Landlords Trying to Mobilize Students Against Parcel Tax?

Share:
Vanguard Analysis Shows Scare Tactics and Deception Used in Flier Passed Out At an Apartment Complex

The Vanguard received late word last night that some landlords may be trying to mobilize their student tenants against the parcel tax.

A flier was apparently passed around at least one apartment complex outlining the parcel tax, making the case as to why students should be concerned, and then asking them to attend today’s school board meeting which is at 9 am in the East Conference Room in the district office located at 526 B Street.

“With our tenants facing higher enrollment fees and gas prices at the pump, we have had increased inquiries regarding the proposed new school tax of $80-$140 per house and $40-70 per apartment unit per year…”

This sounds scary until you actually do the math. First, the general cost passed on to students is about half of the per unit price, meaning they are looking at a $20 to $35 dollar PER YEAR increase. Broken down to a monthly basis, you are talking $3 per month.

Even the increase to $196 PER UNIT PER YEAR for ALL school taxes would mean at most $8 to $9 per month for the student. In other words, students are not going to feel this increase. Landlords may, but not students.

“There are three (3) school age students in the 300 units we surveyed on Alvarado, which averages one (1) student per 100 apartments. One has to wonder how the School Board decided that an apartment should pay half of the amount of a house when there are most likely 50 to 100 kids per 100 houses. Why should UCD student housing pay 50 to 100 times more per student than houses do? Shouldn’t the tax be proportional to burden on the school system?”

The logic is somewhat subjective. The public pays for public schools regardless of whether or not there are school aged kids in the residence. The tax burden is generally spread based on ability to pay. The numbers game is somewhat of a shell game to begin with. 50 to 100 times more sounds very scary until again you realize that the student in total is paying at most $8 to $9 per month as the result of the parcel tax combined with all other taxes and would only pay an additional $3 per month for this new tax. Remember many students share a residence, meaning that the burden on each individual is very small.

The leaflet does raise a valid point however here:

“Our concern is that there was no study to show how much burden apartments should carry and that eventually these taxes result in rent increases.”

And that is something to look into. However, the point is unfortunately wrapped in some distortions and apparent scare tactics. A $200 per year tax per unit is not going to result in a huge rent increase on a per monthly basis.

The leaflet then shifts the burden to the Davis Schools Foundation. Pointing out that they raised 1.7 million in donations last year.

They ask:

“Should the School Board add a new parcel tax every year to cover costs, or should the School Foundation continue fundraising?”

This is a red-herring. First of all, the school board is not going to add a new parcel tax every year. Second, the school foundation is going to continue fundraising. However, the school foundation, as great as they are, is not going to sustain that level of fundraising indefinitely. The idea was to bridge the gap until the school board could find a more reliable stream of revenue to cover the deficit between spending needs and revenue.

The leaflet then concludes:

“The school board will have to hope the uninformed UCD students will vote for a tax that is unfairly weighted on them, especially at a time when UCD Students are facing an 11-13% increase in enrollment fees.”

Unfortunately, message such as this flier are not going to help inform UCD Students. This is basically a scare tactic. This leaflet is completely dishonest. It presents students with basic facts about the parcel tax but in a very distorted manner without breaking down what the actual per monthly cost will be.

They then encourage the students to write emails to the Board of Education, the Superintendent, and the Davis Enterprise. Apparently the tactic got a few students to write in.

There are legitimate concerns that students and landlords alike may share in this process. The school board should have the burden to lay out and education the public on this process. However, tactics like this leaflet are not the answer. It is unfortunate that someone has stooped to this level of trying to scare students to oppose the parcel tax.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

Share:

About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

Related posts

128 thoughts on “Landlords Trying to Mobilize Students Against Parcel Tax?”

  1. Anonymous

    UCD students (or their parents) spend roughly $6000 to $7000 per quarter, so an extra $10 per quarter is insignificant.

    That being said, the community and the students can benefit each other. The students do contribute to education and parks (via taxes) with very little direct benefit from those contributions. The community can offset the impact of higher taxes by providing adequate student housing. The difference between an 8% rent increase and a 4% rent increase more than offsets any tax increases thrown at the students. It is ok to take from the students but remember to give something back.

  2. Anonymous

    UCD students (or their parents) spend roughly $6000 to $7000 per quarter, so an extra $10 per quarter is insignificant.

    That being said, the community and the students can benefit each other. The students do contribute to education and parks (via taxes) with very little direct benefit from those contributions. The community can offset the impact of higher taxes by providing adequate student housing. The difference between an 8% rent increase and a 4% rent increase more than offsets any tax increases thrown at the students. It is ok to take from the students but remember to give something back.

  3. Anonymous

    UCD students (or their parents) spend roughly $6000 to $7000 per quarter, so an extra $10 per quarter is insignificant.

    That being said, the community and the students can benefit each other. The students do contribute to education and parks (via taxes) with very little direct benefit from those contributions. The community can offset the impact of higher taxes by providing adequate student housing. The difference between an 8% rent increase and a 4% rent increase more than offsets any tax increases thrown at the students. It is ok to take from the students but remember to give something back.

  4. Anonymous

    UCD students (or their parents) spend roughly $6000 to $7000 per quarter, so an extra $10 per quarter is insignificant.

    That being said, the community and the students can benefit each other. The students do contribute to education and parks (via taxes) with very little direct benefit from those contributions. The community can offset the impact of higher taxes by providing adequate student housing. The difference between an 8% rent increase and a 4% rent increase more than offsets any tax increases thrown at the students. It is ok to take from the students but remember to give something back.

  5. PRED Old Timer

    Good for those Landlords. This parcel tax is stupid to begin with and the timing is even worse. I’m so glad the school district and the city is spending money on polling and consultants instead of – oh I don’t know – educating our children and providing needed services.

    All that’s missing from this thread now is for a few city council members, defeated nominees, and their spouses to tell us that all the Davis voters are stupid and we desrve the government we get.

  6. PRED Old Timer

    Good for those Landlords. This parcel tax is stupid to begin with and the timing is even worse. I’m so glad the school district and the city is spending money on polling and consultants instead of – oh I don’t know – educating our children and providing needed services.

    All that’s missing from this thread now is for a few city council members, defeated nominees, and their spouses to tell us that all the Davis voters are stupid and we desrve the government we get.

  7. PRED Old Timer

    Good for those Landlords. This parcel tax is stupid to begin with and the timing is even worse. I’m so glad the school district and the city is spending money on polling and consultants instead of – oh I don’t know – educating our children and providing needed services.

    All that’s missing from this thread now is for a few city council members, defeated nominees, and their spouses to tell us that all the Davis voters are stupid and we desrve the government we get.

  8. PRED Old Timer

    Good for those Landlords. This parcel tax is stupid to begin with and the timing is even worse. I’m so glad the school district and the city is spending money on polling and consultants instead of – oh I don’t know – educating our children and providing needed services.

    All that’s missing from this thread now is for a few city council members, defeated nominees, and their spouses to tell us that all the Davis voters are stupid and we desrve the government we get.

  9. Doug Paul Davis

    Pred:

    I have no problem with landlords opposing the parcel tax per se, but they should be a little more honest about it.

    “I’m so glad the school district and the city is spending money on polling and consultants instead of – oh I don’t know – educating our children and providing needed services.”

    I guess that’s one way to look at it. The other way to look at it is that they are spending tens of thousands on polling upfront in homes of getting a few million.

    That said, to run the actual campaign, the money cannot come from district money. I’m not sure how it all works, but when they ran Measure Q they had to separate official district business from campaign business.

    I can think they can be advised on putting the measure on the ballot, but not the actual campaign.

    “All that’s missing from this thread now is for a few city council members, defeated nominees, and their spouses to tell us that all the Davis voters are stupid and we desrve the government we get.”

    Nice.

  10. Doug Paul Davis

    Pred:

    I have no problem with landlords opposing the parcel tax per se, but they should be a little more honest about it.

    “I’m so glad the school district and the city is spending money on polling and consultants instead of – oh I don’t know – educating our children and providing needed services.”

    I guess that’s one way to look at it. The other way to look at it is that they are spending tens of thousands on polling upfront in homes of getting a few million.

    That said, to run the actual campaign, the money cannot come from district money. I’m not sure how it all works, but when they ran Measure Q they had to separate official district business from campaign business.

    I can think they can be advised on putting the measure on the ballot, but not the actual campaign.

    “All that’s missing from this thread now is for a few city council members, defeated nominees, and their spouses to tell us that all the Davis voters are stupid and we desrve the government we get.”

    Nice.

  11. Doug Paul Davis

    Pred:

    I have no problem with landlords opposing the parcel tax per se, but they should be a little more honest about it.

    “I’m so glad the school district and the city is spending money on polling and consultants instead of – oh I don’t know – educating our children and providing needed services.”

    I guess that’s one way to look at it. The other way to look at it is that they are spending tens of thousands on polling upfront in homes of getting a few million.

    That said, to run the actual campaign, the money cannot come from district money. I’m not sure how it all works, but when they ran Measure Q they had to separate official district business from campaign business.

    I can think they can be advised on putting the measure on the ballot, but not the actual campaign.

    “All that’s missing from this thread now is for a few city council members, defeated nominees, and their spouses to tell us that all the Davis voters are stupid and we desrve the government we get.”

    Nice.

  12. Doug Paul Davis

    Pred:

    I have no problem with landlords opposing the parcel tax per se, but they should be a little more honest about it.

    “I’m so glad the school district and the city is spending money on polling and consultants instead of – oh I don’t know – educating our children and providing needed services.”

    I guess that’s one way to look at it. The other way to look at it is that they are spending tens of thousands on polling upfront in homes of getting a few million.

    That said, to run the actual campaign, the money cannot come from district money. I’m not sure how it all works, but when they ran Measure Q they had to separate official district business from campaign business.

    I can think they can be advised on putting the measure on the ballot, but not the actual campaign.

    “All that’s missing from this thread now is for a few city council members, defeated nominees, and their spouses to tell us that all the Davis voters are stupid and we desrve the government we get.”

    Nice.

  13. another davis resident

    PRED Old Timer at 8:08 – You took the words right off my key board. You do deserve the government you get. If you voted for those in office then you have nobody to blame but the person in the mirror and others who are like minded.

  14. another davis resident

    PRED Old Timer at 8:08 – You took the words right off my key board. You do deserve the government you get. If you voted for those in office then you have nobody to blame but the person in the mirror and others who are like minded.

  15. another davis resident

    PRED Old Timer at 8:08 – You took the words right off my key board. You do deserve the government you get. If you voted for those in office then you have nobody to blame but the person in the mirror and others who are like minded.

  16. another davis resident

    PRED Old Timer at 8:08 – You took the words right off my key board. You do deserve the government you get. If you voted for those in office then you have nobody to blame but the person in the mirror and others who are like minded.

  17. Anonymous

    I’m amazed that the broader society in general can convincingly view tens of thousands of dollars (or more) spent on college education as an acceptable investment, but spending relatively less on K-12 public education to try to prepare kids for college is a less acceptable investment.

    “The students do contribute to education and parks (via taxes) with very little direct benefit from those contributions.”

    The immediate, short-term benefits may be less obvious. Good schools generally reduce rates of youth crime.

    But the long term benefits to society are enormous. The more kids who graduate from HS and who are prepared for college, the stronger is the long term health of the economy. A better educated work force is better able to shift jobs and respond to economic challenges.

    I’m amazed to read about U.S. universities recruiting foreign students to fill graduate programs because there aren’t enough qualified domestic students around.

    pred said: “This parcel tax is stupid to begin with and the timing is even worse.”

    When would the timing ever be good for tough school budget times? It usually happens during economic downturns.

  18. Anonymous

    I’m amazed that the broader society in general can convincingly view tens of thousands of dollars (or more) spent on college education as an acceptable investment, but spending relatively less on K-12 public education to try to prepare kids for college is a less acceptable investment.

    “The students do contribute to education and parks (via taxes) with very little direct benefit from those contributions.”

    The immediate, short-term benefits may be less obvious. Good schools generally reduce rates of youth crime.

    But the long term benefits to society are enormous. The more kids who graduate from HS and who are prepared for college, the stronger is the long term health of the economy. A better educated work force is better able to shift jobs and respond to economic challenges.

    I’m amazed to read about U.S. universities recruiting foreign students to fill graduate programs because there aren’t enough qualified domestic students around.

    pred said: “This parcel tax is stupid to begin with and the timing is even worse.”

    When would the timing ever be good for tough school budget times? It usually happens during economic downturns.

  19. Anonymous

    I’m amazed that the broader society in general can convincingly view tens of thousands of dollars (or more) spent on college education as an acceptable investment, but spending relatively less on K-12 public education to try to prepare kids for college is a less acceptable investment.

    “The students do contribute to education and parks (via taxes) with very little direct benefit from those contributions.”

    The immediate, short-term benefits may be less obvious. Good schools generally reduce rates of youth crime.

    But the long term benefits to society are enormous. The more kids who graduate from HS and who are prepared for college, the stronger is the long term health of the economy. A better educated work force is better able to shift jobs and respond to economic challenges.

    I’m amazed to read about U.S. universities recruiting foreign students to fill graduate programs because there aren’t enough qualified domestic students around.

    pred said: “This parcel tax is stupid to begin with and the timing is even worse.”

    When would the timing ever be good for tough school budget times? It usually happens during economic downturns.

  20. Anonymous

    I’m amazed that the broader society in general can convincingly view tens of thousands of dollars (or more) spent on college education as an acceptable investment, but spending relatively less on K-12 public education to try to prepare kids for college is a less acceptable investment.

    “The students do contribute to education and parks (via taxes) with very little direct benefit from those contributions.”

    The immediate, short-term benefits may be less obvious. Good schools generally reduce rates of youth crime.

    But the long term benefits to society are enormous. The more kids who graduate from HS and who are prepared for college, the stronger is the long term health of the economy. A better educated work force is better able to shift jobs and respond to economic challenges.

    I’m amazed to read about U.S. universities recruiting foreign students to fill graduate programs because there aren’t enough qualified domestic students around.

    pred said: “This parcel tax is stupid to begin with and the timing is even worse.”

    When would the timing ever be good for tough school budget times? It usually happens during economic downturns.

  21. different view

    The landlords are being short-sighted. Good schools in Davis contribute to premium housing prices in Davis, which, along with relative shortages in rental units, allows them to jack up the rental prices of their substandard units, and demand one-year leases in all cases. They should be happy to be paying the parcel tax in order to keep the house of cards standing.

  22. different view

    The landlords are being short-sighted. Good schools in Davis contribute to premium housing prices in Davis, which, along with relative shortages in rental units, allows them to jack up the rental prices of their substandard units, and demand one-year leases in all cases. They should be happy to be paying the parcel tax in order to keep the house of cards standing.

  23. different view

    The landlords are being short-sighted. Good schools in Davis contribute to premium housing prices in Davis, which, along with relative shortages in rental units, allows them to jack up the rental prices of their substandard units, and demand one-year leases in all cases. They should be happy to be paying the parcel tax in order to keep the house of cards standing.

  24. different view

    The landlords are being short-sighted. Good schools in Davis contribute to premium housing prices in Davis, which, along with relative shortages in rental units, allows them to jack up the rental prices of their substandard units, and demand one-year leases in all cases. They should be happy to be paying the parcel tax in order to keep the house of cards standing.

  25. Disgusted Taxpayer

    “The numbers game is somewhat of a shell game to begin with.”

    The real game being played is by the School Board, which has not to my knowledge laid out specific needs, and how the parcel tax is going to address those needs. The only thing that has been done is to pay money to hire a consultant to stick a finger in the wind, to determine how much of a parcel tax the electorate would be willing to swallow.

    “I have no problem with landlords opposing the parcel tax per se, but they should be a little more honest about it.”

    Why not demand the same honesty from the School Board/District?

    “You do deserve the government you get.”

    Red herring. The electorate needs to demand better from the School Board/District.

    “I’m amazed that the broader society in general can convincingly view tens of thousands of dollars (or more) spent on college education as an acceptable investment, but spending relatively less on K-12 public education to try to prepare kids for college is a less acceptable investment.”

    The issue is more about fraud and waste than it is about spending more money on education. I don’t want to give the School Board/District another blank check to throw away yet again. It is high time to hold our local officials accountable. If Emerson is to be closed anyway, then a pox on another parcel tax and the heck with the School Board/District, and let the chips fall where they may.

    On the other hand, if the School Board can figure a way to keep Emerson open, and tell us how much is needed to do it or how it can be done, then I am all ears. And don’t give me the business about facilities money is needed for renovations, which is seperate from operating expenses. Can we keep Emerson open without renovations? If not, what minimal amount in facilities money will be required to keep it legally open? If Emerson can be kept open, how much in operating expenses will be required? So far, I haven’t heard word one from the School Board/District on this subject. NOT ONE!

  26. Disgusted Taxpayer

    “The numbers game is somewhat of a shell game to begin with.”

    The real game being played is by the School Board, which has not to my knowledge laid out specific needs, and how the parcel tax is going to address those needs. The only thing that has been done is to pay money to hire a consultant to stick a finger in the wind, to determine how much of a parcel tax the electorate would be willing to swallow.

    “I have no problem with landlords opposing the parcel tax per se, but they should be a little more honest about it.”

    Why not demand the same honesty from the School Board/District?

    “You do deserve the government you get.”

    Red herring. The electorate needs to demand better from the School Board/District.

    “I’m amazed that the broader society in general can convincingly view tens of thousands of dollars (or more) spent on college education as an acceptable investment, but spending relatively less on K-12 public education to try to prepare kids for college is a less acceptable investment.”

    The issue is more about fraud and waste than it is about spending more money on education. I don’t want to give the School Board/District another blank check to throw away yet again. It is high time to hold our local officials accountable. If Emerson is to be closed anyway, then a pox on another parcel tax and the heck with the School Board/District, and let the chips fall where they may.

    On the other hand, if the School Board can figure a way to keep Emerson open, and tell us how much is needed to do it or how it can be done, then I am all ears. And don’t give me the business about facilities money is needed for renovations, which is seperate from operating expenses. Can we keep Emerson open without renovations? If not, what minimal amount in facilities money will be required to keep it legally open? If Emerson can be kept open, how much in operating expenses will be required? So far, I haven’t heard word one from the School Board/District on this subject. NOT ONE!

  27. Disgusted Taxpayer

    “The numbers game is somewhat of a shell game to begin with.”

    The real game being played is by the School Board, which has not to my knowledge laid out specific needs, and how the parcel tax is going to address those needs. The only thing that has been done is to pay money to hire a consultant to stick a finger in the wind, to determine how much of a parcel tax the electorate would be willing to swallow.

    “I have no problem with landlords opposing the parcel tax per se, but they should be a little more honest about it.”

    Why not demand the same honesty from the School Board/District?

    “You do deserve the government you get.”

    Red herring. The electorate needs to demand better from the School Board/District.

    “I’m amazed that the broader society in general can convincingly view tens of thousands of dollars (or more) spent on college education as an acceptable investment, but spending relatively less on K-12 public education to try to prepare kids for college is a less acceptable investment.”

    The issue is more about fraud and waste than it is about spending more money on education. I don’t want to give the School Board/District another blank check to throw away yet again. It is high time to hold our local officials accountable. If Emerson is to be closed anyway, then a pox on another parcel tax and the heck with the School Board/District, and let the chips fall where they may.

    On the other hand, if the School Board can figure a way to keep Emerson open, and tell us how much is needed to do it or how it can be done, then I am all ears. And don’t give me the business about facilities money is needed for renovations, which is seperate from operating expenses. Can we keep Emerson open without renovations? If not, what minimal amount in facilities money will be required to keep it legally open? If Emerson can be kept open, how much in operating expenses will be required? So far, I haven’t heard word one from the School Board/District on this subject. NOT ONE!

  28. Disgusted Taxpayer

    “The numbers game is somewhat of a shell game to begin with.”

    The real game being played is by the School Board, which has not to my knowledge laid out specific needs, and how the parcel tax is going to address those needs. The only thing that has been done is to pay money to hire a consultant to stick a finger in the wind, to determine how much of a parcel tax the electorate would be willing to swallow.

    “I have no problem with landlords opposing the parcel tax per se, but they should be a little more honest about it.”

    Why not demand the same honesty from the School Board/District?

    “You do deserve the government you get.”

    Red herring. The electorate needs to demand better from the School Board/District.

    “I’m amazed that the broader society in general can convincingly view tens of thousands of dollars (or more) spent on college education as an acceptable investment, but spending relatively less on K-12 public education to try to prepare kids for college is a less acceptable investment.”

    The issue is more about fraud and waste than it is about spending more money on education. I don’t want to give the School Board/District another blank check to throw away yet again. It is high time to hold our local officials accountable. If Emerson is to be closed anyway, then a pox on another parcel tax and the heck with the School Board/District, and let the chips fall where they may.

    On the other hand, if the School Board can figure a way to keep Emerson open, and tell us how much is needed to do it or how it can be done, then I am all ears. And don’t give me the business about facilities money is needed for renovations, which is seperate from operating expenses. Can we keep Emerson open without renovations? If not, what minimal amount in facilities money will be required to keep it legally open? If Emerson can be kept open, how much in operating expenses will be required? So far, I haven’t heard word one from the School Board/District on this subject. NOT ONE!

  29. Doug Paul Davis

    A few things:

    The school district by law is required to lay out exactly how parcel tax money is to be spent. Today at the meeting they have discussed a sheet that lays out the exact needs of the district and how the parcel tax will cover those needs.

    Another interesting piece of information from Bruce Colby is that the school district does not have the authority to levy a sales tax nor do they have the authority to ask another jurisdiction to do so on their behalf. The reason that they have gone with the parcel tax is that that is the own tax levying authority that they possess. So a sales tax is a non-issue.

    More on all of this tomorrow.

  30. Doug Paul Davis

    A few things:

    The school district by law is required to lay out exactly how parcel tax money is to be spent. Today at the meeting they have discussed a sheet that lays out the exact needs of the district and how the parcel tax will cover those needs.

    Another interesting piece of information from Bruce Colby is that the school district does not have the authority to levy a sales tax nor do they have the authority to ask another jurisdiction to do so on their behalf. The reason that they have gone with the parcel tax is that that is the own tax levying authority that they possess. So a sales tax is a non-issue.

    More on all of this tomorrow.

  31. Doug Paul Davis

    A few things:

    The school district by law is required to lay out exactly how parcel tax money is to be spent. Today at the meeting they have discussed a sheet that lays out the exact needs of the district and how the parcel tax will cover those needs.

    Another interesting piece of information from Bruce Colby is that the school district does not have the authority to levy a sales tax nor do they have the authority to ask another jurisdiction to do so on their behalf. The reason that they have gone with the parcel tax is that that is the own tax levying authority that they possess. So a sales tax is a non-issue.

    More on all of this tomorrow.

  32. Doug Paul Davis

    A few things:

    The school district by law is required to lay out exactly how parcel tax money is to be spent. Today at the meeting they have discussed a sheet that lays out the exact needs of the district and how the parcel tax will cover those needs.

    Another interesting piece of information from Bruce Colby is that the school district does not have the authority to levy a sales tax nor do they have the authority to ask another jurisdiction to do so on their behalf. The reason that they have gone with the parcel tax is that that is the own tax levying authority that they possess. So a sales tax is a non-issue.

    More on all of this tomorrow.

  33. be practical

    “If Emerson is to be closed anyway, then a pox on another parcel tax and the heck with the School Board/District, and let the chips fall where they may.”

    This is the blogger who seems to be more enamored of public school architecture than keeping teachers employed and programs running. Programs and teachers clearly benefit kids more than brick and mortar, if those are your choices.

    Any normal multi-franchise business that has to cut expenses would close some of its franchises, and move as many of its employees to other stores.

    In Davis, you see egocentric individuals like this who demand to keep a school in every neighborhood, and damn the consequences. This kind of thinking loses sight of the bigger picture.

    Valley Oak closed, but the teachers and programs were saved. If Emerson were to close, then we will still have the same teachers and programs, just at a different school.

    Personally, I want to see the district exercise a little business sense and make budget cuts by closing schools as needed before coming to us and asking for a parcel tax. And so far that’s what the school board has done.

    This blogger is asking the district to work outside of an acceptable business management model and waste taxpayer money on extra administrative and classified staff to keep all schools open.

  34. be practical

    “If Emerson is to be closed anyway, then a pox on another parcel tax and the heck with the School Board/District, and let the chips fall where they may.”

    This is the blogger who seems to be more enamored of public school architecture than keeping teachers employed and programs running. Programs and teachers clearly benefit kids more than brick and mortar, if those are your choices.

    Any normal multi-franchise business that has to cut expenses would close some of its franchises, and move as many of its employees to other stores.

    In Davis, you see egocentric individuals like this who demand to keep a school in every neighborhood, and damn the consequences. This kind of thinking loses sight of the bigger picture.

    Valley Oak closed, but the teachers and programs were saved. If Emerson were to close, then we will still have the same teachers and programs, just at a different school.

    Personally, I want to see the district exercise a little business sense and make budget cuts by closing schools as needed before coming to us and asking for a parcel tax. And so far that’s what the school board has done.

    This blogger is asking the district to work outside of an acceptable business management model and waste taxpayer money on extra administrative and classified staff to keep all schools open.

  35. be practical

    “If Emerson is to be closed anyway, then a pox on another parcel tax and the heck with the School Board/District, and let the chips fall where they may.”

    This is the blogger who seems to be more enamored of public school architecture than keeping teachers employed and programs running. Programs and teachers clearly benefit kids more than brick and mortar, if those are your choices.

    Any normal multi-franchise business that has to cut expenses would close some of its franchises, and move as many of its employees to other stores.

    In Davis, you see egocentric individuals like this who demand to keep a school in every neighborhood, and damn the consequences. This kind of thinking loses sight of the bigger picture.

    Valley Oak closed, but the teachers and programs were saved. If Emerson were to close, then we will still have the same teachers and programs, just at a different school.

    Personally, I want to see the district exercise a little business sense and make budget cuts by closing schools as needed before coming to us and asking for a parcel tax. And so far that’s what the school board has done.

    This blogger is asking the district to work outside of an acceptable business management model and waste taxpayer money on extra administrative and classified staff to keep all schools open.

  36. be practical

    “If Emerson is to be closed anyway, then a pox on another parcel tax and the heck with the School Board/District, and let the chips fall where they may.”

    This is the blogger who seems to be more enamored of public school architecture than keeping teachers employed and programs running. Programs and teachers clearly benefit kids more than brick and mortar, if those are your choices.

    Any normal multi-franchise business that has to cut expenses would close some of its franchises, and move as many of its employees to other stores.

    In Davis, you see egocentric individuals like this who demand to keep a school in every neighborhood, and damn the consequences. This kind of thinking loses sight of the bigger picture.

    Valley Oak closed, but the teachers and programs were saved. If Emerson were to close, then we will still have the same teachers and programs, just at a different school.

    Personally, I want to see the district exercise a little business sense and make budget cuts by closing schools as needed before coming to us and asking for a parcel tax. And so far that’s what the school board has done.

    This blogger is asking the district to work outside of an acceptable business management model and waste taxpayer money on extra administrative and classified staff to keep all schools open.

  37. wdf

    Another interesting piece of information from Bruce Colby is that the school district does not have the authority to levy a sales tax nor do they have the authority to ask another jurisdiction to do so on their behalf. The reason that they have gone with the parcel tax is that that is the own tax levying authority that they possess. So a sales tax is a non-issue.

    Interesting, but how were San Francisco public schools able to levy a sales tax in 1993? You can find reference to this at the ed-data web site for the SF Unified school district.

  38. wdf

    Another interesting piece of information from Bruce Colby is that the school district does not have the authority to levy a sales tax nor do they have the authority to ask another jurisdiction to do so on their behalf. The reason that they have gone with the parcel tax is that that is the own tax levying authority that they possess. So a sales tax is a non-issue.

    Interesting, but how were San Francisco public schools able to levy a sales tax in 1993? You can find reference to this at the ed-data web site for the SF Unified school district.

  39. wdf

    Another interesting piece of information from Bruce Colby is that the school district does not have the authority to levy a sales tax nor do they have the authority to ask another jurisdiction to do so on their behalf. The reason that they have gone with the parcel tax is that that is the own tax levying authority that they possess. So a sales tax is a non-issue.

    Interesting, but how were San Francisco public schools able to levy a sales tax in 1993? You can find reference to this at the ed-data web site for the SF Unified school district.

  40. wdf

    Another interesting piece of information from Bruce Colby is that the school district does not have the authority to levy a sales tax nor do they have the authority to ask another jurisdiction to do so on their behalf. The reason that they have gone with the parcel tax is that that is the own tax levying authority that they possess. So a sales tax is a non-issue.

    Interesting, but how were San Francisco public schools able to levy a sales tax in 1993? You can find reference to this at the ed-data web site for the SF Unified school district.

  41. FRW

    “Valley Oak closed, but the teachers and programs were saved.”
    That remains to be seen. I believe that most of those famously successful Valley Oak programs are still in flux with finances yet to be allocated and teaching staff fragmented.
    Let’s revisit this statement Next year, after test scores and program assessments have been released.

  42. FRW

    “Valley Oak closed, but the teachers and programs were saved.”
    That remains to be seen. I believe that most of those famously successful Valley Oak programs are still in flux with finances yet to be allocated and teaching staff fragmented.
    Let’s revisit this statement Next year, after test scores and program assessments have been released.

  43. FRW

    “Valley Oak closed, but the teachers and programs were saved.”
    That remains to be seen. I believe that most of those famously successful Valley Oak programs are still in flux with finances yet to be allocated and teaching staff fragmented.
    Let’s revisit this statement Next year, after test scores and program assessments have been released.

  44. FRW

    “Valley Oak closed, but the teachers and programs were saved.”
    That remains to be seen. I believe that most of those famously successful Valley Oak programs are still in flux with finances yet to be allocated and teaching staff fragmented.
    Let’s revisit this statement Next year, after test scores and program assessments have been released.

  45. Anonymous

    The investment is all normalized, unless they come from a town that has no K-12 education (doubtful). I have paid taxes in this town and donated numerous dollars to the schools and I didn’t have kids. UCD is part of our public educational system but it seems only the very affluent “children” can afford to attend. Cars for UC students used to be an anomaly but now it seems strange if you’re not driving a new BMW. Education is not cheap, but ignorance is expensive.

    As one of the most progressive and developed nations, the United States spends less per person on education than many other less developed nations. No Child Left Behind should have been called No Classrooms Left. From the very top, our government has eviscerated our educational system to the point of relying on fundraising to keep needed positions in the schools. By contrast, we spend BILLIONS OF DOLLARS (535 and counting, not including long term medical treatment of our soldiers) in Iraq at the cost of thousands of live all in the name of spreading democracy? Not to mention the hundreds and hundreds of thousands referred to as collateral casualties. I like to think of them as civilians; men, women and children.

    The Lottery is the biggest joke in our State. It was touted as the extra funding for education but the reality it very different.

    Finally, our current budget “crisis” can be traced back to our great presiding Governor. With the stroke of the pen, he put us 4 billion in debt by rescinding the VLF. I got a whopping $7 check that probably cost double that to print and send to me. Sure, it was one campaign promise he kept but we had a surplus before he stepped in. So why send back something most of us didn’t miss already.

    By contrast, I pay $9.06 for public safety (water, sewer, garbage bill) every two months. Safety and education, two very important places I don’t mind spending money. Three dollars is too little in my opinion.

  46. Anonymous

    The investment is all normalized, unless they come from a town that has no K-12 education (doubtful). I have paid taxes in this town and donated numerous dollars to the schools and I didn’t have kids. UCD is part of our public educational system but it seems only the very affluent “children” can afford to attend. Cars for UC students used to be an anomaly but now it seems strange if you’re not driving a new BMW. Education is not cheap, but ignorance is expensive.

    As one of the most progressive and developed nations, the United States spends less per person on education than many other less developed nations. No Child Left Behind should have been called No Classrooms Left. From the very top, our government has eviscerated our educational system to the point of relying on fundraising to keep needed positions in the schools. By contrast, we spend BILLIONS OF DOLLARS (535 and counting, not including long term medical treatment of our soldiers) in Iraq at the cost of thousands of live all in the name of spreading democracy? Not to mention the hundreds and hundreds of thousands referred to as collateral casualties. I like to think of them as civilians; men, women and children.

    The Lottery is the biggest joke in our State. It was touted as the extra funding for education but the reality it very different.

    Finally, our current budget “crisis” can be traced back to our great presiding Governor. With the stroke of the pen, he put us 4 billion in debt by rescinding the VLF. I got a whopping $7 check that probably cost double that to print and send to me. Sure, it was one campaign promise he kept but we had a surplus before he stepped in. So why send back something most of us didn’t miss already.

    By contrast, I pay $9.06 for public safety (water, sewer, garbage bill) every two months. Safety and education, two very important places I don’t mind spending money. Three dollars is too little in my opinion.

  47. Anonymous

    The investment is all normalized, unless they come from a town that has no K-12 education (doubtful). I have paid taxes in this town and donated numerous dollars to the schools and I didn’t have kids. UCD is part of our public educational system but it seems only the very affluent “children” can afford to attend. Cars for UC students used to be an anomaly but now it seems strange if you’re not driving a new BMW. Education is not cheap, but ignorance is expensive.

    As one of the most progressive and developed nations, the United States spends less per person on education than many other less developed nations. No Child Left Behind should have been called No Classrooms Left. From the very top, our government has eviscerated our educational system to the point of relying on fundraising to keep needed positions in the schools. By contrast, we spend BILLIONS OF DOLLARS (535 and counting, not including long term medical treatment of our soldiers) in Iraq at the cost of thousands of live all in the name of spreading democracy? Not to mention the hundreds and hundreds of thousands referred to as collateral casualties. I like to think of them as civilians; men, women and children.

    The Lottery is the biggest joke in our State. It was touted as the extra funding for education but the reality it very different.

    Finally, our current budget “crisis” can be traced back to our great presiding Governor. With the stroke of the pen, he put us 4 billion in debt by rescinding the VLF. I got a whopping $7 check that probably cost double that to print and send to me. Sure, it was one campaign promise he kept but we had a surplus before he stepped in. So why send back something most of us didn’t miss already.

    By contrast, I pay $9.06 for public safety (water, sewer, garbage bill) every two months. Safety and education, two very important places I don’t mind spending money. Three dollars is too little in my opinion.

  48. Anonymous

    The investment is all normalized, unless they come from a town that has no K-12 education (doubtful). I have paid taxes in this town and donated numerous dollars to the schools and I didn’t have kids. UCD is part of our public educational system but it seems only the very affluent “children” can afford to attend. Cars for UC students used to be an anomaly but now it seems strange if you’re not driving a new BMW. Education is not cheap, but ignorance is expensive.

    As one of the most progressive and developed nations, the United States spends less per person on education than many other less developed nations. No Child Left Behind should have been called No Classrooms Left. From the very top, our government has eviscerated our educational system to the point of relying on fundraising to keep needed positions in the schools. By contrast, we spend BILLIONS OF DOLLARS (535 and counting, not including long term medical treatment of our soldiers) in Iraq at the cost of thousands of live all in the name of spreading democracy? Not to mention the hundreds and hundreds of thousands referred to as collateral casualties. I like to think of them as civilians; men, women and children.

    The Lottery is the biggest joke in our State. It was touted as the extra funding for education but the reality it very different.

    Finally, our current budget “crisis” can be traced back to our great presiding Governor. With the stroke of the pen, he put us 4 billion in debt by rescinding the VLF. I got a whopping $7 check that probably cost double that to print and send to me. Sure, it was one campaign promise he kept but we had a surplus before he stepped in. So why send back something most of us didn’t miss already.

    By contrast, I pay $9.06 for public safety (water, sewer, garbage bill) every two months. Safety and education, two very important places I don’t mind spending money. Three dollars is too little in my opinion.

  49. Anonymous

    “Another interesting piece of information from Bruce Colby….”

    More than likely, this is another piece of half-truth, half-baked pronouncements from the District. The District may want to use the parcel tax to protect its control of its “turf” and a sales tax may involve cooperating with the city on revenue matters…

  50. Anonymous

    “Another interesting piece of information from Bruce Colby….”

    More than likely, this is another piece of half-truth, half-baked pronouncements from the District. The District may want to use the parcel tax to protect its control of its “turf” and a sales tax may involve cooperating with the city on revenue matters…

  51. Anonymous

    “Another interesting piece of information from Bruce Colby….”

    More than likely, this is another piece of half-truth, half-baked pronouncements from the District. The District may want to use the parcel tax to protect its control of its “turf” and a sales tax may involve cooperating with the city on revenue matters…

  52. Anonymous

    “Another interesting piece of information from Bruce Colby….”

    More than likely, this is another piece of half-truth, half-baked pronouncements from the District. The District may want to use the parcel tax to protect its control of its “turf” and a sales tax may involve cooperating with the city on revenue matters…

  53. Anonymous

    The flyer was posted @ Almondwood apartments as well, I’m not sure where else it was placed. It was obviously from the management because they placed it on the same little clips next to the doors that they do for all the other postings. I bet that if you drove on by Almondwood you could take one of them from the currently vacant apartments.

    Beyond that, Education is a Public Good, and all the students attending UC Davis have likely benefited from public education in the past, and are definitely benefiting from it right now, just on the UC level as opposed to the K-12. Because education is a public good with a large positive externality attached to it, it is in our best interests as society to support it. However, because of the free-rider problem, we need to use taxes to ensure everyone pays for this good, whether college students or high schoolers.

  54. Anonymous

    The flyer was posted @ Almondwood apartments as well, I’m not sure where else it was placed. It was obviously from the management because they placed it on the same little clips next to the doors that they do for all the other postings. I bet that if you drove on by Almondwood you could take one of them from the currently vacant apartments.

    Beyond that, Education is a Public Good, and all the students attending UC Davis have likely benefited from public education in the past, and are definitely benefiting from it right now, just on the UC level as opposed to the K-12. Because education is a public good with a large positive externality attached to it, it is in our best interests as society to support it. However, because of the free-rider problem, we need to use taxes to ensure everyone pays for this good, whether college students or high schoolers.

  55. Anonymous

    The flyer was posted @ Almondwood apartments as well, I’m not sure where else it was placed. It was obviously from the management because they placed it on the same little clips next to the doors that they do for all the other postings. I bet that if you drove on by Almondwood you could take one of them from the currently vacant apartments.

    Beyond that, Education is a Public Good, and all the students attending UC Davis have likely benefited from public education in the past, and are definitely benefiting from it right now, just on the UC level as opposed to the K-12. Because education is a public good with a large positive externality attached to it, it is in our best interests as society to support it. However, because of the free-rider problem, we need to use taxes to ensure everyone pays for this good, whether college students or high schoolers.

  56. Anonymous

    The flyer was posted @ Almondwood apartments as well, I’m not sure where else it was placed. It was obviously from the management because they placed it on the same little clips next to the doors that they do for all the other postings. I bet that if you drove on by Almondwood you could take one of them from the currently vacant apartments.

    Beyond that, Education is a Public Good, and all the students attending UC Davis have likely benefited from public education in the past, and are definitely benefiting from it right now, just on the UC level as opposed to the K-12. Because education is a public good with a large positive externality attached to it, it is in our best interests as society to support it. However, because of the free-rider problem, we need to use taxes to ensure everyone pays for this good, whether college students or high schoolers.

  57. lets get real

    David,

    All of your points go out the window because the tax continues to increase, and the school board is making it more and more clear this will be an ongoing thing.

    $10 here and there is not much, until it adds up and the taxes increase again and again.

    The school board just got measure Q, and before the funds could be distributed, they want another.

    How many years is this going to pile on?

  58. lets get real

    David,

    All of your points go out the window because the tax continues to increase, and the school board is making it more and more clear this will be an ongoing thing.

    $10 here and there is not much, until it adds up and the taxes increase again and again.

    The school board just got measure Q, and before the funds could be distributed, they want another.

    How many years is this going to pile on?

  59. lets get real

    David,

    All of your points go out the window because the tax continues to increase, and the school board is making it more and more clear this will be an ongoing thing.

    $10 here and there is not much, until it adds up and the taxes increase again and again.

    The school board just got measure Q, and before the funds could be distributed, they want another.

    How many years is this going to pile on?

  60. lets get real

    David,

    All of your points go out the window because the tax continues to increase, and the school board is making it more and more clear this will be an ongoing thing.

    $10 here and there is not much, until it adds up and the taxes increase again and again.

    The school board just got measure Q, and before the funds could be distributed, they want another.

    How many years is this going to pile on?

  61. Progressive Taxer

    Let’s be honest here. The truth is that the current method of assessing the parcel tax is regressive and puts a larger burden on renters — the poorest people in town. This was intentional in order to win low turnout elections with few students/renters voting. It may be hard to admit for some folks, but that was the political calculation of prior school boards, however progressive they claimed to be.

    Now that this school board is looking at a very high turnout election in November and will be counting on student/renter votes they may want to reconsider their approach and have a more progressive tax that is shifted more toward the homeowners – the wealthier folks in town who have kids who attend Davis schools.

    Attacking the landlords is not the answer. It’s time to face the music and make some tough choices. Don’t count on students to be ignorant. They’ll figure out their own interest with or without the assistance of their landlord.

  62. Progressive Taxer

    Let’s be honest here. The truth is that the current method of assessing the parcel tax is regressive and puts a larger burden on renters — the poorest people in town. This was intentional in order to win low turnout elections with few students/renters voting. It may be hard to admit for some folks, but that was the political calculation of prior school boards, however progressive they claimed to be.

    Now that this school board is looking at a very high turnout election in November and will be counting on student/renter votes they may want to reconsider their approach and have a more progressive tax that is shifted more toward the homeowners – the wealthier folks in town who have kids who attend Davis schools.

    Attacking the landlords is not the answer. It’s time to face the music and make some tough choices. Don’t count on students to be ignorant. They’ll figure out their own interest with or without the assistance of their landlord.

  63. Progressive Taxer

    Let’s be honest here. The truth is that the current method of assessing the parcel tax is regressive and puts a larger burden on renters — the poorest people in town. This was intentional in order to win low turnout elections with few students/renters voting. It may be hard to admit for some folks, but that was the political calculation of prior school boards, however progressive they claimed to be.

    Now that this school board is looking at a very high turnout election in November and will be counting on student/renter votes they may want to reconsider their approach and have a more progressive tax that is shifted more toward the homeowners – the wealthier folks in town who have kids who attend Davis schools.

    Attacking the landlords is not the answer. It’s time to face the music and make some tough choices. Don’t count on students to be ignorant. They’ll figure out their own interest with or without the assistance of their landlord.

  64. Progressive Taxer

    Let’s be honest here. The truth is that the current method of assessing the parcel tax is regressive and puts a larger burden on renters — the poorest people in town. This was intentional in order to win low turnout elections with few students/renters voting. It may be hard to admit for some folks, but that was the political calculation of prior school boards, however progressive they claimed to be.

    Now that this school board is looking at a very high turnout election in November and will be counting on student/renter votes they may want to reconsider their approach and have a more progressive tax that is shifted more toward the homeowners – the wealthier folks in town who have kids who attend Davis schools.

    Attacking the landlords is not the answer. It’s time to face the music and make some tough choices. Don’t count on students to be ignorant. They’ll figure out their own interest with or without the assistance of their landlord.

  65. Arent students grown-ups?

    I don’t get how it puts a greater burden on renters, than homeowners.

    I’m sorry, but I pay taxes that are used to help fund their UC education. I’m sure that people in their hometowns, who were not directly benefiting from the funds, also paid taxes to support their K-12 education.

    The student representatives keep saying that the City continually ignores them and doesn’t encourage participation. Helping to support the local schools would be a great way for them to participate.

  66. Arent students grown-ups?

    I don’t get how it puts a greater burden on renters, than homeowners.

    I’m sorry, but I pay taxes that are used to help fund their UC education. I’m sure that people in their hometowns, who were not directly benefiting from the funds, also paid taxes to support their K-12 education.

    The student representatives keep saying that the City continually ignores them and doesn’t encourage participation. Helping to support the local schools would be a great way for them to participate.

  67. Arent students grown-ups?

    I don’t get how it puts a greater burden on renters, than homeowners.

    I’m sorry, but I pay taxes that are used to help fund their UC education. I’m sure that people in their hometowns, who were not directly benefiting from the funds, also paid taxes to support their K-12 education.

    The student representatives keep saying that the City continually ignores them and doesn’t encourage participation. Helping to support the local schools would be a great way for them to participate.

  68. Arent students grown-ups?

    I don’t get how it puts a greater burden on renters, than homeowners.

    I’m sorry, but I pay taxes that are used to help fund their UC education. I’m sure that people in their hometowns, who were not directly benefiting from the funds, also paid taxes to support their K-12 education.

    The student representatives keep saying that the City continually ignores them and doesn’t encourage participation. Helping to support the local schools would be a great way for them to participate.

  69. PRED Old Timer

    “Helping to support the local schools would be a great way for them to participate.”

    So you want them to reward you for nothing?

    Once again, Davis wants the UCD students and employees as consumers, but not as residents.

  70. PRED Old Timer

    “Helping to support the local schools would be a great way for them to participate.”

    So you want them to reward you for nothing?

    Once again, Davis wants the UCD students and employees as consumers, but not as residents.

  71. PRED Old Timer

    “Helping to support the local schools would be a great way for them to participate.”

    So you want them to reward you for nothing?

    Once again, Davis wants the UCD students and employees as consumers, but not as residents.

  72. PRED Old Timer

    “Helping to support the local schools would be a great way for them to participate.”

    So you want them to reward you for nothing?

    Once again, Davis wants the UCD students and employees as consumers, but not as residents.

  73. Egads!

    “This is the blogger who seems to be more enamored of public school architecture than keeping teachers employed and programs running. Programs and teachers clearly benefit kids more than brick and mortar, if those are your choices.”

    This has to be the dumbest statement I have ever heard. How does closing schools save programs and teachers? The best EL program in the entire city was summarily ended when VO closed. In fact the one minority member of the School Board explained just exactly how bad the impact on at-risk minority students would be if VO closed.

    Let me ask you, if a neighborhood school in your end of town were to close, so your child would now have to be transported to the other end of town by you every morning, couldn’t go to school with his/her friends, and your child would now have to attend an overcrowded junior high that is packed to the ceiling with students, would you be all for your business model?

    Furthermore, where were you in endorsing your business model, when the School Board wasted all sorts of money due to the School District’s and Board’s fiscal mismanagement? And where were you with your business model when too many schools were built for the amount of operating expenses in existence? Or when we were paying for two superintendents, one of whom was doing absolutely no work for an entire year? Or when the School Board could not remember allocating money for rebuilding King High AFTER they demolished it?

  74. Egads!

    “This is the blogger who seems to be more enamored of public school architecture than keeping teachers employed and programs running. Programs and teachers clearly benefit kids more than brick and mortar, if those are your choices.”

    This has to be the dumbest statement I have ever heard. How does closing schools save programs and teachers? The best EL program in the entire city was summarily ended when VO closed. In fact the one minority member of the School Board explained just exactly how bad the impact on at-risk minority students would be if VO closed.

    Let me ask you, if a neighborhood school in your end of town were to close, so your child would now have to be transported to the other end of town by you every morning, couldn’t go to school with his/her friends, and your child would now have to attend an overcrowded junior high that is packed to the ceiling with students, would you be all for your business model?

    Furthermore, where were you in endorsing your business model, when the School Board wasted all sorts of money due to the School District’s and Board’s fiscal mismanagement? And where were you with your business model when too many schools were built for the amount of operating expenses in existence? Or when we were paying for two superintendents, one of whom was doing absolutely no work for an entire year? Or when the School Board could not remember allocating money for rebuilding King High AFTER they demolished it?

  75. Egads!

    “This is the blogger who seems to be more enamored of public school architecture than keeping teachers employed and programs running. Programs and teachers clearly benefit kids more than brick and mortar, if those are your choices.”

    This has to be the dumbest statement I have ever heard. How does closing schools save programs and teachers? The best EL program in the entire city was summarily ended when VO closed. In fact the one minority member of the School Board explained just exactly how bad the impact on at-risk minority students would be if VO closed.

    Let me ask you, if a neighborhood school in your end of town were to close, so your child would now have to be transported to the other end of town by you every morning, couldn’t go to school with his/her friends, and your child would now have to attend an overcrowded junior high that is packed to the ceiling with students, would you be all for your business model?

    Furthermore, where were you in endorsing your business model, when the School Board wasted all sorts of money due to the School District’s and Board’s fiscal mismanagement? And where were you with your business model when too many schools were built for the amount of operating expenses in existence? Or when we were paying for two superintendents, one of whom was doing absolutely no work for an entire year? Or when the School Board could not remember allocating money for rebuilding King High AFTER they demolished it?

  76. Egads!

    “This is the blogger who seems to be more enamored of public school architecture than keeping teachers employed and programs running. Programs and teachers clearly benefit kids more than brick and mortar, if those are your choices.”

    This has to be the dumbest statement I have ever heard. How does closing schools save programs and teachers? The best EL program in the entire city was summarily ended when VO closed. In fact the one minority member of the School Board explained just exactly how bad the impact on at-risk minority students would be if VO closed.

    Let me ask you, if a neighborhood school in your end of town were to close, so your child would now have to be transported to the other end of town by you every morning, couldn’t go to school with his/her friends, and your child would now have to attend an overcrowded junior high that is packed to the ceiling with students, would you be all for your business model?

    Furthermore, where were you in endorsing your business model, when the School Board wasted all sorts of money due to the School District’s and Board’s fiscal mismanagement? And where were you with your business model when too many schools were built for the amount of operating expenses in existence? Or when we were paying for two superintendents, one of whom was doing absolutely no work for an entire year? Or when the School Board could not remember allocating money for rebuilding King High AFTER they demolished it?

  77. 無名 - wu ming

    i’d be willing to bet serious money that the annual hike in rental rates will far exceed any parcel tax. and that if the parcel tax does not pass, that rates will go up regardless.

    for the same landlords to print those flyers takes a bit of chutzpa.

  78. 無名 - wu ming

    i’d be willing to bet serious money that the annual hike in rental rates will far exceed any parcel tax. and that if the parcel tax does not pass, that rates will go up regardless.

    for the same landlords to print those flyers takes a bit of chutzpa.

  79. 無名 - wu ming

    i’d be willing to bet serious money that the annual hike in rental rates will far exceed any parcel tax. and that if the parcel tax does not pass, that rates will go up regardless.

    for the same landlords to print those flyers takes a bit of chutzpa.

  80. 無名 - wu ming

    i’d be willing to bet serious money that the annual hike in rental rates will far exceed any parcel tax. and that if the parcel tax does not pass, that rates will go up regardless.

    for the same landlords to print those flyers takes a bit of chutzpa.

  81. Confused

    “for the same landlords to print those flyers takes a bit of chutzpa.”

    Color me confused. Why should landlords care about the parcel tax one way or the other, if the cost will be passed on to students? It will not be an out of pocket expense to landlords, unless I am missing something here. If I am correct, then I would have to assume the landlord in question was against another parcel tax because of the principle of the matter.

  82. Confused

    “for the same landlords to print those flyers takes a bit of chutzpa.”

    Color me confused. Why should landlords care about the parcel tax one way or the other, if the cost will be passed on to students? It will not be an out of pocket expense to landlords, unless I am missing something here. If I am correct, then I would have to assume the landlord in question was against another parcel tax because of the principle of the matter.

  83. Confused

    “for the same landlords to print those flyers takes a bit of chutzpa.”

    Color me confused. Why should landlords care about the parcel tax one way or the other, if the cost will be passed on to students? It will not be an out of pocket expense to landlords, unless I am missing something here. If I am correct, then I would have to assume the landlord in question was against another parcel tax because of the principle of the matter.

  84. Confused

    “for the same landlords to print those flyers takes a bit of chutzpa.”

    Color me confused. Why should landlords care about the parcel tax one way or the other, if the cost will be passed on to students? It will not be an out of pocket expense to landlords, unless I am missing something here. If I am correct, then I would have to assume the landlord in question was against another parcel tax because of the principle of the matter.

  85. get a grip!

    “How does closing schools save programs and teachers? The best EL program in the entire city was summarily ended when VO closed.”

    My kids were in an EL program in a different elementary school, and came out quite well from it. Some VO kids will be attending that school next year. So don’t tell me that DJUSD will have no more EL program just because VO isn’t around.

    It costs up to $500,000 to pay the classified and administrative staff to keep open an elementary school for a year. That would add an additional $500,000 to the annual deficit that means laying off additional teachers. Can you name even one former VO teacher that was laid off?

    If it has been demonstrated that DJUSD doesn’t have the money or enrollment to sustain 9 elementaries, then why live the irresponsible fantasy of keeping 9 open?

    “Furthermore, where were you in endorsing your business model, when the School Board wasted all sorts of money due to the School District’s and Board’s fiscal mismanagement?”

    And just what the hell are you arguing for? Bringing back the old administrators and board members that got us to this point? That overbuilt too many schools in Davis? THAT was fiscal mismanagement and poor planning.

    I’m glad the old group is gone and the current group is at least working to clean up that mess.

    Kids connect with teachers more than they connect with brick buildings. Save the teachers!

  86. get a grip!

    “How does closing schools save programs and teachers? The best EL program in the entire city was summarily ended when VO closed.”

    My kids were in an EL program in a different elementary school, and came out quite well from it. Some VO kids will be attending that school next year. So don’t tell me that DJUSD will have no more EL program just because VO isn’t around.

    It costs up to $500,000 to pay the classified and administrative staff to keep open an elementary school for a year. That would add an additional $500,000 to the annual deficit that means laying off additional teachers. Can you name even one former VO teacher that was laid off?

    If it has been demonstrated that DJUSD doesn’t have the money or enrollment to sustain 9 elementaries, then why live the irresponsible fantasy of keeping 9 open?

    “Furthermore, where were you in endorsing your business model, when the School Board wasted all sorts of money due to the School District’s and Board’s fiscal mismanagement?”

    And just what the hell are you arguing for? Bringing back the old administrators and board members that got us to this point? That overbuilt too many schools in Davis? THAT was fiscal mismanagement and poor planning.

    I’m glad the old group is gone and the current group is at least working to clean up that mess.

    Kids connect with teachers more than they connect with brick buildings. Save the teachers!

  87. get a grip!

    “How does closing schools save programs and teachers? The best EL program in the entire city was summarily ended when VO closed.”

    My kids were in an EL program in a different elementary school, and came out quite well from it. Some VO kids will be attending that school next year. So don’t tell me that DJUSD will have no more EL program just because VO isn’t around.

    It costs up to $500,000 to pay the classified and administrative staff to keep open an elementary school for a year. That would add an additional $500,000 to the annual deficit that means laying off additional teachers. Can you name even one former VO teacher that was laid off?

    If it has been demonstrated that DJUSD doesn’t have the money or enrollment to sustain 9 elementaries, then why live the irresponsible fantasy of keeping 9 open?

    “Furthermore, where were you in endorsing your business model, when the School Board wasted all sorts of money due to the School District’s and Board’s fiscal mismanagement?”

    And just what the hell are you arguing for? Bringing back the old administrators and board members that got us to this point? That overbuilt too many schools in Davis? THAT was fiscal mismanagement and poor planning.

    I’m glad the old group is gone and the current group is at least working to clean up that mess.

    Kids connect with teachers more than they connect with brick buildings. Save the teachers!

  88. get a grip!

    “How does closing schools save programs and teachers? The best EL program in the entire city was summarily ended when VO closed.”

    My kids were in an EL program in a different elementary school, and came out quite well from it. Some VO kids will be attending that school next year. So don’t tell me that DJUSD will have no more EL program just because VO isn’t around.

    It costs up to $500,000 to pay the classified and administrative staff to keep open an elementary school for a year. That would add an additional $500,000 to the annual deficit that means laying off additional teachers. Can you name even one former VO teacher that was laid off?

    If it has been demonstrated that DJUSD doesn’t have the money or enrollment to sustain 9 elementaries, then why live the irresponsible fantasy of keeping 9 open?

    “Furthermore, where were you in endorsing your business model, when the School Board wasted all sorts of money due to the School District’s and Board’s fiscal mismanagement?”

    And just what the hell are you arguing for? Bringing back the old administrators and board members that got us to this point? That overbuilt too many schools in Davis? THAT was fiscal mismanagement and poor planning.

    I’m glad the old group is gone and the current group is at least working to clean up that mess.

    Kids connect with teachers more than they connect with brick buildings. Save the teachers!

  89. Anonymous

    Davis used to be, circa 1996, but not thereafter, a gentle town in which the studentry (coinage: William Strunk, as in Strunk and White’s, if any of you Messrs. and Madames Bovary’s ever read any books) was here today and gone next year, while respecting the stuctures they inhabited.
    Now you’ve got the Chuck Roes and other developers making money off of ruining the town. Sheesh, are all you SUV suburbanites asleep at the wheel, this is just a college town: to be gone through and left, with the emphasis on left while you’re here.

  90. Anonymous

    Davis used to be, circa 1996, but not thereafter, a gentle town in which the studentry (coinage: William Strunk, as in Strunk and White’s, if any of you Messrs. and Madames Bovary’s ever read any books) was here today and gone next year, while respecting the stuctures they inhabited.
    Now you’ve got the Chuck Roes and other developers making money off of ruining the town. Sheesh, are all you SUV suburbanites asleep at the wheel, this is just a college town: to be gone through and left, with the emphasis on left while you’re here.

  91. Anonymous

    Davis used to be, circa 1996, but not thereafter, a gentle town in which the studentry (coinage: William Strunk, as in Strunk and White’s, if any of you Messrs. and Madames Bovary’s ever read any books) was here today and gone next year, while respecting the stuctures they inhabited.
    Now you’ve got the Chuck Roes and other developers making money off of ruining the town. Sheesh, are all you SUV suburbanites asleep at the wheel, this is just a college town: to be gone through and left, with the emphasis on left while you’re here.

  92. Anonymous

    Davis used to be, circa 1996, but not thereafter, a gentle town in which the studentry (coinage: William Strunk, as in Strunk and White’s, if any of you Messrs. and Madames Bovary’s ever read any books) was here today and gone next year, while respecting the stuctures they inhabited.
    Now you’ve got the Chuck Roes and other developers making money off of ruining the town. Sheesh, are all you SUV suburbanites asleep at the wheel, this is just a college town: to be gone through and left, with the emphasis on left while you’re here.

  93. Mike Harrington

    Chuck Roe is not ruining this town. He has built some interesting projects that have brought new energy and life downtown. I have lived and worked downtown since 1995. His projects have been hugely risky, but he loves the downtown and has chosen to put his money into this community.

  94. Mike Harrington

    Chuck Roe is not ruining this town. He has built some interesting projects that have brought new energy and life downtown. I have lived and worked downtown since 1995. His projects have been hugely risky, but he loves the downtown and has chosen to put his money into this community.

  95. Mike Harrington

    Chuck Roe is not ruining this town. He has built some interesting projects that have brought new energy and life downtown. I have lived and worked downtown since 1995. His projects have been hugely risky, but he loves the downtown and has chosen to put his money into this community.

  96. Mike Harrington

    Chuck Roe is not ruining this town. He has built some interesting projects that have brought new energy and life downtown. I have lived and worked downtown since 1995. His projects have been hugely risky, but he loves the downtown and has chosen to put his money into this community.

  97. egads!

    “So don’t tell me that DJUSD will have no more EL program just because VO isn’t around.”

    They will not have THE BEST EL PROGRAM. Soon, they will not have Emerson either.

    “It costs up to $500,000 to pay the classified and administrative staff to keep open an elementary school for a year. That would add an additional $500,000 to the annual deficit that means laying off additional teachers.”

    I don’t think so. The School District reopened VO as an “educational center”, which I am sure has a classified and administrative staff of some sort. I very much doubt $500,000 was saved, especially if no teachers were layed off from VO as you claim.

    “If it has been demonstrated that DJUSD doesn’t have the money or enrollment to sustain 9 elementaries, then why live the
    fantasy of keeping 9 open?”

    Right, so let’s close the last one open, which I believe is Karamatsu, which had a severe underenrollment when it opened. But you won’t see that happen, because too many wealthy folks live in that area. The building of new schools has become developer driven – a policy that needs to be fixed. But I don’t see that happening.

    “I’m glad the old group is gone and the current group is at least working to clean up that mess.”

    So am I. But I’m not too thrilled with the current crop either. Emerson will be closed if citizens don’t stand up and insist otherwise.

    “Now you’ve got the Chuck Roes and other developers making money off of ruining the town. Sheesh, are all you SUV suburbanites asleep at the wheel, this is just a college town: to be gone through and left, with the emphasis on left while you’re here.”

    No, many of us are not asleep at the wheel, but struggling mightily against the stupidity that exists. Too many in this town have been too complacent for too long, and now that apathy has come home to roost. But I don’t necessarily blame the taxpayers. For the most part, the School Board has not been particularly upfront about their mismanagement.

    “Chuck Roe is not ruining this town. He has built some interesting projects that have brought new energy and life downtown.”

    If the Roe building is any example, yuck!

  98. egads!

    “So don’t tell me that DJUSD will have no more EL program just because VO isn’t around.”

    They will not have THE BEST EL PROGRAM. Soon, they will not have Emerson either.

    “It costs up to $500,000 to pay the classified and administrative staff to keep open an elementary school for a year. That would add an additional $500,000 to the annual deficit that means laying off additional teachers.”

    I don’t think so. The School District reopened VO as an “educational center”, which I am sure has a classified and administrative staff of some sort. I very much doubt $500,000 was saved, especially if no teachers were layed off from VO as you claim.

    “If it has been demonstrated that DJUSD doesn’t have the money or enrollment to sustain 9 elementaries, then why live the
    fantasy of keeping 9 open?”

    Right, so let’s close the last one open, which I believe is Karamatsu, which had a severe underenrollment when it opened. But you won’t see that happen, because too many wealthy folks live in that area. The building of new schools has become developer driven – a policy that needs to be fixed. But I don’t see that happening.

    “I’m glad the old group is gone and the current group is at least working to clean up that mess.”

    So am I. But I’m not too thrilled with the current crop either. Emerson will be closed if citizens don’t stand up and insist otherwise.

    “Now you’ve got the Chuck Roes and other developers making money off of ruining the town. Sheesh, are all you SUV suburbanites asleep at the wheel, this is just a college town: to be gone through and left, with the emphasis on left while you’re here.”

    No, many of us are not asleep at the wheel, but struggling mightily against the stupidity that exists. Too many in this town have been too complacent for too long, and now that apathy has come home to roost. But I don’t necessarily blame the taxpayers. For the most part, the School Board has not been particularly upfront about their mismanagement.

    “Chuck Roe is not ruining this town. He has built some interesting projects that have brought new energy and life downtown.”

    If the Roe building is any example, yuck!

  99. egads!

    “So don’t tell me that DJUSD will have no more EL program just because VO isn’t around.”

    They will not have THE BEST EL PROGRAM. Soon, they will not have Emerson either.

    “It costs up to $500,000 to pay the classified and administrative staff to keep open an elementary school for a year. That would add an additional $500,000 to the annual deficit that means laying off additional teachers.”

    I don’t think so. The School District reopened VO as an “educational center”, which I am sure has a classified and administrative staff of some sort. I very much doubt $500,000 was saved, especially if no teachers were layed off from VO as you claim.

    “If it has been demonstrated that DJUSD doesn’t have the money or enrollment to sustain 9 elementaries, then why live the
    fantasy of keeping 9 open?”

    Right, so let’s close the last one open, which I believe is Karamatsu, which had a severe underenrollment when it opened. But you won’t see that happen, because too many wealthy folks live in that area. The building of new schools has become developer driven – a policy that needs to be fixed. But I don’t see that happening.

    “I’m glad the old group is gone and the current group is at least working to clean up that mess.”

    So am I. But I’m not too thrilled with the current crop either. Emerson will be closed if citizens don’t stand up and insist otherwise.

    “Now you’ve got the Chuck Roes and other developers making money off of ruining the town. Sheesh, are all you SUV suburbanites asleep at the wheel, this is just a college town: to be gone through and left, with the emphasis on left while you’re here.”

    No, many of us are not asleep at the wheel, but struggling mightily against the stupidity that exists. Too many in this town have been too complacent for too long, and now that apathy has come home to roost. But I don’t necessarily blame the taxpayers. For the most part, the School Board has not been particularly upfront about their mismanagement.

    “Chuck Roe is not ruining this town. He has built some interesting projects that have brought new energy and life downtown.”

    If the Roe building is any example, yuck!

  100. egads!

    “So don’t tell me that DJUSD will have no more EL program just because VO isn’t around.”

    They will not have THE BEST EL PROGRAM. Soon, they will not have Emerson either.

    “It costs up to $500,000 to pay the classified and administrative staff to keep open an elementary school for a year. That would add an additional $500,000 to the annual deficit that means laying off additional teachers.”

    I don’t think so. The School District reopened VO as an “educational center”, which I am sure has a classified and administrative staff of some sort. I very much doubt $500,000 was saved, especially if no teachers were layed off from VO as you claim.

    “If it has been demonstrated that DJUSD doesn’t have the money or enrollment to sustain 9 elementaries, then why live the
    fantasy of keeping 9 open?”

    Right, so let’s close the last one open, which I believe is Karamatsu, which had a severe underenrollment when it opened. But you won’t see that happen, because too many wealthy folks live in that area. The building of new schools has become developer driven – a policy that needs to be fixed. But I don’t see that happening.

    “I’m glad the old group is gone and the current group is at least working to clean up that mess.”

    So am I. But I’m not too thrilled with the current crop either. Emerson will be closed if citizens don’t stand up and insist otherwise.

    “Now you’ve got the Chuck Roes and other developers making money off of ruining the town. Sheesh, are all you SUV suburbanites asleep at the wheel, this is just a college town: to be gone through and left, with the emphasis on left while you’re here.”

    No, many of us are not asleep at the wheel, but struggling mightily against the stupidity that exists. Too many in this town have been too complacent for too long, and now that apathy has come home to roost. But I don’t necessarily blame the taxpayers. For the most part, the School Board has not been particularly upfront about their mismanagement.

    “Chuck Roe is not ruining this town. He has built some interesting projects that have brought new energy and life downtown.”

    If the Roe building is any example, yuck!

  101. Greg D

    I am a UCD student, a tenant of an apartment complex, and the chair of the ASUCD External Affairs Commission.

    I personally hope that UCD students will vote in FAVOR of this parcel tax. While many student-voters believe they have no responsibility to this city, they should remember that this community gives so much the well-being of the campus community. We each have a shared responsibility to ensure this community can nurture the educational needs of all its members – whether it be at the elementary, middle, high school or collegiate level. As students of the university, we should understand the importance of education.

    I applaud the efforts of the school board to ensure this parcel tax would not be detrimental to the student renters of this community. This parcel tax would not create a large financial burden to apartment renters – the monthly or even quarterly impact of this tax appears relatively negligible compared to the immense expenditures that students already face.

    I hope that, come November, students will look beyond their status of residency and support this community of one. Together we must value and support our community’s educational endeavors.

  102. Greg D

    I am a UCD student, a tenant of an apartment complex, and the chair of the ASUCD External Affairs Commission.

    I personally hope that UCD students will vote in FAVOR of this parcel tax. While many student-voters believe they have no responsibility to this city, they should remember that this community gives so much the well-being of the campus community. We each have a shared responsibility to ensure this community can nurture the educational needs of all its members – whether it be at the elementary, middle, high school or collegiate level. As students of the university, we should understand the importance of education.

    I applaud the efforts of the school board to ensure this parcel tax would not be detrimental to the student renters of this community. This parcel tax would not create a large financial burden to apartment renters – the monthly or even quarterly impact of this tax appears relatively negligible compared to the immense expenditures that students already face.

    I hope that, come November, students will look beyond their status of residency and support this community of one. Together we must value and support our community’s educational endeavors.

  103. Greg D

    I am a UCD student, a tenant of an apartment complex, and the chair of the ASUCD External Affairs Commission.

    I personally hope that UCD students will vote in FAVOR of this parcel tax. While many student-voters believe they have no responsibility to this city, they should remember that this community gives so much the well-being of the campus community. We each have a shared responsibility to ensure this community can nurture the educational needs of all its members – whether it be at the elementary, middle, high school or collegiate level. As students of the university, we should understand the importance of education.

    I applaud the efforts of the school board to ensure this parcel tax would not be detrimental to the student renters of this community. This parcel tax would not create a large financial burden to apartment renters – the monthly or even quarterly impact of this tax appears relatively negligible compared to the immense expenditures that students already face.

    I hope that, come November, students will look beyond their status of residency and support this community of one. Together we must value and support our community’s educational endeavors.

  104. Greg D

    I am a UCD student, a tenant of an apartment complex, and the chair of the ASUCD External Affairs Commission.

    I personally hope that UCD students will vote in FAVOR of this parcel tax. While many student-voters believe they have no responsibility to this city, they should remember that this community gives so much the well-being of the campus community. We each have a shared responsibility to ensure this community can nurture the educational needs of all its members – whether it be at the elementary, middle, high school or collegiate level. As students of the university, we should understand the importance of education.

    I applaud the efforts of the school board to ensure this parcel tax would not be detrimental to the student renters of this community. This parcel tax would not create a large financial burden to apartment renters – the monthly or even quarterly impact of this tax appears relatively negligible compared to the immense expenditures that students already face.

    I hope that, come November, students will look beyond their status of residency and support this community of one. Together we must value and support our community’s educational endeavors.

Leave a Reply

X Close

Newsletter Sign-Up

X Close

Monthly Subscriber Sign-Up

Enter the maximum amount you want to pay each month
$ USD
Sign up for