Ballot Arguments in For Measure W–The Parcel Tax

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The ballot arguments have been submitted both for and against the Parcel Tax. This marks the first time in awhile that there has been an argument submitted against a parcel tax ballot initiative. Read the arguments both for and against Measure W and decide for yourself.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR MEASURE W

Yes on W: Continuing a Quality Education for our Kids!

Davis public schools are among the best in the state because generations of residents have made investing in education a top commitment of our community.

Measure W is needed to make up for the shortfall in state funding immediately and over the next several years. Without Measure W our schools will face severe program cuts and teacher layoffs.

The Davis School Board cut educational programs and made significant cutbacks in school administration this past year. An unprecedented community-wide fundraising effort was necessary to preserve core educational programs, and prevent teacher layoffs for the 2008/2009 school year only. But we cannot rely on such extraordinary stop-gap efforts to fund our schools.

Measure W will provide a reliable funding source for critical educational programs for the next three school years. Homeowners can continue our community’s tradition of preserving quality schools for $120 per year, or $10 per month.

Measure W will:

  • Protect science, math and English programs;
  • Keep class sizes small;
  • Fund classes and teachers for music, art, social studies and foreign language;
  • Preserve athletics and physical fitness programs; and
  • Support our school librarians.
Every dollar Measure W generates will go directly to classrooms and instructors for student learning. Not one dollar from Measure W can be spent on administration. An independent Citizen’s Oversight Committee will track all funds.

Measure W is designed for Davis. Apartments are assessed a lower amount and there is a voluntary exemption for seniors.

We ask that you VOTE YES on W to continue our community’s long-standing tradition of investing in education because this investment benefits not just our children, it benefits all of us.

Signed:

Judy Davis (Retired Elementary School Principal)
Jay Gerber (Business Owner)
Eleanor Neagley (Davis Teacher)
Janet Berry (Parent and Community Volunteer)
Many Carbahal (Accountant and Local Business Owner)

ARGUMENT AGAINST MEASURE W

Measure W is a continuous effort by the School Board to seek voter approval to place a third local tax into effect in addition to Measure K: The School Facilities Bond passed in a Special Election in 2000 and Measure Q which passed last year and now with Measure W as a nearly identically written proposal to Measure Q to provide additional funding for Instructional programs which if passed in addition to the two other existing measures will increase the amount of special taxes paid to the school district from $258. to $378. per single unit dwelling and increase of 32%. despite that there has been a projected slight decrease in enrollment in the district from 8,863 to 8,833 students between the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 school years with less enrollment in addition to two (2) additional tax measures passed by the voters in previous years for other government organizations for their other purposes are still in effect doesn’t justify supporting this proposed new tax.

In Davis the cost of living is already excessively high due to such new taxes and increases in recent years such as Measure W imposed on many middle income property owners not exempted from low income exemption provisions thereby subjecting them to possible future hardship as well such as possibly being evicted from their or excluded from purchasing residences due to the unaffordability to pay these current and new taxes.

In the interests to preserve the affordable cost of living for Davis residents against this excessive and continuous “tax raising frenzy” being sought by our local elected officials to gouge the local residents with excessive taxation: Vote No on Measure W.

For more information for more reasons to Vote No on Measure W please log on to the following
website address:

http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/vme/arena

Signed:

Thomas Randall, Jr.

REBUTTAL TO ARGUMENT IN FAVOR OF MEASURE W

The Proponents for Measure W don’t mention in their ballot argument:

-That Measure Q was passed by voters last year still remains in effect assessing an additional $200. per year per parcel if Measure W passes for the remaining three (3) year term in effect as both tax assessments would serve nearly duplicate purposes in funding instructional programs and therefore a significant amount of additional funding could still be provided if Measure W doesn’t pass.

-Measure W’s provisions set a flexible tax rate per year up to a maximum of $120. per single unit parcel subject to an annual review with public hearings to be held by the School Board which is not legally required to set the rate at the preferred limit advised through public testimony or the recommendations of the Oversight Committee. This situation places taxpayers in the unfair situation in which the rate assessed to them could fluctuate from year to year and is unpredictable to specifically fixing their rate of annual property tax assessment thereby precluding them from accurately contemplating in advance what their total tax rate assessed would be annually and especially problematic provided the current cost of living is being affected by higher rates of inflation.

-Measure W’s provisions contain no eligibility limit for tax reductions or exemptions for low
income property owners in the district (including some university employees and students) to pay the additional taxes imposed if the measure passes.

Vote No on Measure Wrong, Vote No on Measure W.

Signed:

Thomas Randall, Jr.

REBUTTAL TO ARGUMENT AGAINST MEASURE W

Please don’t be fooled by false and misleading arguments against Measure W.

FACT: Measure W is designed to address immediate school funding shortfalls that forced the Davis School Board to authorize substantial cuts for the 2008-2009 school year. A community-wide fundraising drive then restored important educational programs for only one year. Measure W would fund these valued services for the next three years.

  • FACT: Programs funded by Measure W are NOT INCLUDED in any existing parcel tax measures.
  • FACT: Measure W will expire in three years.
  • FACT: Measure W includes a lower rate for apartments and an exemption for seniors so they are released from undue tax burden.
  • FACT: Measure W meets immediate funding needs – it does not create new programs.
  • FACT: If Measure W is rejected, the Davis Board of Education will be forced to eliminate teaching positions and instructional programs.
Davis residents know the quality of life in Davis is linked to the quality of our schools. Our children, our neighborhoods, even property values, are supported
by quality schools.

Though the economy is uncertain, we know that the way to a better future is to protect the quality of public education. it’s time to demonstrate our values once again. We ask that you vote YES on Measure W to support our schools and our community.

To learn more visit www.YesforOurStudents.org. Thank you.

Signed:

Helen Spangler (Davis Teacher)
Glen Holderreed (Investment Adviser)
Prudencio Mendez (Small Business Owner)
James Beckwith (President and CEO Five Star Bank)
Lois Crowe (Retired UCD Science Researcher)

Vanguard Commentary

At this point in time, there is no organized group or committee opposing the Measure W parcel tax that will be on the ballot for the November election. However, Thomas Randall, Jr., submitted an argument against the parcel tax and a rebuttal to the argument in favor of Measure W.

Mr. Randall wrote these arguments as an individual. While he is a member of the Yolo County Republican Central Committee, his statements are those of an individual and do not represent the Central Committee on this matter.

In fact, supporters of Measure W noted that Glen Holderreed, who signed the “Rebuttal to Argument Against Measure W” is also a member of the Republican Central Committee, and his views also do not represent the Republican Central Committee on this matter. At this time, that organization has not taken a position on the ballot measure.

The Yolo County Taxpayers Association, led by among others former Davis School Board Member John Munn, has not taken a position on the parcel tax and is not expected to do so.

From my standpoint, Mr. Randall’s argument against Measure W is several long run-on sentences. More importantly however, several of the arguments are not accurate. For instance, Measure W and Measure Q do not fund any of the same programs, it does not create any new programs, and it only goes to fund educational programs–not administrators. In other words, the money goes directly into the classroom and if the measure is not passed, the money comes directly from the classroom.

The bottom line is this point by Measure W supporters:

“If Measure W is rejected, the Davis Board of Education will be forced to eliminate teaching positions and instructional programs.”

That is what the public needs to weigh. There are few people in this community that are more cautious about raising new taxes than I am. I have been very outspoken on the issue of fiscal responsibility both by this school district and the city of Davis. I am very leery about potential rate hikes for water services, which by the way, dwarf this tax. The water rate hikes will likely be larger per month, than Measure W is per year.

Unfortunately, I see no alternative at this time to passing Measure W. The choice is clear, pay $120 additional in tax dollars or see teachers and programs cut. In the coming days, the Vanguard will talk about exactly what that means. Tomorrow, the Vanguard examines some very interesting data from the school district on spending over the past few school years.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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140 thoughts on “Ballot Arguments in For Measure W–The Parcel Tax”

  1. Anonymous

    The Yolo County Taxpayer’s Association is a joke. Just a bunch of grumpy old white dudes who don’t like to pay taxes. Their ‘opposition’ is usually a sign that whatever it is they are opposing is something I should support.

  2. Anonymous

    The Yolo County Taxpayer’s Association is a joke. Just a bunch of grumpy old white dudes who don’t like to pay taxes. Their ‘opposition’ is usually a sign that whatever it is they are opposing is something I should support.

  3. Anonymous

    The Yolo County Taxpayer’s Association is a joke. Just a bunch of grumpy old white dudes who don’t like to pay taxes. Their ‘opposition’ is usually a sign that whatever it is they are opposing is something I should support.

  4. Anonymous

    The Yolo County Taxpayer’s Association is a joke. Just a bunch of grumpy old white dudes who don’t like to pay taxes. Their ‘opposition’ is usually a sign that whatever it is they are opposing is something I should support.

  5. Doug Paul Davis

    “FYI DPD. The person who wrote the argument against Measure W is developmentally disabled. Give the guy a break on his grammar.”

    Jeff Hudson made a similar comment in the Enterprise story, not that that matters. I know a little bit about Mr. Randall, he and Cecilia used to have debates on the radio or TV (not sure which) over various policy issues. My understanding is that he was pretty bright.

    Nevertheless, I think your point illustrates the No on W’s lack of organization.

    In response to the other anonymous:

    If I had to bet right now, W would probably narrowly fail, but I think if the district and community can get their message out, it has a decent chance to pass.

  6. Doug Paul Davis

    “FYI DPD. The person who wrote the argument against Measure W is developmentally disabled. Give the guy a break on his grammar.”

    Jeff Hudson made a similar comment in the Enterprise story, not that that matters. I know a little bit about Mr. Randall, he and Cecilia used to have debates on the radio or TV (not sure which) over various policy issues. My understanding is that he was pretty bright.

    Nevertheless, I think your point illustrates the No on W’s lack of organization.

    In response to the other anonymous:

    If I had to bet right now, W would probably narrowly fail, but I think if the district and community can get their message out, it has a decent chance to pass.

  7. Doug Paul Davis

    “FYI DPD. The person who wrote the argument against Measure W is developmentally disabled. Give the guy a break on his grammar.”

    Jeff Hudson made a similar comment in the Enterprise story, not that that matters. I know a little bit about Mr. Randall, he and Cecilia used to have debates on the radio or TV (not sure which) over various policy issues. My understanding is that he was pretty bright.

    Nevertheless, I think your point illustrates the No on W’s lack of organization.

    In response to the other anonymous:

    If I had to bet right now, W would probably narrowly fail, but I think if the district and community can get their message out, it has a decent chance to pass.

  8. Doug Paul Davis

    “FYI DPD. The person who wrote the argument against Measure W is developmentally disabled. Give the guy a break on his grammar.”

    Jeff Hudson made a similar comment in the Enterprise story, not that that matters. I know a little bit about Mr. Randall, he and Cecilia used to have debates on the radio or TV (not sure which) over various policy issues. My understanding is that he was pretty bright.

    Nevertheless, I think your point illustrates the No on W’s lack of organization.

    In response to the other anonymous:

    If I had to bet right now, W would probably narrowly fail, but I think if the district and community can get their message out, it has a decent chance to pass.

  9. yes on W

    A progressive community supports its schools. Davis also has a lower than average revenue limit (amount per student received from the state). I hope measure W will pass.

  10. yes on W

    A progressive community supports its schools. Davis also has a lower than average revenue limit (amount per student received from the state). I hope measure W will pass.

  11. yes on W

    A progressive community supports its schools. Davis also has a lower than average revenue limit (amount per student received from the state). I hope measure W will pass.

  12. yes on W

    A progressive community supports its schools. Davis also has a lower than average revenue limit (amount per student received from the state). I hope measure W will pass.

  13. Cecilia Escamilla-Greenwald

    When I was a student and Presdient of College Democrats at UC Davis Thomas Randall and I along with other Republicans and Democrats, Greens, and Libertarians would debate and discuss various party issues on DCTV.

    We had different views, but I always found him to be a nice guy with passionate views about taxes and the Republican Party agenda.

    It doesn’t suprise me that he is opposed to Measure W. I still think he’s a nice guy with diffent views.

  14. Cecilia Escamilla-Greenwald

    When I was a student and Presdient of College Democrats at UC Davis Thomas Randall and I along with other Republicans and Democrats, Greens, and Libertarians would debate and discuss various party issues on DCTV.

    We had different views, but I always found him to be a nice guy with passionate views about taxes and the Republican Party agenda.

    It doesn’t suprise me that he is opposed to Measure W. I still think he’s a nice guy with diffent views.

  15. Cecilia Escamilla-Greenwald

    When I was a student and Presdient of College Democrats at UC Davis Thomas Randall and I along with other Republicans and Democrats, Greens, and Libertarians would debate and discuss various party issues on DCTV.

    We had different views, but I always found him to be a nice guy with passionate views about taxes and the Republican Party agenda.

    It doesn’t suprise me that he is opposed to Measure W. I still think he’s a nice guy with diffent views.

  16. Cecilia Escamilla-Greenwald

    When I was a student and Presdient of College Democrats at UC Davis Thomas Randall and I along with other Republicans and Democrats, Greens, and Libertarians would debate and discuss various party issues on DCTV.

    We had different views, but I always found him to be a nice guy with passionate views about taxes and the Republican Party agenda.

    It doesn’t suprise me that he is opposed to Measure W. I still think he’s a nice guy with diffent views.

  17. No on W So Far

    There are still problems w Measure W. For instance:
    1) If enrollment is declining, why the request for money for smaller class sizes?
    2) We need to save “core curricula”, not frills. There is still no definitive definition of “core curricula”. According to the School District/Board, everything, and I mean everything, is considered “core curricula”.
    3) How does the closing of Emerson equate to making sure our educational programs survive? Yet I have heard no assurances/promises from the School Board/District that Emerson will remain open. For many of us, that is a sticking point, but the powers that be are not listening.
    4) It is very unlikely that this parcel tax will end up being phased out in three years. Trust me, this will be a permanent parcel tax increase. We need to be sure we are getting the proper “bang for the buck”, and not just paying for frills to remain in place.
    5) Where is the accountability? An oversight committee hand picked by the School Board/District is not what most would consider accountablility.
    6) Where is the “education” that was promised, to justify this new parcel tax, for those of us too stupid to understand why it is necessary? Thus far, I am not convinced the money is going to even be put to good use. To say it is to save existing programs says absolutely nothing, especially if Emerson may close. Where is there any budgeting going on? Of course the schools want to keep all existing programs, but are all existing programs necessary? Some of us don’t think so, but the School Board/District is not listening.

    There is a basic disconnect between the public and the powers that be at the School Board. They don’t seem to understand the public has deep concerns when money is being given to pay for “core curricula”, yet entire schools are being closed that eliminate “core curricula” in a particular neighborhood. Nothing seems to be in the works to guarantee we don’t build too many schools we cannot fund; or that employees don’t end up working for a consulting firm directly after terminating their employment w the School District.

    In short, there is nothing but another request for money, that will continue unabated w no accountability if we as the public agree. We will have no guarantee that Emerson won’t be closed for expediency’s sake, to save a mere $600,000, which would only take a $20 parcel tax to save. Sorry, things just don’t add up.

  18. No on W So Far

    There are still problems w Measure W. For instance:
    1) If enrollment is declining, why the request for money for smaller class sizes?
    2) We need to save “core curricula”, not frills. There is still no definitive definition of “core curricula”. According to the School District/Board, everything, and I mean everything, is considered “core curricula”.
    3) How does the closing of Emerson equate to making sure our educational programs survive? Yet I have heard no assurances/promises from the School Board/District that Emerson will remain open. For many of us, that is a sticking point, but the powers that be are not listening.
    4) It is very unlikely that this parcel tax will end up being phased out in three years. Trust me, this will be a permanent parcel tax increase. We need to be sure we are getting the proper “bang for the buck”, and not just paying for frills to remain in place.
    5) Where is the accountability? An oversight committee hand picked by the School Board/District is not what most would consider accountablility.
    6) Where is the “education” that was promised, to justify this new parcel tax, for those of us too stupid to understand why it is necessary? Thus far, I am not convinced the money is going to even be put to good use. To say it is to save existing programs says absolutely nothing, especially if Emerson may close. Where is there any budgeting going on? Of course the schools want to keep all existing programs, but are all existing programs necessary? Some of us don’t think so, but the School Board/District is not listening.

    There is a basic disconnect between the public and the powers that be at the School Board. They don’t seem to understand the public has deep concerns when money is being given to pay for “core curricula”, yet entire schools are being closed that eliminate “core curricula” in a particular neighborhood. Nothing seems to be in the works to guarantee we don’t build too many schools we cannot fund; or that employees don’t end up working for a consulting firm directly after terminating their employment w the School District.

    In short, there is nothing but another request for money, that will continue unabated w no accountability if we as the public agree. We will have no guarantee that Emerson won’t be closed for expediency’s sake, to save a mere $600,000, which would only take a $20 parcel tax to save. Sorry, things just don’t add up.

  19. No on W So Far

    There are still problems w Measure W. For instance:
    1) If enrollment is declining, why the request for money for smaller class sizes?
    2) We need to save “core curricula”, not frills. There is still no definitive definition of “core curricula”. According to the School District/Board, everything, and I mean everything, is considered “core curricula”.
    3) How does the closing of Emerson equate to making sure our educational programs survive? Yet I have heard no assurances/promises from the School Board/District that Emerson will remain open. For many of us, that is a sticking point, but the powers that be are not listening.
    4) It is very unlikely that this parcel tax will end up being phased out in three years. Trust me, this will be a permanent parcel tax increase. We need to be sure we are getting the proper “bang for the buck”, and not just paying for frills to remain in place.
    5) Where is the accountability? An oversight committee hand picked by the School Board/District is not what most would consider accountablility.
    6) Where is the “education” that was promised, to justify this new parcel tax, for those of us too stupid to understand why it is necessary? Thus far, I am not convinced the money is going to even be put to good use. To say it is to save existing programs says absolutely nothing, especially if Emerson may close. Where is there any budgeting going on? Of course the schools want to keep all existing programs, but are all existing programs necessary? Some of us don’t think so, but the School Board/District is not listening.

    There is a basic disconnect between the public and the powers that be at the School Board. They don’t seem to understand the public has deep concerns when money is being given to pay for “core curricula”, yet entire schools are being closed that eliminate “core curricula” in a particular neighborhood. Nothing seems to be in the works to guarantee we don’t build too many schools we cannot fund; or that employees don’t end up working for a consulting firm directly after terminating their employment w the School District.

    In short, there is nothing but another request for money, that will continue unabated w no accountability if we as the public agree. We will have no guarantee that Emerson won’t be closed for expediency’s sake, to save a mere $600,000, which would only take a $20 parcel tax to save. Sorry, things just don’t add up.

  20. No on W So Far

    There are still problems w Measure W. For instance:
    1) If enrollment is declining, why the request for money for smaller class sizes?
    2) We need to save “core curricula”, not frills. There is still no definitive definition of “core curricula”. According to the School District/Board, everything, and I mean everything, is considered “core curricula”.
    3) How does the closing of Emerson equate to making sure our educational programs survive? Yet I have heard no assurances/promises from the School Board/District that Emerson will remain open. For many of us, that is a sticking point, but the powers that be are not listening.
    4) It is very unlikely that this parcel tax will end up being phased out in three years. Trust me, this will be a permanent parcel tax increase. We need to be sure we are getting the proper “bang for the buck”, and not just paying for frills to remain in place.
    5) Where is the accountability? An oversight committee hand picked by the School Board/District is not what most would consider accountablility.
    6) Where is the “education” that was promised, to justify this new parcel tax, for those of us too stupid to understand why it is necessary? Thus far, I am not convinced the money is going to even be put to good use. To say it is to save existing programs says absolutely nothing, especially if Emerson may close. Where is there any budgeting going on? Of course the schools want to keep all existing programs, but are all existing programs necessary? Some of us don’t think so, but the School Board/District is not listening.

    There is a basic disconnect between the public and the powers that be at the School Board. They don’t seem to understand the public has deep concerns when money is being given to pay for “core curricula”, yet entire schools are being closed that eliminate “core curricula” in a particular neighborhood. Nothing seems to be in the works to guarantee we don’t build too many schools we cannot fund; or that employees don’t end up working for a consulting firm directly after terminating their employment w the School District.

    In short, there is nothing but another request for money, that will continue unabated w no accountability if we as the public agree. We will have no guarantee that Emerson won’t be closed for expediency’s sake, to save a mere $600,000, which would only take a $20 parcel tax to save. Sorry, things just don’t add up.

  21. Doug Paul Davis

    Four specific points that I want to respond to:

    1. “It is very unlikely that this parcel tax will end up being phased out in three years. Trust me, this will be a permanent parcel tax increase.”

    There is no such thing as a “permanent” parcel tax increase. This parcel tax will expire in three years if approved.

    If by “permanent” you mean, they will ask for the money again in three years, that is a distinct possibility depending on the budget. At that point, two-thirds of the voters of Davis will have to support re-upping it.

    2. “Where is the accountability? An oversight committee hand picked by the School Board/District is not what most would consider accountablility.”

    The school board is an elected body, I think having additional eyes to oversee operation is a good policy decision, but in the end, the accountability rests with the public who will next year get to vote on three of the school board positions.

    3. “Where is the “education” that was promised, to justify this new parcel tax, for those of us too stupid to understand why it is necessary?”

    This new parcel tax will enable the district to maintain the current programs.

    4. “We will have no guarantee that Emerson won’t be closed for expediency’s sake, to save a mere $600,000, which would only take a $20 parcel tax to save.”

    It is unlikely that the district would close Emerson if the parcel tax passes. It is virtually guaranteed to happen if the parcel tax does not pass.

  22. Doug Paul Davis

    Four specific points that I want to respond to:

    1. “It is very unlikely that this parcel tax will end up being phased out in three years. Trust me, this will be a permanent parcel tax increase.”

    There is no such thing as a “permanent” parcel tax increase. This parcel tax will expire in three years if approved.

    If by “permanent” you mean, they will ask for the money again in three years, that is a distinct possibility depending on the budget. At that point, two-thirds of the voters of Davis will have to support re-upping it.

    2. “Where is the accountability? An oversight committee hand picked by the School Board/District is not what most would consider accountablility.”

    The school board is an elected body, I think having additional eyes to oversee operation is a good policy decision, but in the end, the accountability rests with the public who will next year get to vote on three of the school board positions.

    3. “Where is the “education” that was promised, to justify this new parcel tax, for those of us too stupid to understand why it is necessary?”

    This new parcel tax will enable the district to maintain the current programs.

    4. “We will have no guarantee that Emerson won’t be closed for expediency’s sake, to save a mere $600,000, which would only take a $20 parcel tax to save.”

    It is unlikely that the district would close Emerson if the parcel tax passes. It is virtually guaranteed to happen if the parcel tax does not pass.

  23. Doug Paul Davis

    Four specific points that I want to respond to:

    1. “It is very unlikely that this parcel tax will end up being phased out in three years. Trust me, this will be a permanent parcel tax increase.”

    There is no such thing as a “permanent” parcel tax increase. This parcel tax will expire in three years if approved.

    If by “permanent” you mean, they will ask for the money again in three years, that is a distinct possibility depending on the budget. At that point, two-thirds of the voters of Davis will have to support re-upping it.

    2. “Where is the accountability? An oversight committee hand picked by the School Board/District is not what most would consider accountablility.”

    The school board is an elected body, I think having additional eyes to oversee operation is a good policy decision, but in the end, the accountability rests with the public who will next year get to vote on three of the school board positions.

    3. “Where is the “education” that was promised, to justify this new parcel tax, for those of us too stupid to understand why it is necessary?”

    This new parcel tax will enable the district to maintain the current programs.

    4. “We will have no guarantee that Emerson won’t be closed for expediency’s sake, to save a mere $600,000, which would only take a $20 parcel tax to save.”

    It is unlikely that the district would close Emerson if the parcel tax passes. It is virtually guaranteed to happen if the parcel tax does not pass.

  24. Doug Paul Davis

    Four specific points that I want to respond to:

    1. “It is very unlikely that this parcel tax will end up being phased out in three years. Trust me, this will be a permanent parcel tax increase.”

    There is no such thing as a “permanent” parcel tax increase. This parcel tax will expire in three years if approved.

    If by “permanent” you mean, they will ask for the money again in three years, that is a distinct possibility depending on the budget. At that point, two-thirds of the voters of Davis will have to support re-upping it.

    2. “Where is the accountability? An oversight committee hand picked by the School Board/District is not what most would consider accountablility.”

    The school board is an elected body, I think having additional eyes to oversee operation is a good policy decision, but in the end, the accountability rests with the public who will next year get to vote on three of the school board positions.

    3. “Where is the “education” that was promised, to justify this new parcel tax, for those of us too stupid to understand why it is necessary?”

    This new parcel tax will enable the district to maintain the current programs.

    4. “We will have no guarantee that Emerson won’t be closed for expediency’s sake, to save a mere $600,000, which would only take a $20 parcel tax to save.”

    It is unlikely that the district would close Emerson if the parcel tax passes. It is virtually guaranteed to happen if the parcel tax does not pass.

  25. public school supporter

    “We will have no guarantee that Emerson won’t be closed for expediency’s sake, to save a mere $600,000, which would only take a $20 parcel tax to save. Sorry, things just don’t add up.”

    I don’t want to vote for something just to keep a school open!

    The more important issues are what’s taught inside a building.

    This blogger argues for sacrificing content (the real point of education) for the sake of keeping a school open.

    If Measure W fails, you will probably see political pressure in the district that will lead to the closure of Emerson in order to guarantee the preservation of some programs that Measure W proposes to fund.

    I think the board/district will not guarantee anything on Emerson or any other school in this parcel tax because budget issues with the state are bad enough that there is a reasonable possibility another bad/worse budget the following year.

    The encouraging sign for public education is that both dems and reeps seem to agree to funding education higher than other programs.

    But if you want to give the best guarantee to keep Emerson open, then Measure W is the way to make that happen. Emerson Wins if W passes.

    I just don’t understand what point this lady is trying to make. She makes it over and over on this blog w/o thinking this through.

  26. public school supporter

    “We will have no guarantee that Emerson won’t be closed for expediency’s sake, to save a mere $600,000, which would only take a $20 parcel tax to save. Sorry, things just don’t add up.”

    I don’t want to vote for something just to keep a school open!

    The more important issues are what’s taught inside a building.

    This blogger argues for sacrificing content (the real point of education) for the sake of keeping a school open.

    If Measure W fails, you will probably see political pressure in the district that will lead to the closure of Emerson in order to guarantee the preservation of some programs that Measure W proposes to fund.

    I think the board/district will not guarantee anything on Emerson or any other school in this parcel tax because budget issues with the state are bad enough that there is a reasonable possibility another bad/worse budget the following year.

    The encouraging sign for public education is that both dems and reeps seem to agree to funding education higher than other programs.

    But if you want to give the best guarantee to keep Emerson open, then Measure W is the way to make that happen. Emerson Wins if W passes.

    I just don’t understand what point this lady is trying to make. She makes it over and over on this blog w/o thinking this through.

  27. public school supporter

    “We will have no guarantee that Emerson won’t be closed for expediency’s sake, to save a mere $600,000, which would only take a $20 parcel tax to save. Sorry, things just don’t add up.”

    I don’t want to vote for something just to keep a school open!

    The more important issues are what’s taught inside a building.

    This blogger argues for sacrificing content (the real point of education) for the sake of keeping a school open.

    If Measure W fails, you will probably see political pressure in the district that will lead to the closure of Emerson in order to guarantee the preservation of some programs that Measure W proposes to fund.

    I think the board/district will not guarantee anything on Emerson or any other school in this parcel tax because budget issues with the state are bad enough that there is a reasonable possibility another bad/worse budget the following year.

    The encouraging sign for public education is that both dems and reeps seem to agree to funding education higher than other programs.

    But if you want to give the best guarantee to keep Emerson open, then Measure W is the way to make that happen. Emerson Wins if W passes.

    I just don’t understand what point this lady is trying to make. She makes it over and over on this blog w/o thinking this through.

  28. public school supporter

    “We will have no guarantee that Emerson won’t be closed for expediency’s sake, to save a mere $600,000, which would only take a $20 parcel tax to save. Sorry, things just don’t add up.”

    I don’t want to vote for something just to keep a school open!

    The more important issues are what’s taught inside a building.

    This blogger argues for sacrificing content (the real point of education) for the sake of keeping a school open.

    If Measure W fails, you will probably see political pressure in the district that will lead to the closure of Emerson in order to guarantee the preservation of some programs that Measure W proposes to fund.

    I think the board/district will not guarantee anything on Emerson or any other school in this parcel tax because budget issues with the state are bad enough that there is a reasonable possibility another bad/worse budget the following year.

    The encouraging sign for public education is that both dems and reeps seem to agree to funding education higher than other programs.

    But if you want to give the best guarantee to keep Emerson open, then Measure W is the way to make that happen. Emerson Wins if W passes.

    I just don’t understand what point this lady is trying to make. She makes it over and over on this blog w/o thinking this through.

  29. Marginal W supporter

    I am a marginal supporter of Measure W. I am really upset with how the district got to this point. This is taxpayer money that has been misspent, and it deserves a high level of accountability and consideration. But I will probably vote for for this measure for two reasons:

    1. It seems clear that it was past members and administrators who did the screw-ups that we’re now trying to fix.

    2. In spite of the one criticism above that these programs are “frills”, as someone who has done some work in advising for college admissions, these are the programs that actually make the difference between a student getting into and succeeding in college. It will probably be less affluent families that will be hurt the most if they are cut.

    But I want the district to be really worried into behaving if this passes.

    I was initially glad to learn that there was a No argument, just to scare the district into behaving and being accountable, but Randall’s argument is poor compared to what could have been articulated. I am sorry if Mr. Randall is developmentally disabled, but there is such a thing a collaboration with others in putting together an argument.

    This is serious business and taxpayer money. Voters need the best explanation for each position without the excuse that a person’s argument isn’t ideally articulate because he is developmentally disabled.

    I’m sorry if that isn’t PC, but this is a higher standard. The no argument that is given is almost discredited because it is poorly written.

    I’m sure the W supporters smiled and bought another round once they read Randall’s text.

    Now they don’t have to feel the kind of pressure they could have with a stronger argument.

  30. Marginal W supporter

    I am a marginal supporter of Measure W. I am really upset with how the district got to this point. This is taxpayer money that has been misspent, and it deserves a high level of accountability and consideration. But I will probably vote for for this measure for two reasons:

    1. It seems clear that it was past members and administrators who did the screw-ups that we’re now trying to fix.

    2. In spite of the one criticism above that these programs are “frills”, as someone who has done some work in advising for college admissions, these are the programs that actually make the difference between a student getting into and succeeding in college. It will probably be less affluent families that will be hurt the most if they are cut.

    But I want the district to be really worried into behaving if this passes.

    I was initially glad to learn that there was a No argument, just to scare the district into behaving and being accountable, but Randall’s argument is poor compared to what could have been articulated. I am sorry if Mr. Randall is developmentally disabled, but there is such a thing a collaboration with others in putting together an argument.

    This is serious business and taxpayer money. Voters need the best explanation for each position without the excuse that a person’s argument isn’t ideally articulate because he is developmentally disabled.

    I’m sorry if that isn’t PC, but this is a higher standard. The no argument that is given is almost discredited because it is poorly written.

    I’m sure the W supporters smiled and bought another round once they read Randall’s text.

    Now they don’t have to feel the kind of pressure they could have with a stronger argument.

  31. Marginal W supporter

    I am a marginal supporter of Measure W. I am really upset with how the district got to this point. This is taxpayer money that has been misspent, and it deserves a high level of accountability and consideration. But I will probably vote for for this measure for two reasons:

    1. It seems clear that it was past members and administrators who did the screw-ups that we’re now trying to fix.

    2. In spite of the one criticism above that these programs are “frills”, as someone who has done some work in advising for college admissions, these are the programs that actually make the difference between a student getting into and succeeding in college. It will probably be less affluent families that will be hurt the most if they are cut.

    But I want the district to be really worried into behaving if this passes.

    I was initially glad to learn that there was a No argument, just to scare the district into behaving and being accountable, but Randall’s argument is poor compared to what could have been articulated. I am sorry if Mr. Randall is developmentally disabled, but there is such a thing a collaboration with others in putting together an argument.

    This is serious business and taxpayer money. Voters need the best explanation for each position without the excuse that a person’s argument isn’t ideally articulate because he is developmentally disabled.

    I’m sorry if that isn’t PC, but this is a higher standard. The no argument that is given is almost discredited because it is poorly written.

    I’m sure the W supporters smiled and bought another round once they read Randall’s text.

    Now they don’t have to feel the kind of pressure they could have with a stronger argument.

  32. Marginal W supporter

    I am a marginal supporter of Measure W. I am really upset with how the district got to this point. This is taxpayer money that has been misspent, and it deserves a high level of accountability and consideration. But I will probably vote for for this measure for two reasons:

    1. It seems clear that it was past members and administrators who did the screw-ups that we’re now trying to fix.

    2. In spite of the one criticism above that these programs are “frills”, as someone who has done some work in advising for college admissions, these are the programs that actually make the difference between a student getting into and succeeding in college. It will probably be less affluent families that will be hurt the most if they are cut.

    But I want the district to be really worried into behaving if this passes.

    I was initially glad to learn that there was a No argument, just to scare the district into behaving and being accountable, but Randall’s argument is poor compared to what could have been articulated. I am sorry if Mr. Randall is developmentally disabled, but there is such a thing a collaboration with others in putting together an argument.

    This is serious business and taxpayer money. Voters need the best explanation for each position without the excuse that a person’s argument isn’t ideally articulate because he is developmentally disabled.

    I’m sorry if that isn’t PC, but this is a higher standard. The no argument that is given is almost discredited because it is poorly written.

    I’m sure the W supporters smiled and bought another round once they read Randall’s text.

    Now they don’t have to feel the kind of pressure they could have with a stronger argument.

  33. Anonymous

    The fact that there is no organized opposition to W should not necessarily be taken as an indication that there is strong support for it. It is almost impossible in this town to oppose this measure without being blackballed.

    Any argument against the measure is either met with the “it’s for the children” argument, the “don’t you support teachers?” argument or the “You must be a grumpy old white dude” argument (see above).

    I am a mother of Davis public school kids and I will not support throwing more money at this situation. My kids bore the brunt of losing our neighborhood school (Valley Oak). But that obvioiusly wasn’t enough. It’s time to make some tough choices.

    C

  34. Anonymous

    The fact that there is no organized opposition to W should not necessarily be taken as an indication that there is strong support for it. It is almost impossible in this town to oppose this measure without being blackballed.

    Any argument against the measure is either met with the “it’s for the children” argument, the “don’t you support teachers?” argument or the “You must be a grumpy old white dude” argument (see above).

    I am a mother of Davis public school kids and I will not support throwing more money at this situation. My kids bore the brunt of losing our neighborhood school (Valley Oak). But that obvioiusly wasn’t enough. It’s time to make some tough choices.

    C

  35. Anonymous

    The fact that there is no organized opposition to W should not necessarily be taken as an indication that there is strong support for it. It is almost impossible in this town to oppose this measure without being blackballed.

    Any argument against the measure is either met with the “it’s for the children” argument, the “don’t you support teachers?” argument or the “You must be a grumpy old white dude” argument (see above).

    I am a mother of Davis public school kids and I will not support throwing more money at this situation. My kids bore the brunt of losing our neighborhood school (Valley Oak). But that obvioiusly wasn’t enough. It’s time to make some tough choices.

    C

  36. Anonymous

    The fact that there is no organized opposition to W should not necessarily be taken as an indication that there is strong support for it. It is almost impossible in this town to oppose this measure without being blackballed.

    Any argument against the measure is either met with the “it’s for the children” argument, the “don’t you support teachers?” argument or the “You must be a grumpy old white dude” argument (see above).

    I am a mother of Davis public school kids and I will not support throwing more money at this situation. My kids bore the brunt of losing our neighborhood school (Valley Oak). But that obvioiusly wasn’t enough. It’s time to make some tough choices.

    C

  37. answering #1

    1) If enrollment is declining, why the request for money for smaller class sizes?

    A class size of 20, the standard in grades K-3, costs more to run than a class size of 30. For 180 students you would need to hire 6 teachers for a class size of 30, 9 teachers for a class size of 20. This is unrelated to enrollment trends being up or down. The district has to hire the number of teachers appropriate to the number of students. But the fact is if you have a smaller class size you need to pay for more teachers.

  38. answering #1

    1) If enrollment is declining, why the request for money for smaller class sizes?

    A class size of 20, the standard in grades K-3, costs more to run than a class size of 30. For 180 students you would need to hire 6 teachers for a class size of 30, 9 teachers for a class size of 20. This is unrelated to enrollment trends being up or down. The district has to hire the number of teachers appropriate to the number of students. But the fact is if you have a smaller class size you need to pay for more teachers.

  39. answering #1

    1) If enrollment is declining, why the request for money for smaller class sizes?

    A class size of 20, the standard in grades K-3, costs more to run than a class size of 30. For 180 students you would need to hire 6 teachers for a class size of 30, 9 teachers for a class size of 20. This is unrelated to enrollment trends being up or down. The district has to hire the number of teachers appropriate to the number of students. But the fact is if you have a smaller class size you need to pay for more teachers.

  40. answering #1

    1) If enrollment is declining, why the request for money for smaller class sizes?

    A class size of 20, the standard in grades K-3, costs more to run than a class size of 30. For 180 students you would need to hire 6 teachers for a class size of 30, 9 teachers for a class size of 20. This is unrelated to enrollment trends being up or down. The district has to hire the number of teachers appropriate to the number of students. But the fact is if you have a smaller class size you need to pay for more teachers.

  41. Anonymous

    I am the grumpy old white dude.

    I observe Davis from a distance and I must say Davis certainly has a lot of people who refuse to do things for there own selfish reasons. For example, “I refuse to help the schools beccause they closed my school” – what a lame comment.

    I fully expect the measure to fail because there are too many people like “C”

    Oh and by the way the School Board is part of the Public – they are just the small segment of the Public that decided to step forward and help oversee school operations. The fundamental issue in Davis is lack of adequate school funding, that is pretty obvious if you bother to look. The discussion about mismanagment is just noise – the impact of that on classroom funding has been insignificant. Funding per student is no better is average, which is pretty poor consdering the hype that Davis is a “progressive” place.

  42. Anonymous

    I am the grumpy old white dude.

    I observe Davis from a distance and I must say Davis certainly has a lot of people who refuse to do things for there own selfish reasons. For example, “I refuse to help the schools beccause they closed my school” – what a lame comment.

    I fully expect the measure to fail because there are too many people like “C”

    Oh and by the way the School Board is part of the Public – they are just the small segment of the Public that decided to step forward and help oversee school operations. The fundamental issue in Davis is lack of adequate school funding, that is pretty obvious if you bother to look. The discussion about mismanagment is just noise – the impact of that on classroom funding has been insignificant. Funding per student is no better is average, which is pretty poor consdering the hype that Davis is a “progressive” place.

  43. Anonymous

    I am the grumpy old white dude.

    I observe Davis from a distance and I must say Davis certainly has a lot of people who refuse to do things for there own selfish reasons. For example, “I refuse to help the schools beccause they closed my school” – what a lame comment.

    I fully expect the measure to fail because there are too many people like “C”

    Oh and by the way the School Board is part of the Public – they are just the small segment of the Public that decided to step forward and help oversee school operations. The fundamental issue in Davis is lack of adequate school funding, that is pretty obvious if you bother to look. The discussion about mismanagment is just noise – the impact of that on classroom funding has been insignificant. Funding per student is no better is average, which is pretty poor consdering the hype that Davis is a “progressive” place.

  44. Anonymous

    I am the grumpy old white dude.

    I observe Davis from a distance and I must say Davis certainly has a lot of people who refuse to do things for there own selfish reasons. For example, “I refuse to help the schools beccause they closed my school” – what a lame comment.

    I fully expect the measure to fail because there are too many people like “C”

    Oh and by the way the School Board is part of the Public – they are just the small segment of the Public that decided to step forward and help oversee school operations. The fundamental issue in Davis is lack of adequate school funding, that is pretty obvious if you bother to look. The discussion about mismanagment is just noise – the impact of that on classroom funding has been insignificant. Funding per student is no better is average, which is pretty poor consdering the hype that Davis is a “progressive” place.

  45. Samantha McCarthy

    I find it unfathomable that measure W could be opposed. Children whether you have 6 or zero need education. Homeschooling, and private school is not feasible or available to the vast majority of kids. Kids are the future old saying still correct. If we fail to educate these kids think what wonderful administrators they will make for their own children, we face a quick downward spiral. The kids in Davis are going to be educated in this system withe the present administrators, present board and teachers. These folks can either be given W money to work with and still have the per student spendign be abysmally low or they can have their hands feet and tongues tied with not enough money to educate a coackroach or maintain the buildings and landscaping that will only cost more if it is allowed to fall into further disrepair and our kids will suffer the short-sighted consequences. The difference b/w funding W and not is there will be fewer teachers, administrators, grounds repair etc… and less programs. ANY government body or agency wastes money. Good luck finding even two people to agree agree what is waste or poor management in any given system.unlikely. The past waste is past let it go. The folks that are running the schools now we have whether we choose to fund them or not. A no vote is a vote against everything a community should stand for. Will the administration of that tax be perfect and free of waste…NO nor would it be if those screaming against W were administering our schools either.

    The only conscionable vote is YES! CA already is ranked 47th in the nation in per student spending… how much more can we deprive our kids of?

  46. Anonymous

    Grumpy White Dude:

    You have simplified our situation, Although closing of VO is a personal situation, it is also a neighborhood situation and one that was the culmination of many missteps by the Davis Board of Education, their “consultants” and the city council also with their botched negotiations concerning Mace Ranch and Lake Alhambra Estates developments in the beginning (and we thought Covell Village was a bad idea?)

    In my opinion Valley Oak was closed due to our elected officials attempts to appease a section of Davis that I will call the haves. This was done for many reasons and when it comes down to it, as always, someones quest to put their political name forward.

    Crazy how that in a town with slow growth, those who preach that were willing to build schools at a rapid pace when the likelihood of expansion and need had all but ended.

    So your argument that the closing of a school is a self centered reason is uniformed blather. I too had kids at VO and what is surviving, these boutique programs such as Cesar Chavez that in my opinion don’t add to a child’s education unless you intend to send them to School in a Latin American country.

    There are many good stories about Spanish immersion, and here it is, there are others in this town who remain silent but are disappointed with the outcome or have removed their kids from Chavez. . .

    Forgive me for asking, but why are we holding one program above another, or one school above them all. Cuts should be equal and not selected by the amount of opposition – I know a naive and idealistic idea. But in a town that heralds itself for it’s “progressive” title Davis is just that in title alone and those who have lived a school closing have more than a justified reason for saying no to more taxes, in fact it is their role to say the hard things that most in this town can’t say.

    Perhaps we need more private schools around Davis, and those who want programs unlike VO, or Birch Lane or Emerson can pay for that without burdening the entire school district with their pet project.

    Thomas Randall’s argument may have grammatical errors, but what is shows me is that this town is not ready to discuss this subject and instead is just going to throw more money at a messed up situation.

    Go Tommy, tell them what they need to hear.

  47. Samantha McCarthy

    I find it unfathomable that measure W could be opposed. Children whether you have 6 or zero need education. Homeschooling, and private school is not feasible or available to the vast majority of kids. Kids are the future old saying still correct. If we fail to educate these kids think what wonderful administrators they will make for their own children, we face a quick downward spiral. The kids in Davis are going to be educated in this system withe the present administrators, present board and teachers. These folks can either be given W money to work with and still have the per student spendign be abysmally low or they can have their hands feet and tongues tied with not enough money to educate a coackroach or maintain the buildings and landscaping that will only cost more if it is allowed to fall into further disrepair and our kids will suffer the short-sighted consequences. The difference b/w funding W and not is there will be fewer teachers, administrators, grounds repair etc… and less programs. ANY government body or agency wastes money. Good luck finding even two people to agree agree what is waste or poor management in any given system.unlikely. The past waste is past let it go. The folks that are running the schools now we have whether we choose to fund them or not. A no vote is a vote against everything a community should stand for. Will the administration of that tax be perfect and free of waste…NO nor would it be if those screaming against W were administering our schools either.

    The only conscionable vote is YES! CA already is ranked 47th in the nation in per student spending… how much more can we deprive our kids of?

  48. Anonymous

    Grumpy White Dude:

    You have simplified our situation, Although closing of VO is a personal situation, it is also a neighborhood situation and one that was the culmination of many missteps by the Davis Board of Education, their “consultants” and the city council also with their botched negotiations concerning Mace Ranch and Lake Alhambra Estates developments in the beginning (and we thought Covell Village was a bad idea?)

    In my opinion Valley Oak was closed due to our elected officials attempts to appease a section of Davis that I will call the haves. This was done for many reasons and when it comes down to it, as always, someones quest to put their political name forward.

    Crazy how that in a town with slow growth, those who preach that were willing to build schools at a rapid pace when the likelihood of expansion and need had all but ended.

    So your argument that the closing of a school is a self centered reason is uniformed blather. I too had kids at VO and what is surviving, these boutique programs such as Cesar Chavez that in my opinion don’t add to a child’s education unless you intend to send them to School in a Latin American country.

    There are many good stories about Spanish immersion, and here it is, there are others in this town who remain silent but are disappointed with the outcome or have removed their kids from Chavez. . .

    Forgive me for asking, but why are we holding one program above another, or one school above them all. Cuts should be equal and not selected by the amount of opposition – I know a naive and idealistic idea. But in a town that heralds itself for it’s “progressive” title Davis is just that in title alone and those who have lived a school closing have more than a justified reason for saying no to more taxes, in fact it is their role to say the hard things that most in this town can’t say.

    Perhaps we need more private schools around Davis, and those who want programs unlike VO, or Birch Lane or Emerson can pay for that without burdening the entire school district with their pet project.

    Thomas Randall’s argument may have grammatical errors, but what is shows me is that this town is not ready to discuss this subject and instead is just going to throw more money at a messed up situation.

    Go Tommy, tell them what they need to hear.

  49. Samantha McCarthy

    I find it unfathomable that measure W could be opposed. Children whether you have 6 or zero need education. Homeschooling, and private school is not feasible or available to the vast majority of kids. Kids are the future old saying still correct. If we fail to educate these kids think what wonderful administrators they will make for their own children, we face a quick downward spiral. The kids in Davis are going to be educated in this system withe the present administrators, present board and teachers. These folks can either be given W money to work with and still have the per student spendign be abysmally low or they can have their hands feet and tongues tied with not enough money to educate a coackroach or maintain the buildings and landscaping that will only cost more if it is allowed to fall into further disrepair and our kids will suffer the short-sighted consequences. The difference b/w funding W and not is there will be fewer teachers, administrators, grounds repair etc… and less programs. ANY government body or agency wastes money. Good luck finding even two people to agree agree what is waste or poor management in any given system.unlikely. The past waste is past let it go. The folks that are running the schools now we have whether we choose to fund them or not. A no vote is a vote against everything a community should stand for. Will the administration of that tax be perfect and free of waste…NO nor would it be if those screaming against W were administering our schools either.

    The only conscionable vote is YES! CA already is ranked 47th in the nation in per student spending… how much more can we deprive our kids of?

  50. Anonymous

    Grumpy White Dude:

    You have simplified our situation, Although closing of VO is a personal situation, it is also a neighborhood situation and one that was the culmination of many missteps by the Davis Board of Education, their “consultants” and the city council also with their botched negotiations concerning Mace Ranch and Lake Alhambra Estates developments in the beginning (and we thought Covell Village was a bad idea?)

    In my opinion Valley Oak was closed due to our elected officials attempts to appease a section of Davis that I will call the haves. This was done for many reasons and when it comes down to it, as always, someones quest to put their political name forward.

    Crazy how that in a town with slow growth, those who preach that were willing to build schools at a rapid pace when the likelihood of expansion and need had all but ended.

    So your argument that the closing of a school is a self centered reason is uniformed blather. I too had kids at VO and what is surviving, these boutique programs such as Cesar Chavez that in my opinion don’t add to a child’s education unless you intend to send them to School in a Latin American country.

    There are many good stories about Spanish immersion, and here it is, there are others in this town who remain silent but are disappointed with the outcome or have removed their kids from Chavez. . .

    Forgive me for asking, but why are we holding one program above another, or one school above them all. Cuts should be equal and not selected by the amount of opposition – I know a naive and idealistic idea. But in a town that heralds itself for it’s “progressive” title Davis is just that in title alone and those who have lived a school closing have more than a justified reason for saying no to more taxes, in fact it is their role to say the hard things that most in this town can’t say.

    Perhaps we need more private schools around Davis, and those who want programs unlike VO, or Birch Lane or Emerson can pay for that without burdening the entire school district with their pet project.

    Thomas Randall’s argument may have grammatical errors, but what is shows me is that this town is not ready to discuss this subject and instead is just going to throw more money at a messed up situation.

    Go Tommy, tell them what they need to hear.

  51. Samantha McCarthy

    I find it unfathomable that measure W could be opposed. Children whether you have 6 or zero need education. Homeschooling, and private school is not feasible or available to the vast majority of kids. Kids are the future old saying still correct. If we fail to educate these kids think what wonderful administrators they will make for their own children, we face a quick downward spiral. The kids in Davis are going to be educated in this system withe the present administrators, present board and teachers. These folks can either be given W money to work with and still have the per student spendign be abysmally low or they can have their hands feet and tongues tied with not enough money to educate a coackroach or maintain the buildings and landscaping that will only cost more if it is allowed to fall into further disrepair and our kids will suffer the short-sighted consequences. The difference b/w funding W and not is there will be fewer teachers, administrators, grounds repair etc… and less programs. ANY government body or agency wastes money. Good luck finding even two people to agree agree what is waste or poor management in any given system.unlikely. The past waste is past let it go. The folks that are running the schools now we have whether we choose to fund them or not. A no vote is a vote against everything a community should stand for. Will the administration of that tax be perfect and free of waste…NO nor would it be if those screaming against W were administering our schools either.

    The only conscionable vote is YES! CA already is ranked 47th in the nation in per student spending… how much more can we deprive our kids of?

  52. Anonymous

    Grumpy White Dude:

    You have simplified our situation, Although closing of VO is a personal situation, it is also a neighborhood situation and one that was the culmination of many missteps by the Davis Board of Education, their “consultants” and the city council also with their botched negotiations concerning Mace Ranch and Lake Alhambra Estates developments in the beginning (and we thought Covell Village was a bad idea?)

    In my opinion Valley Oak was closed due to our elected officials attempts to appease a section of Davis that I will call the haves. This was done for many reasons and when it comes down to it, as always, someones quest to put their political name forward.

    Crazy how that in a town with slow growth, those who preach that were willing to build schools at a rapid pace when the likelihood of expansion and need had all but ended.

    So your argument that the closing of a school is a self centered reason is uniformed blather. I too had kids at VO and what is surviving, these boutique programs such as Cesar Chavez that in my opinion don’t add to a child’s education unless you intend to send them to School in a Latin American country.

    There are many good stories about Spanish immersion, and here it is, there are others in this town who remain silent but are disappointed with the outcome or have removed their kids from Chavez. . .

    Forgive me for asking, but why are we holding one program above another, or one school above them all. Cuts should be equal and not selected by the amount of opposition – I know a naive and idealistic idea. But in a town that heralds itself for it’s “progressive” title Davis is just that in title alone and those who have lived a school closing have more than a justified reason for saying no to more taxes, in fact it is their role to say the hard things that most in this town can’t say.

    Perhaps we need more private schools around Davis, and those who want programs unlike VO, or Birch Lane or Emerson can pay for that without burdening the entire school district with their pet project.

    Thomas Randall’s argument may have grammatical errors, but what is shows me is that this town is not ready to discuss this subject and instead is just going to throw more money at a messed up situation.

    Go Tommy, tell them what they need to hear.

  53. Anti-Crazy Lady

    “I find it unfathomable that measure W could be opposed.”

    Until we get a Level 5 Bio-Lab built next to Samantha McCarthy’s house, I cannot vote for W.

  54. Anti-Crazy Lady

    “I find it unfathomable that measure W could be opposed.”

    Until we get a Level 5 Bio-Lab built next to Samantha McCarthy’s house, I cannot vote for W.

  55. Anti-Crazy Lady

    “I find it unfathomable that measure W could be opposed.”

    Until we get a Level 5 Bio-Lab built next to Samantha McCarthy’s house, I cannot vote for W.

  56. Anti-Crazy Lady

    “I find it unfathomable that measure W could be opposed.”

    Until we get a Level 5 Bio-Lab built next to Samantha McCarthy’s house, I cannot vote for W.

  57. Spanish Immersion parent

    these boutique programs such as Cesar Chavez that in my opinion don’t add to a child’s education unless you intend to send them to School in a Latin American country.

    Chavez is one of the highest enrolled schools in the district, and not every parent who is interested is able to get their child in the program. That fact demonstrates this is a high value program in the district. There are a lot of parents in Davis who think learning a second language is important.

    Spanish Immersion students are otherwise subject to the same curriculum requirements as other students in the district.

    When I was growing up, you could do well in life even if you didn’t graduate from high school. The rules have changed. Having just a HS diploma and competence in the basics is insufficient for getting into many colleges or getting a job that one can live on for the long term.

    Plenty of employers would like very much to have some bilingual employees to serve customers Spanish speaking customers with limited English. It’s helped me get jobs.

    The beginning language classes that are offered in JH and HS may be fine if you want to satisfy university requirements, but in the end it usually offers very limited capability to function conversationally.

  58. Spanish Immersion parent

    these boutique programs such as Cesar Chavez that in my opinion don’t add to a child’s education unless you intend to send them to School in a Latin American country.

    Chavez is one of the highest enrolled schools in the district, and not every parent who is interested is able to get their child in the program. That fact demonstrates this is a high value program in the district. There are a lot of parents in Davis who think learning a second language is important.

    Spanish Immersion students are otherwise subject to the same curriculum requirements as other students in the district.

    When I was growing up, you could do well in life even if you didn’t graduate from high school. The rules have changed. Having just a HS diploma and competence in the basics is insufficient for getting into many colleges or getting a job that one can live on for the long term.

    Plenty of employers would like very much to have some bilingual employees to serve customers Spanish speaking customers with limited English. It’s helped me get jobs.

    The beginning language classes that are offered in JH and HS may be fine if you want to satisfy university requirements, but in the end it usually offers very limited capability to function conversationally.

  59. Spanish Immersion parent

    these boutique programs such as Cesar Chavez that in my opinion don’t add to a child’s education unless you intend to send them to School in a Latin American country.

    Chavez is one of the highest enrolled schools in the district, and not every parent who is interested is able to get their child in the program. That fact demonstrates this is a high value program in the district. There are a lot of parents in Davis who think learning a second language is important.

    Spanish Immersion students are otherwise subject to the same curriculum requirements as other students in the district.

    When I was growing up, you could do well in life even if you didn’t graduate from high school. The rules have changed. Having just a HS diploma and competence in the basics is insufficient for getting into many colleges or getting a job that one can live on for the long term.

    Plenty of employers would like very much to have some bilingual employees to serve customers Spanish speaking customers with limited English. It’s helped me get jobs.

    The beginning language classes that are offered in JH and HS may be fine if you want to satisfy university requirements, but in the end it usually offers very limited capability to function conversationally.

  60. Spanish Immersion parent

    these boutique programs such as Cesar Chavez that in my opinion don’t add to a child’s education unless you intend to send them to School in a Latin American country.

    Chavez is one of the highest enrolled schools in the district, and not every parent who is interested is able to get their child in the program. That fact demonstrates this is a high value program in the district. There are a lot of parents in Davis who think learning a second language is important.

    Spanish Immersion students are otherwise subject to the same curriculum requirements as other students in the district.

    When I was growing up, you could do well in life even if you didn’t graduate from high school. The rules have changed. Having just a HS diploma and competence in the basics is insufficient for getting into many colleges or getting a job that one can live on for the long term.

    Plenty of employers would like very much to have some bilingual employees to serve customers Spanish speaking customers with limited English. It’s helped me get jobs.

    The beginning language classes that are offered in JH and HS may be fine if you want to satisfy university requirements, but in the end it usually offers very limited capability to function conversationally.

  61. Anonymous

    CA already is ranked 47th in the nation in per student spending… how much more can we deprive our kids of?

    No only that but India and China are also on the verge of passing us in quality education.

  62. Anonymous

    CA already is ranked 47th in the nation in per student spending… how much more can we deprive our kids of?

    No only that but India and China are also on the verge of passing us in quality education.

  63. Anonymous

    CA already is ranked 47th in the nation in per student spending… how much more can we deprive our kids of?

    No only that but India and China are also on the verge of passing us in quality education.

  64. Anonymous

    CA already is ranked 47th in the nation in per student spending… how much more can we deprive our kids of?

    No only that but India and China are also on the verge of passing us in quality education.

  65. Anonymous

    “No on W So Far said…
    There are still problems w Measure W. For instance:”

    Are you Thomas Randall? If not, then why didn’t you submit a negative position on Measure W? You spend enough time talking about it on this blog.

  66. Anonymous

    “No on W So Far said…
    There are still problems w Measure W. For instance:”

    Are you Thomas Randall? If not, then why didn’t you submit a negative position on Measure W? You spend enough time talking about it on this blog.

  67. Anonymous

    “No on W So Far said…
    There are still problems w Measure W. For instance:”

    Are you Thomas Randall? If not, then why didn’t you submit a negative position on Measure W? You spend enough time talking about it on this blog.

  68. Anonymous

    “No on W So Far said…
    There are still problems w Measure W. For instance:”

    Are you Thomas Randall? If not, then why didn’t you submit a negative position on Measure W? You spend enough time talking about it on this blog.

  69. J.G.

    “There are a lot of parents in Davis who think learning a second language is important.”

    I agree with this. My wife and I (both Mexican Americans) support Spanish immersion for native English speakers.

    The problem is the number (about 15-20%) of children at Cesar Chavez Elementary who are native Spanish speakers. They are not learning English prficiently, which they will need when they enter the workforce. They don’t get “a second language.” They are being deprived in the name of political correctness, which is afraid to tell them they don’t belong in that program.

    My parents, who came to this country from Mexico, insisted that my brothers and sisters learn to speak and read and write good English. We were integrated in Merced in classrooms where only English was taught. We spoke Spanish at home, but otherwise became native English speakers. That is missing for immigrant children who go to programs designed for “a second language.”

  70. J.G.

    “There are a lot of parents in Davis who think learning a second language is important.”

    I agree with this. My wife and I (both Mexican Americans) support Spanish immersion for native English speakers.

    The problem is the number (about 15-20%) of children at Cesar Chavez Elementary who are native Spanish speakers. They are not learning English prficiently, which they will need when they enter the workforce. They don’t get “a second language.” They are being deprived in the name of political correctness, which is afraid to tell them they don’t belong in that program.

    My parents, who came to this country from Mexico, insisted that my brothers and sisters learn to speak and read and write good English. We were integrated in Merced in classrooms where only English was taught. We spoke Spanish at home, but otherwise became native English speakers. That is missing for immigrant children who go to programs designed for “a second language.”

  71. J.G.

    “There are a lot of parents in Davis who think learning a second language is important.”

    I agree with this. My wife and I (both Mexican Americans) support Spanish immersion for native English speakers.

    The problem is the number (about 15-20%) of children at Cesar Chavez Elementary who are native Spanish speakers. They are not learning English prficiently, which they will need when they enter the workforce. They don’t get “a second language.” They are being deprived in the name of political correctness, which is afraid to tell them they don’t belong in that program.

    My parents, who came to this country from Mexico, insisted that my brothers and sisters learn to speak and read and write good English. We were integrated in Merced in classrooms where only English was taught. We spoke Spanish at home, but otherwise became native English speakers. That is missing for immigrant children who go to programs designed for “a second language.”

  72. J.G.

    “There are a lot of parents in Davis who think learning a second language is important.”

    I agree with this. My wife and I (both Mexican Americans) support Spanish immersion for native English speakers.

    The problem is the number (about 15-20%) of children at Cesar Chavez Elementary who are native Spanish speakers. They are not learning English prficiently, which they will need when they enter the workforce. They don’t get “a second language.” They are being deprived in the name of political correctness, which is afraid to tell them they don’t belong in that program.

    My parents, who came to this country from Mexico, insisted that my brothers and sisters learn to speak and read and write good English. We were integrated in Merced in classrooms where only English was taught. We spoke Spanish at home, but otherwise became native English speakers. That is missing for immigrant children who go to programs designed for “a second language.”

  73. Black Bart

    To all you cheap nimby’s who don’t want to fund the schools remember that there are two things that are keeping real estate values in Davis from completely crashing like they are all around Davis. One is the lack of building over the last decade the other is the schools. People want to live here for the schools, you defund the schools and you can kiss your home equity goodbye. Its lose lose for you, pay more in taxes or watch the value of your home go down even more.

  74. Black Bart

    To all you cheap nimby’s who don’t want to fund the schools remember that there are two things that are keeping real estate values in Davis from completely crashing like they are all around Davis. One is the lack of building over the last decade the other is the schools. People want to live here for the schools, you defund the schools and you can kiss your home equity goodbye. Its lose lose for you, pay more in taxes or watch the value of your home go down even more.

  75. Black Bart

    To all you cheap nimby’s who don’t want to fund the schools remember that there are two things that are keeping real estate values in Davis from completely crashing like they are all around Davis. One is the lack of building over the last decade the other is the schools. People want to live here for the schools, you defund the schools and you can kiss your home equity goodbye. Its lose lose for you, pay more in taxes or watch the value of your home go down even more.

  76. Black Bart

    To all you cheap nimby’s who don’t want to fund the schools remember that there are two things that are keeping real estate values in Davis from completely crashing like they are all around Davis. One is the lack of building over the last decade the other is the schools. People want to live here for the schools, you defund the schools and you can kiss your home equity goodbye. Its lose lose for you, pay more in taxes or watch the value of your home go down even more.

  77. parent to native Spanish speakers

    “The problem is the number (about 15-20%) of children at Cesar Chavez Elementary who are native Spanish speakers. They are not learning English prficiently, which they will need when they enter the workforce. They don’t get “a second language.” They are being deprived in the name of political correctness, which is afraid to tell them they don’t belong in that program.”

    I think you generalize a little too much and overstate the problem.

    I am a gringo. My wife is latina and a native Spanish speaker. My kids learned Spanish as their first language and thus qualify as “native Spanish speakers” on paper.

    When we moved to Davis, we put our kids in another elementary (not Chavez) for about three years. When they clearly became English dominant, we put them in Chavez. Chavez will allow native Spanish speakers to enter after kindergarten.

    They did well in Chavez and have performed well in secondary school in both English and Spanish. One has even taken honors English.

    There are a variety of explanations for how and why a native Spanish speaker ends up at Chavez and is counted in the statistic that you cite.

    The label “native Spanish speaker” covers a spectrum of fluency and backgrounds.

    Our interest was that our kids speak, read, and write proficiently in both English and Spanish.

    If my native Spanish speaking kids are a problem to the system, then please explain further.

  78. parent to native Spanish speak

    “The problem is the number (about 15-20%) of children at Cesar Chavez Elementary who are native Spanish speakers. They are not learning English prficiently, which they will need when they enter the workforce. They don’t get “a second language.” They are being deprived in the name of political correctness, which is afraid to tell them they don’t belong in that program.”

    I think you generalize a little too much and overstate the problem.

    I am a gringo. My wife is latina and a native Spanish speaker. My kids learned Spanish as their first language and thus qualify as “native Spanish speakers” on paper.

    When we moved to Davis, we put our kids in another elementary (not Chavez) for about three years. When they clearly became English dominant, we put them in Chavez. Chavez will allow native Spanish speakers to enter after kindergarten.

    They did well in Chavez and have performed well in secondary school in both English and Spanish. One has even taken honors English.

    There are a variety of explanations for how and why a native Spanish speaker ends up at Chavez and is counted in the statistic that you cite.

    The label “native Spanish speaker” covers a spectrum of fluency and backgrounds.

    Our interest was that our kids speak, read, and write proficiently in both English and Spanish.

    If my native Spanish speaking kids are a problem to the system, then please explain further.

  79. parent to native Spanish speak

    “The problem is the number (about 15-20%) of children at Cesar Chavez Elementary who are native Spanish speakers. They are not learning English prficiently, which they will need when they enter the workforce. They don’t get “a second language.” They are being deprived in the name of political correctness, which is afraid to tell them they don’t belong in that program.”

    I think you generalize a little too much and overstate the problem.

    I am a gringo. My wife is latina and a native Spanish speaker. My kids learned Spanish as their first language and thus qualify as “native Spanish speakers” on paper.

    When we moved to Davis, we put our kids in another elementary (not Chavez) for about three years. When they clearly became English dominant, we put them in Chavez. Chavez will allow native Spanish speakers to enter after kindergarten.

    They did well in Chavez and have performed well in secondary school in both English and Spanish. One has even taken honors English.

    There are a variety of explanations for how and why a native Spanish speaker ends up at Chavez and is counted in the statistic that you cite.

    The label “native Spanish speaker” covers a spectrum of fluency and backgrounds.

    Our interest was that our kids speak, read, and write proficiently in both English and Spanish.

    If my native Spanish speaking kids are a problem to the system, then please explain further.

  80. parent to native Spanish speak

    “The problem is the number (about 15-20%) of children at Cesar Chavez Elementary who are native Spanish speakers. They are not learning English prficiently, which they will need when they enter the workforce. They don’t get “a second language.” They are being deprived in the name of political correctness, which is afraid to tell them they don’t belong in that program.”

    I think you generalize a little too much and overstate the problem.

    I am a gringo. My wife is latina and a native Spanish speaker. My kids learned Spanish as their first language and thus qualify as “native Spanish speakers” on paper.

    When we moved to Davis, we put our kids in another elementary (not Chavez) for about three years. When they clearly became English dominant, we put them in Chavez. Chavez will allow native Spanish speakers to enter after kindergarten.

    They did well in Chavez and have performed well in secondary school in both English and Spanish. One has even taken honors English.

    There are a variety of explanations for how and why a native Spanish speaker ends up at Chavez and is counted in the statistic that you cite.

    The label “native Spanish speaker” covers a spectrum of fluency and backgrounds.

    Our interest was that our kids speak, read, and write proficiently in both English and Spanish.

    If my native Spanish speaking kids are a problem to the system, then please explain further.

  81. Anonymous

    The current School Board is made up of parents who are raising kids and/or who hold down full-time day jobs and have NO resume of expertise in running a school district. When they rejected the recommendation of their own recently hired Superintendent to give VO charter school a chance to succeed, it cinched it for me. I will be very reluctant to trust them with any more of my money.

  82. Anonymous

    The current School Board is made up of parents who are raising kids and/or who hold down full-time day jobs and have NO resume of expertise in running a school district. When they rejected the recommendation of their own recently hired Superintendent to give VO charter school a chance to succeed, it cinched it for me. I will be very reluctant to trust them with any more of my money.

  83. Anonymous

    The current School Board is made up of parents who are raising kids and/or who hold down full-time day jobs and have NO resume of expertise in running a school district. When they rejected the recommendation of their own recently hired Superintendent to give VO charter school a chance to succeed, it cinched it for me. I will be very reluctant to trust them with any more of my money.

  84. Anonymous

    The current School Board is made up of parents who are raising kids and/or who hold down full-time day jobs and have NO resume of expertise in running a school district. When they rejected the recommendation of their own recently hired Superintendent to give VO charter school a chance to succeed, it cinched it for me. I will be very reluctant to trust them with any more of my money.

  85. Anonymous

    “Its lose lose for you, pay more in taxes or watch the value of your home go down even more…”

    Black Bart… those days are long past and it was for the most part a myth to begin with. The Davis School district has been mediocre at best as long as I hae lived in Davis. The parent/student quality is what keeeps the scores above average. Davis home values will continue to be high if only because it is largely a “gated” community(without the gate).

  86. Anonymous

    “Its lose lose for you, pay more in taxes or watch the value of your home go down even more…”

    Black Bart… those days are long past and it was for the most part a myth to begin with. The Davis School district has been mediocre at best as long as I hae lived in Davis. The parent/student quality is what keeeps the scores above average. Davis home values will continue to be high if only because it is largely a “gated” community(without the gate).

  87. Anonymous

    “Its lose lose for you, pay more in taxes or watch the value of your home go down even more…”

    Black Bart… those days are long past and it was for the most part a myth to begin with. The Davis School district has been mediocre at best as long as I hae lived in Davis. The parent/student quality is what keeeps the scores above average. Davis home values will continue to be high if only because it is largely a “gated” community(without the gate).

  88. Anonymous

    “Its lose lose for you, pay more in taxes or watch the value of your home go down even more…”

    Black Bart… those days are long past and it was for the most part a myth to begin with. The Davis School district has been mediocre at best as long as I hae lived in Davis. The parent/student quality is what keeeps the scores above average. Davis home values will continue to be high if only because it is largely a “gated” community(without the gate).

  89. No on W So Far

    What I hear from the other side is a lot of blather. “For the good of the children”; “To keep Emerson open”; etc, etc, etc. What I don’t hear is accountability, budgeting, attempts to make us more independent of state funding. The problem with the Yes on W folks is they equate more money with solving a problem. Throwing more money at a problem does not always solve it. Let me remind them that Valley Oak closed, despite parcel taxes paid, despite community opposition, despite attempts to save the institution as a charter school. The School Board didn’t even listen to its own Supt./School District on the issue.

    There are complaints from proponents that they are tired of hearing my litany of complaints. What they fail to understand is that it reflects doubts in other people’s minds that need addressing. If I felt more certain that my concerns were being addressed, my vote might be different. But thus far, all I have heard from the School Board/District in essence is “We want more money because we said so.”

    To ignore these concerns almost certainly will doom Measure W to failure, whereas addressing these concerns might save it. One has to wonder why the public is essentially not being allowed to voice any concerns, without feeling as if they will be blasted by proponents of this measure. It is undemocratic, and foolish since proponents cannot see what we do in the voting booth.

  90. No on W So Far

    What I hear from the other side is a lot of blather. “For the good of the children”; “To keep Emerson open”; etc, etc, etc. What I don’t hear is accountability, budgeting, attempts to make us more independent of state funding. The problem with the Yes on W folks is they equate more money with solving a problem. Throwing more money at a problem does not always solve it. Let me remind them that Valley Oak closed, despite parcel taxes paid, despite community opposition, despite attempts to save the institution as a charter school. The School Board didn’t even listen to its own Supt./School District on the issue.

    There are complaints from proponents that they are tired of hearing my litany of complaints. What they fail to understand is that it reflects doubts in other people’s minds that need addressing. If I felt more certain that my concerns were being addressed, my vote might be different. But thus far, all I have heard from the School Board/District in essence is “We want more money because we said so.”

    To ignore these concerns almost certainly will doom Measure W to failure, whereas addressing these concerns might save it. One has to wonder why the public is essentially not being allowed to voice any concerns, without feeling as if they will be blasted by proponents of this measure. It is undemocratic, and foolish since proponents cannot see what we do in the voting booth.

  91. No on W So Far

    What I hear from the other side is a lot of blather. “For the good of the children”; “To keep Emerson open”; etc, etc, etc. What I don’t hear is accountability, budgeting, attempts to make us more independent of state funding. The problem with the Yes on W folks is they equate more money with solving a problem. Throwing more money at a problem does not always solve it. Let me remind them that Valley Oak closed, despite parcel taxes paid, despite community opposition, despite attempts to save the institution as a charter school. The School Board didn’t even listen to its own Supt./School District on the issue.

    There are complaints from proponents that they are tired of hearing my litany of complaints. What they fail to understand is that it reflects doubts in other people’s minds that need addressing. If I felt more certain that my concerns were being addressed, my vote might be different. But thus far, all I have heard from the School Board/District in essence is “We want more money because we said so.”

    To ignore these concerns almost certainly will doom Measure W to failure, whereas addressing these concerns might save it. One has to wonder why the public is essentially not being allowed to voice any concerns, without feeling as if they will be blasted by proponents of this measure. It is undemocratic, and foolish since proponents cannot see what we do in the voting booth.

  92. No on W So Far

    What I hear from the other side is a lot of blather. “For the good of the children”; “To keep Emerson open”; etc, etc, etc. What I don’t hear is accountability, budgeting, attempts to make us more independent of state funding. The problem with the Yes on W folks is they equate more money with solving a problem. Throwing more money at a problem does not always solve it. Let me remind them that Valley Oak closed, despite parcel taxes paid, despite community opposition, despite attempts to save the institution as a charter school. The School Board didn’t even listen to its own Supt./School District on the issue.

    There are complaints from proponents that they are tired of hearing my litany of complaints. What they fail to understand is that it reflects doubts in other people’s minds that need addressing. If I felt more certain that my concerns were being addressed, my vote might be different. But thus far, all I have heard from the School Board/District in essence is “We want more money because we said so.”

    To ignore these concerns almost certainly will doom Measure W to failure, whereas addressing these concerns might save it. One has to wonder why the public is essentially not being allowed to voice any concerns, without feeling as if they will be blasted by proponents of this measure. It is undemocratic, and foolish since proponents cannot see what we do in the voting booth.

  93. Doug Paul Davis

    As I said in the other comment thread:

    Proposition 13 pretty much forced school districts to be reliant on the state because it made it almost impossible in most communities to raise funds locally.

    Obviously, the parcel tax would make the district less reliant on the state, but of course you seem to be opposed to those efforts.

    Voting against the parcel tax would actually contradict your concern about being reliant on state money.

  94. Doug Paul Davis

    As I said in the other comment thread:

    Proposition 13 pretty much forced school districts to be reliant on the state because it made it almost impossible in most communities to raise funds locally.

    Obviously, the parcel tax would make the district less reliant on the state, but of course you seem to be opposed to those efforts.

    Voting against the parcel tax would actually contradict your concern about being reliant on state money.

  95. Doug Paul Davis

    As I said in the other comment thread:

    Proposition 13 pretty much forced school districts to be reliant on the state because it made it almost impossible in most communities to raise funds locally.

    Obviously, the parcel tax would make the district less reliant on the state, but of course you seem to be opposed to those efforts.

    Voting against the parcel tax would actually contradict your concern about being reliant on state money.

  96. Doug Paul Davis

    As I said in the other comment thread:

    Proposition 13 pretty much forced school districts to be reliant on the state because it made it almost impossible in most communities to raise funds locally.

    Obviously, the parcel tax would make the district less reliant on the state, but of course you seem to be opposed to those efforts.

    Voting against the parcel tax would actually contradict your concern about being reliant on state money.

  97. Curious

    “Proposition 13 pretty much forced school districts to be reliant on the state because it made it almost impossible in most communities to raise funds locally.”

    Then how come Woodland seems to be weathering the storm, yet Davis is not? Same with West Sac?

  98. Curious

    “Proposition 13 pretty much forced school districts to be reliant on the state because it made it almost impossible in most communities to raise funds locally.”

    Then how come Woodland seems to be weathering the storm, yet Davis is not? Same with West Sac?

  99. Curious

    “Proposition 13 pretty much forced school districts to be reliant on the state because it made it almost impossible in most communities to raise funds locally.”

    Then how come Woodland seems to be weathering the storm, yet Davis is not? Same with West Sac?

  100. Curious

    “Proposition 13 pretty much forced school districts to be reliant on the state because it made it almost impossible in most communities to raise funds locally.”

    Then how come Woodland seems to be weathering the storm, yet Davis is not? Same with West Sac?

  101. Anon

    “Boutique programs” is a good description. We have Spanish Emmersion, Mandarin Chinese 4, Da Vinci, all sorts of programs that hardly can be considered “core curricula”.

  102. Anon

    “Boutique programs” is a good description. We have Spanish Emmersion, Mandarin Chinese 4, Da Vinci, all sorts of programs that hardly can be considered “core curricula”.

  103. Anon

    “Boutique programs” is a good description. We have Spanish Emmersion, Mandarin Chinese 4, Da Vinci, all sorts of programs that hardly can be considered “core curricula”.

  104. Anon

    “Boutique programs” is a good description. We have Spanish Emmersion, Mandarin Chinese 4, Da Vinci, all sorts of programs that hardly can be considered “core curricula”.

  105. Cash strapped

    “The Yolo County Taxpayer’s Association is a joke. Just a bunch of grumpy old white dudes who don’t like to pay taxes. Their ‘opposition’ is usually a sign that whatever it is they are opposing is something I should support.”

    Now this is a really cogent argument, sure to convince me to vote for more taxes!

  106. Cash strapped

    “The Yolo County Taxpayer’s Association is a joke. Just a bunch of grumpy old white dudes who don’t like to pay taxes. Their ‘opposition’ is usually a sign that whatever it is they are opposing is something I should support.”

    Now this is a really cogent argument, sure to convince me to vote for more taxes!

  107. Cash strapped

    “The Yolo County Taxpayer’s Association is a joke. Just a bunch of grumpy old white dudes who don’t like to pay taxes. Their ‘opposition’ is usually a sign that whatever it is they are opposing is something I should support.”

    Now this is a really cogent argument, sure to convince me to vote for more taxes!

  108. Cash strapped

    “The Yolo County Taxpayer’s Association is a joke. Just a bunch of grumpy old white dudes who don’t like to pay taxes. Their ‘opposition’ is usually a sign that whatever it is they are opposing is something I should support.”

    Now this is a really cogent argument, sure to convince me to vote for more taxes!

  109. Doug Paul Davis

    Curious:

    Woodland is surviving at the moment doing the same policies that Davis was doing three years ago–plunging into their reserves, they will get hammered fairly soon if the state budget stays where it is. West Sac is in disastrous shape and cannot get the voters to fund projects that are in desperate need. I would think you could find two better examples as districts that are doing well.

    Cash Strapped:

    Imagine how the kids will feel when their programs are cut and teachers are laid off–those are the people who are really cash strapped. You want to worry about cash, get concerned about the water project, it’s going to cost you 12 times the parcel tax on a yearly basis.

  110. Doug Paul Davis

    Curious:

    Woodland is surviving at the moment doing the same policies that Davis was doing three years ago–plunging into their reserves, they will get hammered fairly soon if the state budget stays where it is. West Sac is in disastrous shape and cannot get the voters to fund projects that are in desperate need. I would think you could find two better examples as districts that are doing well.

    Cash Strapped:

    Imagine how the kids will feel when their programs are cut and teachers are laid off–those are the people who are really cash strapped. You want to worry about cash, get concerned about the water project, it’s going to cost you 12 times the parcel tax on a yearly basis.

  111. Doug Paul Davis

    Curious:

    Woodland is surviving at the moment doing the same policies that Davis was doing three years ago–plunging into their reserves, they will get hammered fairly soon if the state budget stays where it is. West Sac is in disastrous shape and cannot get the voters to fund projects that are in desperate need. I would think you could find two better examples as districts that are doing well.

    Cash Strapped:

    Imagine how the kids will feel when their programs are cut and teachers are laid off–those are the people who are really cash strapped. You want to worry about cash, get concerned about the water project, it’s going to cost you 12 times the parcel tax on a yearly basis.

  112. Doug Paul Davis

    Curious:

    Woodland is surviving at the moment doing the same policies that Davis was doing three years ago–plunging into their reserves, they will get hammered fairly soon if the state budget stays where it is. West Sac is in disastrous shape and cannot get the voters to fund projects that are in desperate need. I would think you could find two better examples as districts that are doing well.

    Cash Strapped:

    Imagine how the kids will feel when their programs are cut and teachers are laid off–those are the people who are really cash strapped. You want to worry about cash, get concerned about the water project, it’s going to cost you 12 times the parcel tax on a yearly basis.

  113. schools supporter

    What I don’t hear is accountability, budgeting, attempts to make us more independent of state funding.

    I hear it loud and clear!

    Accountability and budgeting to make us more independent of state funding.

    We as a community are accountable to some measure for the success of our students in the public schools. The programs Davis has right now have a good track record of helping our students to succeed. The state does not care enough to provide enough funding. Every dollar that Measure W will provide helps Davis schools and students, regardless of what the legislature does.

    How many dropouts did your high school have when you graduated? Did all of your classmates who graduated have adequate skills? How do you know?

    Today all of that information is available online for the state of California. And Davis schools and teachers are doing a great job with the current program.

  114. schools supporter

    What I don’t hear is accountability, budgeting, attempts to make us more independent of state funding.

    I hear it loud and clear!

    Accountability and budgeting to make us more independent of state funding.

    We as a community are accountable to some measure for the success of our students in the public schools. The programs Davis has right now have a good track record of helping our students to succeed. The state does not care enough to provide enough funding. Every dollar that Measure W will provide helps Davis schools and students, regardless of what the legislature does.

    How many dropouts did your high school have when you graduated? Did all of your classmates who graduated have adequate skills? How do you know?

    Today all of that information is available online for the state of California. And Davis schools and teachers are doing a great job with the current program.

  115. schools supporter

    What I don’t hear is accountability, budgeting, attempts to make us more independent of state funding.

    I hear it loud and clear!

    Accountability and budgeting to make us more independent of state funding.

    We as a community are accountable to some measure for the success of our students in the public schools. The programs Davis has right now have a good track record of helping our students to succeed. The state does not care enough to provide enough funding. Every dollar that Measure W will provide helps Davis schools and students, regardless of what the legislature does.

    How many dropouts did your high school have when you graduated? Did all of your classmates who graduated have adequate skills? How do you know?

    Today all of that information is available online for the state of California. And Davis schools and teachers are doing a great job with the current program.

  116. schools supporter

    What I don’t hear is accountability, budgeting, attempts to make us more independent of state funding.

    I hear it loud and clear!

    Accountability and budgeting to make us more independent of state funding.

    We as a community are accountable to some measure for the success of our students in the public schools. The programs Davis has right now have a good track record of helping our students to succeed. The state does not care enough to provide enough funding. Every dollar that Measure W will provide helps Davis schools and students, regardless of what the legislature does.

    How many dropouts did your high school have when you graduated? Did all of your classmates who graduated have adequate skills? How do you know?

    Today all of that information is available online for the state of California. And Davis schools and teachers are doing a great job with the current program.

  117. Anonymous

    To Parent Of Native Spanish Speaker,

    May I ask why you did not teach them English in an English speaking country? It sure would benefit the kids. And no, no one owes anyone anything on this issue.

  118. Anonymous

    To Parent Of Native Spanish Speaker,

    May I ask why you did not teach them English in an English speaking country? It sure would benefit the kids. And no, no one owes anyone anything on this issue.

  119. Anonymous

    To Parent Of Native Spanish Speaker,

    May I ask why you did not teach them English in an English speaking country? It sure would benefit the kids. And no, no one owes anyone anything on this issue.

  120. Anonymous

    To Parent Of Native Spanish Speaker,

    May I ask why you did not teach them English in an English speaking country? It sure would benefit the kids. And no, no one owes anyone anything on this issue.

  121. Anonymous

    Don’t assume too much…

    They have always been learning English in America. Every single year in the U.S., they have had public school classroom instruction in English, and in many grades, in Spanish as well. In later grades in Chavez, English is a regular part of the curriculum.

    It is the lower grades in Chavez that are heavier on Spanish instruction time. As students advance in each grade, the amount of Spanish time instruction is progressively reduced.

    You would probably never guess that they were native Spanish speakers if you met them.

  122. Anonymous

    Don’t assume too much…

    They have always been learning English in America. Every single year in the U.S., they have had public school classroom instruction in English, and in many grades, in Spanish as well. In later grades in Chavez, English is a regular part of the curriculum.

    It is the lower grades in Chavez that are heavier on Spanish instruction time. As students advance in each grade, the amount of Spanish time instruction is progressively reduced.

    You would probably never guess that they were native Spanish speakers if you met them.

  123. Anonymous

    Don’t assume too much…

    They have always been learning English in America. Every single year in the U.S., they have had public school classroom instruction in English, and in many grades, in Spanish as well. In later grades in Chavez, English is a regular part of the curriculum.

    It is the lower grades in Chavez that are heavier on Spanish instruction time. As students advance in each grade, the amount of Spanish time instruction is progressively reduced.

    You would probably never guess that they were native Spanish speakers if you met them.

  124. Anonymous

    Don’t assume too much…

    They have always been learning English in America. Every single year in the U.S., they have had public school classroom instruction in English, and in many grades, in Spanish as well. In later grades in Chavez, English is a regular part of the curriculum.

    It is the lower grades in Chavez that are heavier on Spanish instruction time. As students advance in each grade, the amount of Spanish time instruction is progressively reduced.

    You would probably never guess that they were native Spanish speakers if you met them.

  125. Thomas Randall Jr

    In regards to the sample ballot argument against Measure W I have a several points of contention with the article writer:

    -Measure Q and Measure W are almost indentical in the programs they seek to fund which is contrary to the writers argument. Look closely at the published sample ballot impartial anaylsis of them.

    As the “No on Measure W” ballot argument is concerned, it was written by me to address the problem that there is an opposing point of view in the community in regard to this Measure and many simular one like it that seldomly if ever gets effectively heard. Many of the local special tax ballot Measures that we have voted on in the past seldomly have faced any organized opposition in the community leaving the voters being presented predominently with only one side on the issue creating the problem that local governing organizations i.e. City Council, School Board etc. are not onjectively challenged by a segment of the community in regard to the proposals and that has opened the situation to abuses to occuring.

    Right now take for example, in the sample ballot: Two other local ballot measures: M and N have no published ballot arguments appearing against them although their are many substantial arguments the opponents could have made against them as well the the voting public should be informed about.

    Perhaps many of you that have opposing postions on these ballot measures could publicize them in the opinion page of the local newspaper so that the community can hear both sides effectively on these measures.

  126. Thomas Randall Jr

    In regards to the sample ballot argument against Measure W I have a several points of contention with the article writer:

    -Measure Q and Measure W are almost indentical in the programs they seek to fund which is contrary to the writers argument. Look closely at the published sample ballot impartial anaylsis of them.

    As the “No on Measure W” ballot argument is concerned, it was written by me to address the problem that there is an opposing point of view in the community in regard to this Measure and many simular one like it that seldomly if ever gets effectively heard. Many of the local special tax ballot Measures that we have voted on in the past seldomly have faced any organized opposition in the community leaving the voters being presented predominently with only one side on the issue creating the problem that local governing organizations i.e. City Council, School Board etc. are not onjectively challenged by a segment of the community in regard to the proposals and that has opened the situation to abuses to occuring.

    Right now take for example, in the sample ballot: Two other local ballot measures: M and N have no published ballot arguments appearing against them although their are many substantial arguments the opponents could have made against them as well the the voting public should be informed about.

    Perhaps many of you that have opposing postions on these ballot measures could publicize them in the opinion page of the local newspaper so that the community can hear both sides effectively on these measures.

  127. Thomas Randall Jr

    In regards to the sample ballot argument against Measure W I have a several points of contention with the article writer:

    -Measure Q and Measure W are almost indentical in the programs they seek to fund which is contrary to the writers argument. Look closely at the published sample ballot impartial anaylsis of them.

    As the “No on Measure W” ballot argument is concerned, it was written by me to address the problem that there is an opposing point of view in the community in regard to this Measure and many simular one like it that seldomly if ever gets effectively heard. Many of the local special tax ballot Measures that we have voted on in the past seldomly have faced any organized opposition in the community leaving the voters being presented predominently with only one side on the issue creating the problem that local governing organizations i.e. City Council, School Board etc. are not onjectively challenged by a segment of the community in regard to the proposals and that has opened the situation to abuses to occuring.

    Right now take for example, in the sample ballot: Two other local ballot measures: M and N have no published ballot arguments appearing against them although their are many substantial arguments the opponents could have made against them as well the the voting public should be informed about.

    Perhaps many of you that have opposing postions on these ballot measures could publicize them in the opinion page of the local newspaper so that the community can hear both sides effectively on these measures.

  128. Thomas Randall Jr

    In regards to the sample ballot argument against Measure W I have a several points of contention with the article writer:

    -Measure Q and Measure W are almost indentical in the programs they seek to fund which is contrary to the writers argument. Look closely at the published sample ballot impartial anaylsis of them.

    As the “No on Measure W” ballot argument is concerned, it was written by me to address the problem that there is an opposing point of view in the community in regard to this Measure and many simular one like it that seldomly if ever gets effectively heard. Many of the local special tax ballot Measures that we have voted on in the past seldomly have faced any organized opposition in the community leaving the voters being presented predominently with only one side on the issue creating the problem that local governing organizations i.e. City Council, School Board etc. are not onjectively challenged by a segment of the community in regard to the proposals and that has opened the situation to abuses to occuring.

    Right now take for example, in the sample ballot: Two other local ballot measures: M and N have no published ballot arguments appearing against them although their are many substantial arguments the opponents could have made against them as well the the voting public should be informed about.

    Perhaps many of you that have opposing postions on these ballot measures could publicize them in the opinion page of the local newspaper so that the community can hear both sides effectively on these measures.

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