Commentary: Where is the Coverage of the City Council Elections

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By Monday, the Vanguard will have covered four City Council forums, the most recently a bit delayed from Wednesday night’s Sierra Club and Davis Neighborhood Association Forum.

What is appalling however is a conversation I recently had with a reporter from the Davis Enterprise who informed me that the Enterprise will not be covering the candidates forums. In fact, the Davis Enterprise has not covered much of anything regarding the City Council races. Last week they ran a supposed fluff people on all of the candidates. Of course some were more fluffy than others.

This strikingly pales in comparison to past coverage. As one candidate told me, this puts the candidates that lack the vast resources of developer money at a strict disadvantage. For the grassroots candidate, there is no long the direct means to communicate the voters without the expenditure of a large amount of funds. The fact that these reporting policies have to benefit the paper’s endorsed candidates cannot be accidental.

The lack of apparent interest by the Davis Enterprise in the council races of course will not prevent them from endorsing their candidates in tomorrow’s paper.

The same is largely true for the other paper with major penetration into the Davis market, the Sacramento Bee. I had a long conversation with a reporter from that paper as well. The Sacramento Bee likely in the next few days will have really its only article on the Davis City Council race.

If you read the Sacramento Bee’s past editorials on Davis, Davis is largely treated with disdain and lack of empathy. The idea that a city should determine its own future, should control its growth and therefore its character seems to bring the Bee’s editorial staff to a slow boil. Davis is largely dismissed as strange, parochial, and elitist. And while that depiction may not be wholly wrong, it misses the rich contextual nature of Davis’ internal political debates over growth and its borders. It misses the divide between the moderate, more pro-growth elements, who pay lipservice to its core liberal and progressive values and the more progressive and liberal elements for which these values fully embody their world view.

To put another way, people like Stephen Souza and Don Saylor tend to get the Bee’s endorsement over people like Sue Greenwald because the Bee understands the views of the former more than those of the latter and fails to appreciate the true divide in Davis politics between the liberals and the moderates.

At the end of the day, the reasonable person has to wonder what business the Sacramento Bee has in trying to recommend the candidates for an office it hardly sees fit to even cover. To try to pick sides in a battle is barely understands.

To me it makes little sense. I fully understand why the Bee does not commit more resources to Davis. Davis and Yolo County are a small percentage of their readership. What I do not understand is the Davis Enterprise’s lack of coverage of the race that traditionally Davisites care most about. Davisites take their City Council elections quite seriously. It would seem that the Enterprise would profit by generating more interest in their paper.

In this day of internet connections and national instant news, it would not seem to the average observer that a local paper covering national stories was the way to go.

Old news reporting in general is fading with the fall of newspaper coverage in general. It would seem all the more important to cover the issues that no one else has an interest in covering. And yet, the Davis Enterprise if anything pulls back on local coverage rather than the other way around. I guess I just do not get it.

We can talk about blogs all day, but on my best day on this blog, it’s still a niche market at best, hitting maybe one-fourth of the readership of the Enterprise. While that is certainly not bad, and it on some issues the blog has had a profound impact. Overall it still aims at the 10% population–the population that pays close attention to politics rather than the 90% mass population that will end up deciding a local election.

It is difficult to replace a local paper in terms of their market penetration into the homes of people who are more concerned with what movies are playing than which candidate is most in favor of growth.

In fact, in political parlance, the only replacement for such “free” coverage is paid political advertising. In local races that means direct mail. But direct mail is profoundingly expensive costing in general $10,000 per mailer when all is said and done. At $100 per person, that’s a lot of people. When you are not getting development money, people who are literally bundling together $100 donations to make it a more sizable contribution, it is difficult.

The Davis firefighters for instance each contributed $100 to their endorsed candidates campaign, 38 $100 contributions. Suddenly that’s real money. When a Don Saylor talks about not being bought by a $100 John Whitcombe contribution, he’s probably correct. When John Whitcombe or others like him can bundle together 25 $100 contributions, then we are starting to get in the realm of real money. The other side just cannot compete with that kind of bank without severely dipping into their own personal savings.

There was a time when you could win an election in Davis spending a small amount of money and relying on the free press and a broad grassroots movements to get the word out. Now the grassroots networks are fading and the newspaper is not covering the race.

I never thought I would support district elections in a town the size of Davis and a town as contentious as Davis. In some ways, I still think it is not a good idea. I think we have enough divisions as it is. I think the prospect of drawing lines in Davis would lead to political fighting like we have never seen. But given the lack of coverage by the local paper and the cost of running for elective office, district elections may be the only way to go.

Things to ponder on the first weekend in May.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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64 thoughts on “Commentary: Where is the Coverage of the City Council Elections”

  1. Davisite

    Excellent commentary today, DPD.
    Let me add one more way to deal with the Enterprise’s outrageous failure to fulfill its responsibilities as the only local paper in Davis in addition to the uneven playing field with regard to campaign monies. Turn off American Idol! Get up out of your TV chairs! Invest some of your free time in Davis’ future by going door to door, walking precincts and TALKING to your neighbors. Contact the campaigns of the council candidates that you hope will represent you on the next Council. They are waiting for your call.

  2. Davisite

    Excellent commentary today, DPD.
    Let me add one more way to deal with the Enterprise’s outrageous failure to fulfill its responsibilities as the only local paper in Davis in addition to the uneven playing field with regard to campaign monies. Turn off American Idol! Get up out of your TV chairs! Invest some of your free time in Davis’ future by going door to door, walking precincts and TALKING to your neighbors. Contact the campaigns of the council candidates that you hope will represent you on the next Council. They are waiting for your call.

  3. Davisite

    Excellent commentary today, DPD.
    Let me add one more way to deal with the Enterprise’s outrageous failure to fulfill its responsibilities as the only local paper in Davis in addition to the uneven playing field with regard to campaign monies. Turn off American Idol! Get up out of your TV chairs! Invest some of your free time in Davis’ future by going door to door, walking precincts and TALKING to your neighbors. Contact the campaigns of the council candidates that you hope will represent you on the next Council. They are waiting for your call.

  4. Davisite

    Excellent commentary today, DPD.
    Let me add one more way to deal with the Enterprise’s outrageous failure to fulfill its responsibilities as the only local paper in Davis in addition to the uneven playing field with regard to campaign monies. Turn off American Idol! Get up out of your TV chairs! Invest some of your free time in Davis’ future by going door to door, walking precincts and TALKING to your neighbors. Contact the campaigns of the council candidates that you hope will represent you on the next Council. They are waiting for your call.

  5. Robin

    I would also recommend informing community members about important differences between the candidates by writing letters for publication in The Enterprise. A large segment of our community is more likely to read the Letters than any other section of The Enterprise.

  6. Robin

    I would also recommend informing community members about important differences between the candidates by writing letters for publication in The Enterprise. A large segment of our community is more likely to read the Letters than any other section of The Enterprise.

  7. Robin

    I would also recommend informing community members about important differences between the candidates by writing letters for publication in The Enterprise. A large segment of our community is more likely to read the Letters than any other section of The Enterprise.

  8. Robin

    I would also recommend informing community members about important differences between the candidates by writing letters for publication in The Enterprise. A large segment of our community is more likely to read the Letters than any other section of The Enterprise.

  9. Anonymous

    I would venture to guess that the majority of the Enterprise readers who will be participating in the June election will do so by absentee ballot. Watch for the Enterprise to “fulfill” its responsibilities to the Davis voter by running some election coverage AFTER the bulk of the absentee ballots are judged,by past history, to have been submitted.

  10. Anonymous

    I would venture to guess that the majority of the Enterprise readers who will be participating in the June election will do so by absentee ballot. Watch for the Enterprise to “fulfill” its responsibilities to the Davis voter by running some election coverage AFTER the bulk of the absentee ballots are judged,by past history, to have been submitted.

  11. Anonymous

    I would venture to guess that the majority of the Enterprise readers who will be participating in the June election will do so by absentee ballot. Watch for the Enterprise to “fulfill” its responsibilities to the Davis voter by running some election coverage AFTER the bulk of the absentee ballots are judged,by past history, to have been submitted.

  12. Anonymous

    I would venture to guess that the majority of the Enterprise readers who will be participating in the June election will do so by absentee ballot. Watch for the Enterprise to “fulfill” its responsibilities to the Davis voter by running some election coverage AFTER the bulk of the absentee ballots are judged,by past history, to have been submitted.

  13. Anonymous

    The hit on the Enterprise is correct. The view that the “progressives” are the true liberals is a stretch though. No growth economic policies are extremely conservative in terms of economic policy. They tend to increase profits and real estate values, which favors people with higher incomes and harms poor people. That is why there are very few groups of people with low incomes living in Davis.

  14. Anonymous

    The hit on the Enterprise is correct. The view that the “progressives” are the true liberals is a stretch though. No growth economic policies are extremely conservative in terms of economic policy. They tend to increase profits and real estate values, which favors people with higher incomes and harms poor people. That is why there are very few groups of people with low incomes living in Davis.

  15. Anonymous

    The hit on the Enterprise is correct. The view that the “progressives” are the true liberals is a stretch though. No growth economic policies are extremely conservative in terms of economic policy. They tend to increase profits and real estate values, which favors people with higher incomes and harms poor people. That is why there are very few groups of people with low incomes living in Davis.

  16. Anonymous

    The hit on the Enterprise is correct. The view that the “progressives” are the true liberals is a stretch though. No growth economic policies are extremely conservative in terms of economic policy. They tend to increase profits and real estate values, which favors people with higher incomes and harms poor people. That is why there are very few groups of people with low incomes living in Davis.

  17. Mike Hart

    A City Council with a strong City Manager really only has token authority to do much about operations of a city. They have but one significant role, to determine future growth for a city. In this role, previous Davis councils failed miserably and were rewarded by having their authority essentially removed by Measure J. In short, the Davis City Council spends a great deal of time making a lot of noise about nothing. Newspapers such as the Bee and the Enterprise are probably tired of wasting space on noisy posturing about issues where everyone reading it knows it MAKES NO DIFFERENCE. No one actually cares how the Davis City Council weighs in on University union issues, the war on Iraq etc.

    The real issue is if the voters will once again make the right decision and continue to keep the Davis City Council ceremonial and marginally entertaining by passing Measure J again.

  18. Mike Hart

    A City Council with a strong City Manager really only has token authority to do much about operations of a city. They have but one significant role, to determine future growth for a city. In this role, previous Davis councils failed miserably and were rewarded by having their authority essentially removed by Measure J. In short, the Davis City Council spends a great deal of time making a lot of noise about nothing. Newspapers such as the Bee and the Enterprise are probably tired of wasting space on noisy posturing about issues where everyone reading it knows it MAKES NO DIFFERENCE. No one actually cares how the Davis City Council weighs in on University union issues, the war on Iraq etc.

    The real issue is if the voters will once again make the right decision and continue to keep the Davis City Council ceremonial and marginally entertaining by passing Measure J again.

  19. Mike Hart

    A City Council with a strong City Manager really only has token authority to do much about operations of a city. They have but one significant role, to determine future growth for a city. In this role, previous Davis councils failed miserably and were rewarded by having their authority essentially removed by Measure J. In short, the Davis City Council spends a great deal of time making a lot of noise about nothing. Newspapers such as the Bee and the Enterprise are probably tired of wasting space on noisy posturing about issues where everyone reading it knows it MAKES NO DIFFERENCE. No one actually cares how the Davis City Council weighs in on University union issues, the war on Iraq etc.

    The real issue is if the voters will once again make the right decision and continue to keep the Davis City Council ceremonial and marginally entertaining by passing Measure J again.

  20. Mike Hart

    A City Council with a strong City Manager really only has token authority to do much about operations of a city. They have but one significant role, to determine future growth for a city. In this role, previous Davis councils failed miserably and were rewarded by having their authority essentially removed by Measure J. In short, the Davis City Council spends a great deal of time making a lot of noise about nothing. Newspapers such as the Bee and the Enterprise are probably tired of wasting space on noisy posturing about issues where everyone reading it knows it MAKES NO DIFFERENCE. No one actually cares how the Davis City Council weighs in on University union issues, the war on Iraq etc.

    The real issue is if the voters will once again make the right decision and continue to keep the Davis City Council ceremonial and marginally entertaining by passing Measure J again.

  21. whoa!

    “If you read the Sacramento Bee’s past editorials on Davis, Davis is largely treated with disdain and lack of empathy. The idea that a city should determine its own future, should control its growth and therefore its character seems to bring the Bee’s editorial staff to a slow boil. Davis is largely dismissed as strange, parochial, and elitist. And while that depiction may not be wholly wrong, it misses the rich contextual nature of Davis’ internal political debates over growth and its borders. It misses the divide between the moderate, more pro-growth elements, who pay lipservice to its core liberal and progressive values and the more progressive and liberal elements for which these values fully embody their world view.”

    Whoa, there are some generalizations here that I don’t think are particularly accurate. To be a “moderate” does not necessarily mean a person is “pro-growth”. I am, believe it or not, a registered Republican. However, I do not consider myself a Republican per se. I am fairly conservative fiscally, but more liberal on social issues. I will vote for what I think is the best qualified candidate, be it a Democrat or Republican. In the past I have voted for both. I am not even sure what a “progressive” is, quite frankly. I voted no on Covell Village, but yes on Target – as it turns out I am in the majority on both counts.

    Now lets take a look at the reasons I voted the way I did. I was against Covell Village because it would have cost the city a fortune to provide services, and the city could not afford it. Covell Village also catered more to an “external” demand, rather than the citizens here in Davis. Covell Village developers were in it for the money, the City Council should have vetoed it as too expensive for the city and not in the city’s best interests. Covell Village developers needed to go back to the drawing board.

    On the other hand I approved Target, because I see tax revenue leaking out to Woodland et al. We need stores like Target, for citizens who cannot afford $10 socks sold in the downtown Davis area, if you can even find a pair of plain socks in Davis (actually I think Gottchalks may have them – and I do shop there frequently). The city of Davis needs business, sizeable business that will generate significant tax revenue to pay for all the wonderful services we have come to expect.

    IMHO, it is not helpful but divisive to label all Republicans as evil, pro-growthers as bad, liberals and progressives as the only ones who really care about the people, ad nauseum (I am exaggerating my point here). DPD, I respect this blog because it welcomes all opinions, generally tries to be fair and balanced, but I cringe at the labels that too often appear. I HATE LABELS, because it tends to make for lazy thinking. Vote issues, vote personal conscience, pick candidates that best represent your views.

    All the candidates tout themselves as Democrats, but as we know each candidate is unique in their views. VOTE BASED ON WHAT A CANDIDATE DOES, NOT ON WHAT S/HE SAYS. TALK IS CHEAP, ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS. IF YOU CARE ABOUT THIS CITY, IN MY OPINION, YOU WILL NOT VOTE FOR SAYLOR, SOUZA OR VERGIS. THEY CLEARLY ARE ANTAGONISTIC TO SOME DEGREE AGAINST MEASURE J – WHICH SPEAKS VOLUMES ABOUT THEIR OPINION OF THE VOTER!

  22. whoa!

    “If you read the Sacramento Bee’s past editorials on Davis, Davis is largely treated with disdain and lack of empathy. The idea that a city should determine its own future, should control its growth and therefore its character seems to bring the Bee’s editorial staff to a slow boil. Davis is largely dismissed as strange, parochial, and elitist. And while that depiction may not be wholly wrong, it misses the rich contextual nature of Davis’ internal political debates over growth and its borders. It misses the divide between the moderate, more pro-growth elements, who pay lipservice to its core liberal and progressive values and the more progressive and liberal elements for which these values fully embody their world view.”

    Whoa, there are some generalizations here that I don’t think are particularly accurate. To be a “moderate” does not necessarily mean a person is “pro-growth”. I am, believe it or not, a registered Republican. However, I do not consider myself a Republican per se. I am fairly conservative fiscally, but more liberal on social issues. I will vote for what I think is the best qualified candidate, be it a Democrat or Republican. In the past I have voted for both. I am not even sure what a “progressive” is, quite frankly. I voted no on Covell Village, but yes on Target – as it turns out I am in the majority on both counts.

    Now lets take a look at the reasons I voted the way I did. I was against Covell Village because it would have cost the city a fortune to provide services, and the city could not afford it. Covell Village also catered more to an “external” demand, rather than the citizens here in Davis. Covell Village developers were in it for the money, the City Council should have vetoed it as too expensive for the city and not in the city’s best interests. Covell Village developers needed to go back to the drawing board.

    On the other hand I approved Target, because I see tax revenue leaking out to Woodland et al. We need stores like Target, for citizens who cannot afford $10 socks sold in the downtown Davis area, if you can even find a pair of plain socks in Davis (actually I think Gottchalks may have them – and I do shop there frequently). The city of Davis needs business, sizeable business that will generate significant tax revenue to pay for all the wonderful services we have come to expect.

    IMHO, it is not helpful but divisive to label all Republicans as evil, pro-growthers as bad, liberals and progressives as the only ones who really care about the people, ad nauseum (I am exaggerating my point here). DPD, I respect this blog because it welcomes all opinions, generally tries to be fair and balanced, but I cringe at the labels that too often appear. I HATE LABELS, because it tends to make for lazy thinking. Vote issues, vote personal conscience, pick candidates that best represent your views.

    All the candidates tout themselves as Democrats, but as we know each candidate is unique in their views. VOTE BASED ON WHAT A CANDIDATE DOES, NOT ON WHAT S/HE SAYS. TALK IS CHEAP, ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS. IF YOU CARE ABOUT THIS CITY, IN MY OPINION, YOU WILL NOT VOTE FOR SAYLOR, SOUZA OR VERGIS. THEY CLEARLY ARE ANTAGONISTIC TO SOME DEGREE AGAINST MEASURE J – WHICH SPEAKS VOLUMES ABOUT THEIR OPINION OF THE VOTER!

  23. whoa!

    “If you read the Sacramento Bee’s past editorials on Davis, Davis is largely treated with disdain and lack of empathy. The idea that a city should determine its own future, should control its growth and therefore its character seems to bring the Bee’s editorial staff to a slow boil. Davis is largely dismissed as strange, parochial, and elitist. And while that depiction may not be wholly wrong, it misses the rich contextual nature of Davis’ internal political debates over growth and its borders. It misses the divide between the moderate, more pro-growth elements, who pay lipservice to its core liberal and progressive values and the more progressive and liberal elements for which these values fully embody their world view.”

    Whoa, there are some generalizations here that I don’t think are particularly accurate. To be a “moderate” does not necessarily mean a person is “pro-growth”. I am, believe it or not, a registered Republican. However, I do not consider myself a Republican per se. I am fairly conservative fiscally, but more liberal on social issues. I will vote for what I think is the best qualified candidate, be it a Democrat or Republican. In the past I have voted for both. I am not even sure what a “progressive” is, quite frankly. I voted no on Covell Village, but yes on Target – as it turns out I am in the majority on both counts.

    Now lets take a look at the reasons I voted the way I did. I was against Covell Village because it would have cost the city a fortune to provide services, and the city could not afford it. Covell Village also catered more to an “external” demand, rather than the citizens here in Davis. Covell Village developers were in it for the money, the City Council should have vetoed it as too expensive for the city and not in the city’s best interests. Covell Village developers needed to go back to the drawing board.

    On the other hand I approved Target, because I see tax revenue leaking out to Woodland et al. We need stores like Target, for citizens who cannot afford $10 socks sold in the downtown Davis area, if you can even find a pair of plain socks in Davis (actually I think Gottchalks may have them – and I do shop there frequently). The city of Davis needs business, sizeable business that will generate significant tax revenue to pay for all the wonderful services we have come to expect.

    IMHO, it is not helpful but divisive to label all Republicans as evil, pro-growthers as bad, liberals and progressives as the only ones who really care about the people, ad nauseum (I am exaggerating my point here). DPD, I respect this blog because it welcomes all opinions, generally tries to be fair and balanced, but I cringe at the labels that too often appear. I HATE LABELS, because it tends to make for lazy thinking. Vote issues, vote personal conscience, pick candidates that best represent your views.

    All the candidates tout themselves as Democrats, but as we know each candidate is unique in their views. VOTE BASED ON WHAT A CANDIDATE DOES, NOT ON WHAT S/HE SAYS. TALK IS CHEAP, ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS. IF YOU CARE ABOUT THIS CITY, IN MY OPINION, YOU WILL NOT VOTE FOR SAYLOR, SOUZA OR VERGIS. THEY CLEARLY ARE ANTAGONISTIC TO SOME DEGREE AGAINST MEASURE J – WHICH SPEAKS VOLUMES ABOUT THEIR OPINION OF THE VOTER!

  24. whoa!

    “If you read the Sacramento Bee’s past editorials on Davis, Davis is largely treated with disdain and lack of empathy. The idea that a city should determine its own future, should control its growth and therefore its character seems to bring the Bee’s editorial staff to a slow boil. Davis is largely dismissed as strange, parochial, and elitist. And while that depiction may not be wholly wrong, it misses the rich contextual nature of Davis’ internal political debates over growth and its borders. It misses the divide between the moderate, more pro-growth elements, who pay lipservice to its core liberal and progressive values and the more progressive and liberal elements for which these values fully embody their world view.”

    Whoa, there are some generalizations here that I don’t think are particularly accurate. To be a “moderate” does not necessarily mean a person is “pro-growth”. I am, believe it or not, a registered Republican. However, I do not consider myself a Republican per se. I am fairly conservative fiscally, but more liberal on social issues. I will vote for what I think is the best qualified candidate, be it a Democrat or Republican. In the past I have voted for both. I am not even sure what a “progressive” is, quite frankly. I voted no on Covell Village, but yes on Target – as it turns out I am in the majority on both counts.

    Now lets take a look at the reasons I voted the way I did. I was against Covell Village because it would have cost the city a fortune to provide services, and the city could not afford it. Covell Village also catered more to an “external” demand, rather than the citizens here in Davis. Covell Village developers were in it for the money, the City Council should have vetoed it as too expensive for the city and not in the city’s best interests. Covell Village developers needed to go back to the drawing board.

    On the other hand I approved Target, because I see tax revenue leaking out to Woodland et al. We need stores like Target, for citizens who cannot afford $10 socks sold in the downtown Davis area, if you can even find a pair of plain socks in Davis (actually I think Gottchalks may have them – and I do shop there frequently). The city of Davis needs business, sizeable business that will generate significant tax revenue to pay for all the wonderful services we have come to expect.

    IMHO, it is not helpful but divisive to label all Republicans as evil, pro-growthers as bad, liberals and progressives as the only ones who really care about the people, ad nauseum (I am exaggerating my point here). DPD, I respect this blog because it welcomes all opinions, generally tries to be fair and balanced, but I cringe at the labels that too often appear. I HATE LABELS, because it tends to make for lazy thinking. Vote issues, vote personal conscience, pick candidates that best represent your views.

    All the candidates tout themselves as Democrats, but as we know each candidate is unique in their views. VOTE BASED ON WHAT A CANDIDATE DOES, NOT ON WHAT S/HE SAYS. TALK IS CHEAP, ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS. IF YOU CARE ABOUT THIS CITY, IN MY OPINION, YOU WILL NOT VOTE FOR SAYLOR, SOUZA OR VERGIS. THEY CLEARLY ARE ANTAGONISTIC TO SOME DEGREE AGAINST MEASURE J – WHICH SPEAKS VOLUMES ABOUT THEIR OPINION OF THE VOTER!

  25. Matt Rexroad

    DPD:

    This only makes me ponder if you have a complete view of the situation here.

    Stop complaining about the local newspaper. You are competing with them for readers.

    You like to see other stuff so you are printing it here. Good for you.

    Complaining about election coverage in the Enterprise does nothing. You have started and continue to run an alternative information source. Celebrate that without complaining about what they do.

    Matt Rexroad
    662-5184

  26. Matt Rexroad

    DPD:

    This only makes me ponder if you have a complete view of the situation here.

    Stop complaining about the local newspaper. You are competing with them for readers.

    You like to see other stuff so you are printing it here. Good for you.

    Complaining about election coverage in the Enterprise does nothing. You have started and continue to run an alternative information source. Celebrate that without complaining about what they do.

    Matt Rexroad
    662-5184

  27. Matt Rexroad

    DPD:

    This only makes me ponder if you have a complete view of the situation here.

    Stop complaining about the local newspaper. You are competing with them for readers.

    You like to see other stuff so you are printing it here. Good for you.

    Complaining about election coverage in the Enterprise does nothing. You have started and continue to run an alternative information source. Celebrate that without complaining about what they do.

    Matt Rexroad
    662-5184

  28. Matt Rexroad

    DPD:

    This only makes me ponder if you have a complete view of the situation here.

    Stop complaining about the local newspaper. You are competing with them for readers.

    You like to see other stuff so you are printing it here. Good for you.

    Complaining about election coverage in the Enterprise does nothing. You have started and continue to run an alternative information source. Celebrate that without complaining about what they do.

    Matt Rexroad
    662-5184

  29. Doug Paul Davis

    Matt:

    I appreciate your point. The first time I saw it was your own blog that you printed it and it was excoriating people for complaining about the Daily Democrat. Your message to them was start your own blog. One of the reason I wanted to start a blog was to provide my own perspective and cover issues that I felt were being neglected. I also hoped though that the newspaper would take a serious look at their own coverage and improve upon it. The readership of this blog is based largely on that void left by the Davis Enterprise both in terms of slant and also in terms of breadth. At the of the day, I think they do a disservice to the people they try to serve by omitting coverage of local issues. I guess I’d feel remiss if I didn’t point that out from time-to-time when it becomes more glaring.

  30. Doug Paul Davis

    Matt:

    I appreciate your point. The first time I saw it was your own blog that you printed it and it was excoriating people for complaining about the Daily Democrat. Your message to them was start your own blog. One of the reason I wanted to start a blog was to provide my own perspective and cover issues that I felt were being neglected. I also hoped though that the newspaper would take a serious look at their own coverage and improve upon it. The readership of this blog is based largely on that void left by the Davis Enterprise both in terms of slant and also in terms of breadth. At the of the day, I think they do a disservice to the people they try to serve by omitting coverage of local issues. I guess I’d feel remiss if I didn’t point that out from time-to-time when it becomes more glaring.

  31. Doug Paul Davis

    Matt:

    I appreciate your point. The first time I saw it was your own blog that you printed it and it was excoriating people for complaining about the Daily Democrat. Your message to them was start your own blog. One of the reason I wanted to start a blog was to provide my own perspective and cover issues that I felt were being neglected. I also hoped though that the newspaper would take a serious look at their own coverage and improve upon it. The readership of this blog is based largely on that void left by the Davis Enterprise both in terms of slant and also in terms of breadth. At the of the day, I think they do a disservice to the people they try to serve by omitting coverage of local issues. I guess I’d feel remiss if I didn’t point that out from time-to-time when it becomes more glaring.

  32. Doug Paul Davis

    Matt:

    I appreciate your point. The first time I saw it was your own blog that you printed it and it was excoriating people for complaining about the Daily Democrat. Your message to them was start your own blog. One of the reason I wanted to start a blog was to provide my own perspective and cover issues that I felt were being neglected. I also hoped though that the newspaper would take a serious look at their own coverage and improve upon it. The readership of this blog is based largely on that void left by the Davis Enterprise both in terms of slant and also in terms of breadth. At the of the day, I think they do a disservice to the people they try to serve by omitting coverage of local issues. I guess I’d feel remiss if I didn’t point that out from time-to-time when it becomes more glaring.

  33. Anonymous

    So much of what you say here about the Bee is just plain wrong and grossly uninformed. All one has to do is reside somewhere other than Davis to appreciate or resent the tremendous amount of coverage devoted to Davis. You are largely opining on how their editorial board views Davis not on their news coverage. True, the editorial board does like to smirk at Davis theatrics but so does everyone else. Mention Davis anywhere other than Davis and you generally get an eye roll in return.

    The fact of the matter is that the Bee devotes an absurd amount of coverage to Davis (even excluding coverage of the univ.). This is principally because of the tremendous market for advertising that Davis represents and the fact (which you fail to mention) that an inordinate amount of Bee editors and reporters live in Davis.

    So stop whining. Davis soaks up the lion’s share of news coverage even when events happen first in other cities. All that matters to the Bee is what happens in Davis. And then Davis takes credit/blame regardless of the facts of the matter.

    Still, that’s just the way it goes I guess. Freedom of the press belongs to those who own one, but then again you already knew that didn’t you?

  34. Anonymous

    So much of what you say here about the Bee is just plain wrong and grossly uninformed. All one has to do is reside somewhere other than Davis to appreciate or resent the tremendous amount of coverage devoted to Davis. You are largely opining on how their editorial board views Davis not on their news coverage. True, the editorial board does like to smirk at Davis theatrics but so does everyone else. Mention Davis anywhere other than Davis and you generally get an eye roll in return.

    The fact of the matter is that the Bee devotes an absurd amount of coverage to Davis (even excluding coverage of the univ.). This is principally because of the tremendous market for advertising that Davis represents and the fact (which you fail to mention) that an inordinate amount of Bee editors and reporters live in Davis.

    So stop whining. Davis soaks up the lion’s share of news coverage even when events happen first in other cities. All that matters to the Bee is what happens in Davis. And then Davis takes credit/blame regardless of the facts of the matter.

    Still, that’s just the way it goes I guess. Freedom of the press belongs to those who own one, but then again you already knew that didn’t you?

  35. Anonymous

    So much of what you say here about the Bee is just plain wrong and grossly uninformed. All one has to do is reside somewhere other than Davis to appreciate or resent the tremendous amount of coverage devoted to Davis. You are largely opining on how their editorial board views Davis not on their news coverage. True, the editorial board does like to smirk at Davis theatrics but so does everyone else. Mention Davis anywhere other than Davis and you generally get an eye roll in return.

    The fact of the matter is that the Bee devotes an absurd amount of coverage to Davis (even excluding coverage of the univ.). This is principally because of the tremendous market for advertising that Davis represents and the fact (which you fail to mention) that an inordinate amount of Bee editors and reporters live in Davis.

    So stop whining. Davis soaks up the lion’s share of news coverage even when events happen first in other cities. All that matters to the Bee is what happens in Davis. And then Davis takes credit/blame regardless of the facts of the matter.

    Still, that’s just the way it goes I guess. Freedom of the press belongs to those who own one, but then again you already knew that didn’t you?

  36. Anonymous

    So much of what you say here about the Bee is just plain wrong and grossly uninformed. All one has to do is reside somewhere other than Davis to appreciate or resent the tremendous amount of coverage devoted to Davis. You are largely opining on how their editorial board views Davis not on their news coverage. True, the editorial board does like to smirk at Davis theatrics but so does everyone else. Mention Davis anywhere other than Davis and you generally get an eye roll in return.

    The fact of the matter is that the Bee devotes an absurd amount of coverage to Davis (even excluding coverage of the univ.). This is principally because of the tremendous market for advertising that Davis represents and the fact (which you fail to mention) that an inordinate amount of Bee editors and reporters live in Davis.

    So stop whining. Davis soaks up the lion’s share of news coverage even when events happen first in other cities. All that matters to the Bee is what happens in Davis. And then Davis takes credit/blame regardless of the facts of the matter.

    Still, that’s just the way it goes I guess. Freedom of the press belongs to those who own one, but then again you already knew that didn’t you?

  37. Jo-blo

    The Aggie has been covering the City Council race. There was an article Thursday giving a brief background on all the candidates, and there was an article Friday on the debate from Wednesday. Cecilia was actually pictured on the front page on that one.

  38. Jo-blo

    The Aggie has been covering the City Council race. There was an article Thursday giving a brief background on all the candidates, and there was an article Friday on the debate from Wednesday. Cecilia was actually pictured on the front page on that one.

  39. Jo-blo

    The Aggie has been covering the City Council race. There was an article Thursday giving a brief background on all the candidates, and there was an article Friday on the debate from Wednesday. Cecilia was actually pictured on the front page on that one.

  40. Jo-blo

    The Aggie has been covering the City Council race. There was an article Thursday giving a brief background on all the candidates, and there was an article Friday on the debate from Wednesday. Cecilia was actually pictured on the front page on that one.

  41. Don Gibson

    The Aggie has been a very poor resource. They posted an editorial a week or two ago saying all the candidates need to clearly state their positions on measure J. By following the Vanguard it has been clear where everyone stands on that issue.

    It is strange to me why the enterprise would not ever cover the council forums. They are a very informative on how they will act on council and how they think on their feet.

    They should cover more often election if they losing readership. Why read the Enterprise when the Bee covers more national and state? It would smart of them to cover the election more because it will give people who want to know more about the election a reason to read it.

  42. Don Gibson

    The Aggie has been a very poor resource. They posted an editorial a week or two ago saying all the candidates need to clearly state their positions on measure J. By following the Vanguard it has been clear where everyone stands on that issue.

    It is strange to me why the enterprise would not ever cover the council forums. They are a very informative on how they will act on council and how they think on their feet.

    They should cover more often election if they losing readership. Why read the Enterprise when the Bee covers more national and state? It would smart of them to cover the election more because it will give people who want to know more about the election a reason to read it.

  43. Don Gibson

    The Aggie has been a very poor resource. They posted an editorial a week or two ago saying all the candidates need to clearly state their positions on measure J. By following the Vanguard it has been clear where everyone stands on that issue.

    It is strange to me why the enterprise would not ever cover the council forums. They are a very informative on how they will act on council and how they think on their feet.

    They should cover more often election if they losing readership. Why read the Enterprise when the Bee covers more national and state? It would smart of them to cover the election more because it will give people who want to know more about the election a reason to read it.

  44. Don Gibson

    The Aggie has been a very poor resource. They posted an editorial a week or two ago saying all the candidates need to clearly state their positions on measure J. By following the Vanguard it has been clear where everyone stands on that issue.

    It is strange to me why the enterprise would not ever cover the council forums. They are a very informative on how they will act on council and how they think on their feet.

    They should cover more often election if they losing readership. Why read the Enterprise when the Bee covers more national and state? It would smart of them to cover the election more because it will give people who want to know more about the election a reason to read it.

  45. 無名 - wu ming

    good to see you’re coming around on district elections. it really is a good step towards a more responsive and more accessible council, IMO.

    as for the enterprise, that’s been the case for a long time. all that can be done is for citizens to take up what slack we can, and hope that other citizens bother to read us.

    looking at sitemeter on my own blog, i’ve found that a surprising number of people google right before elections, so while you might not reach the same readership as the enterprise, i suspect you’re pulling in a lot of curious people trying to be informed citizens. which is something.

  46. 無名 - wu ming

    good to see you’re coming around on district elections. it really is a good step towards a more responsive and more accessible council, IMO.

    as for the enterprise, that’s been the case for a long time. all that can be done is for citizens to take up what slack we can, and hope that other citizens bother to read us.

    looking at sitemeter on my own blog, i’ve found that a surprising number of people google right before elections, so while you might not reach the same readership as the enterprise, i suspect you’re pulling in a lot of curious people trying to be informed citizens. which is something.

  47. 無名 - wu ming

    good to see you’re coming around on district elections. it really is a good step towards a more responsive and more accessible council, IMO.

    as for the enterprise, that’s been the case for a long time. all that can be done is for citizens to take up what slack we can, and hope that other citizens bother to read us.

    looking at sitemeter on my own blog, i’ve found that a surprising number of people google right before elections, so while you might not reach the same readership as the enterprise, i suspect you’re pulling in a lot of curious people trying to be informed citizens. which is something.

  48. 無名 - wu ming

    good to see you’re coming around on district elections. it really is a good step towards a more responsive and more accessible council, IMO.

    as for the enterprise, that’s been the case for a long time. all that can be done is for citizens to take up what slack we can, and hope that other citizens bother to read us.

    looking at sitemeter on my own blog, i’ve found that a surprising number of people google right before elections, so while you might not reach the same readership as the enterprise, i suspect you’re pulling in a lot of curious people trying to be informed citizens. which is something.

  49. Anonymous

    I hope you noted the coverage in today’s Bee. You won’t see coverage like that in other local races. So stop whining about it will ya?

  50. Anonymous

    I hope you noted the coverage in today’s Bee. You won’t see coverage like that in other local races. So stop whining about it will ya?

  51. Anonymous

    I hope you noted the coverage in today’s Bee. You won’t see coverage like that in other local races. So stop whining about it will ya?

  52. Anonymous

    I hope you noted the coverage in today’s Bee. You won’t see coverage like that in other local races. So stop whining about it will ya?

  53. Doug Paul Davis

    According to the Bee reporter who did this story, it will be the only story. He asked good questions, but that’s not a lot of coverage. If you think we have enough coverage of the council races, that is fine, a lot of people have complained to me personally, including some who work for the Enterprise.

  54. Doug Paul Davis

    According to the Bee reporter who did this story, it will be the only story. He asked good questions, but that’s not a lot of coverage. If you think we have enough coverage of the council races, that is fine, a lot of people have complained to me personally, including some who work for the Enterprise.

  55. Doug Paul Davis

    According to the Bee reporter who did this story, it will be the only story. He asked good questions, but that’s not a lot of coverage. If you think we have enough coverage of the council races, that is fine, a lot of people have complained to me personally, including some who work for the Enterprise.

  56. Doug Paul Davis

    According to the Bee reporter who did this story, it will be the only story. He asked good questions, but that’s not a lot of coverage. If you think we have enough coverage of the council races, that is fine, a lot of people have complained to me personally, including some who work for the Enterprise.

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