Wrongful Death Lawsuit Filed on Behalf of Farm Worker Who Died Due to Heat Stroke

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In one of the worst human rights abuses I have heard of in recent memory in this area, a wrongful death lawsuit was filed yesterday at the Merced Superior Court for the death of 17 year old Maria Isabel Vasquez Jimenez. The lawsuit is for wrongful death, general negligence and premises liability.

Maria Isabel, a 17-year-old farm worker from Oaxaca collapsed on May 14 while working for a Merced Farm Laborer in a vineyard owned by West Coast Grape Farming outside of Stockton. Maria Isabel, who was two-months pregnant, had worked nine hours in temperatures that reached 100 degrees inside the vineyard. Her body temperature was 108.4 degrees when she was finally taken to a hospital nearly two hours after collapsing. She died on May 16. The Vanguard spoke yesterday evening with Merlyn Calderon from the United Farm Workers on the Vanguard Radio Show on KDRT 101.5 FM.

Ms. Calderon told us this was Maria Isabel’s third day on the job. By 3 pm in 100 degree heat, she had already worked nine hours.

In 2005, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed into law a heat regulation act to protect workers from heat. Among other things this requires employers to provide shade, water, and periodic breaks to laborers. Maria Isabel should have had access to shade and water. However, there was no water provided on the site until 10:30 am when the temperature was already in the 90s. To make matters worse the water was a 10 minute walk away and the workers only received a 10 minute break. Meaning that there was no realistic access to water.

At the point at which, Maria Isabel’s boyfriend noticed she was in trouble around 3 pm, she collapsed. The supervisor came over and stood four or five feet from her and told her boyfriend not to worry, this happens all the time, all she needed was some rubbing alcohol to cool her off.

She was placed in the van which was sitting in the sun with no air conditioning. They had to wait until all the workers came back before departing.

There were several additional delays before Maria was taken to a clinic.

Merlyn Calderon told us:

“While in route the foreman called saying, “If you take her to a clinic don’t say she was working [for the contractor]. Say she became sick because she was jogging to get exercise. Since she’s underage, it will create big problems for us.” She was so sick an ambulance took her to the hospital.”

By the time she got to the hospital her body temperature was 108.4 degree. Her heart stopped numerous times during the next two days.

Doctors said if emergency medical help had been summoned or she had been taken to the hospital sooner, she might have survived. Moreover most of this could have been prevented by simply following the heat regulation law.

Merlyn Calderon told us that there are 80,000 farms in the state of California but only 180 inspectors. She said she wanted to remind people that “the laws on the books are not the laws in the field.”

Yesterday the coroner officially ruled the cause of death as heat stroke.

In addition to the lawsuit, UFW is working to give workers the tools to organize in order to prevent future tragedies.

As I said at the onset, this is one of the worst cases of human rights abuses I have seen in this area.

They are not sure that Maria Isabel knew that she was pregnant, apparently her fiance, Folrentino, did not know until after her death.

There is additional information available on the United Farm Workers website.

Merlyn Calderon said that no one from the companies involved have even had the decency to express condolences to Maria’s family.

“To date no one from the companies involved has had the decency to express condolences to Maria’s family–not the farm labor contractor, not the company who owns the field where Maria labored, nor the wine distributor. There have been no letters, no one showed up at the funeral–nothing. The only reaction they had was to try to shift part of the blame of Maria’s death onto her fiancé, Florentino.”

UFW is encouraging people to sign condolence cards to send to Maria’s mother in Mexico.

For me the worst part of this is not only the blatant disregard for human life shown by the supervisor and the company, but also the fact that laws are on the books supposedly to protect against such occurrences and there is no enforcement and no resources to enforce with only 180 inspectors to cover tens of thousands of farms. How hard is it to provide people with water, periodic shade and breaks?

While this occurred down in Merced, Yolo County undoubtedly with its vast farms and agriculture undoubted has similar issues that we need to be much more aware of.

Last weekend, the Latino Caucus of the California Democratic Party passed a resolution urging the Governor and the State Legislature to provide additional resources for the necessary enforcement of regulations that protect farmworkers from heat related injuries and deaths.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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140 thoughts on “Wrongful Death Lawsuit Filed on Behalf of Farm Worker Who Died Due to Heat Stroke”

  1. Anonymous

    “Please keep your posts on topic to the extent possible.” is what the owner of this blog asks. A dead girl and baby and all you can talk about is the Yolo Sheriff’s? Shame on you!

  2. Anonymous

    “Please keep your posts on topic to the extent possible.” is what the owner of this blog asks. A dead girl and baby and all you can talk about is the Yolo Sheriff’s? Shame on you!

  3. Anonymous

    “Please keep your posts on topic to the extent possible.” is what the owner of this blog asks. A dead girl and baby and all you can talk about is the Yolo Sheriff’s? Shame on you!

  4. Anonymous

    “Please keep your posts on topic to the extent possible.” is what the owner of this blog asks. A dead girl and baby and all you can talk about is the Yolo Sheriff’s? Shame on you!

  5. Richard

    It is a common practice on the Internet to draw a blogger’s attention to a story that is pertinent to the purpose of the blog by posting a brief Off Topic post to that effect, with the introduction, OT.

    Nothing to be ashamed of at all, especially as, in this instance, DPD has actually posted a blog entry about the killing of the Sheriff’s Deputy, and he frequently posts about the conduct of legal proceedings in Yolo County.

    –Richard Estes

  6. Richard

    It is a common practice on the Internet to draw a blogger’s attention to a story that is pertinent to the purpose of the blog by posting a brief Off Topic post to that effect, with the introduction, OT.

    Nothing to be ashamed of at all, especially as, in this instance, DPD has actually posted a blog entry about the killing of the Sheriff’s Deputy, and he frequently posts about the conduct of legal proceedings in Yolo County.

    –Richard Estes

  7. Richard

    It is a common practice on the Internet to draw a blogger’s attention to a story that is pertinent to the purpose of the blog by posting a brief Off Topic post to that effect, with the introduction, OT.

    Nothing to be ashamed of at all, especially as, in this instance, DPD has actually posted a blog entry about the killing of the Sheriff’s Deputy, and he frequently posts about the conduct of legal proceedings in Yolo County.

    –Richard Estes

  8. Richard

    It is a common practice on the Internet to draw a blogger’s attention to a story that is pertinent to the purpose of the blog by posting a brief Off Topic post to that effect, with the introduction, OT.

    Nothing to be ashamed of at all, especially as, in this instance, DPD has actually posted a blog entry about the killing of the Sheriff’s Deputy, and he frequently posts about the conduct of legal proceedings in Yolo County.

    –Richard Estes

  9. off topic guru

    the death of this young lady and unborn child is wrong on so many levels. 17 years old, working without water in the heat, shortened breaks, and possibly other labor violations, etc.. that should be the focus.

    when did internet protocol and common practices trump human decency? there were several posts concerning the Yolo County Sheriff’s on this blog the last few days where your comments would have been more appropriate. it’s all about you.

  10. off topic guru

    the death of this young lady and unborn child is wrong on so many levels. 17 years old, working without water in the heat, shortened breaks, and possibly other labor violations, etc.. that should be the focus.

    when did internet protocol and common practices trump human decency? there were several posts concerning the Yolo County Sheriff’s on this blog the last few days where your comments would have been more appropriate. it’s all about you.

  11. off topic guru

    the death of this young lady and unborn child is wrong on so many levels. 17 years old, working without water in the heat, shortened breaks, and possibly other labor violations, etc.. that should be the focus.

    when did internet protocol and common practices trump human decency? there were several posts concerning the Yolo County Sheriff’s on this blog the last few days where your comments would have been more appropriate. it’s all about you.

  12. off topic guru

    the death of this young lady and unborn child is wrong on so many levels. 17 years old, working without water in the heat, shortened breaks, and possibly other labor violations, etc.. that should be the focus.

    when did internet protocol and common practices trump human decency? there were several posts concerning the Yolo County Sheriff’s on this blog the last few days where your comments would have been more appropriate. it’s all about you.

  13. Anonymous

    DPD – Please delete all the comments above and including mine so we can talk about the topic of worker health & safety in light of the death of this poor child and her own unborn child.

  14. Anonymous

    DPD – Please delete all the comments above and including mine so we can talk about the topic of worker health & safety in light of the death of this poor child and her own unborn child.

  15. Anonymous

    DPD – Please delete all the comments above and including mine so we can talk about the topic of worker health & safety in light of the death of this poor child and her own unborn child.

  16. Anonymous

    DPD – Please delete all the comments above and including mine so we can talk about the topic of worker health & safety in light of the death of this poor child and her own unborn child.

  17. Doug Paul Davis

    Let me just shift the topic. I interviewed the UFW rep last night on the radio show, wrote up the story this morning, by the time I finished I was actually crying. I’ve never done that from a story before. It was also very upsetting to read the comments and insensitivity on the Sac Bee article this morning.

  18. Doug Paul Davis

    Let me just shift the topic. I interviewed the UFW rep last night on the radio show, wrote up the story this morning, by the time I finished I was actually crying. I’ve never done that from a story before. It was also very upsetting to read the comments and insensitivity on the Sac Bee article this morning.

  19. Doug Paul Davis

    Let me just shift the topic. I interviewed the UFW rep last night on the radio show, wrote up the story this morning, by the time I finished I was actually crying. I’ve never done that from a story before. It was also very upsetting to read the comments and insensitivity on the Sac Bee article this morning.

  20. Doug Paul Davis

    Let me just shift the topic. I interviewed the UFW rep last night on the radio show, wrote up the story this morning, by the time I finished I was actually crying. I’ve never done that from a story before. It was also very upsetting to read the comments and insensitivity on the Sac Bee article this morning.

  21. Anonymous

    While no one died, farm working women filed a lawsuit against RH Phillips a few years back and won. They had horrible wokring conditions; including no access to water or bathrooms in the field. Women and men alike had to go to the bathroom in the fields of RH Phillips. Furthermore, many were harassed and physically threatened when they discussed unionizing and filing complaints.

    The mistreatment of farmworkers happens right here in our backyard.

  22. Anonymous

    While no one died, farm working women filed a lawsuit against RH Phillips a few years back and won. They had horrible wokring conditions; including no access to water or bathrooms in the field. Women and men alike had to go to the bathroom in the fields of RH Phillips. Furthermore, many were harassed and physically threatened when they discussed unionizing and filing complaints.

    The mistreatment of farmworkers happens right here in our backyard.

  23. Anonymous

    While no one died, farm working women filed a lawsuit against RH Phillips a few years back and won. They had horrible wokring conditions; including no access to water or bathrooms in the field. Women and men alike had to go to the bathroom in the fields of RH Phillips. Furthermore, many were harassed and physically threatened when they discussed unionizing and filing complaints.

    The mistreatment of farmworkers happens right here in our backyard.

  24. Anonymous

    While no one died, farm working women filed a lawsuit against RH Phillips a few years back and won. They had horrible wokring conditions; including no access to water or bathrooms in the field. Women and men alike had to go to the bathroom in the fields of RH Phillips. Furthermore, many were harassed and physically threatened when they discussed unionizing and filing complaints.

    The mistreatment of farmworkers happens right here in our backyard.

  25. Michael Adams

    These are the highlights of The Bee’s story that Richard Estes linked:

    Yolo County Sheriff Ed Prieto … said his deputies kept the doors locked on their own and that was “a huge mistake.”

    Superior Court Judge David Rosenberg … told The Bee the arraignment hearing should have been open to the public and media.

    “The doors are supposed to be unlocked when court is in session. This kind of hearing should have been open to the public. There are no excuses. It shouldn’t have happened,” Rosenberg said.

    Yolo County sheriff’s deputies and Diaz’s survivors were admitted selectively by deputies – who control courthouse security – to the hearing through side entrances.

    The court’s executive officer, Jim Perry, was called upon to provide an explanation. … Perry said the hearing was meant to be public and that the locked doors were a result of a “misunderstanding with the Sheriff’s Department.”

    Sheriff Prieto … said the department wanted to accommodate the request of Diaz’s loved ones to be insulated from the media.

    He said there were between 25 and 40 law-enforcement officers sitting in the small courtroom, a number of them, occupying the front rows, were there to provide extra security.

    “Somebody, because the room was full, didn’t open the door,” Prieto said.

    “Our job was not to keep you out,” he told reporters. “I guarantee you this: It will not happen again.”

    It seems to me this was an honest mistake. Because the courtroom was small and full with the deputy’s family and with the other deputies, and because the family did not want to deal with the media during the hearing, they failed to accommodate more people. Since this was just an arraignment and the transcript was made public, I don’t see this as being a big deal.

  26. Michael Adams

    These are the highlights of The Bee’s story that Richard Estes linked:

    Yolo County Sheriff Ed Prieto … said his deputies kept the doors locked on their own and that was “a huge mistake.”

    Superior Court Judge David Rosenberg … told The Bee the arraignment hearing should have been open to the public and media.

    “The doors are supposed to be unlocked when court is in session. This kind of hearing should have been open to the public. There are no excuses. It shouldn’t have happened,” Rosenberg said.

    Yolo County sheriff’s deputies and Diaz’s survivors were admitted selectively by deputies – who control courthouse security – to the hearing through side entrances.

    The court’s executive officer, Jim Perry, was called upon to provide an explanation. … Perry said the hearing was meant to be public and that the locked doors were a result of a “misunderstanding with the Sheriff’s Department.”

    Sheriff Prieto … said the department wanted to accommodate the request of Diaz’s loved ones to be insulated from the media.

    He said there were between 25 and 40 law-enforcement officers sitting in the small courtroom, a number of them, occupying the front rows, were there to provide extra security.

    “Somebody, because the room was full, didn’t open the door,” Prieto said.

    “Our job was not to keep you out,” he told reporters. “I guarantee you this: It will not happen again.”

    It seems to me this was an honest mistake. Because the courtroom was small and full with the deputy’s family and with the other deputies, and because the family did not want to deal with the media during the hearing, they failed to accommodate more people. Since this was just an arraignment and the transcript was made public, I don’t see this as being a big deal.

  27. Michael Adams

    These are the highlights of The Bee’s story that Richard Estes linked:

    Yolo County Sheriff Ed Prieto … said his deputies kept the doors locked on their own and that was “a huge mistake.”

    Superior Court Judge David Rosenberg … told The Bee the arraignment hearing should have been open to the public and media.

    “The doors are supposed to be unlocked when court is in session. This kind of hearing should have been open to the public. There are no excuses. It shouldn’t have happened,” Rosenberg said.

    Yolo County sheriff’s deputies and Diaz’s survivors were admitted selectively by deputies – who control courthouse security – to the hearing through side entrances.

    The court’s executive officer, Jim Perry, was called upon to provide an explanation. … Perry said the hearing was meant to be public and that the locked doors were a result of a “misunderstanding with the Sheriff’s Department.”

    Sheriff Prieto … said the department wanted to accommodate the request of Diaz’s loved ones to be insulated from the media.

    He said there were between 25 and 40 law-enforcement officers sitting in the small courtroom, a number of them, occupying the front rows, were there to provide extra security.

    “Somebody, because the room was full, didn’t open the door,” Prieto said.

    “Our job was not to keep you out,” he told reporters. “I guarantee you this: It will not happen again.”

    It seems to me this was an honest mistake. Because the courtroom was small and full with the deputy’s family and with the other deputies, and because the family did not want to deal with the media during the hearing, they failed to accommodate more people. Since this was just an arraignment and the transcript was made public, I don’t see this as being a big deal.

  28. Michael Adams

    These are the highlights of The Bee’s story that Richard Estes linked:

    Yolo County Sheriff Ed Prieto … said his deputies kept the doors locked on their own and that was “a huge mistake.”

    Superior Court Judge David Rosenberg … told The Bee the arraignment hearing should have been open to the public and media.

    “The doors are supposed to be unlocked when court is in session. This kind of hearing should have been open to the public. There are no excuses. It shouldn’t have happened,” Rosenberg said.

    Yolo County sheriff’s deputies and Diaz’s survivors were admitted selectively by deputies – who control courthouse security – to the hearing through side entrances.

    The court’s executive officer, Jim Perry, was called upon to provide an explanation. … Perry said the hearing was meant to be public and that the locked doors were a result of a “misunderstanding with the Sheriff’s Department.”

    Sheriff Prieto … said the department wanted to accommodate the request of Diaz’s loved ones to be insulated from the media.

    He said there were between 25 and 40 law-enforcement officers sitting in the small courtroom, a number of them, occupying the front rows, were there to provide extra security.

    “Somebody, because the room was full, didn’t open the door,” Prieto said.

    “Our job was not to keep you out,” he told reporters. “I guarantee you this: It will not happen again.”

    It seems to me this was an honest mistake. Because the courtroom was small and full with the deputy’s family and with the other deputies, and because the family did not want to deal with the media during the hearing, they failed to accommodate more people. Since this was just an arraignment and the transcript was made public, I don’t see this as being a big deal.

  29. wdf

    This is upsetting to learn about. Thank you for taking the time to share that with us, DPD. I know very little about the details of these issues.

    We have migrant farm laborers in Yolo County. Some of their kids go to our schools. Does anyone know what kind of farm labor oversight exists locally?

    Is there consistency in implementing regulations across the state?

  30. wdf

    This is upsetting to learn about. Thank you for taking the time to share that with us, DPD. I know very little about the details of these issues.

    We have migrant farm laborers in Yolo County. Some of their kids go to our schools. Does anyone know what kind of farm labor oversight exists locally?

    Is there consistency in implementing regulations across the state?

  31. wdf

    This is upsetting to learn about. Thank you for taking the time to share that with us, DPD. I know very little about the details of these issues.

    We have migrant farm laborers in Yolo County. Some of their kids go to our schools. Does anyone know what kind of farm labor oversight exists locally?

    Is there consistency in implementing regulations across the state?

  32. wdf

    This is upsetting to learn about. Thank you for taking the time to share that with us, DPD. I know very little about the details of these issues.

    We have migrant farm laborers in Yolo County. Some of their kids go to our schools. Does anyone know what kind of farm labor oversight exists locally?

    Is there consistency in implementing regulations across the state?

  33. darnell

    I have never worked a vineyard or such, but how in the world can people be denied water and made to walk, by my calculation, a half mile to get it?

    The 10 minute breaks. How often were they awarded? What time did she finally make it to the hospital that day? Who was the supervisor trying to protect by not taking immediate action, the contracting firm or the vineyard owner.

    Senseless tragedy.

  34. darnell

    I have never worked a vineyard or such, but how in the world can people be denied water and made to walk, by my calculation, a half mile to get it?

    The 10 minute breaks. How often were they awarded? What time did she finally make it to the hospital that day? Who was the supervisor trying to protect by not taking immediate action, the contracting firm or the vineyard owner.

    Senseless tragedy.

  35. darnell

    I have never worked a vineyard or such, but how in the world can people be denied water and made to walk, by my calculation, a half mile to get it?

    The 10 minute breaks. How often were they awarded? What time did she finally make it to the hospital that day? Who was the supervisor trying to protect by not taking immediate action, the contracting firm or the vineyard owner.

    Senseless tragedy.

  36. darnell

    I have never worked a vineyard or such, but how in the world can people be denied water and made to walk, by my calculation, a half mile to get it?

    The 10 minute breaks. How often were they awarded? What time did she finally make it to the hospital that day? Who was the supervisor trying to protect by not taking immediate action, the contracting firm or the vineyard owner.

    Senseless tragedy.

  37. Anonymous

    These grapes being grown in the vineyard where this girl died apparently are destined for the winery that makes the Two-buck Chuck wine for Trader Joes.

    Remember this when you flock to Trader Joes to buy low cost items.

  38. Anonymous

    These grapes being grown in the vineyard where this girl died apparently are destined for the winery that makes the Two-buck Chuck wine for Trader Joes.

    Remember this when you flock to Trader Joes to buy low cost items.

  39. Anonymous

    These grapes being grown in the vineyard where this girl died apparently are destined for the winery that makes the Two-buck Chuck wine for Trader Joes.

    Remember this when you flock to Trader Joes to buy low cost items.

  40. Anonymous

    These grapes being grown in the vineyard where this girl died apparently are destined for the winery that makes the Two-buck Chuck wine for Trader Joes.

    Remember this when you flock to Trader Joes to buy low cost items.

  41. Anonymous

    Also remember why these people come here. Mexico is a corrupt country where something like this would have been tossed aside. However the reason they come here is because their country of origin provides little or nothing to their people in many aspects. And the U.S. allows the borders to be overrun. Forcing the taxpayers here to pay for atrocities committed against and BY them. Atrocities committed by them being, by far, the larger category.
    This is another good case for mechanization of crop work, which the self serving UFW has always protested. Do people lie to get jobs in the U.S.? All the time.
    Do people from this and other countries make bad choices the rest of us have to pay for? All the time. And to those of you who are questioning, yes I have worked in the fields in summer weather that is far hotter than here, and for a lot less money. Did we have water close by? Most of the time. Was there a ufw rep around to tell lies about water and bathroom facilities? No.
    My condolences to the family. Also some good advice: Keep your children home until they grow up. Do not send them to another country to work, so they can send you money. Protest your corrupt government until they provide for their people. The taxpayers of the U.S. can ill afford to support the children of mexico any longer.

  42. Anonymous

    Also remember why these people come here. Mexico is a corrupt country where something like this would have been tossed aside. However the reason they come here is because their country of origin provides little or nothing to their people in many aspects. And the U.S. allows the borders to be overrun. Forcing the taxpayers here to pay for atrocities committed against and BY them. Atrocities committed by them being, by far, the larger category.
    This is another good case for mechanization of crop work, which the self serving UFW has always protested. Do people lie to get jobs in the U.S.? All the time.
    Do people from this and other countries make bad choices the rest of us have to pay for? All the time. And to those of you who are questioning, yes I have worked in the fields in summer weather that is far hotter than here, and for a lot less money. Did we have water close by? Most of the time. Was there a ufw rep around to tell lies about water and bathroom facilities? No.
    My condolences to the family. Also some good advice: Keep your children home until they grow up. Do not send them to another country to work, so they can send you money. Protest your corrupt government until they provide for their people. The taxpayers of the U.S. can ill afford to support the children of mexico any longer.

  43. Anonymous

    Also remember why these people come here. Mexico is a corrupt country where something like this would have been tossed aside. However the reason they come here is because their country of origin provides little or nothing to their people in many aspects. And the U.S. allows the borders to be overrun. Forcing the taxpayers here to pay for atrocities committed against and BY them. Atrocities committed by them being, by far, the larger category.
    This is another good case for mechanization of crop work, which the self serving UFW has always protested. Do people lie to get jobs in the U.S.? All the time.
    Do people from this and other countries make bad choices the rest of us have to pay for? All the time. And to those of you who are questioning, yes I have worked in the fields in summer weather that is far hotter than here, and for a lot less money. Did we have water close by? Most of the time. Was there a ufw rep around to tell lies about water and bathroom facilities? No.
    My condolences to the family. Also some good advice: Keep your children home until they grow up. Do not send them to another country to work, so they can send you money. Protest your corrupt government until they provide for their people. The taxpayers of the U.S. can ill afford to support the children of mexico any longer.

  44. Anonymous

    Also remember why these people come here. Mexico is a corrupt country where something like this would have been tossed aside. However the reason they come here is because their country of origin provides little or nothing to their people in many aspects. And the U.S. allows the borders to be overrun. Forcing the taxpayers here to pay for atrocities committed against and BY them. Atrocities committed by them being, by far, the larger category.
    This is another good case for mechanization of crop work, which the self serving UFW has always protested. Do people lie to get jobs in the U.S.? All the time.
    Do people from this and other countries make bad choices the rest of us have to pay for? All the time. And to those of you who are questioning, yes I have worked in the fields in summer weather that is far hotter than here, and for a lot less money. Did we have water close by? Most of the time. Was there a ufw rep around to tell lies about water and bathroom facilities? No.
    My condolences to the family. Also some good advice: Keep your children home until they grow up. Do not send them to another country to work, so they can send you money. Protest your corrupt government until they provide for their people. The taxpayers of the U.S. can ill afford to support the children of mexico any longer.

  45. Anonymous

    Annonymous 3:37 –
    You assume so much about this 17 year old girl. Would you really look at this differently only if you found out that she was a citizen of the U.S., maybe even born here?

    Surely it doesn’t matter.

    Why would you ask us to allow or excuse a working environment where any person can die of thirst and/or exposure in this country… or anywhere for that matter?

  46. Anonymous

    Annonymous 3:37 –
    You assume so much about this 17 year old girl. Would you really look at this differently only if you found out that she was a citizen of the U.S., maybe even born here?

    Surely it doesn’t matter.

    Why would you ask us to allow or excuse a working environment where any person can die of thirst and/or exposure in this country… or anywhere for that matter?

  47. Anonymous

    Annonymous 3:37 –
    You assume so much about this 17 year old girl. Would you really look at this differently only if you found out that she was a citizen of the U.S., maybe even born here?

    Surely it doesn’t matter.

    Why would you ask us to allow or excuse a working environment where any person can die of thirst and/or exposure in this country… or anywhere for that matter?

  48. Anonymous

    Annonymous 3:37 –
    You assume so much about this 17 year old girl. Would you really look at this differently only if you found out that she was a citizen of the U.S., maybe even born here?

    Surely it doesn’t matter.

    Why would you ask us to allow or excuse a working environment where any person can die of thirst and/or exposure in this country… or anywhere for that matter?

  49. wdf

    A relevant letter to the editor in this afternoon’s Enterprise, author’s name deleted:

    Youth gets a lesson in activism
    Davis | June 19, 2008 11:39 a.m.

    On June 4, my mom and I walked with the United Farm Workers. We walked 10 miles from South Sacramento to the state Capitol to honor a 17-year-old farm worker named Maria Isabel Vasquez Jimenez, who had collapsed from heat in the onion fields where she worked. She was pregnant, and she and her baby died.

    From what I heard, I think I was the only 10-year-old there. The walk was long. I met a famous photographer named John Castillo and we talked. My feet hurt and I was exhausted but I didn’t give up. They were giving us food and water during the walk.

    When we reached Sacramento City College, César Chávez’s successor, Arturo Rodriquez, came up to me and shook my hand. As soon as we got to Southland Park, we stopped there and ate beans and rice. Dolores Huerta spoke and we continued to walk to the state Capitol.

    We reached the Capitol and there were different legislators who spoke. When they were done, I went to my mom’s work office. I had a great time walking.

    My mom tells me there are some laws already in place to protect farm workers but some contractors and growers are not enforcing them. We walked to send a message to Gov. Schwarzenegger and the Legislature to enforce the laws. It was a great field trip.

  50. wdf

    A relevant letter to the editor in this afternoon’s Enterprise, author’s name deleted:

    Youth gets a lesson in activism
    Davis | June 19, 2008 11:39 a.m.

    On June 4, my mom and I walked with the United Farm Workers. We walked 10 miles from South Sacramento to the state Capitol to honor a 17-year-old farm worker named Maria Isabel Vasquez Jimenez, who had collapsed from heat in the onion fields where she worked. She was pregnant, and she and her baby died.

    From what I heard, I think I was the only 10-year-old there. The walk was long. I met a famous photographer named John Castillo and we talked. My feet hurt and I was exhausted but I didn’t give up. They were giving us food and water during the walk.

    When we reached Sacramento City College, César Chávez’s successor, Arturo Rodriquez, came up to me and shook my hand. As soon as we got to Southland Park, we stopped there and ate beans and rice. Dolores Huerta spoke and we continued to walk to the state Capitol.

    We reached the Capitol and there were different legislators who spoke. When they were done, I went to my mom’s work office. I had a great time walking.

    My mom tells me there are some laws already in place to protect farm workers but some contractors and growers are not enforcing them. We walked to send a message to Gov. Schwarzenegger and the Legislature to enforce the laws. It was a great field trip.

  51. wdf

    A relevant letter to the editor in this afternoon’s Enterprise, author’s name deleted:

    Youth gets a lesson in activism
    Davis | June 19, 2008 11:39 a.m.

    On June 4, my mom and I walked with the United Farm Workers. We walked 10 miles from South Sacramento to the state Capitol to honor a 17-year-old farm worker named Maria Isabel Vasquez Jimenez, who had collapsed from heat in the onion fields where she worked. She was pregnant, and she and her baby died.

    From what I heard, I think I was the only 10-year-old there. The walk was long. I met a famous photographer named John Castillo and we talked. My feet hurt and I was exhausted but I didn’t give up. They were giving us food and water during the walk.

    When we reached Sacramento City College, César Chávez’s successor, Arturo Rodriquez, came up to me and shook my hand. As soon as we got to Southland Park, we stopped there and ate beans and rice. Dolores Huerta spoke and we continued to walk to the state Capitol.

    We reached the Capitol and there were different legislators who spoke. When they were done, I went to my mom’s work office. I had a great time walking.

    My mom tells me there are some laws already in place to protect farm workers but some contractors and growers are not enforcing them. We walked to send a message to Gov. Schwarzenegger and the Legislature to enforce the laws. It was a great field trip.

  52. wdf

    A relevant letter to the editor in this afternoon’s Enterprise, author’s name deleted:

    Youth gets a lesson in activism
    Davis | June 19, 2008 11:39 a.m.

    On June 4, my mom and I walked with the United Farm Workers. We walked 10 miles from South Sacramento to the state Capitol to honor a 17-year-old farm worker named Maria Isabel Vasquez Jimenez, who had collapsed from heat in the onion fields where she worked. She was pregnant, and she and her baby died.

    From what I heard, I think I was the only 10-year-old there. The walk was long. I met a famous photographer named John Castillo and we talked. My feet hurt and I was exhausted but I didn’t give up. They were giving us food and water during the walk.

    When we reached Sacramento City College, César Chávez’s successor, Arturo Rodriquez, came up to me and shook my hand. As soon as we got to Southland Park, we stopped there and ate beans and rice. Dolores Huerta spoke and we continued to walk to the state Capitol.

    We reached the Capitol and there were different legislators who spoke. When they were done, I went to my mom’s work office. I had a great time walking.

    My mom tells me there are some laws already in place to protect farm workers but some contractors and growers are not enforcing them. We walked to send a message to Gov. Schwarzenegger and the Legislature to enforce the laws. It was a great field trip.

  53. Doug Paul Davis

    The radio show from yesterday is now available.

    and then on June 18, 2008

    About 10 minutes in is the interview with Meryln Calderon from UFW.

  54. Doug Paul Davis

    The radio show from yesterday is now available.

    and then on June 18, 2008

    About 10 minutes in is the interview with Meryln Calderon from UFW.

  55. Doug Paul Davis

    The radio show from yesterday is now available.

    and then on June 18, 2008

    About 10 minutes in is the interview with Meryln Calderon from UFW.

  56. Doug Paul Davis

    The radio show from yesterday is now available.

    and then on June 18, 2008

    About 10 minutes in is the interview with Meryln Calderon from UFW.

  57. wdf

    anon 3:37:

    This is another good case for mechanization of crop work, which the self serving UFW has always protested.

    Excerpted from The Merced Sun-Star,
    June 9, 2008 article by
    Garance Burke & John Holland:

    Vasquez Jimenez, an illegal Mexican immigrant, collapsed while pruning vines in 100-degree heat May 14, investigators said. She died two days later at Lodi Memorial Hospital. She was working for Merced Farm Labor, a contractor in Atwater. The vineyard is owned by West Coast Grape Farming, a division of Bronco Wine Co. in Ceres. Ag leaders said the girl’s death was a tragic but rare case.

    Do machines currently exist to prune grape vines? I’ve always heard of grape crops as being labor intensive, unlike the local (roma) tomato crops, which are heavily mechanized.

    anon 3:37:

    However the reason they come here is because their country of origin provides little or nothing to their people in many aspects.

    and

    Do people lie to get jobs in the U.S.? All the time. etc.

    Say what you like, but immigrant work ethic is admirable, even though it sadly led to this tragic incident. Some of us native-borns, who take a lot for granted, could learn something from people who would risk so much for the opportunities available here.

    This kind of cheap labor is consistent with a free trade, open market, capitalist model. It allows you to buy things cheaply (from places like Walmart?). The usual argument is that you’d have to pay significantly more to attract a U.S. citizen workforce to do the same thing.

    Would you like to pay more out of your pocketbook in exchange for whatever tax savings may occur if you could successfully seal the border?

    Personally, I suspect that sealing the border would be an economic disaster for the U.S. Agri-business would just move everything that wasn’t economical to do in the U.S. to other countries (Mexico, obviously).

    Imagine it: hordes of illegal immigrants from the U.S. stealing into Mexico looking for migrant farmwork because of economic collapse in the U.S.

  58. wdf

    anon 3:37:

    This is another good case for mechanization of crop work, which the self serving UFW has always protested.

    Excerpted from The Merced Sun-Star,
    June 9, 2008 article by
    Garance Burke & John Holland:

    Vasquez Jimenez, an illegal Mexican immigrant, collapsed while pruning vines in 100-degree heat May 14, investigators said. She died two days later at Lodi Memorial Hospital. She was working for Merced Farm Labor, a contractor in Atwater. The vineyard is owned by West Coast Grape Farming, a division of Bronco Wine Co. in Ceres. Ag leaders said the girl’s death was a tragic but rare case.

    Do machines currently exist to prune grape vines? I’ve always heard of grape crops as being labor intensive, unlike the local (roma) tomato crops, which are heavily mechanized.

    anon 3:37:

    However the reason they come here is because their country of origin provides little or nothing to their people in many aspects.

    and

    Do people lie to get jobs in the U.S.? All the time. etc.

    Say what you like, but immigrant work ethic is admirable, even though it sadly led to this tragic incident. Some of us native-borns, who take a lot for granted, could learn something from people who would risk so much for the opportunities available here.

    This kind of cheap labor is consistent with a free trade, open market, capitalist model. It allows you to buy things cheaply (from places like Walmart?). The usual argument is that you’d have to pay significantly more to attract a U.S. citizen workforce to do the same thing.

    Would you like to pay more out of your pocketbook in exchange for whatever tax savings may occur if you could successfully seal the border?

    Personally, I suspect that sealing the border would be an economic disaster for the U.S. Agri-business would just move everything that wasn’t economical to do in the U.S. to other countries (Mexico, obviously).

    Imagine it: hordes of illegal immigrants from the U.S. stealing into Mexico looking for migrant farmwork because of economic collapse in the U.S.

  59. wdf

    anon 3:37:

    This is another good case for mechanization of crop work, which the self serving UFW has always protested.

    Excerpted from The Merced Sun-Star,
    June 9, 2008 article by
    Garance Burke & John Holland:

    Vasquez Jimenez, an illegal Mexican immigrant, collapsed while pruning vines in 100-degree heat May 14, investigators said. She died two days later at Lodi Memorial Hospital. She was working for Merced Farm Labor, a contractor in Atwater. The vineyard is owned by West Coast Grape Farming, a division of Bronco Wine Co. in Ceres. Ag leaders said the girl’s death was a tragic but rare case.

    Do machines currently exist to prune grape vines? I’ve always heard of grape crops as being labor intensive, unlike the local (roma) tomato crops, which are heavily mechanized.

    anon 3:37:

    However the reason they come here is because their country of origin provides little or nothing to their people in many aspects.

    and

    Do people lie to get jobs in the U.S.? All the time. etc.

    Say what you like, but immigrant work ethic is admirable, even though it sadly led to this tragic incident. Some of us native-borns, who take a lot for granted, could learn something from people who would risk so much for the opportunities available here.

    This kind of cheap labor is consistent with a free trade, open market, capitalist model. It allows you to buy things cheaply (from places like Walmart?). The usual argument is that you’d have to pay significantly more to attract a U.S. citizen workforce to do the same thing.

    Would you like to pay more out of your pocketbook in exchange for whatever tax savings may occur if you could successfully seal the border?

    Personally, I suspect that sealing the border would be an economic disaster for the U.S. Agri-business would just move everything that wasn’t economical to do in the U.S. to other countries (Mexico, obviously).

    Imagine it: hordes of illegal immigrants from the U.S. stealing into Mexico looking for migrant farmwork because of economic collapse in the U.S.

  60. wdf

    anon 3:37:

    This is another good case for mechanization of crop work, which the self serving UFW has always protested.

    Excerpted from The Merced Sun-Star,
    June 9, 2008 article by
    Garance Burke & John Holland:

    Vasquez Jimenez, an illegal Mexican immigrant, collapsed while pruning vines in 100-degree heat May 14, investigators said. She died two days later at Lodi Memorial Hospital. She was working for Merced Farm Labor, a contractor in Atwater. The vineyard is owned by West Coast Grape Farming, a division of Bronco Wine Co. in Ceres. Ag leaders said the girl’s death was a tragic but rare case.

    Do machines currently exist to prune grape vines? I’ve always heard of grape crops as being labor intensive, unlike the local (roma) tomato crops, which are heavily mechanized.

    anon 3:37:

    However the reason they come here is because their country of origin provides little or nothing to their people in many aspects.

    and

    Do people lie to get jobs in the U.S.? All the time. etc.

    Say what you like, but immigrant work ethic is admirable, even though it sadly led to this tragic incident. Some of us native-borns, who take a lot for granted, could learn something from people who would risk so much for the opportunities available here.

    This kind of cheap labor is consistent with a free trade, open market, capitalist model. It allows you to buy things cheaply (from places like Walmart?). The usual argument is that you’d have to pay significantly more to attract a U.S. citizen workforce to do the same thing.

    Would you like to pay more out of your pocketbook in exchange for whatever tax savings may occur if you could successfully seal the border?

    Personally, I suspect that sealing the border would be an economic disaster for the U.S. Agri-business would just move everything that wasn’t economical to do in the U.S. to other countries (Mexico, obviously).

    Imagine it: hordes of illegal immigrants from the U.S. stealing into Mexico looking for migrant farmwork because of economic collapse in the U.S.

  61. Anonymous

    WDF,
    About your response above. You took no depth, and gave none as a reply. The statements still stand. You have no idea what it’s like to work in the fields as I do. You have no idea what it’s like to have thugs from mexico come to your mom’s house 3 x in one year and rip her off while she’s working to support you. Yes, they come over the border from Mexicali to case who goes to work and when so they can rip’em off.
    You have no idea what it’s like when your sister’s car is stolen by illegals in her neighborhood who wreck it and kill themselves,2 of them, while racing. Two fewer thieves in the world.
    You have no idea what it’s like to talk to their parents, who have been here 4 years and you need an interpreter. When the interpreter speaks the parents respond that they will sue you because their kids were “good boys and meant no harm”. Wow, how about that one. You have no idea how it feels when you spouse has died and you leave for 1 week and the neighborhood worthless mexican gang members rip off your home, furniture and all. And just for info, one of them was a pregnant 15 year old.
    I don’t care what you personally think about sealing the border with mexico. It would be be worth doing to find out. Hopefully none of this will happen to you. But if you ever get the opportunity please take the time to speak with hundred’s of thousands of people in southern calif. who have been victimized by ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS and their worthless GANG MEMBER SON’S AND DAUGHTER’S. Then you can start on Northern Calif. After that the other border states.
    I can imagine of all your rebuttal’s to this. You need not reply because it changes nothing of my real experience’s, as opposed to yours. You are still clueless.

  62. Anonymous

    WDF,
    About your response above. You took no depth, and gave none as a reply. The statements still stand. You have no idea what it’s like to work in the fields as I do. You have no idea what it’s like to have thugs from mexico come to your mom’s house 3 x in one year and rip her off while she’s working to support you. Yes, they come over the border from Mexicali to case who goes to work and when so they can rip’em off.
    You have no idea what it’s like when your sister’s car is stolen by illegals in her neighborhood who wreck it and kill themselves,2 of them, while racing. Two fewer thieves in the world.
    You have no idea what it’s like to talk to their parents, who have been here 4 years and you need an interpreter. When the interpreter speaks the parents respond that they will sue you because their kids were “good boys and meant no harm”. Wow, how about that one. You have no idea how it feels when you spouse has died and you leave for 1 week and the neighborhood worthless mexican gang members rip off your home, furniture and all. And just for info, one of them was a pregnant 15 year old.
    I don’t care what you personally think about sealing the border with mexico. It would be be worth doing to find out. Hopefully none of this will happen to you. But if you ever get the opportunity please take the time to speak with hundred’s of thousands of people in southern calif. who have been victimized by ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS and their worthless GANG MEMBER SON’S AND DAUGHTER’S. Then you can start on Northern Calif. After that the other border states.
    I can imagine of all your rebuttal’s to this. You need not reply because it changes nothing of my real experience’s, as opposed to yours. You are still clueless.

  63. Anonymous

    WDF,
    About your response above. You took no depth, and gave none as a reply. The statements still stand. You have no idea what it’s like to work in the fields as I do. You have no idea what it’s like to have thugs from mexico come to your mom’s house 3 x in one year and rip her off while she’s working to support you. Yes, they come over the border from Mexicali to case who goes to work and when so they can rip’em off.
    You have no idea what it’s like when your sister’s car is stolen by illegals in her neighborhood who wreck it and kill themselves,2 of them, while racing. Two fewer thieves in the world.
    You have no idea what it’s like to talk to their parents, who have been here 4 years and you need an interpreter. When the interpreter speaks the parents respond that they will sue you because their kids were “good boys and meant no harm”. Wow, how about that one. You have no idea how it feels when you spouse has died and you leave for 1 week and the neighborhood worthless mexican gang members rip off your home, furniture and all. And just for info, one of them was a pregnant 15 year old.
    I don’t care what you personally think about sealing the border with mexico. It would be be worth doing to find out. Hopefully none of this will happen to you. But if you ever get the opportunity please take the time to speak with hundred’s of thousands of people in southern calif. who have been victimized by ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS and their worthless GANG MEMBER SON’S AND DAUGHTER’S. Then you can start on Northern Calif. After that the other border states.
    I can imagine of all your rebuttal’s to this. You need not reply because it changes nothing of my real experience’s, as opposed to yours. You are still clueless.

  64. Anonymous

    WDF,
    About your response above. You took no depth, and gave none as a reply. The statements still stand. You have no idea what it’s like to work in the fields as I do. You have no idea what it’s like to have thugs from mexico come to your mom’s house 3 x in one year and rip her off while she’s working to support you. Yes, they come over the border from Mexicali to case who goes to work and when so they can rip’em off.
    You have no idea what it’s like when your sister’s car is stolen by illegals in her neighborhood who wreck it and kill themselves,2 of them, while racing. Two fewer thieves in the world.
    You have no idea what it’s like to talk to their parents, who have been here 4 years and you need an interpreter. When the interpreter speaks the parents respond that they will sue you because their kids were “good boys and meant no harm”. Wow, how about that one. You have no idea how it feels when you spouse has died and you leave for 1 week and the neighborhood worthless mexican gang members rip off your home, furniture and all. And just for info, one of them was a pregnant 15 year old.
    I don’t care what you personally think about sealing the border with mexico. It would be be worth doing to find out. Hopefully none of this will happen to you. But if you ever get the opportunity please take the time to speak with hundred’s of thousands of people in southern calif. who have been victimized by ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS and their worthless GANG MEMBER SON’S AND DAUGHTER’S. Then you can start on Northern Calif. After that the other border states.
    I can imagine of all your rebuttal’s to this. You need not reply because it changes nothing of my real experience’s, as opposed to yours. You are still clueless.

  65. Anonymous

    Your reaction is troubling.

    I think that a girl working herself to death in the fields doesn’t match the kind of people that you describe. I’m pretty sure that she wasn’t stealing anything at the time.

    I don’t believe that working conditions where someone could die of thirst and exposure is something that we want or should tolerate. Providing water and a pop up tent for shade on breaks are such little things to ask for and so easy to provide. Don’t you think?

  66. Anonymous

    Your reaction is troubling.

    I think that a girl working herself to death in the fields doesn’t match the kind of people that you describe. I’m pretty sure that she wasn’t stealing anything at the time.

    I don’t believe that working conditions where someone could die of thirst and exposure is something that we want or should tolerate. Providing water and a pop up tent for shade on breaks are such little things to ask for and so easy to provide. Don’t you think?

  67. Anonymous

    Your reaction is troubling.

    I think that a girl working herself to death in the fields doesn’t match the kind of people that you describe. I’m pretty sure that she wasn’t stealing anything at the time.

    I don’t believe that working conditions where someone could die of thirst and exposure is something that we want or should tolerate. Providing water and a pop up tent for shade on breaks are such little things to ask for and so easy to provide. Don’t you think?

  68. Anonymous

    Your reaction is troubling.

    I think that a girl working herself to death in the fields doesn’t match the kind of people that you describe. I’m pretty sure that she wasn’t stealing anything at the time.

    I don’t believe that working conditions where someone could die of thirst and exposure is something that we want or should tolerate. Providing water and a pop up tent for shade on breaks are such little things to ask for and so easy to provide. Don’t you think?

  69. Doug Paul Davis

    Even if what was described by anon is true and accurate, how does that justify allowing a worker to die of heat stroke due to factors that seem easily preventable?

  70. Doug Paul Davis

    Even if what was described by anon is true and accurate, how does that justify allowing a worker to die of heat stroke due to factors that seem easily preventable?

  71. Doug Paul Davis

    Even if what was described by anon is true and accurate, how does that justify allowing a worker to die of heat stroke due to factors that seem easily preventable?

  72. Doug Paul Davis

    Even if what was described by anon is true and accurate, how does that justify allowing a worker to die of heat stroke due to factors that seem easily preventable?

  73. wdf

    anon. 1:36

    These grapes being grown in the vineyard where this girl died apparently are destined for the winery that makes the Two-buck Chuck wine for Trader Joes.

    Remember this when you flock to Trader Joes to buy low cost items.

    FYI: An MSNBC piece supports the connection of Bronco Wine Co. and Trader Joe’s “Two Buck Chuck”. Talks a little about the company.

  74. wdf

    anon. 1:36

    These grapes being grown in the vineyard where this girl died apparently are destined for the winery that makes the Two-buck Chuck wine for Trader Joes.

    Remember this when you flock to Trader Joes to buy low cost items.

    FYI: An MSNBC piece supports the connection of Bronco Wine Co. and Trader Joe’s “Two Buck Chuck”. Talks a little about the company.

  75. wdf

    anon. 1:36

    These grapes being grown in the vineyard where this girl died apparently are destined for the winery that makes the Two-buck Chuck wine for Trader Joes.

    Remember this when you flock to Trader Joes to buy low cost items.

    FYI: An MSNBC piece supports the connection of Bronco Wine Co. and Trader Joe’s “Two Buck Chuck”. Talks a little about the company.

  76. wdf

    anon. 1:36

    These grapes being grown in the vineyard where this girl died apparently are destined for the winery that makes the Two-buck Chuck wine for Trader Joes.

    Remember this when you flock to Trader Joes to buy low cost items.

    FYI: An MSNBC piece supports the connection of Bronco Wine Co. and Trader Joe’s “Two Buck Chuck”. Talks a little about the company.

  77. have a heart

    My condolences to the family and friends of the poor girl and her unborn child.

    To the sad pathetic “anonymous” who is missing the boat – well, what can we say expect there is nothing to change your bias.

    The poor girl and thousands like her work under these terrible conditions. No human being, documented or undocumented, deserves to work under these inhumane working conditions.

    Thank you for covering this important story DPD. I hope that our legislators and local county elected officials do something so that this does not happen in Yolo County.

  78. have a heart

    My condolences to the family and friends of the poor girl and her unborn child.

    To the sad pathetic “anonymous” who is missing the boat – well, what can we say expect there is nothing to change your bias.

    The poor girl and thousands like her work under these terrible conditions. No human being, documented or undocumented, deserves to work under these inhumane working conditions.

    Thank you for covering this important story DPD. I hope that our legislators and local county elected officials do something so that this does not happen in Yolo County.

  79. have a heart

    My condolences to the family and friends of the poor girl and her unborn child.

    To the sad pathetic “anonymous” who is missing the boat – well, what can we say expect there is nothing to change your bias.

    The poor girl and thousands like her work under these terrible conditions. No human being, documented or undocumented, deserves to work under these inhumane working conditions.

    Thank you for covering this important story DPD. I hope that our legislators and local county elected officials do something so that this does not happen in Yolo County.

  80. have a heart

    My condolences to the family and friends of the poor girl and her unborn child.

    To the sad pathetic “anonymous” who is missing the boat – well, what can we say expect there is nothing to change your bias.

    The poor girl and thousands like her work under these terrible conditions. No human being, documented or undocumented, deserves to work under these inhumane working conditions.

    Thank you for covering this important story DPD. I hope that our legislators and local county elected officials do something so that this does not happen in Yolo County.

  81. 無名 - wu ming

    anyone who has done some yardwork in the summer out here knows how debilitating that summer heat is. i would gladly pay whatever it cost to ensure that the people picking my food were given humane working conditions, and suspect that it isn’t even a major part of the cost.

    as for the push factor for why migrant workers come to work in california’s fields, one need look no further than the neoliberal economic reforms pushed upon mexico in the 80s and 90s, and codified under the disastrous NAFTA treaty. cheap american corn imports put millions of mexican farmers out of work, getting rid of price controls on staples and dissolving minimum wage drove families into sojourning, devaluation of the peso wrecked many families’ savings, , slashing what was left of the social safety net forced people to take bigger risks to stay afloat.

    and all of it done by ivy league educated economists, backed to the hilt by the american government.

    and once the victims of the washington consensus wash upon our shores, desperate to find work, americans blame their plight on the workers themselves.

  82. 無名 - wu ming

    anyone who has done some yardwork in the summer out here knows how debilitating that summer heat is. i would gladly pay whatever it cost to ensure that the people picking my food were given humane working conditions, and suspect that it isn’t even a major part of the cost.

    as for the push factor for why migrant workers come to work in california’s fields, one need look no further than the neoliberal economic reforms pushed upon mexico in the 80s and 90s, and codified under the disastrous NAFTA treaty. cheap american corn imports put millions of mexican farmers out of work, getting rid of price controls on staples and dissolving minimum wage drove families into sojourning, devaluation of the peso wrecked many families’ savings, , slashing what was left of the social safety net forced people to take bigger risks to stay afloat.

    and all of it done by ivy league educated economists, backed to the hilt by the american government.

    and once the victims of the washington consensus wash upon our shores, desperate to find work, americans blame their plight on the workers themselves.

  83. 無名 - wu ming

    anyone who has done some yardwork in the summer out here knows how debilitating that summer heat is. i would gladly pay whatever it cost to ensure that the people picking my food were given humane working conditions, and suspect that it isn’t even a major part of the cost.

    as for the push factor for why migrant workers come to work in california’s fields, one need look no further than the neoliberal economic reforms pushed upon mexico in the 80s and 90s, and codified under the disastrous NAFTA treaty. cheap american corn imports put millions of mexican farmers out of work, getting rid of price controls on staples and dissolving minimum wage drove families into sojourning, devaluation of the peso wrecked many families’ savings, , slashing what was left of the social safety net forced people to take bigger risks to stay afloat.

    and all of it done by ivy league educated economists, backed to the hilt by the american government.

    and once the victims of the washington consensus wash upon our shores, desperate to find work, americans blame their plight on the workers themselves.

  84. 無名 - wu ming

    anyone who has done some yardwork in the summer out here knows how debilitating that summer heat is. i would gladly pay whatever it cost to ensure that the people picking my food were given humane working conditions, and suspect that it isn’t even a major part of the cost.

    as for the push factor for why migrant workers come to work in california’s fields, one need look no further than the neoliberal economic reforms pushed upon mexico in the 80s and 90s, and codified under the disastrous NAFTA treaty. cheap american corn imports put millions of mexican farmers out of work, getting rid of price controls on staples and dissolving minimum wage drove families into sojourning, devaluation of the peso wrecked many families’ savings, , slashing what was left of the social safety net forced people to take bigger risks to stay afloat.

    and all of it done by ivy league educated economists, backed to the hilt by the american government.

    and once the victims of the washington consensus wash upon our shores, desperate to find work, americans blame their plight on the workers themselves.

  85. wdf

    anon 8:42

    But if you ever get the opportunity please take the time to speak with hundred’s of thousands of people in southern calif. who have been victimized by ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS and their worthless GANG MEMBER SON’S AND DAUGHTER’S.

    I can imagine of all your rebuttal’s to this. You need not reply because it changes nothing of my real experience’s, as opposed to yours. You are still clueless.

    I wouldn’t presume to change your mind, and clearly you make a case that I have something to learn.

    I am sorry for the hardships you and your family had to endure.

    First, however, can’t employers taking advantage of cheap labor (regardless of whether they are legal or not) provide a minimum of employee care — adequate water and rest? Perhaps you endured worse, but a young pregnant woman shouldn’t have to die in order to raise the point. What appears to have happened violates basic human decency.

    The problem I see with your point is that you extrapolate some bad experiences and behavior among
    Mexican immigrants to apply to a far larger population than may be warranted.

    My sense is that some people from an identifiable group behaving badly can create a bad public reputation out of proportion to what is deserved.

    People from that group who work hard to follow a positive vision for themselves and their families will not create nearly as equivalent a positive public reputation.

    This gets us to the point where an observor can presume “all people like this behave badly”.

    We get cheap wine, and probably plenty of other economic benefits from illegal immigrants.

    So my question (from one who has been labeled clueless), is there some robust quantitative information that illegal immigrants do more harm than good to U.S. society?

    Is this more than a convenient scapegoating of our society’s problems?

  86. wdf

    anon 8:42

    But if you ever get the opportunity please take the time to speak with hundred’s of thousands of people in southern calif. who have been victimized by ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS and their worthless GANG MEMBER SON’S AND DAUGHTER’S.

    I can imagine of all your rebuttal’s to this. You need not reply because it changes nothing of my real experience’s, as opposed to yours. You are still clueless.

    I wouldn’t presume to change your mind, and clearly you make a case that I have something to learn.

    I am sorry for the hardships you and your family had to endure.

    First, however, can’t employers taking advantage of cheap labor (regardless of whether they are legal or not) provide a minimum of employee care — adequate water and rest? Perhaps you endured worse, but a young pregnant woman shouldn’t have to die in order to raise the point. What appears to have happened violates basic human decency.

    The problem I see with your point is that you extrapolate some bad experiences and behavior among
    Mexican immigrants to apply to a far larger population than may be warranted.

    My sense is that some people from an identifiable group behaving badly can create a bad public reputation out of proportion to what is deserved.

    People from that group who work hard to follow a positive vision for themselves and their families will not create nearly as equivalent a positive public reputation.

    This gets us to the point where an observor can presume “all people like this behave badly”.

    We get cheap wine, and probably plenty of other economic benefits from illegal immigrants.

    So my question (from one who has been labeled clueless), is there some robust quantitative information that illegal immigrants do more harm than good to U.S. society?

    Is this more than a convenient scapegoating of our society’s problems?

  87. wdf

    anon 8:42

    But if you ever get the opportunity please take the time to speak with hundred’s of thousands of people in southern calif. who have been victimized by ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS and their worthless GANG MEMBER SON’S AND DAUGHTER’S.

    I can imagine of all your rebuttal’s to this. You need not reply because it changes nothing of my real experience’s, as opposed to yours. You are still clueless.

    I wouldn’t presume to change your mind, and clearly you make a case that I have something to learn.

    I am sorry for the hardships you and your family had to endure.

    First, however, can’t employers taking advantage of cheap labor (regardless of whether they are legal or not) provide a minimum of employee care — adequate water and rest? Perhaps you endured worse, but a young pregnant woman shouldn’t have to die in order to raise the point. What appears to have happened violates basic human decency.

    The problem I see with your point is that you extrapolate some bad experiences and behavior among
    Mexican immigrants to apply to a far larger population than may be warranted.

    My sense is that some people from an identifiable group behaving badly can create a bad public reputation out of proportion to what is deserved.

    People from that group who work hard to follow a positive vision for themselves and their families will not create nearly as equivalent a positive public reputation.

    This gets us to the point where an observor can presume “all people like this behave badly”.

    We get cheap wine, and probably plenty of other economic benefits from illegal immigrants.

    So my question (from one who has been labeled clueless), is there some robust quantitative information that illegal immigrants do more harm than good to U.S. society?

    Is this more than a convenient scapegoating of our society’s problems?

  88. wdf

    anon 8:42

    But if you ever get the opportunity please take the time to speak with hundred’s of thousands of people in southern calif. who have been victimized by ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS and their worthless GANG MEMBER SON’S AND DAUGHTER’S.

    I can imagine of all your rebuttal’s to this. You need not reply because it changes nothing of my real experience’s, as opposed to yours. You are still clueless.

    I wouldn’t presume to change your mind, and clearly you make a case that I have something to learn.

    I am sorry for the hardships you and your family had to endure.

    First, however, can’t employers taking advantage of cheap labor (regardless of whether they are legal or not) provide a minimum of employee care — adequate water and rest? Perhaps you endured worse, but a young pregnant woman shouldn’t have to die in order to raise the point. What appears to have happened violates basic human decency.

    The problem I see with your point is that you extrapolate some bad experiences and behavior among
    Mexican immigrants to apply to a far larger population than may be warranted.

    My sense is that some people from an identifiable group behaving badly can create a bad public reputation out of proportion to what is deserved.

    People from that group who work hard to follow a positive vision for themselves and their families will not create nearly as equivalent a positive public reputation.

    This gets us to the point where an observor can presume “all people like this behave badly”.

    We get cheap wine, and probably plenty of other economic benefits from illegal immigrants.

    So my question (from one who has been labeled clueless), is there some robust quantitative information that illegal immigrants do more harm than good to U.S. society?

    Is this more than a convenient scapegoating of our society’s problems?

  89. Complicated Issue

    What seems to be clear is the tragic death of this young girl and her child highlights how complicated the issue of illegal immigration is, and its relationship to farmworkers who pick our food.
    1) Why was a 17 year old child working the fields as if an adult? Or is it legal for a 17 year old to be a migrant worker?
    2) When conditions are extremely hot, why is anyone out in the fields picking in the heat of the day? Seems as if the work should be done during the cooler parts of the day.
    3) The law is not being enforced, and the employers know it – and is the reason they flout it with impunity. Legal reform is needed, that sets up a hotline, funds spot checks, and makes enforcement mandatory and very uncomfortable for violators. That requires funding – taxpayer dollars.
    4) We need greater border security to cut down on drug trafficing and criminals coming across. However, we also need the establishment of a guest worker program, bc like it or not, this country needs the cheap labor from across the border to pick our fruits and vegetables (that portion that cannot be done by machine). Illegal immigrants would not come across the border unless there was a market for their type of skills.
    5) There has to be a certain amount of personal responsibility amongst farm workers themselves. You do not work yourself literally to death. In this case, bc a child was involved, it is not clear that she had the maturity to make those kinds of mature decisions.
    6) What is a 17 year old girl doing in the fields beside an older boyfriend who got her pregnant – but put her to work in the fields to make money?

    So many questions, issues, emotions – and the needless death of someone (actually two) who had her (their) whole life in front of her (them).

  90. Complicated Issue

    What seems to be clear is the tragic death of this young girl and her child highlights how complicated the issue of illegal immigration is, and its relationship to farmworkers who pick our food.
    1) Why was a 17 year old child working the fields as if an adult? Or is it legal for a 17 year old to be a migrant worker?
    2) When conditions are extremely hot, why is anyone out in the fields picking in the heat of the day? Seems as if the work should be done during the cooler parts of the day.
    3) The law is not being enforced, and the employers know it – and is the reason they flout it with impunity. Legal reform is needed, that sets up a hotline, funds spot checks, and makes enforcement mandatory and very uncomfortable for violators. That requires funding – taxpayer dollars.
    4) We need greater border security to cut down on drug trafficing and criminals coming across. However, we also need the establishment of a guest worker program, bc like it or not, this country needs the cheap labor from across the border to pick our fruits and vegetables (that portion that cannot be done by machine). Illegal immigrants would not come across the border unless there was a market for their type of skills.
    5) There has to be a certain amount of personal responsibility amongst farm workers themselves. You do not work yourself literally to death. In this case, bc a child was involved, it is not clear that she had the maturity to make those kinds of mature decisions.
    6) What is a 17 year old girl doing in the fields beside an older boyfriend who got her pregnant – but put her to work in the fields to make money?

    So many questions, issues, emotions – and the needless death of someone (actually two) who had her (their) whole life in front of her (them).

  91. Complicated Issue

    What seems to be clear is the tragic death of this young girl and her child highlights how complicated the issue of illegal immigration is, and its relationship to farmworkers who pick our food.
    1) Why was a 17 year old child working the fields as if an adult? Or is it legal for a 17 year old to be a migrant worker?
    2) When conditions are extremely hot, why is anyone out in the fields picking in the heat of the day? Seems as if the work should be done during the cooler parts of the day.
    3) The law is not being enforced, and the employers know it – and is the reason they flout it with impunity. Legal reform is needed, that sets up a hotline, funds spot checks, and makes enforcement mandatory and very uncomfortable for violators. That requires funding – taxpayer dollars.
    4) We need greater border security to cut down on drug trafficing and criminals coming across. However, we also need the establishment of a guest worker program, bc like it or not, this country needs the cheap labor from across the border to pick our fruits and vegetables (that portion that cannot be done by machine). Illegal immigrants would not come across the border unless there was a market for their type of skills.
    5) There has to be a certain amount of personal responsibility amongst farm workers themselves. You do not work yourself literally to death. In this case, bc a child was involved, it is not clear that she had the maturity to make those kinds of mature decisions.
    6) What is a 17 year old girl doing in the fields beside an older boyfriend who got her pregnant – but put her to work in the fields to make money?

    So many questions, issues, emotions – and the needless death of someone (actually two) who had her (their) whole life in front of her (them).

  92. Complicated Issue

    What seems to be clear is the tragic death of this young girl and her child highlights how complicated the issue of illegal immigration is, and its relationship to farmworkers who pick our food.
    1) Why was a 17 year old child working the fields as if an adult? Or is it legal for a 17 year old to be a migrant worker?
    2) When conditions are extremely hot, why is anyone out in the fields picking in the heat of the day? Seems as if the work should be done during the cooler parts of the day.
    3) The law is not being enforced, and the employers know it – and is the reason they flout it with impunity. Legal reform is needed, that sets up a hotline, funds spot checks, and makes enforcement mandatory and very uncomfortable for violators. That requires funding – taxpayer dollars.
    4) We need greater border security to cut down on drug trafficing and criminals coming across. However, we also need the establishment of a guest worker program, bc like it or not, this country needs the cheap labor from across the border to pick our fruits and vegetables (that portion that cannot be done by machine). Illegal immigrants would not come across the border unless there was a market for their type of skills.
    5) There has to be a certain amount of personal responsibility amongst farm workers themselves. You do not work yourself literally to death. In this case, bc a child was involved, it is not clear that she had the maturity to make those kinds of mature decisions.
    6) What is a 17 year old girl doing in the fields beside an older boyfriend who got her pregnant – but put her to work in the fields to make money?

    So many questions, issues, emotions – and the needless death of someone (actually two) who had her (their) whole life in front of her (them).

  93. Rich Rifkin

    “cheap american corn imports put millions of mexican farmers out of work, getting rid of price controls on staples and dissolving minimum wage drove families into sojourning, devaluation of the peso wrecked many families’ savings, , slashing what was left of the social safety net forced people to take bigger risks to stay afloat.”

    Nonsense. The rate of emigration out of Mexico has SLOWED since NAFTA was adopted by Mexico, the U.S. and Canada; and NAFTA has resulted in an INCREASE in the standard of living in Mexico.

    The problem, though lessening, is that Mexico is overpopulated and has too high of a rate of birth to employ all of the people entering its workforce.

    Once the Mexican birthrate approaches ours, the outflow of its population will cease.

  94. Rich Rifkin

    “cheap american corn imports put millions of mexican farmers out of work, getting rid of price controls on staples and dissolving minimum wage drove families into sojourning, devaluation of the peso wrecked many families’ savings, , slashing what was left of the social safety net forced people to take bigger risks to stay afloat.”

    Nonsense. The rate of emigration out of Mexico has SLOWED since NAFTA was adopted by Mexico, the U.S. and Canada; and NAFTA has resulted in an INCREASE in the standard of living in Mexico.

    The problem, though lessening, is that Mexico is overpopulated and has too high of a rate of birth to employ all of the people entering its workforce.

    Once the Mexican birthrate approaches ours, the outflow of its population will cease.

  95. Rich Rifkin

    “cheap american corn imports put millions of mexican farmers out of work, getting rid of price controls on staples and dissolving minimum wage drove families into sojourning, devaluation of the peso wrecked many families’ savings, , slashing what was left of the social safety net forced people to take bigger risks to stay afloat.”

    Nonsense. The rate of emigration out of Mexico has SLOWED since NAFTA was adopted by Mexico, the U.S. and Canada; and NAFTA has resulted in an INCREASE in the standard of living in Mexico.

    The problem, though lessening, is that Mexico is overpopulated and has too high of a rate of birth to employ all of the people entering its workforce.

    Once the Mexican birthrate approaches ours, the outflow of its population will cease.

  96. Rich Rifkin

    “cheap american corn imports put millions of mexican farmers out of work, getting rid of price controls on staples and dissolving minimum wage drove families into sojourning, devaluation of the peso wrecked many families’ savings, , slashing what was left of the social safety net forced people to take bigger risks to stay afloat.”

    Nonsense. The rate of emigration out of Mexico has SLOWED since NAFTA was adopted by Mexico, the U.S. and Canada; and NAFTA has resulted in an INCREASE in the standard of living in Mexico.

    The problem, though lessening, is that Mexico is overpopulated and has too high of a rate of birth to employ all of the people entering its workforce.

    Once the Mexican birthrate approaches ours, the outflow of its population will cease.

  97. Anon

    “Once the Mexican birthrate approaches ours, the outflow of its population will cease.”

    Not if higher paying jobs that they can do are here in the United States attracting them to come across the border.

  98. Anon

    “Once the Mexican birthrate approaches ours, the outflow of its population will cease.”

    Not if higher paying jobs that they can do are here in the United States attracting them to come across the border.

  99. Anon

    “Once the Mexican birthrate approaches ours, the outflow of its population will cease.”

    Not if higher paying jobs that they can do are here in the United States attracting them to come across the border.

  100. Anon

    “Once the Mexican birthrate approaches ours, the outflow of its population will cease.”

    Not if higher paying jobs that they can do are here in the United States attracting them to come across the border.

  101. Anonymous

    I agree with COMPLICATED ISSUE. We don’t need anymore people here in the U.S. The mexican gov’t needs to teach it’s ignorant populace, BIRTH CONTROL.
    They have overrun themselves with a high birth rate and next they will overrun us if we don’t close the southern borders. WDF is wrong about this situation but that is not unsusal for WDF on this topic. He too is ignorant. Do you get it WDF? OVER POPULATION…….

  102. Anonymous

    I agree with COMPLICATED ISSUE. We don’t need anymore people here in the U.S. The mexican gov’t needs to teach it’s ignorant populace, BIRTH CONTROL.
    They have overrun themselves with a high birth rate and next they will overrun us if we don’t close the southern borders. WDF is wrong about this situation but that is not unsusal for WDF on this topic. He too is ignorant. Do you get it WDF? OVER POPULATION…….

  103. Anonymous

    I agree with COMPLICATED ISSUE. We don’t need anymore people here in the U.S. The mexican gov’t needs to teach it’s ignorant populace, BIRTH CONTROL.
    They have overrun themselves with a high birth rate and next they will overrun us if we don’t close the southern borders. WDF is wrong about this situation but that is not unsusal for WDF on this topic. He too is ignorant. Do you get it WDF? OVER POPULATION…….

  104. Anonymous

    I agree with COMPLICATED ISSUE. We don’t need anymore people here in the U.S. The mexican gov’t needs to teach it’s ignorant populace, BIRTH CONTROL.
    They have overrun themselves with a high birth rate and next they will overrun us if we don’t close the southern borders. WDF is wrong about this situation but that is not unsusal for WDF on this topic. He too is ignorant. Do you get it WDF? OVER POPULATION…….

  105. Doug Paul Davis

    The best and most proven way to reduce birthrate is to increase one’s standard of living.

    That said, I again implore people to separate issues. Whatever your view on immigration issues, the treatment of this girl was wrong and needs to stop.

  106. Doug Paul Davis

    The best and most proven way to reduce birthrate is to increase one’s standard of living.

    That said, I again implore people to separate issues. Whatever your view on immigration issues, the treatment of this girl was wrong and needs to stop.

  107. Doug Paul Davis

    The best and most proven way to reduce birthrate is to increase one’s standard of living.

    That said, I again implore people to separate issues. Whatever your view on immigration issues, the treatment of this girl was wrong and needs to stop.

  108. Doug Paul Davis

    The best and most proven way to reduce birthrate is to increase one’s standard of living.

    That said, I again implore people to separate issues. Whatever your view on immigration issues, the treatment of this girl was wrong and needs to stop.

  109. 無名 - wu ming

    indeed. what is so telling is that if the person dead was a davis AYSO kid or little leaguer, and the coach said “oh, just rub some alcohol on them, they don’t need water or breaks,” in the middle of the summer heat, and the kid died, that person would be going to jail for manslaughter, most likely.

    but when it’s a mexican fieldworker? someone else’s problem, not worth the outrage.

    that kid was someone’s daughter.

  110. 無名 - wu ming

    indeed. what is so telling is that if the person dead was a davis AYSO kid or little leaguer, and the coach said “oh, just rub some alcohol on them, they don’t need water or breaks,” in the middle of the summer heat, and the kid died, that person would be going to jail for manslaughter, most likely.

    but when it’s a mexican fieldworker? someone else’s problem, not worth the outrage.

    that kid was someone’s daughter.

  111. 無名 - wu ming

    indeed. what is so telling is that if the person dead was a davis AYSO kid or little leaguer, and the coach said “oh, just rub some alcohol on them, they don’t need water or breaks,” in the middle of the summer heat, and the kid died, that person would be going to jail for manslaughter, most likely.

    but when it’s a mexican fieldworker? someone else’s problem, not worth the outrage.

    that kid was someone’s daughter.

  112. 無名 - wu ming

    indeed. what is so telling is that if the person dead was a davis AYSO kid or little leaguer, and the coach said “oh, just rub some alcohol on them, they don’t need water or breaks,” in the middle of the summer heat, and the kid died, that person would be going to jail for manslaughter, most likely.

    but when it’s a mexican fieldworker? someone else’s problem, not worth the outrage.

    that kid was someone’s daughter.

  113. wdf

    anon 9:41: The mexican gov’t needs to teach it’s ignorant populace, BIRTH CONTROL.

    Mexico is the 12th largest economy in the world by GDP, as summarized on wikipedia from the 2007 CIA World Factbook. That position on the list is attributed in part to the economic benefit of NAFTA.

    The fertility rate in Mexico has been rapidly approaching that of the U.S. (average of 2.09 children per woman, from 2008 CIA World Factbook). So Mexico has been on a trend toward population stabilization in recent years.

    wu-ming said…
    but when it’s a mexican fieldworker? someone else’s problem, not worth the outrage.

    that kid was someone’s daughter.

    That’s a good point. But there is an interesting amount of awareness. I saw an online listing of ~30 news articles on this incident for this week alone and more than 200 in the past month. Even the Governor attended the funeral. Question is what happens next?

  114. wdf

    anon 9:41: The mexican gov’t needs to teach it’s ignorant populace, BIRTH CONTROL.

    Mexico is the 12th largest economy in the world by GDP, as summarized on wikipedia from the 2007 CIA World Factbook. That position on the list is attributed in part to the economic benefit of NAFTA.

    The fertility rate in Mexico has been rapidly approaching that of the U.S. (average of 2.09 children per woman, from 2008 CIA World Factbook). So Mexico has been on a trend toward population stabilization in recent years.

    wu-ming said…
    but when it’s a mexican fieldworker? someone else’s problem, not worth the outrage.

    that kid was someone’s daughter.

    That’s a good point. But there is an interesting amount of awareness. I saw an online listing of ~30 news articles on this incident for this week alone and more than 200 in the past month. Even the Governor attended the funeral. Question is what happens next?

  115. wdf

    anon 9:41: The mexican gov’t needs to teach it’s ignorant populace, BIRTH CONTROL.

    Mexico is the 12th largest economy in the world by GDP, as summarized on wikipedia from the 2007 CIA World Factbook. That position on the list is attributed in part to the economic benefit of NAFTA.

    The fertility rate in Mexico has been rapidly approaching that of the U.S. (average of 2.09 children per woman, from 2008 CIA World Factbook). So Mexico has been on a trend toward population stabilization in recent years.

    wu-ming said…
    but when it’s a mexican fieldworker? someone else’s problem, not worth the outrage.

    that kid was someone’s daughter.

    That’s a good point. But there is an interesting amount of awareness. I saw an online listing of ~30 news articles on this incident for this week alone and more than 200 in the past month. Even the Governor attended the funeral. Question is what happens next?

  116. wdf

    anon 9:41: The mexican gov’t needs to teach it’s ignorant populace, BIRTH CONTROL.

    Mexico is the 12th largest economy in the world by GDP, as summarized on wikipedia from the 2007 CIA World Factbook. That position on the list is attributed in part to the economic benefit of NAFTA.

    The fertility rate in Mexico has been rapidly approaching that of the U.S. (average of 2.09 children per woman, from 2008 CIA World Factbook). So Mexico has been on a trend toward population stabilization in recent years.

    wu-ming said…
    but when it’s a mexican fieldworker? someone else’s problem, not worth the outrage.

    that kid was someone’s daughter.

    That’s a good point. But there is an interesting amount of awareness. I saw an online listing of ~30 news articles on this incident for this week alone and more than 200 in the past month. Even the Governor attended the funeral. Question is what happens next?

  117. Anonymous

    DPD and wu ming;
    The best way to stop overpopulation is for people to be educated. That would, in turn, increase the standard of living. Those coming here ILLEGALLY do so because of the worthless corrupt mexican gov’t that does little for their people.
    I am concerned about the death of anyone in this or any other similar circumstance, although wu ming would be make me out to be the opposite. wu ming has a style of doing that when someone does not agree with him/her.
    The U.S. does not need anymore ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS. Please enjoy the WHITE LIBERAL GUILT THEY LAID UPON YOU.

  118. Anonymous

    DPD and wu ming;
    The best way to stop overpopulation is for people to be educated. That would, in turn, increase the standard of living. Those coming here ILLEGALLY do so because of the worthless corrupt mexican gov’t that does little for their people.
    I am concerned about the death of anyone in this or any other similar circumstance, although wu ming would be make me out to be the opposite. wu ming has a style of doing that when someone does not agree with him/her.
    The U.S. does not need anymore ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS. Please enjoy the WHITE LIBERAL GUILT THEY LAID UPON YOU.

  119. Anonymous

    DPD and wu ming;
    The best way to stop overpopulation is for people to be educated. That would, in turn, increase the standard of living. Those coming here ILLEGALLY do so because of the worthless corrupt mexican gov’t that does little for their people.
    I am concerned about the death of anyone in this or any other similar circumstance, although wu ming would be make me out to be the opposite. wu ming has a style of doing that when someone does not agree with him/her.
    The U.S. does not need anymore ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS. Please enjoy the WHITE LIBERAL GUILT THEY LAID UPON YOU.

  120. Anonymous

    DPD and wu ming;
    The best way to stop overpopulation is for people to be educated. That would, in turn, increase the standard of living. Those coming here ILLEGALLY do so because of the worthless corrupt mexican gov’t that does little for their people.
    I am concerned about the death of anyone in this or any other similar circumstance, although wu ming would be make me out to be the opposite. wu ming has a style of doing that when someone does not agree with him/her.
    The U.S. does not need anymore ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS. Please enjoy the WHITE LIBERAL GUILT THEY LAID UPON YOU.

  121. Doug Paul Davis

    You have to realize that my late mother-in-law worked in the fields, probably died prematurely from it. For me this all about safety for workers. If you want to turn it into an immigration debate, I lose interest quickly. No one deserves to die because of those type of choices. No one deserves to profit from putting people’s lives at risk.

    Back to the topic at hand, whoever said two-buck chuck was correct.

    Here’s the link:

    Trader Joes needs to open their eyes

  122. Doug Paul Davis

    You have to realize that my late mother-in-law worked in the fields, probably died prematurely from it. For me this all about safety for workers. If you want to turn it into an immigration debate, I lose interest quickly. No one deserves to die because of those type of choices. No one deserves to profit from putting people’s lives at risk.

    Back to the topic at hand, whoever said two-buck chuck was correct.

    Here’s the link:

    Trader Joes needs to open their eyes

  123. Doug Paul Davis

    You have to realize that my late mother-in-law worked in the fields, probably died prematurely from it. For me this all about safety for workers. If you want to turn it into an immigration debate, I lose interest quickly. No one deserves to die because of those type of choices. No one deserves to profit from putting people’s lives at risk.

    Back to the topic at hand, whoever said two-buck chuck was correct.

    Here’s the link:

    Trader Joes needs to open their eyes

  124. Doug Paul Davis

    You have to realize that my late mother-in-law worked in the fields, probably died prematurely from it. For me this all about safety for workers. If you want to turn it into an immigration debate, I lose interest quickly. No one deserves to die because of those type of choices. No one deserves to profit from putting people’s lives at risk.

    Back to the topic at hand, whoever said two-buck chuck was correct.

    Here’s the link:

    Trader Joes needs to open their eyes

  125. Anonymous

    DPD,
    I am the person from 6/22/08 5:28 p.m. You have my condolences for the loss of your mother in-law. Please do not equate,relate or attempt to extrapolate your mother in-laws death with this recent tragedy. People pass away from this earth due to a myriad of causes, not just because they worked in the fields.
    Does anyone know what the Coroner’s report was on the young womans cause of death? Worker Safety? I agree about this but the biggest safety factor for workers, and for anyone for that matter, is one’s own awareness and intelligence.
    It is an illegal immigration problem in spite of any denial you may make on that subject. This problem primarily belongs to the mexican gov’t,non enforced U.S. laws and greed on both sides. I too worked in the fields in Imperial Valley for the, Arena Land and Cattle Company, where most summer days are 110 to 120 degrees F. The pay was MUCH lower, and tax free.
    And mostly the poor, uneducated people suffer, as usual. And for WDF, can you provide some “robust quantitative” analysis for your opinions for the rest of us? I speak from far more experience than I related to you here, and far more than you will ever experience.

  126. Anonymous

    DPD,
    I am the person from 6/22/08 5:28 p.m. You have my condolences for the loss of your mother in-law. Please do not equate,relate or attempt to extrapolate your mother in-laws death with this recent tragedy. People pass away from this earth due to a myriad of causes, not just because they worked in the fields.
    Does anyone know what the Coroner’s report was on the young womans cause of death? Worker Safety? I agree about this but the biggest safety factor for workers, and for anyone for that matter, is one’s own awareness and intelligence.
    It is an illegal immigration problem in spite of any denial you may make on that subject. This problem primarily belongs to the mexican gov’t,non enforced U.S. laws and greed on both sides. I too worked in the fields in Imperial Valley for the, Arena Land and Cattle Company, where most summer days are 110 to 120 degrees F. The pay was MUCH lower, and tax free.
    And mostly the poor, uneducated people suffer, as usual. And for WDF, can you provide some “robust quantitative” analysis for your opinions for the rest of us? I speak from far more experience than I related to you here, and far more than you will ever experience.

  127. Anonymous

    DPD,
    I am the person from 6/22/08 5:28 p.m. You have my condolences for the loss of your mother in-law. Please do not equate,relate or attempt to extrapolate your mother in-laws death with this recent tragedy. People pass away from this earth due to a myriad of causes, not just because they worked in the fields.
    Does anyone know what the Coroner’s report was on the young womans cause of death? Worker Safety? I agree about this but the biggest safety factor for workers, and for anyone for that matter, is one’s own awareness and intelligence.
    It is an illegal immigration problem in spite of any denial you may make on that subject. This problem primarily belongs to the mexican gov’t,non enforced U.S. laws and greed on both sides. I too worked in the fields in Imperial Valley for the, Arena Land and Cattle Company, where most summer days are 110 to 120 degrees F. The pay was MUCH lower, and tax free.
    And mostly the poor, uneducated people suffer, as usual. And for WDF, can you provide some “robust quantitative” analysis for your opinions for the rest of us? I speak from far more experience than I related to you here, and far more than you will ever experience.

  128. Anonymous

    DPD,
    I am the person from 6/22/08 5:28 p.m. You have my condolences for the loss of your mother in-law. Please do not equate,relate or attempt to extrapolate your mother in-laws death with this recent tragedy. People pass away from this earth due to a myriad of causes, not just because they worked in the fields.
    Does anyone know what the Coroner’s report was on the young womans cause of death? Worker Safety? I agree about this but the biggest safety factor for workers, and for anyone for that matter, is one’s own awareness and intelligence.
    It is an illegal immigration problem in spite of any denial you may make on that subject. This problem primarily belongs to the mexican gov’t,non enforced U.S. laws and greed on both sides. I too worked in the fields in Imperial Valley for the, Arena Land and Cattle Company, where most summer days are 110 to 120 degrees F. The pay was MUCH lower, and tax free.
    And mostly the poor, uneducated people suffer, as usual. And for WDF, can you provide some “robust quantitative” analysis for your opinions for the rest of us? I speak from far more experience than I related to you here, and far more than you will ever experience.

  129. Doug Paul Davis

    One other thing I should have said, is that my mother-in-law died two years before I met Cecilia. Cecilia was just 29.

    The coroner’s report was that this woman died from heat stroke and they probably could have saved her had they gotten her to doctor when she first collapsed as opposed to putting her into a hot van for two hours and then driving around trying to find rubbing alcohol. She probably would not have collapsed had she had access to water and shade from a pop tent. The cost the company would have been negligible to do these things.

    It is also worth noting that in developing countries where there is heat problems, people do not work during the heat of the day, they work early and they work late.

    There are all sorts of ways to avoid these kinds of tragedies–and let us face it, this work needs to be done regardless of who does it. That’s why I focus on the tragedy itself rather than the politics of illegal immigration. I would hope we could all agree on avoiding a repeat of this tragedy.

  130. Doug Paul Davis

    One other thing I should have said, is that my mother-in-law died two years before I met Cecilia. Cecilia was just 29.

    The coroner’s report was that this woman died from heat stroke and they probably could have saved her had they gotten her to doctor when she first collapsed as opposed to putting her into a hot van for two hours and then driving around trying to find rubbing alcohol. She probably would not have collapsed had she had access to water and shade from a pop tent. The cost the company would have been negligible to do these things.

    It is also worth noting that in developing countries where there is heat problems, people do not work during the heat of the day, they work early and they work late.

    There are all sorts of ways to avoid these kinds of tragedies–and let us face it, this work needs to be done regardless of who does it. That’s why I focus on the tragedy itself rather than the politics of illegal immigration. I would hope we could all agree on avoiding a repeat of this tragedy.

  131. Doug Paul Davis

    One other thing I should have said, is that my mother-in-law died two years before I met Cecilia. Cecilia was just 29.

    The coroner’s report was that this woman died from heat stroke and they probably could have saved her had they gotten her to doctor when she first collapsed as opposed to putting her into a hot van for two hours and then driving around trying to find rubbing alcohol. She probably would not have collapsed had she had access to water and shade from a pop tent. The cost the company would have been negligible to do these things.

    It is also worth noting that in developing countries where there is heat problems, people do not work during the heat of the day, they work early and they work late.

    There are all sorts of ways to avoid these kinds of tragedies–and let us face it, this work needs to be done regardless of who does it. That’s why I focus on the tragedy itself rather than the politics of illegal immigration. I would hope we could all agree on avoiding a repeat of this tragedy.

  132. Doug Paul Davis

    One other thing I should have said, is that my mother-in-law died two years before I met Cecilia. Cecilia was just 29.

    The coroner’s report was that this woman died from heat stroke and they probably could have saved her had they gotten her to doctor when she first collapsed as opposed to putting her into a hot van for two hours and then driving around trying to find rubbing alcohol. She probably would not have collapsed had she had access to water and shade from a pop tent. The cost the company would have been negligible to do these things.

    It is also worth noting that in developing countries where there is heat problems, people do not work during the heat of the day, they work early and they work late.

    There are all sorts of ways to avoid these kinds of tragedies–and let us face it, this work needs to be done regardless of who does it. That’s why I focus on the tragedy itself rather than the politics of illegal immigration. I would hope we could all agree on avoiding a repeat of this tragedy.

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