Wednesday Strike Update

Share:
imageUC Davis

The strike will continue today for a third day. There were a number of interesting developments yesterday.

Community members from across the state donated groceries and provided food assistance to the strikers who are struggling to make ends meet to begin with and now face disciplinary action for the striking.

UC President Mark Yudof who has just literally taken over in that position, has threatened to take action against the workers for conducting an illegal strike. Mr. Yudof was hired at a beginning salary of $828,084–a salary nearly twice what his predecessor received. With benefits, he receivers nearly one million per year. Yudof quipped at a press conference, “As you can see from my compensation package, I’m not starving to death.”

Elizabeth Meyer, director of UC Davis employee and labor relations called the strike illegal and suggested that workers could be disciplined.

“We’re going to take appropriate discipline up to the fullest extent with the law and in accord with past practice.”

In a letter sent to UC President Mark Yudof, Senator Leland Yee writes that he is “dismayed by the comments of Elizabeth Meyer and other UC spokespersons who have stated the administration will discipline striking workers to the ‘fullest extent.’”

The Senator wrote in a press release yesterday:

“Service workers gave adequate notice of their strike and the law explicitly provides workers the right to strike for fair wages, working conditions, and basic equity. If even one worker is retaliated against or disciplined for exercising their right to strike, I will do everything in my power to appropriately respond to the University.”

One thing that Mr. Yee might suggest is reforming the UC system. UC Regents are largely unaccountable officials, appointed by the Governor. The legislature could move to increase their accountability by putting limits on their term and making them up for reappointment every two to four years. In addition, the amount of money that the UC President receives is beyond absurd. People complain about the demands of people making $10 per hour. The UC President makes almost as much in a month as these workers make in FOUR YEARS.

The Vanguard yesterday evening received an interesting report from one of the AFSCME 3299 organizers. There is a large contingent of strikers at the corner of Russell and College. As cars pass by, they will often honk in support of the cause. However, apparently a Davis Police Officer on a motorcycle began pulling people over for honking and issuing them tickets. According to this organizer, he saw at least three people given tickets for honking in support of the strike. The Vanguard will be investigating this matter and may have more to report later on.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

Share:

About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

Related posts

84 thoughts on “Wednesday Strike Update”

  1. For More Equity In Wages

    Doesn’t honking come under freedom of speech??? If flag burning does, why not honking?

    If Yudof’s salary were cut in half, it would pay for the salaries of 25 food service workers for one year. Yudof’s comment about “not starving” shows an arrogance that is disgusting.

    However, if striking will endanger lives, I cannot support it. There are other ways to get your point across, like a “work slowdown”, that sort of thing.

    If these workers don’t like their wages, they are always free to get a job elsewhere. As I said before, enlisted personnel in the military are receiving below minimum wage for the job they do – and they put their lives on the line.

    Seems to me the way we compensate people is inequitable period. We are not compensating folks for the inherent value of the service or product they provide. It is as if we are overcompensating people who have a much better bargaining position for less than savory reasons – the good ol’ boy system, nepotism, lack of competition, politics, greed, graft…

  2. For More Equity In Wages

    Doesn’t honking come under freedom of speech??? If flag burning does, why not honking?

    If Yudof’s salary were cut in half, it would pay for the salaries of 25 food service workers for one year. Yudof’s comment about “not starving” shows an arrogance that is disgusting.

    However, if striking will endanger lives, I cannot support it. There are other ways to get your point across, like a “work slowdown”, that sort of thing.

    If these workers don’t like their wages, they are always free to get a job elsewhere. As I said before, enlisted personnel in the military are receiving below minimum wage for the job they do – and they put their lives on the line.

    Seems to me the way we compensate people is inequitable period. We are not compensating folks for the inherent value of the service or product they provide. It is as if we are overcompensating people who have a much better bargaining position for less than savory reasons – the good ol’ boy system, nepotism, lack of competition, politics, greed, graft…

  3. For More Equity In Wages

    Doesn’t honking come under freedom of speech??? If flag burning does, why not honking?

    If Yudof’s salary were cut in half, it would pay for the salaries of 25 food service workers for one year. Yudof’s comment about “not starving” shows an arrogance that is disgusting.

    However, if striking will endanger lives, I cannot support it. There are other ways to get your point across, like a “work slowdown”, that sort of thing.

    If these workers don’t like their wages, they are always free to get a job elsewhere. As I said before, enlisted personnel in the military are receiving below minimum wage for the job they do – and they put their lives on the line.

    Seems to me the way we compensate people is inequitable period. We are not compensating folks for the inherent value of the service or product they provide. It is as if we are overcompensating people who have a much better bargaining position for less than savory reasons – the good ol’ boy system, nepotism, lack of competition, politics, greed, graft…

  4. For More Equity In Wages

    Doesn’t honking come under freedom of speech??? If flag burning does, why not honking?

    If Yudof’s salary were cut in half, it would pay for the salaries of 25 food service workers for one year. Yudof’s comment about “not starving” shows an arrogance that is disgusting.

    However, if striking will endanger lives, I cannot support it. There are other ways to get your point across, like a “work slowdown”, that sort of thing.

    If these workers don’t like their wages, they are always free to get a job elsewhere. As I said before, enlisted personnel in the military are receiving below minimum wage for the job they do – and they put their lives on the line.

    Seems to me the way we compensate people is inequitable period. We are not compensating folks for the inherent value of the service or product they provide. It is as if we are overcompensating people who have a much better bargaining position for less than savory reasons – the good ol’ boy system, nepotism, lack of competition, politics, greed, graft…

  5. Richard

    looks like UC has been stuffed to the gills with anti-labor executives, after all, the Republicans have had control over the institution for 23 of the last 26 years, with UC Davis being one of the most notorious campuses

    we are talking about an institution that granted substantial settlements to high level executives without public notice and without the approval of the Board of Regents, actions that, in many instances, would have resulted in a criminal investigation and prosecution, while drawing a line in the sand with its lowest wage workers

    UC is mirroring some of the larger changes in society that have occurred as a result of neoliberal policies over the last 30 years, higher and higher wages, fees and investment income for the upper class, often subsidized by the government (just look at what the Federal Reserve has been doing for banks and brokerage houses lately as one example) based upon reference to an illusory marketplace, while the wages of middle income, lower middle income and low income workers have been relatively stagnant, with the costs of pension, health care and educating their children transferred over to them

    so, we should not be surprised that the UC is increasingly modeling itself after the private sector in this regard, after all, it seems pretty obvious that people like Yudof, Vanderhoef and others I(Elizabeth Meyer, too?) are receiving their fringe benefits and generous salary increases because of their willingness to take a hostile stance with their workforce

    or, to put it more bluntly, every dollar they get is taken from these workers who can barely afford to survive in this state

    –Richard Estes

  6. Richard

    looks like UC has been stuffed to the gills with anti-labor executives, after all, the Republicans have had control over the institution for 23 of the last 26 years, with UC Davis being one of the most notorious campuses

    we are talking about an institution that granted substantial settlements to high level executives without public notice and without the approval of the Board of Regents, actions that, in many instances, would have resulted in a criminal investigation and prosecution, while drawing a line in the sand with its lowest wage workers

    UC is mirroring some of the larger changes in society that have occurred as a result of neoliberal policies over the last 30 years, higher and higher wages, fees and investment income for the upper class, often subsidized by the government (just look at what the Federal Reserve has been doing for banks and brokerage houses lately as one example) based upon reference to an illusory marketplace, while the wages of middle income, lower middle income and low income workers have been relatively stagnant, with the costs of pension, health care and educating their children transferred over to them

    so, we should not be surprised that the UC is increasingly modeling itself after the private sector in this regard, after all, it seems pretty obvious that people like Yudof, Vanderhoef and others I(Elizabeth Meyer, too?) are receiving their fringe benefits and generous salary increases because of their willingness to take a hostile stance with their workforce

    or, to put it more bluntly, every dollar they get is taken from these workers who can barely afford to survive in this state

    –Richard Estes

  7. Richard

    looks like UC has been stuffed to the gills with anti-labor executives, after all, the Republicans have had control over the institution for 23 of the last 26 years, with UC Davis being one of the most notorious campuses

    we are talking about an institution that granted substantial settlements to high level executives without public notice and without the approval of the Board of Regents, actions that, in many instances, would have resulted in a criminal investigation and prosecution, while drawing a line in the sand with its lowest wage workers

    UC is mirroring some of the larger changes in society that have occurred as a result of neoliberal policies over the last 30 years, higher and higher wages, fees and investment income for the upper class, often subsidized by the government (just look at what the Federal Reserve has been doing for banks and brokerage houses lately as one example) based upon reference to an illusory marketplace, while the wages of middle income, lower middle income and low income workers have been relatively stagnant, with the costs of pension, health care and educating their children transferred over to them

    so, we should not be surprised that the UC is increasingly modeling itself after the private sector in this regard, after all, it seems pretty obvious that people like Yudof, Vanderhoef and others I(Elizabeth Meyer, too?) are receiving their fringe benefits and generous salary increases because of their willingness to take a hostile stance with their workforce

    or, to put it more bluntly, every dollar they get is taken from these workers who can barely afford to survive in this state

    –Richard Estes

  8. Richard

    looks like UC has been stuffed to the gills with anti-labor executives, after all, the Republicans have had control over the institution for 23 of the last 26 years, with UC Davis being one of the most notorious campuses

    we are talking about an institution that granted substantial settlements to high level executives without public notice and without the approval of the Board of Regents, actions that, in many instances, would have resulted in a criminal investigation and prosecution, while drawing a line in the sand with its lowest wage workers

    UC is mirroring some of the larger changes in society that have occurred as a result of neoliberal policies over the last 30 years, higher and higher wages, fees and investment income for the upper class, often subsidized by the government (just look at what the Federal Reserve has been doing for banks and brokerage houses lately as one example) based upon reference to an illusory marketplace, while the wages of middle income, lower middle income and low income workers have been relatively stagnant, with the costs of pension, health care and educating their children transferred over to them

    so, we should not be surprised that the UC is increasingly modeling itself after the private sector in this regard, after all, it seems pretty obvious that people like Yudof, Vanderhoef and others I(Elizabeth Meyer, too?) are receiving their fringe benefits and generous salary increases because of their willingness to take a hostile stance with their workforce

    or, to put it more bluntly, every dollar they get is taken from these workers who can barely afford to survive in this state

    –Richard Estes

  9. Michael

    “UC is mirroring some of the larger changes in society that have occurred as a result of neoliberal policies over the last 30 years, higher and higher wages, fees and investment income for the upper class, often subsidized by the government (just look at what the Federal Reserve has been doing for banks and brokerage houses lately as one example) based upon reference to an illusory marketplace, while the wages of middle income, lower middle income and low income workers have been relatively stagnant”

    The LAO last year did a cost study for the University of California. Its findings contradict your opinions.

    The wages plus benefits for all UC employees, from the highest to the lowest, are much higher today than they were 20 years ago. We now have far more high-paid administrators and they make almost triple what their colleagues made a generation ago. A starting professor’s cost in 2007 was, after adjusting for inflation, double the same position’s cost in 1987. A secretary in Mrak Hall today costs UC almost 2.5 times as much as a secretary cost 20 years ago.

    About half of that increase in expenses has been with a ballooning in benefits — better retirement plans and life and medical insurance coverage. The other half is made up of higher wages.

  10. Michael

    “UC is mirroring some of the larger changes in society that have occurred as a result of neoliberal policies over the last 30 years, higher and higher wages, fees and investment income for the upper class, often subsidized by the government (just look at what the Federal Reserve has been doing for banks and brokerage houses lately as one example) based upon reference to an illusory marketplace, while the wages of middle income, lower middle income and low income workers have been relatively stagnant”

    The LAO last year did a cost study for the University of California. Its findings contradict your opinions.

    The wages plus benefits for all UC employees, from the highest to the lowest, are much higher today than they were 20 years ago. We now have far more high-paid administrators and they make almost triple what their colleagues made a generation ago. A starting professor’s cost in 2007 was, after adjusting for inflation, double the same position’s cost in 1987. A secretary in Mrak Hall today costs UC almost 2.5 times as much as a secretary cost 20 years ago.

    About half of that increase in expenses has been with a ballooning in benefits — better retirement plans and life and medical insurance coverage. The other half is made up of higher wages.

  11. Michael

    “UC is mirroring some of the larger changes in society that have occurred as a result of neoliberal policies over the last 30 years, higher and higher wages, fees and investment income for the upper class, often subsidized by the government (just look at what the Federal Reserve has been doing for banks and brokerage houses lately as one example) based upon reference to an illusory marketplace, while the wages of middle income, lower middle income and low income workers have been relatively stagnant”

    The LAO last year did a cost study for the University of California. Its findings contradict your opinions.

    The wages plus benefits for all UC employees, from the highest to the lowest, are much higher today than they were 20 years ago. We now have far more high-paid administrators and they make almost triple what their colleagues made a generation ago. A starting professor’s cost in 2007 was, after adjusting for inflation, double the same position’s cost in 1987. A secretary in Mrak Hall today costs UC almost 2.5 times as much as a secretary cost 20 years ago.

    About half of that increase in expenses has been with a ballooning in benefits — better retirement plans and life and medical insurance coverage. The other half is made up of higher wages.

  12. Michael

    “UC is mirroring some of the larger changes in society that have occurred as a result of neoliberal policies over the last 30 years, higher and higher wages, fees and investment income for the upper class, often subsidized by the government (just look at what the Federal Reserve has been doing for banks and brokerage houses lately as one example) based upon reference to an illusory marketplace, while the wages of middle income, lower middle income and low income workers have been relatively stagnant”

    The LAO last year did a cost study for the University of California. Its findings contradict your opinions.

    The wages plus benefits for all UC employees, from the highest to the lowest, are much higher today than they were 20 years ago. We now have far more high-paid administrators and they make almost triple what their colleagues made a generation ago. A starting professor’s cost in 2007 was, after adjusting for inflation, double the same position’s cost in 1987. A secretary in Mrak Hall today costs UC almost 2.5 times as much as a secretary cost 20 years ago.

    About half of that increase in expenses has been with a ballooning in benefits — better retirement plans and life and medical insurance coverage. The other half is made up of higher wages.

  13. Michael

    Note to Richard: “The wages plus benefits for all UC employees, from the highest to the lowest, are much higher today than they were 20 years ago.”

  14. Michael

    Note to Richard: “The wages plus benefits for all UC employees, from the highest to the lowest, are much higher today than they were 20 years ago.”

  15. Michael

    Note to Richard: “The wages plus benefits for all UC employees, from the highest to the lowest, are much higher today than they were 20 years ago.”

  16. Michael

    Note to Richard: “The wages plus benefits for all UC employees, from the highest to the lowest, are much higher today than they were 20 years ago.”

  17. former uc davis employee

    anonymous and others: The cost of living is now more than it was 20 years ago. So, to compare what a secretay in Mrak Hall makes now with benefits, retirement, etc. to what they made 20 years ago does not hold much.

    “A secretary in Mrak Hall today costs UC almost 2.5 times as much as a secretary cost 20 years ago.

    About half of that increase in expenses has been with a ballooning in benefits — better retirement plans and life and medical insurance coverage. The other half is made up of higher wages.”

    Higher wages are needed to keep up with the higher cost of living.

    However the adminstrators salaries and bonuses are still a joke and outlandish!!!

  18. former uc davis employee

    anonymous and others: The cost of living is now more than it was 20 years ago. So, to compare what a secretay in Mrak Hall makes now with benefits, retirement, etc. to what they made 20 years ago does not hold much.

    “A secretary in Mrak Hall today costs UC almost 2.5 times as much as a secretary cost 20 years ago.

    About half of that increase in expenses has been with a ballooning in benefits — better retirement plans and life and medical insurance coverage. The other half is made up of higher wages.”

    Higher wages are needed to keep up with the higher cost of living.

    However the adminstrators salaries and bonuses are still a joke and outlandish!!!

  19. former uc davis employee

    anonymous and others: The cost of living is now more than it was 20 years ago. So, to compare what a secretay in Mrak Hall makes now with benefits, retirement, etc. to what they made 20 years ago does not hold much.

    “A secretary in Mrak Hall today costs UC almost 2.5 times as much as a secretary cost 20 years ago.

    About half of that increase in expenses has been with a ballooning in benefits — better retirement plans and life and medical insurance coverage. The other half is made up of higher wages.”

    Higher wages are needed to keep up with the higher cost of living.

    However the adminstrators salaries and bonuses are still a joke and outlandish!!!

  20. former uc davis employee

    anonymous and others: The cost of living is now more than it was 20 years ago. So, to compare what a secretay in Mrak Hall makes now with benefits, retirement, etc. to what they made 20 years ago does not hold much.

    “A secretary in Mrak Hall today costs UC almost 2.5 times as much as a secretary cost 20 years ago.

    About half of that increase in expenses has been with a ballooning in benefits — better retirement plans and life and medical insurance coverage. The other half is made up of higher wages.”

    Higher wages are needed to keep up with the higher cost of living.

    However the adminstrators salaries and bonuses are still a joke and outlandish!!!

  21. Richard

    one might also note that what we used to call “teacher’s assistants” now supposedly do a lot of things that faculty used to do at UC, at least if you listen to them

    and the UC used them to conceal what would normally be considered work subject to collective bargaining within the confines of the professor/graduate student academic relationship

    they wouldn’t show up anywhere in a salary/benefits study involving UC employees, because UC administrators were adamant that they weren’t “employees”, and that they therefore had no labor rights

    finally, that came to an end several years ago, but only after a bitter struggle, and it serves as a cautionary tale about relying upon UC salary studies to establish how well its employees have been compensated

    the situation at Sodexho, where privatization (a typical neoliberal policy) was used at UC Davis to separate food service employees from those receiving these purportedly generous UC salaries and benefits

    now, we have these people, people who have been compensated so generously that, if their claims are to be believed, get paid substantially less than their private sector counterparts, and have to work second jobs to get by

    –Richard Estes

  22. Richard

    one might also note that what we used to call “teacher’s assistants” now supposedly do a lot of things that faculty used to do at UC, at least if you listen to them

    and the UC used them to conceal what would normally be considered work subject to collective bargaining within the confines of the professor/graduate student academic relationship

    they wouldn’t show up anywhere in a salary/benefits study involving UC employees, because UC administrators were adamant that they weren’t “employees”, and that they therefore had no labor rights

    finally, that came to an end several years ago, but only after a bitter struggle, and it serves as a cautionary tale about relying upon UC salary studies to establish how well its employees have been compensated

    the situation at Sodexho, where privatization (a typical neoliberal policy) was used at UC Davis to separate food service employees from those receiving these purportedly generous UC salaries and benefits

    now, we have these people, people who have been compensated so generously that, if their claims are to be believed, get paid substantially less than their private sector counterparts, and have to work second jobs to get by

    –Richard Estes

  23. Richard

    one might also note that what we used to call “teacher’s assistants” now supposedly do a lot of things that faculty used to do at UC, at least if you listen to them

    and the UC used them to conceal what would normally be considered work subject to collective bargaining within the confines of the professor/graduate student academic relationship

    they wouldn’t show up anywhere in a salary/benefits study involving UC employees, because UC administrators were adamant that they weren’t “employees”, and that they therefore had no labor rights

    finally, that came to an end several years ago, but only after a bitter struggle, and it serves as a cautionary tale about relying upon UC salary studies to establish how well its employees have been compensated

    the situation at Sodexho, where privatization (a typical neoliberal policy) was used at UC Davis to separate food service employees from those receiving these purportedly generous UC salaries and benefits

    now, we have these people, people who have been compensated so generously that, if their claims are to be believed, get paid substantially less than their private sector counterparts, and have to work second jobs to get by

    –Richard Estes

  24. Richard

    one might also note that what we used to call “teacher’s assistants” now supposedly do a lot of things that faculty used to do at UC, at least if you listen to them

    and the UC used them to conceal what would normally be considered work subject to collective bargaining within the confines of the professor/graduate student academic relationship

    they wouldn’t show up anywhere in a salary/benefits study involving UC employees, because UC administrators were adamant that they weren’t “employees”, and that they therefore had no labor rights

    finally, that came to an end several years ago, but only after a bitter struggle, and it serves as a cautionary tale about relying upon UC salary studies to establish how well its employees have been compensated

    the situation at Sodexho, where privatization (a typical neoliberal policy) was used at UC Davis to separate food service employees from those receiving these purportedly generous UC salaries and benefits

    now, we have these people, people who have been compensated so generously that, if their claims are to be believed, get paid substantially less than their private sector counterparts, and have to work second jobs to get by

    –Richard Estes

  25. Anonymous

    A secretary in Mrak Hall today costs UC almost 2.5 times as much as a secretary cost 20 years ago.
    And what does the median house in Davis today cost compared with what it cost 20 years ago?

    Probably still far too much for that secretary to afford.

  26. Anonymous

    A secretary in Mrak Hall today costs UC almost 2.5 times as much as a secretary cost 20 years ago.
    And what does the median house in Davis today cost compared with what it cost 20 years ago?

    Probably still far too much for that secretary to afford.

  27. Anonymous

    A secretary in Mrak Hall today costs UC almost 2.5 times as much as a secretary cost 20 years ago.
    And what does the median house in Davis today cost compared with what it cost 20 years ago?

    Probably still far too much for that secretary to afford.

  28. Anonymous

    A secretary in Mrak Hall today costs UC almost 2.5 times as much as a secretary cost 20 years ago.
    And what does the median house in Davis today cost compared with what it cost 20 years ago?

    Probably still far too much for that secretary to afford.

  29. Michael

    “The professors aren’t going on strike. That’s what Richard was trying to get across to you.”

    Richard actually said that only higher paid people are making more these days (“higher and higher wages, fees and investment income for the upper class”), while people at the middle level (starting profs) and at the lower (secretaries) are not. He was incorrect.

    “The cost of living is now more than it was 20 years ago. So, to compare what a secretay in Mrak Hall makes now with benefits, retirement, etc. to what they made 20 years ago does not hold much.”

    The comparison by LAO accounted for inflation. In other words, the cost of salaries and benefits have gone up much more than 2-3 times. But when you account for inflation, they have doubled or tripled.

  30. Michael

    “The professors aren’t going on strike. That’s what Richard was trying to get across to you.”

    Richard actually said that only higher paid people are making more these days (“higher and higher wages, fees and investment income for the upper class”), while people at the middle level (starting profs) and at the lower (secretaries) are not. He was incorrect.

    “The cost of living is now more than it was 20 years ago. So, to compare what a secretay in Mrak Hall makes now with benefits, retirement, etc. to what they made 20 years ago does not hold much.”

    The comparison by LAO accounted for inflation. In other words, the cost of salaries and benefits have gone up much more than 2-3 times. But when you account for inflation, they have doubled or tripled.

  31. Michael

    “The professors aren’t going on strike. That’s what Richard was trying to get across to you.”

    Richard actually said that only higher paid people are making more these days (“higher and higher wages, fees and investment income for the upper class”), while people at the middle level (starting profs) and at the lower (secretaries) are not. He was incorrect.

    “The cost of living is now more than it was 20 years ago. So, to compare what a secretay in Mrak Hall makes now with benefits, retirement, etc. to what they made 20 years ago does not hold much.”

    The comparison by LAO accounted for inflation. In other words, the cost of salaries and benefits have gone up much more than 2-3 times. But when you account for inflation, they have doubled or tripled.

  32. Michael

    “The professors aren’t going on strike. That’s what Richard was trying to get across to you.”

    Richard actually said that only higher paid people are making more these days (“higher and higher wages, fees and investment income for the upper class”), while people at the middle level (starting profs) and at the lower (secretaries) are not. He was incorrect.

    “The cost of living is now more than it was 20 years ago. So, to compare what a secretay in Mrak Hall makes now with benefits, retirement, etc. to what they made 20 years ago does not hold much.”

    The comparison by LAO accounted for inflation. In other words, the cost of salaries and benefits have gone up much more than 2-3 times. But when you account for inflation, they have doubled or tripled.

  33. Anonymous

    If that’s the stocky motorcycle cop who harasses parents dropping their kids off at school in the morning, then I doubt there is a conspiracy between the strike and the traffic citations. He’s a nazi who would pull over anyone at anytime for any reason. Every time I see him it reminds me of a desperate hunter looking for prey.

  34. Anonymous

    If that’s the stocky motorcycle cop who harasses parents dropping their kids off at school in the morning, then I doubt there is a conspiracy between the strike and the traffic citations. He’s a nazi who would pull over anyone at anytime for any reason. Every time I see him it reminds me of a desperate hunter looking for prey.

  35. Anonymous

    If that’s the stocky motorcycle cop who harasses parents dropping their kids off at school in the morning, then I doubt there is a conspiracy between the strike and the traffic citations. He’s a nazi who would pull over anyone at anytime for any reason. Every time I see him it reminds me of a desperate hunter looking for prey.

  36. Anonymous

    If that’s the stocky motorcycle cop who harasses parents dropping their kids off at school in the morning, then I doubt there is a conspiracy between the strike and the traffic citations. He’s a nazi who would pull over anyone at anytime for any reason. Every time I see him it reminds me of a desperate hunter looking for prey.

  37. 無名 - wu ming

    if you’re talking about core inflation, which excludes energy, rent, gas, food and insurance, then we’re talking funny numbers anyways.

    relative to the cost of actually living in CA, wages for most have sunk significantly. given that we’re talking about the lowest rung in the UC economy, it’s pretty absurd to claim that people are doing better today.

  38. 無名 - wu ming

    if you’re talking about core inflation, which excludes energy, rent, gas, food and insurance, then we’re talking funny numbers anyways.

    relative to the cost of actually living in CA, wages for most have sunk significantly. given that we’re talking about the lowest rung in the UC economy, it’s pretty absurd to claim that people are doing better today.

  39. 無名 - wu ming

    if you’re talking about core inflation, which excludes energy, rent, gas, food and insurance, then we’re talking funny numbers anyways.

    relative to the cost of actually living in CA, wages for most have sunk significantly. given that we’re talking about the lowest rung in the UC economy, it’s pretty absurd to claim that people are doing better today.

  40. 無名 - wu ming

    if you’re talking about core inflation, which excludes energy, rent, gas, food and insurance, then we’re talking funny numbers anyways.

    relative to the cost of actually living in CA, wages for most have sunk significantly. given that we’re talking about the lowest rung in the UC economy, it’s pretty absurd to claim that people are doing better today.

  41. Anonymous

    There were two calls into the police department complaining of the noise of honking horns per the Davis PD website by someone near the corner.

    I’ve never heard of a ticket for honking your horn in support of something.

    The City should drop these tickets. If not, the people getting tickets should contest them. I can’t believe that the Yolo County Referee will enforce penalties for something so …American.

  42. Anonymous

    There were two calls into the police department complaining of the noise of honking horns per the Davis PD website by someone near the corner.

    I’ve never heard of a ticket for honking your horn in support of something.

    The City should drop these tickets. If not, the people getting tickets should contest them. I can’t believe that the Yolo County Referee will enforce penalties for something so …American.

  43. Anonymous

    There were two calls into the police department complaining of the noise of honking horns per the Davis PD website by someone near the corner.

    I’ve never heard of a ticket for honking your horn in support of something.

    The City should drop these tickets. If not, the people getting tickets should contest them. I can’t believe that the Yolo County Referee will enforce penalties for something so …American.

  44. Anonymous

    There were two calls into the police department complaining of the noise of honking horns per the Davis PD website by someone near the corner.

    I’ve never heard of a ticket for honking your horn in support of something.

    The City should drop these tickets. If not, the people getting tickets should contest them. I can’t believe that the Yolo County Referee will enforce penalties for something so …American.

  45. Anonymous

    California Code: Vehicle Code
    “27001. (a) The driver of a motor vehicle when reasonably necessary
    to insure safe operation shall give audible warning with his horn.
    (b) The horn shall not otherwise be used, except as a theft alarm
    system which operates as specified in Article 13 (commencing with
    Section 28085) of this chapter.”

    However, the Police Department should be ashamed of itself for enforcing this with regards honking horns in support of an employee stike. Contest the tickets and make the person who called the police come and explain themselves.

  46. Anonymous

    California Code: Vehicle Code
    “27001. (a) The driver of a motor vehicle when reasonably necessary
    to insure safe operation shall give audible warning with his horn.
    (b) The horn shall not otherwise be used, except as a theft alarm
    system which operates as specified in Article 13 (commencing with
    Section 28085) of this chapter.”

    However, the Police Department should be ashamed of itself for enforcing this with regards honking horns in support of an employee stike. Contest the tickets and make the person who called the police come and explain themselves.

  47. Anonymous

    California Code: Vehicle Code
    “27001. (a) The driver of a motor vehicle when reasonably necessary
    to insure safe operation shall give audible warning with his horn.
    (b) The horn shall not otherwise be used, except as a theft alarm
    system which operates as specified in Article 13 (commencing with
    Section 28085) of this chapter.”

    However, the Police Department should be ashamed of itself for enforcing this with regards honking horns in support of an employee stike. Contest the tickets and make the person who called the police come and explain themselves.

  48. Anonymous

    California Code: Vehicle Code
    “27001. (a) The driver of a motor vehicle when reasonably necessary
    to insure safe operation shall give audible warning with his horn.
    (b) The horn shall not otherwise be used, except as a theft alarm
    system which operates as specified in Article 13 (commencing with
    Section 28085) of this chapter.”

    However, the Police Department should be ashamed of itself for enforcing this with regards honking horns in support of an employee stike. Contest the tickets and make the person who called the police come and explain themselves.

  49. Michael

    “if you’re talking about core inflation, which excludes energy, rent, gas, food and insurance, then we’re talking funny numbers anyways.”

    No. The LAO used CPI for inflation. That accounts for food and energy and housing.

  50. Michael

    “if you’re talking about core inflation, which excludes energy, rent, gas, food and insurance, then we’re talking funny numbers anyways.”

    No. The LAO used CPI for inflation. That accounts for food and energy and housing.

  51. Michael

    “if you’re talking about core inflation, which excludes energy, rent, gas, food and insurance, then we’re talking funny numbers anyways.”

    No. The LAO used CPI for inflation. That accounts for food and energy and housing.

  52. Michael

    “if you’re talking about core inflation, which excludes energy, rent, gas, food and insurance, then we’re talking funny numbers anyways.”

    No. The LAO used CPI for inflation. That accounts for food and energy and housing.

  53. Richard

    No. The LAO used CPI for inflation. That accounts for food and energy and housing.

    So, in addition to the flaws I pointed out earlier, pushing low wage workers “off the books”, so to speak (to which you’d didn’t respond, despite responding to others), you actually believe that the CPI is an accurate reflection of the costs of food, energy and housing in California over the last 20 years?

    In other words, the study was based on the notion that California is not towards the high end of these costs, but a straight down the middle, median cost state?

    If so, that might explain why the study isn’t very credible.

    –Richard Estes

  54. Richard

    No. The LAO used CPI for inflation. That accounts for food and energy and housing.

    So, in addition to the flaws I pointed out earlier, pushing low wage workers “off the books”, so to speak (to which you’d didn’t respond, despite responding to others), you actually believe that the CPI is an accurate reflection of the costs of food, energy and housing in California over the last 20 years?

    In other words, the study was based on the notion that California is not towards the high end of these costs, but a straight down the middle, median cost state?

    If so, that might explain why the study isn’t very credible.

    –Richard Estes

  55. Richard

    No. The LAO used CPI for inflation. That accounts for food and energy and housing.

    So, in addition to the flaws I pointed out earlier, pushing low wage workers “off the books”, so to speak (to which you’d didn’t respond, despite responding to others), you actually believe that the CPI is an accurate reflection of the costs of food, energy and housing in California over the last 20 years?

    In other words, the study was based on the notion that California is not towards the high end of these costs, but a straight down the middle, median cost state?

    If so, that might explain why the study isn’t very credible.

    –Richard Estes

  56. Richard

    No. The LAO used CPI for inflation. That accounts for food and energy and housing.

    So, in addition to the flaws I pointed out earlier, pushing low wage workers “off the books”, so to speak (to which you’d didn’t respond, despite responding to others), you actually believe that the CPI is an accurate reflection of the costs of food, energy and housing in California over the last 20 years?

    In other words, the study was based on the notion that California is not towards the high end of these costs, but a straight down the middle, median cost state?

    If so, that might explain why the study isn’t very credible.

    –Richard Estes

  57. Michael

    The CPI used by the LAO study (you should read it — it’s available on the LAO website) is from the San Francisco (12th) Federal Reserve Bank district. That accounts for our regional housing and labor costs.

  58. Michael

    The CPI used by the LAO study (you should read it — it’s available on the LAO website) is from the San Francisco (12th) Federal Reserve Bank district. That accounts for our regional housing and labor costs.

  59. Michael

    The CPI used by the LAO study (you should read it — it’s available on the LAO website) is from the San Francisco (12th) Federal Reserve Bank district. That accounts for our regional housing and labor costs.

  60. Michael

    The CPI used by the LAO study (you should read it — it’s available on the LAO website) is from the San Francisco (12th) Federal Reserve Bank district. That accounts for our regional housing and labor costs.

  61. Brandon Key

    Any chance we can get a UC Davis economist to comment on this issue? In skimming this discussion, I see a lot of numbers being tossed about, emotions running high, and in many instances little regard to actual living expenses adjusted for inflation over time. It just seems hard to make clear sense out of it. Just a friendly observation.

  62. Brandon Key

    Any chance we can get a UC Davis economist to comment on this issue? In skimming this discussion, I see a lot of numbers being tossed about, emotions running high, and in many instances little regard to actual living expenses adjusted for inflation over time. It just seems hard to make clear sense out of it. Just a friendly observation.

  63. Brandon Key

    Any chance we can get a UC Davis economist to comment on this issue? In skimming this discussion, I see a lot of numbers being tossed about, emotions running high, and in many instances little regard to actual living expenses adjusted for inflation over time. It just seems hard to make clear sense out of it. Just a friendly observation.

  64. Brandon Key

    Any chance we can get a UC Davis economist to comment on this issue? In skimming this discussion, I see a lot of numbers being tossed about, emotions running high, and in many instances little regard to actual living expenses adjusted for inflation over time. It just seems hard to make clear sense out of it. Just a friendly observation.

  65. Anonymous

    To Anon in regard to the”Stocky Motorcycle Cop”.

    I’m glad that Stocky Cop is out there protecting people from themselves. Stupid generalities like the one you made are just that, Stupid. Clowns like you have no idea what it takes to do that job. If I were able, I’d be out there doing that job.

    You are absolutely clueless. And when you make accusations be sure you can back them up.

  66. Anonymous

    To Anon in regard to the”Stocky Motorcycle Cop”.

    I’m glad that Stocky Cop is out there protecting people from themselves. Stupid generalities like the one you made are just that, Stupid. Clowns like you have no idea what it takes to do that job. If I were able, I’d be out there doing that job.

    You are absolutely clueless. And when you make accusations be sure you can back them up.

  67. Anonymous

    To Anon in regard to the”Stocky Motorcycle Cop”.

    I’m glad that Stocky Cop is out there protecting people from themselves. Stupid generalities like the one you made are just that, Stupid. Clowns like you have no idea what it takes to do that job. If I were able, I’d be out there doing that job.

    You are absolutely clueless. And when you make accusations be sure you can back them up.

  68. Anonymous

    To Anon in regard to the”Stocky Motorcycle Cop”.

    I’m glad that Stocky Cop is out there protecting people from themselves. Stupid generalities like the one you made are just that, Stupid. Clowns like you have no idea what it takes to do that job. If I were able, I’d be out there doing that job.

    You are absolutely clueless. And when you make accusations be sure you can back them up.

  69. Anonymous

    Being new to this site I must say, it will be my first and last time. In general there are a bunch of clueless,biased and ignorant people commenting here. Good Bye!

  70. Anonymous

    Being new to this site I must say, it will be my first and last time. In general there are a bunch of clueless,biased and ignorant people commenting here. Good Bye!

  71. Anonymous

    Being new to this site I must say, it will be my first and last time. In general there are a bunch of clueless,biased and ignorant people commenting here. Good Bye!

  72. Anonymous

    Being new to this site I must say, it will be my first and last time. In general there are a bunch of clueless,biased and ignorant people commenting here. Good Bye!

Leave a Reply

X Close

Newsletter Sign-Up

X Close

Monthly Subscriber Sign-Up

Enter the maximum amount you want to pay each month
$ USD
Sign up for