Let’s give the credit where it is really due, to the workers and labor organizers and alternative media that worked this issue all along instead of praising the mayor who facetiouly wants to claim her letter broke the camels back. What is particularly annoying is that she does this without recognizing the people who did work so hard.

    Finally, is it too much to suggest that maybe her new found support for the Sodexo workers coming during her own re-election campaign might not be anything more than a self-serving ploy for votes. I just hope that organized labor can see it for what it is. I bet they can and maybe that is why they are supporting a Greenwald, Cecilia Greenwald, who has supported the Sodexo workers from the very start.

  65. Don Gibson

    I know there will be a full article in a little bit but this is a huge victory by all people who marched, protested, and questioned the policies of UC Davis administration. Even though it is about as last minute as physically possible, it was great that Greenwald and Heystek stood for what is right in our community.

  66. Don Gibson

    I know there will be a full article in a little bit but this is a huge victory by all people who marched, protested, and questioned the policies of UC Davis administration. Even though it is about as last minute as physically possible, it was great that Greenwald and Heystek stood for what is right in our community.

  67. Don Gibson

    I know there will be a full article in a little bit but this is a huge victory by all people who marched, protested, and questioned the policies of UC Davis administration. Even though it is about as last minute as physically possible, it was great that Greenwald and Heystek stood for what is right in our community.

  68. Don Gibson

    I know there will be a full article in a little bit but this is a huge victory by all people who marched, protested, and questioned the policies of UC Davis administration. Even though it is about as last minute as physically possible, it was great that Greenwald and Heystek stood for what is right in our community.

  69. machine politics

    pleased with the good news said:
    “She did, but it was somewhat of a lukewarm support. She should have been the one sponsoring the current bill under consideration. Instead, it is a Senator from the Bay Area who is sponsoring the bill.”

    Lois Wolk’s political career has been forged in the cauldron of local Dem special-interest machine politics.
    Her political record is best summarized as “lukewarm”. The causes she champions are almost always politically safe and thoroughly veted by public opinion before she takes a position;she consistently avoids taking a leadership position on controversial issues. Cabaldon is cast in the same political mold and we can expect a similar Assembly record if he is elected to her seat; he has been chosen by these same backroom political power-brokers to follow Wolk up the political ladder. Our own Don Saylor is, of course, working unceasingly every day in every way to earn the backing of these special-inerest power-brokers to be next in line.

  70. machine politics

    pleased with the good news said:
    “She did, but it was somewhat of a lukewarm support. She should have been the one sponsoring the current bill under consideration. Instead, it is a Senator from the Bay Area who is sponsoring the bill.”

    Lois Wolk’s political career has been forged in the cauldron of local Dem special-interest machine politics.
    Her political record is best summarized as “lukewarm”. The causes she champions are almost always politically safe and thoroughly veted by public opinion before she takes a position;she consistently avoids taking a leadership position on controversial issues. Cabaldon is cast in the same political mold and we can expect a similar Assembly record if he is elected to her seat; he has been chosen by these same backroom political power-brokers to follow Wolk up the political ladder. Our own Don Saylor is, of course, working unceasingly every day in every way to earn the backing of these special-inerest power-brokers to be next in line.

  71. machine politics

    pleased with the good news said:
    “She did, but it was somewhat of a lukewarm support. She should have been the one sponsoring the current bill under consideration. Instead, it is a Senator from the Bay Area who is sponsoring the bill.”

    Lois Wolk’s political career has been forged in the cauldron of local Dem special-interest machine politics.
    Her political record is best summarized as “lukewarm”. The causes she champions are almost always politically safe and thoroughly veted by public opinion before she takes a position;she consistently avoids taking a leadership position on controversial issues. Cabaldon is cast in the same political mold and we can expect a similar Assembly record if he is elected to her seat; he has been chosen by these same backroom political power-brokers to follow Wolk up the political ladder. Our own Don Saylor is, of course, working unceasingly every day in every way to earn the backing of these special-inerest power-brokers to be next in line.

  72. machine politics

    pleased with the good news said:
    “She did, but it was somewhat of a lukewarm support. She should have been the one sponsoring the current bill under consideration. Instead, it is a Senator from the Bay Area who is sponsoring the bill.”

    Lois Wolk’s political career has been forged in the cauldron of local Dem special-interest machine politics.
    Her political record is best summarized as “lukewarm”. The causes she champions are almost always politically safe and thoroughly veted by public opinion before she takes a position;she consistently avoids taking a leadership position on controversial issues. Cabaldon is cast in the same political mold and we can expect a similar Assembly record if he is elected to her seat; he has been chosen by these same backroom political power-brokers to follow Wolk up the political ladder. Our own Don Saylor is, of course, working unceasingly every day in every way to earn the backing of these special-inerest power-brokers to be next in line.

  73. politics as usual

    anony 2:01 pm said:
    “Wolk came out in support of Sodexo workers long ago.”

    Wolk may have “come out” but it was political rhetoric, not sponsoring legislation or actually having to cast a meaningful vote. Cabaldon, not surprisingly, uses the same playbook in his current campaign. Long on campaign rhetoric about land use and sprawl which he would have little or no power(unlike when Mayor of West Sac) to effect if winning Wolk’s assembly seat.

  74. politics as usual

    anony 2:01 pm said:
    “Wolk came out in support of Sodexo workers long ago.”

    Wolk may have “come out” but it was political rhetoric, not sponsoring legislation or actually having to cast a meaningful vote. Cabaldon, not surprisingly, uses the same playbook in his current campaign. Long on campaign rhetoric about land use and sprawl which he would have little or no power(unlike when Mayor of West Sac) to effect if winning Wolk’s assembly seat.

  75. politics as usual

    anony 2:01 pm said:
    “Wolk came out in support of Sodexo workers long ago.”

    Wolk may have “come out” but it was political rhetoric, not sponsoring legislation or actually having to cast a meaningful vote. Cabaldon, not surprisingly, uses the same playbook in his current campaign. Long on campaign rhetoric about land use and sprawl which he would have little or no power(unlike when Mayor of West Sac) to effect if winning Wolk’s assembly seat.

  76. politics as usual

    anony 2:01 pm said:
    “Wolk came out in support of Sodexo workers long ago.”

    Wolk may have “come out” but it was political rhetoric, not sponsoring legislation or actually having to cast a meaningful vote. Cabaldon, not surprisingly, uses the same playbook in his current campaign. Long on campaign rhetoric about land use and sprawl which he would have little or no power(unlike when Mayor of West Sac) to effect if winning Wolk’s assembly seat.

  77. Anonymous

    You guys want to bash Wolk for not taking a more public stance on this but you have no idea what she said to the chancellor in private. If she came out in support of food service workers and nothing happened it would be one thing but that isn’t what happened.

    I think the real story here is that the university had a contract they wanted to honor with Sodexo so they bought a little time with the interim deal which went down when Wolk got involved. I bet she had a promise from the university to do this when the contract ended.

  78. Anonymous

    You guys want to bash Wolk for not taking a more public stance on this but you have no idea what she said to the chancellor in private. If she came out in support of food service workers and nothing happened it would be one thing but that isn’t what happened.

    I think the real story here is that the university had a contract they wanted to honor with Sodexo so they bought a little time with the interim deal which went down when Wolk got involved. I bet she had a promise from the university to do this when the contract ended.

  79. Anonymous

    You guys want to bash Wolk for not taking a more public stance on this but you have no idea what she said to the chancellor in private. If she came out in support of food service workers and nothing happened it would be one thing but that isn’t what happened.

    I think the real story here is that the university had a contract they wanted to honor with Sodexo so they bought a little time with the interim deal which went down when Wolk got involved. I bet she had a promise from the university to do this when the contract ended.

  80. Anonymous

    You guys want to bash Wolk for not taking a more public stance on this but you have no idea what she said to the chancellor in private. If she came out in support of food service workers and nothing happened it would be one thing but that isn’t what happened.

    I think the real story here is that the university had a contract they wanted to honor with Sodexo so they bought a little time with the interim deal which went down when Wolk got involved. I bet she had a promise from the university to do this when the contract ended.

  81. Anonymous

    A few people criticized Wolk as having lukewarm support for the Sodexho workers, it is not clear to me that that amounts to “bash” or even whether it is worth depicting as “you guys” since it seems like three people at most amount the many complaints. I’d go as far to suggest that the Mayor was more closely to bash here rather than Wolk.

    I don’t get any impression that Wolk had some sort of behind the scenes deal planned and I am certainly not going to credit here based on conjecture.

  82. Anonymous

    A few people criticized Wolk as having lukewarm support for the Sodexho workers, it is not clear to me that that amounts to “bash” or even whether it is worth depicting as “you guys” since it seems like three people at most amount the many complaints. I’d go as far to suggest that the Mayor was more closely to bash here rather than Wolk.

    I don’t get any impression that Wolk had some sort of behind the scenes deal planned and I am certainly not going to credit here based on conjecture.

  83. Anonymous

    A few people criticized Wolk as having lukewarm support for the Sodexho workers, it is not clear to me that that amounts to “bash” or even whether it is worth depicting as “you guys” since it seems like three people at most amount the many complaints. I’d go as far to suggest that the Mayor was more closely to bash here rather than Wolk.

    I don’t get any impression that Wolk had some sort of behind the scenes deal planned and I am certainly not going to credit here based on conjecture.

  84. Anonymous

    A few people criticized Wolk as having lukewarm support for the Sodexho workers, it is not clear to me that that amounts to “bash” or even whether it is worth depicting as “you guys” since it seems like three people at most amount the many complaints. I’d go as far to suggest that the Mayor was more closely to bash here rather than Wolk.

    I don’t get any impression that Wolk had some sort of behind the scenes deal planned and I am certainly not going to credit here based on conjecture.

  85. politics as usual

    Anon 9:56 AM said:
    “So, the choice is between Cabaldon’s rhetoric and Yamada’s incompetence. Or you can always elect a Republican.”

    Yamada has demonstrated two things to me. One, that she isn’t running a great campaign, either because of personal style or resources. This means little to me. There is little correlation between campaigning effectiveness(extensive polling then pandering to the electorate) and what they do in office that you support or do not support. As to her attempt to change the status -quo with regard to Davis’ relationship with the County on growth issues, I would have voted to recall her if she had persisted but can still respect her integrity(and courage) in attempting to fulfill her responsibility as a COUNTY supervisor as she saw it. As our Assembly representative, she will have no power to alter our relationship with the county on this issue.

  86. politics as usual

    Anon 9:56 AM said:
    “So, the choice is between Cabaldon’s rhetoric and Yamada’s incompetence. Or you can always elect a Republican.”

    Yamada has demonstrated two things to me. One, that she isn’t running a great campaign, either because of personal style or resources. This means little to me. There is little correlation between campaigning effectiveness(extensive polling then pandering to the electorate) and what they do in office that you support or do not support. As to her attempt to change the status -quo with regard to Davis’ relationship with the County on growth issues, I would have voted to recall her if she had persisted but can still respect her integrity(and courage) in attempting to fulfill her responsibility as a COUNTY supervisor as she saw it. As our Assembly representative, she will have no power to alter our relationship with the county on this issue.

  87. politics as usual

    Anon 9:56 AM said:
    “So, the choice is between Cabaldon’s rhetoric and Yamada’s incompetence. Or you can always elect a Republican.”

    Yamada has demonstrated two things to me. One, that she isn’t running a great campaign, either because of personal style or resources. This means little to me. There is little correlation between campaigning effectiveness(extensive polling then pandering to the electorate) and what they do in office that you support or do not support. As to her attempt to change the status -quo with regard to Davis’ relationship with the County on growth issues, I would have voted to recall her if she had persisted but can still respect her integrity(and courage) in attempting to fulfill her responsibility as a COUNTY supervisor as she saw it. As our Assembly representative, she will have no power to alter our relationship with the county on this issue.

  88. politics as usual

    Anon 9:56 AM said:
    “So, the choice is between Cabaldon’s rhetoric and Yamada’s incompetence. Or you can always elect a Republican.”

    Yamada has demonstrated two things to me. One, that she isn’t running a great campaign, either because of personal style or resources. This means little to me. There is little correlation between campaigning effectiveness(extensive polling then pandering to the electorate) and what they do in office that you support or do not support. As to her attempt to change the status -quo with regard to Davis’ relationship with the County on growth issues, I would have voted to recall her if she had persisted but can still respect her integrity(and courage) in attempting to fulfill her responsibility as a COUNTY supervisor as she saw it. As our Assembly representative, she will have no power to alter our relationship with the county on this issue.

  89. Anonymous

    11:59

    Credit who you want but I KNOW that Wolk was the pivotal player in this little drama. Anyone who was on the inside knows that as well. As always you’re free to believe what you want and as illustrated by so many of the comments here…people love nonsense!

  90. Anonymous

    11:59

    Credit who you want but I KNOW that Wolk was the pivotal player in this little drama. Anyone who was on the inside knows that as well. As always you’re free to believe what you want and as illustrated by so many of the comments here…people love nonsense!

  91. Anonymous

    11:59

    Credit who you want but I KNOW that Wolk was the pivotal player in this little drama. Anyone who was on the inside knows that as well. As always you’re free to believe what you want and as illustrated by so many of the comments here…people love nonsense!

  92. Anonymous

    11:59

    Credit who you want but I KNOW that Wolk was the pivotal player in this little drama. Anyone who was on the inside knows that as well. As always you’re free to believe what you want and as illustrated by so many of the comments here…people love nonsense!

Leave a Reply

X Close

Newsletter Sign-Up

X Close

Monthly Subscriber Sign-Up

Enter the maximum amount you want to pay each month
$ USD
Sign up for