Parcel Tax Campaign Announces Two Prominent Davisites Have Been Named As Co-Chairs

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The Vanguard received a press release from the YES on Measure W, “Yes for Our Students” campaign. It announced that Janet Berry and Judy Davis will serve as co-chairs of the Measure W campaign.

According to the release:

“Berry and Davis will be involved in the overall strategic direction of the campaign and its community outreach efforts. Janet Berry is a familiar and dedicated parent of children in Davis schools and Judy Davis is the just-retired principal of North Davis Elementary School.”

Janet Berry is acting as a private citizen on this campaign. She heads up the Davis Schools Foundation which raised $1.7 million this year to rescue the Davis schools from huge budget cuts that would have forced many teachers to lose their jobs.

Judy Davis was a very well-regarded long-time principal at North Davis Elementary School and one of the most respected principals in the district. She just retired this year after returning for one additional.

Said Judy Davis:

“It has been my great honor to be associated with Davis schools for many years. It is the involvement of parents, volunteers and the extraordinary commitment of our entire community that has made Davis public schools what they are today. However, it is really important for people to understand that state funding for schools is dropping and that there is a genuine gap between the cost of educating our students and funds from the state. It is up to us to bridge the gap. At stake is the range of diverse educational programs that are offered today. Preserving quality will be determined by a vote yes or no on Measure W. It is really that simple.”

Said Janet Berry:

“The immediate future for education funding in this state is at best unclear. Additional cuts are likely but no one knows with certainty at this time. What we do know from our collective experience this past spring is that people in Davis care about children. They are committed to public education. And they are willing to support important programs and teachers in all our schools. What we learned during this period is that there is a structural budget problem in the District and we heard over and over that people expected a structural solution, like a parcel tax. That’s what Measure W is about and why I’m personally involved in the campaign. Voting yes for Measure W will provide the long-term protection for the classroom programs we saved this spring.”

School Board Member Gina Daleiden was very excited about the selection of Ms. Berry and Ms. Davis:

“Janet and Judy have both demonstrated extraordinary leadership in their commitment to Davis schools and protecting educational opportunities in our community. We are really fortunate to have them involved in our community effort.”

Measure W will be on the ballot this November. It will place an additional $120 per parcel per year tax on Davis Residents to fund core programs like the Elementary Science, Elementary Music, librarians, a few high school teachers, and the athletic program at the high school. Without these funds, DJUSD will be announcing once again potentially deep cuts to programs and teachers.

According to both polls from the District and the Vanguard this will be a very tough election to get over the two-thirds threshold required to raise taxes. Janet Berry and Judy Davis are excellent choices to help lead up what needs to be a very strong grassroots effort.

On Wednesday, the Vanguard Radio interviewed Former State Superintendent of Public Instruction Delaine Eastin. We discussed the parcel tax, education, and the implications if this measure does not pass. Please click here to listen to the podcast.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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112 thoughts on “Parcel Tax Campaign Announces Two Prominent Davisites Have Been Named As Co-Chairs”

  1. No on W So Far

    “Measure W will be on the ballot this November. It will place an additional $120 per parcel per year tax on Davis Residents to fund core programs like the Elementary Science, Elementary Music, librarians, a few high school teachers, and the athletic program at the high school. Without these funds, DJUSD will be announcing once again potentially deep cuts to programs and teachers.”

    According to Ms. Daleidan’s comments, anything and everything constitutes a “core program”. I suspect a goodly number of citizens are having difficulty with the School District/Board’s loose interpretation of the term “core program”.

    Even though citizens coughed up a past parcel tax, the “core programs” at Valley Oak were eliminated when the school was summarily closed – and Emerson was also slated for closure. When citizens attempted to save “core programs” at Valley Oak through the establishment of a charter school, the School Baord was not in the least bit interested. So I have to wonder just how serious these officials are about saving “core programs”, as they claim.

    It should also be noted that the proposed parcel tax is ostensibly not for keeping Emerson open. If not, why not? The usual argument is that upgrading Emerson to bring it up to code will take facilities funding, drawing from a different pot of money than that for operating expenses as in parcel tax funding.

    But what will it take to keep the physical facility of Emerson open from a legal standpoint? Probably zilch. Most likely all that is needed is operating expenses to keep Emerson legally open. That means money for teachers salaries, something that can be paid for through a parcel tax.

    If I remember correctly, the School Board argued that they would have saved a mere $600,000 by closing Emerson. Let’s see, a $20 parcel tax should about cover that.

    What we need is some straight talk:
    1) Clearly define terms, such as “core programs”;
    2) Form an independent advisory School Board Oversight Commission, not selected by friends of the school district;
    3) Have school officials sign off on financial statements, much as companies must do since the Enron scandal;
    4) Pass a regulation that forbids district employees from being employed by outside consulting firms for a period of 5 years once they have left employment with the school district.
    5) Require consistent arguments when proposed parcel taxes are being contemplated.

    Demand the institution of such reasonable reforms, or vote NO on Measure W – which soaks the taxpayer without any guarantees of better accountability. The very existence of Emerson Junior High is still at stake.

  2. No on W So Far

    “Measure W will be on the ballot this November. It will place an additional $120 per parcel per year tax on Davis Residents to fund core programs like the Elementary Science, Elementary Music, librarians, a few high school teachers, and the athletic program at the high school. Without these funds, DJUSD will be announcing once again potentially deep cuts to programs and teachers.”

    According to Ms. Daleidan’s comments, anything and everything constitutes a “core program”. I suspect a goodly number of citizens are having difficulty with the School District/Board’s loose interpretation of the term “core program”.

    Even though citizens coughed up a past parcel tax, the “core programs” at Valley Oak were eliminated when the school was summarily closed – and Emerson was also slated for closure. When citizens attempted to save “core programs” at Valley Oak through the establishment of a charter school, the School Baord was not in the least bit interested. So I have to wonder just how serious these officials are about saving “core programs”, as they claim.

    It should also be noted that the proposed parcel tax is ostensibly not for keeping Emerson open. If not, why not? The usual argument is that upgrading Emerson to bring it up to code will take facilities funding, drawing from a different pot of money than that for operating expenses as in parcel tax funding.

    But what will it take to keep the physical facility of Emerson open from a legal standpoint? Probably zilch. Most likely all that is needed is operating expenses to keep Emerson legally open. That means money for teachers salaries, something that can be paid for through a parcel tax.

    If I remember correctly, the School Board argued that they would have saved a mere $600,000 by closing Emerson. Let’s see, a $20 parcel tax should about cover that.

    What we need is some straight talk:
    1) Clearly define terms, such as “core programs”;
    2) Form an independent advisory School Board Oversight Commission, not selected by friends of the school district;
    3) Have school officials sign off on financial statements, much as companies must do since the Enron scandal;
    4) Pass a regulation that forbids district employees from being employed by outside consulting firms for a period of 5 years once they have left employment with the school district.
    5) Require consistent arguments when proposed parcel taxes are being contemplated.

    Demand the institution of such reasonable reforms, or vote NO on Measure W – which soaks the taxpayer without any guarantees of better accountability. The very existence of Emerson Junior High is still at stake.

  3. No on W So Far

    “Measure W will be on the ballot this November. It will place an additional $120 per parcel per year tax on Davis Residents to fund core programs like the Elementary Science, Elementary Music, librarians, a few high school teachers, and the athletic program at the high school. Without these funds, DJUSD will be announcing once again potentially deep cuts to programs and teachers.”

    According to Ms. Daleidan’s comments, anything and everything constitutes a “core program”. I suspect a goodly number of citizens are having difficulty with the School District/Board’s loose interpretation of the term “core program”.

    Even though citizens coughed up a past parcel tax, the “core programs” at Valley Oak were eliminated when the school was summarily closed – and Emerson was also slated for closure. When citizens attempted to save “core programs” at Valley Oak through the establishment of a charter school, the School Baord was not in the least bit interested. So I have to wonder just how serious these officials are about saving “core programs”, as they claim.

    It should also be noted that the proposed parcel tax is ostensibly not for keeping Emerson open. If not, why not? The usual argument is that upgrading Emerson to bring it up to code will take facilities funding, drawing from a different pot of money than that for operating expenses as in parcel tax funding.

    But what will it take to keep the physical facility of Emerson open from a legal standpoint? Probably zilch. Most likely all that is needed is operating expenses to keep Emerson legally open. That means money for teachers salaries, something that can be paid for through a parcel tax.

    If I remember correctly, the School Board argued that they would have saved a mere $600,000 by closing Emerson. Let’s see, a $20 parcel tax should about cover that.

    What we need is some straight talk:
    1) Clearly define terms, such as “core programs”;
    2) Form an independent advisory School Board Oversight Commission, not selected by friends of the school district;
    3) Have school officials sign off on financial statements, much as companies must do since the Enron scandal;
    4) Pass a regulation that forbids district employees from being employed by outside consulting firms for a period of 5 years once they have left employment with the school district.
    5) Require consistent arguments when proposed parcel taxes are being contemplated.

    Demand the institution of such reasonable reforms, or vote NO on Measure W – which soaks the taxpayer without any guarantees of better accountability. The very existence of Emerson Junior High is still at stake.

  4. No on W So Far

    “Measure W will be on the ballot this November. It will place an additional $120 per parcel per year tax on Davis Residents to fund core programs like the Elementary Science, Elementary Music, librarians, a few high school teachers, and the athletic program at the high school. Without these funds, DJUSD will be announcing once again potentially deep cuts to programs and teachers.”

    According to Ms. Daleidan’s comments, anything and everything constitutes a “core program”. I suspect a goodly number of citizens are having difficulty with the School District/Board’s loose interpretation of the term “core program”.

    Even though citizens coughed up a past parcel tax, the “core programs” at Valley Oak were eliminated when the school was summarily closed – and Emerson was also slated for closure. When citizens attempted to save “core programs” at Valley Oak through the establishment of a charter school, the School Baord was not in the least bit interested. So I have to wonder just how serious these officials are about saving “core programs”, as they claim.

    It should also be noted that the proposed parcel tax is ostensibly not for keeping Emerson open. If not, why not? The usual argument is that upgrading Emerson to bring it up to code will take facilities funding, drawing from a different pot of money than that for operating expenses as in parcel tax funding.

    But what will it take to keep the physical facility of Emerson open from a legal standpoint? Probably zilch. Most likely all that is needed is operating expenses to keep Emerson legally open. That means money for teachers salaries, something that can be paid for through a parcel tax.

    If I remember correctly, the School Board argued that they would have saved a mere $600,000 by closing Emerson. Let’s see, a $20 parcel tax should about cover that.

    What we need is some straight talk:
    1) Clearly define terms, such as “core programs”;
    2) Form an independent advisory School Board Oversight Commission, not selected by friends of the school district;
    3) Have school officials sign off on financial statements, much as companies must do since the Enron scandal;
    4) Pass a regulation that forbids district employees from being employed by outside consulting firms for a period of 5 years once they have left employment with the school district.
    5) Require consistent arguments when proposed parcel taxes are being contemplated.

    Demand the institution of such reasonable reforms, or vote NO on Measure W – which soaks the taxpayer without any guarantees of better accountability. The very existence of Emerson Junior High is still at stake.

  5. Doug Paul Davis

    Two points.

    One is previously I showed exactly what the parcel tax funds in an article a few weeks ago.

    Second, Valley Oak was closed prior to the Parcel Tax being passed in 2007.

    As Delaine Eastin pointed out in the interview, the two parcel taxes are different. The 2007 parcel tax extension funds extra programs like 7th period, counseling and library services, etc. It is an extension of the types of extra programs that parcel taxes have traditionally funded. This parcel tax is different, it funds core programs that would have been cut last spring without help from the schools foundation. Unfortunately the spending for parcel taxes is locked in for the specific programs that are listed on the ballot at the time of passage.

  6. Doug Paul Davis

    Two points.

    One is previously I showed exactly what the parcel tax funds in an article a few weeks ago.

    Second, Valley Oak was closed prior to the Parcel Tax being passed in 2007.

    As Delaine Eastin pointed out in the interview, the two parcel taxes are different. The 2007 parcel tax extension funds extra programs like 7th period, counseling and library services, etc. It is an extension of the types of extra programs that parcel taxes have traditionally funded. This parcel tax is different, it funds core programs that would have been cut last spring without help from the schools foundation. Unfortunately the spending for parcel taxes is locked in for the specific programs that are listed on the ballot at the time of passage.

  7. Doug Paul Davis

    Two points.

    One is previously I showed exactly what the parcel tax funds in an article a few weeks ago.

    Second, Valley Oak was closed prior to the Parcel Tax being passed in 2007.

    As Delaine Eastin pointed out in the interview, the two parcel taxes are different. The 2007 parcel tax extension funds extra programs like 7th period, counseling and library services, etc. It is an extension of the types of extra programs that parcel taxes have traditionally funded. This parcel tax is different, it funds core programs that would have been cut last spring without help from the schools foundation. Unfortunately the spending for parcel taxes is locked in for the specific programs that are listed on the ballot at the time of passage.

  8. Doug Paul Davis

    Two points.

    One is previously I showed exactly what the parcel tax funds in an article a few weeks ago.

    Second, Valley Oak was closed prior to the Parcel Tax being passed in 2007.

    As Delaine Eastin pointed out in the interview, the two parcel taxes are different. The 2007 parcel tax extension funds extra programs like 7th period, counseling and library services, etc. It is an extension of the types of extra programs that parcel taxes have traditionally funded. This parcel tax is different, it funds core programs that would have been cut last spring without help from the schools foundation. Unfortunately the spending for parcel taxes is locked in for the specific programs that are listed on the ballot at the time of passage.

  9. No on W So Far

    “This parcel tax is different, it funds core programs that would have been cut last spring without help from the schools foundation.”

    What “core programs”? Elementary Music? After-school athletics? Da Vinci? These are not “core programs” in my book. I know, I know, someone is going to comment that Mandarin Chinese 4 is a “core program”. How about elementary school gardening to grow 35 lb cabbages? That was considered important enough to include as necessary to fund in a previous parcel tax.

    This is the problem with the parcel tax – it becomes a moving target, shifting arguments constantly with clever wording. Think about it. If something is labeled as a “core program”, it appears to have more legitimacy. I want a more clearcut and professional def’n of the term “core program”.

    “Second, Valley Oak was closed prior to the Parcel Tax being passed in 2007.”

    The point is still the same – passing parcel taxes does not save “core programs”. It only saves programs the School Board/District decide they want to label as “core programs”.

    Why isn’t Emerson a “core program” worth saving? The citizens have already spoken on that issue, and have made it very clear this is what they want.

    It is the arbitrary and capricious way the School District/Board uses terms of art, or formulates arguments, or uses various tactics that make it very difficult for citizens to have much faith in what they do.

    As of now, based on what I am hearing, I would vote NO on W. Yet I would vote for a $20 parcel tax to save Emerson. Think about it.

    “Unfortunately the spending for parcel taxes is locked in for the specific programs that are listed on the ballot at the time of passage.”

    But isn’t there time to change the minds of the School Board/District on what should be included in this latest parcel tax – like keeping Emerson open, for example? Or are you saying that discussion is closed, the School Board/District has already decided?

    Funny how that works. The School Board/District sticks its proverbial finger in the wind, decides which way its blowing, ignores what they learned, then ask for more than what the public will tolerate. And you wonder why we don’t trust these people??? Yikes, its a wonder you do!

  10. No on W So Far

    “This parcel tax is different, it funds core programs that would have been cut last spring without help from the schools foundation.”

    What “core programs”? Elementary Music? After-school athletics? Da Vinci? These are not “core programs” in my book. I know, I know, someone is going to comment that Mandarin Chinese 4 is a “core program”. How about elementary school gardening to grow 35 lb cabbages? That was considered important enough to include as necessary to fund in a previous parcel tax.

    This is the problem with the parcel tax – it becomes a moving target, shifting arguments constantly with clever wording. Think about it. If something is labeled as a “core program”, it appears to have more legitimacy. I want a more clearcut and professional def’n of the term “core program”.

    “Second, Valley Oak was closed prior to the Parcel Tax being passed in 2007.”

    The point is still the same – passing parcel taxes does not save “core programs”. It only saves programs the School Board/District decide they want to label as “core programs”.

    Why isn’t Emerson a “core program” worth saving? The citizens have already spoken on that issue, and have made it very clear this is what they want.

    It is the arbitrary and capricious way the School District/Board uses terms of art, or formulates arguments, or uses various tactics that make it very difficult for citizens to have much faith in what they do.

    As of now, based on what I am hearing, I would vote NO on W. Yet I would vote for a $20 parcel tax to save Emerson. Think about it.

    “Unfortunately the spending for parcel taxes is locked in for the specific programs that are listed on the ballot at the time of passage.”

    But isn’t there time to change the minds of the School Board/District on what should be included in this latest parcel tax – like keeping Emerson open, for example? Or are you saying that discussion is closed, the School Board/District has already decided?

    Funny how that works. The School Board/District sticks its proverbial finger in the wind, decides which way its blowing, ignores what they learned, then ask for more than what the public will tolerate. And you wonder why we don’t trust these people??? Yikes, its a wonder you do!

  11. No on W So Far

    “This parcel tax is different, it funds core programs that would have been cut last spring without help from the schools foundation.”

    What “core programs”? Elementary Music? After-school athletics? Da Vinci? These are not “core programs” in my book. I know, I know, someone is going to comment that Mandarin Chinese 4 is a “core program”. How about elementary school gardening to grow 35 lb cabbages? That was considered important enough to include as necessary to fund in a previous parcel tax.

    This is the problem with the parcel tax – it becomes a moving target, shifting arguments constantly with clever wording. Think about it. If something is labeled as a “core program”, it appears to have more legitimacy. I want a more clearcut and professional def’n of the term “core program”.

    “Second, Valley Oak was closed prior to the Parcel Tax being passed in 2007.”

    The point is still the same – passing parcel taxes does not save “core programs”. It only saves programs the School Board/District decide they want to label as “core programs”.

    Why isn’t Emerson a “core program” worth saving? The citizens have already spoken on that issue, and have made it very clear this is what they want.

    It is the arbitrary and capricious way the School District/Board uses terms of art, or formulates arguments, or uses various tactics that make it very difficult for citizens to have much faith in what they do.

    As of now, based on what I am hearing, I would vote NO on W. Yet I would vote for a $20 parcel tax to save Emerson. Think about it.

    “Unfortunately the spending for parcel taxes is locked in for the specific programs that are listed on the ballot at the time of passage.”

    But isn’t there time to change the minds of the School Board/District on what should be included in this latest parcel tax – like keeping Emerson open, for example? Or are you saying that discussion is closed, the School Board/District has already decided?

    Funny how that works. The School Board/District sticks its proverbial finger in the wind, decides which way its blowing, ignores what they learned, then ask for more than what the public will tolerate. And you wonder why we don’t trust these people??? Yikes, its a wonder you do!

  12. No on W So Far

    “This parcel tax is different, it funds core programs that would have been cut last spring without help from the schools foundation.”

    What “core programs”? Elementary Music? After-school athletics? Da Vinci? These are not “core programs” in my book. I know, I know, someone is going to comment that Mandarin Chinese 4 is a “core program”. How about elementary school gardening to grow 35 lb cabbages? That was considered important enough to include as necessary to fund in a previous parcel tax.

    This is the problem with the parcel tax – it becomes a moving target, shifting arguments constantly with clever wording. Think about it. If something is labeled as a “core program”, it appears to have more legitimacy. I want a more clearcut and professional def’n of the term “core program”.

    “Second, Valley Oak was closed prior to the Parcel Tax being passed in 2007.”

    The point is still the same – passing parcel taxes does not save “core programs”. It only saves programs the School Board/District decide they want to label as “core programs”.

    Why isn’t Emerson a “core program” worth saving? The citizens have already spoken on that issue, and have made it very clear this is what they want.

    It is the arbitrary and capricious way the School District/Board uses terms of art, or formulates arguments, or uses various tactics that make it very difficult for citizens to have much faith in what they do.

    As of now, based on what I am hearing, I would vote NO on W. Yet I would vote for a $20 parcel tax to save Emerson. Think about it.

    “Unfortunately the spending for parcel taxes is locked in for the specific programs that are listed on the ballot at the time of passage.”

    But isn’t there time to change the minds of the School Board/District on what should be included in this latest parcel tax – like keeping Emerson open, for example? Or are you saying that discussion is closed, the School Board/District has already decided?

    Funny how that works. The School Board/District sticks its proverbial finger in the wind, decides which way its blowing, ignores what they learned, then ask for more than what the public will tolerate. And you wonder why we don’t trust these people??? Yikes, its a wonder you do!

  13. hell no on W

    The fundamental lesson in education that we teach our kids early on is THEY HAVE TO LIVE WITHIN A BUDGET!!! What lesson are we teaching them when the school board does not have to do this and can count on constant increases to pull them out of the fire? And these people are educating our kids?

    Homeschooling and vouchers is looking better and better.

  14. hell no on W

    The fundamental lesson in education that we teach our kids early on is THEY HAVE TO LIVE WITHIN A BUDGET!!! What lesson are we teaching them when the school board does not have to do this and can count on constant increases to pull them out of the fire? And these people are educating our kids?

    Homeschooling and vouchers is looking better and better.

  15. hell no on W

    The fundamental lesson in education that we teach our kids early on is THEY HAVE TO LIVE WITHIN A BUDGET!!! What lesson are we teaching them when the school board does not have to do this and can count on constant increases to pull them out of the fire? And these people are educating our kids?

    Homeschooling and vouchers is looking better and better.

  16. hell no on W

    The fundamental lesson in education that we teach our kids early on is THEY HAVE TO LIVE WITHIN A BUDGET!!! What lesson are we teaching them when the school board does not have to do this and can count on constant increases to pull them out of the fire? And these people are educating our kids?

    Homeschooling and vouchers is looking better and better.

  17. Doug Paul Davis

    It’s hard to live within a budget when you get between $2 million and $4.5 million pulled out of it.

    “What lesson are we teaching them when the school board does not have to do this and can count on constant increases to pull them out of the fire?”

    I guess I take exception to the comment constant increases. The district passed a parcel tax in 2003. That parcel tax expired, it was then placed before the voters again in 2007 with a COLA that accounted for inflation to raise the cost to $200. So from the standpoint of the taxpayer and the district, that was essentially revenue neutral.

    The district then faces a loss from declining enrollment–one year to another, combined with a loss in state revenue and a loss of state COLA which enables them generally to account for inflation and increases to salaries based on the inflation. So now they are asking to supplement the loss of state money with an influx of local money. Basically a transfer.

    So it is not a matter that they are not living within their means, it is a matter that they are trying to keep staffing and programs at the previous levels after having revenue cut from the state in three different forms.

  18. Doug Paul Davis

    It’s hard to live within a budget when you get between $2 million and $4.5 million pulled out of it.

    “What lesson are we teaching them when the school board does not have to do this and can count on constant increases to pull them out of the fire?”

    I guess I take exception to the comment constant increases. The district passed a parcel tax in 2003. That parcel tax expired, it was then placed before the voters again in 2007 with a COLA that accounted for inflation to raise the cost to $200. So from the standpoint of the taxpayer and the district, that was essentially revenue neutral.

    The district then faces a loss from declining enrollment–one year to another, combined with a loss in state revenue and a loss of state COLA which enables them generally to account for inflation and increases to salaries based on the inflation. So now they are asking to supplement the loss of state money with an influx of local money. Basically a transfer.

    So it is not a matter that they are not living within their means, it is a matter that they are trying to keep staffing and programs at the previous levels after having revenue cut from the state in three different forms.

  19. Doug Paul Davis

    It’s hard to live within a budget when you get between $2 million and $4.5 million pulled out of it.

    “What lesson are we teaching them when the school board does not have to do this and can count on constant increases to pull them out of the fire?”

    I guess I take exception to the comment constant increases. The district passed a parcel tax in 2003. That parcel tax expired, it was then placed before the voters again in 2007 with a COLA that accounted for inflation to raise the cost to $200. So from the standpoint of the taxpayer and the district, that was essentially revenue neutral.

    The district then faces a loss from declining enrollment–one year to another, combined with a loss in state revenue and a loss of state COLA which enables them generally to account for inflation and increases to salaries based on the inflation. So now they are asking to supplement the loss of state money with an influx of local money. Basically a transfer.

    So it is not a matter that they are not living within their means, it is a matter that they are trying to keep staffing and programs at the previous levels after having revenue cut from the state in three different forms.

  20. Doug Paul Davis

    It’s hard to live within a budget when you get between $2 million and $4.5 million pulled out of it.

    “What lesson are we teaching them when the school board does not have to do this and can count on constant increases to pull them out of the fire?”

    I guess I take exception to the comment constant increases. The district passed a parcel tax in 2003. That parcel tax expired, it was then placed before the voters again in 2007 with a COLA that accounted for inflation to raise the cost to $200. So from the standpoint of the taxpayer and the district, that was essentially revenue neutral.

    The district then faces a loss from declining enrollment–one year to another, combined with a loss in state revenue and a loss of state COLA which enables them generally to account for inflation and increases to salaries based on the inflation. So now they are asking to supplement the loss of state money with an influx of local money. Basically a transfer.

    So it is not a matter that they are not living within their means, it is a matter that they are trying to keep staffing and programs at the previous levels after having revenue cut from the state in three different forms.

  21. Anonymous

    The problem with the anti-W argument is that it is predicated on a lack of confidence towards the School Board. However, if W fails it will actually empower certain Board members to “reconfigure” Davis schools more to their own personal inclination. No matter what one may think of the Board, the bottom line is that as it is Davis Schools are performing very well and deserve the support of the community.

  22. Anonymous

    The problem with the anti-W argument is that it is predicated on a lack of confidence towards the School Board. However, if W fails it will actually empower certain Board members to “reconfigure” Davis schools more to their own personal inclination. No matter what one may think of the Board, the bottom line is that as it is Davis Schools are performing very well and deserve the support of the community.

  23. Anonymous

    The problem with the anti-W argument is that it is predicated on a lack of confidence towards the School Board. However, if W fails it will actually empower certain Board members to “reconfigure” Davis schools more to their own personal inclination. No matter what one may think of the Board, the bottom line is that as it is Davis Schools are performing very well and deserve the support of the community.

  24. Anonymous

    The problem with the anti-W argument is that it is predicated on a lack of confidence towards the School Board. However, if W fails it will actually empower certain Board members to “reconfigure” Davis schools more to their own personal inclination. No matter what one may think of the Board, the bottom line is that as it is Davis Schools are performing very well and deserve the support of the community.

  25. hell no on W

    “It’s hard to live within a budget when you get between $2 million and $4.5 million pulled out of it.”

    You live within your means. Part of the school Board’s responsibility is to prioritize and anticipate potential cuts. Regular people have to deal with this all the time: Dad gets laid off, the economy goes up and down, gas prices soar. Welcome to the real world.

    “I guess I take exception to the comment constant increases.”

    Measure W is up for support very soon after Q was passed. What do you mean you take exception?

    “The district then faces a loss from declining enrollment–one year to another, combined with a loss in state revenue and a loss of state COLA which enables them generally to account for inflation and increases to salaries based on the inflation. So now they are asking to supplement the loss of state money with an influx of local money. Basically a transfer.”

    Declining enrollment/inflation are common problems the school board must anticipate. Ergo they cannot spend $250,000 for the highest paid superintendent in Yolo County.

    Lastly, they pulled the $120 figure out of thin air based on what they thought they could get, not based on a specific need. This is what they said so in the Enterprise.

  26. hell no on W

    “It’s hard to live within a budget when you get between $2 million and $4.5 million pulled out of it.”

    You live within your means. Part of the school Board’s responsibility is to prioritize and anticipate potential cuts. Regular people have to deal with this all the time: Dad gets laid off, the economy goes up and down, gas prices soar. Welcome to the real world.

    “I guess I take exception to the comment constant increases.”

    Measure W is up for support very soon after Q was passed. What do you mean you take exception?

    “The district then faces a loss from declining enrollment–one year to another, combined with a loss in state revenue and a loss of state COLA which enables them generally to account for inflation and increases to salaries based on the inflation. So now they are asking to supplement the loss of state money with an influx of local money. Basically a transfer.”

    Declining enrollment/inflation are common problems the school board must anticipate. Ergo they cannot spend $250,000 for the highest paid superintendent in Yolo County.

    Lastly, they pulled the $120 figure out of thin air based on what they thought they could get, not based on a specific need. This is what they said so in the Enterprise.

  27. hell no on W

    “It’s hard to live within a budget when you get between $2 million and $4.5 million pulled out of it.”

    You live within your means. Part of the school Board’s responsibility is to prioritize and anticipate potential cuts. Regular people have to deal with this all the time: Dad gets laid off, the economy goes up and down, gas prices soar. Welcome to the real world.

    “I guess I take exception to the comment constant increases.”

    Measure W is up for support very soon after Q was passed. What do you mean you take exception?

    “The district then faces a loss from declining enrollment–one year to another, combined with a loss in state revenue and a loss of state COLA which enables them generally to account for inflation and increases to salaries based on the inflation. So now they are asking to supplement the loss of state money with an influx of local money. Basically a transfer.”

    Declining enrollment/inflation are common problems the school board must anticipate. Ergo they cannot spend $250,000 for the highest paid superintendent in Yolo County.

    Lastly, they pulled the $120 figure out of thin air based on what they thought they could get, not based on a specific need. This is what they said so in the Enterprise.

  28. hell no on W

    “It’s hard to live within a budget when you get between $2 million and $4.5 million pulled out of it.”

    You live within your means. Part of the school Board’s responsibility is to prioritize and anticipate potential cuts. Regular people have to deal with this all the time: Dad gets laid off, the economy goes up and down, gas prices soar. Welcome to the real world.

    “I guess I take exception to the comment constant increases.”

    Measure W is up for support very soon after Q was passed. What do you mean you take exception?

    “The district then faces a loss from declining enrollment–one year to another, combined with a loss in state revenue and a loss of state COLA which enables them generally to account for inflation and increases to salaries based on the inflation. So now they are asking to supplement the loss of state money with an influx of local money. Basically a transfer.”

    Declining enrollment/inflation are common problems the school board must anticipate. Ergo they cannot spend $250,000 for the highest paid superintendent in Yolo County.

    Lastly, they pulled the $120 figure out of thin air based on what they thought they could get, not based on a specific need. This is what they said so in the Enterprise.

  29. Doug Paul Davis

    “You live within your means. Part of the school Board’s responsibility is to prioritize and anticipate potential cuts.”

    If I get fired from my job, my first response is not to sell my house. I look for another job, take out a loan, etc. The school board received cuts in state funding, were given a one-year break by the hard work and generosity of the community and now look to find a more permanent solution. The community gets to decide whether they would prefer to pay $120 more or see teachers fired and programs discontinued.

    “Measure W is up for support very soon after Q was passed. What do you mean you take exception? “

    I explained the difference between the two parcel taxes. Twice does not equate to constant.

    “Declining enrollment/inflation are common problems the school board must anticipate. Ergo they cannot spend $250,000 for the highest paid superintendent in Yolo County.”

    I was pretty sure he got a salary of $170,000, which puts him about at the same salary level of Bill Emlen, the City Manager. Regardless, the difference between his salary and the next person’s salary is a drop in the bucket compared to several million dollars.

    “Lastly, they pulled the $120 figure out of thin air based on what they thought they could get, not based on a specific need. This is what they said so in the Enterprise.”

    I agree with you there. I think $120 was a complete and total mistake. It should have been about $90. Only Gina Daleiden even questioned it. A number of people in the community have told me that they think the price was a huge mistake. Nevertheless voting against it is an even bigger mistake.

  30. Doug Paul Davis

    “You live within your means. Part of the school Board’s responsibility is to prioritize and anticipate potential cuts.”

    If I get fired from my job, my first response is not to sell my house. I look for another job, take out a loan, etc. The school board received cuts in state funding, were given a one-year break by the hard work and generosity of the community and now look to find a more permanent solution. The community gets to decide whether they would prefer to pay $120 more or see teachers fired and programs discontinued.

    “Measure W is up for support very soon after Q was passed. What do you mean you take exception? “

    I explained the difference between the two parcel taxes. Twice does not equate to constant.

    “Declining enrollment/inflation are common problems the school board must anticipate. Ergo they cannot spend $250,000 for the highest paid superintendent in Yolo County.”

    I was pretty sure he got a salary of $170,000, which puts him about at the same salary level of Bill Emlen, the City Manager. Regardless, the difference between his salary and the next person’s salary is a drop in the bucket compared to several million dollars.

    “Lastly, they pulled the $120 figure out of thin air based on what they thought they could get, not based on a specific need. This is what they said so in the Enterprise.”

    I agree with you there. I think $120 was a complete and total mistake. It should have been about $90. Only Gina Daleiden even questioned it. A number of people in the community have told me that they think the price was a huge mistake. Nevertheless voting against it is an even bigger mistake.

  31. Doug Paul Davis

    “You live within your means. Part of the school Board’s responsibility is to prioritize and anticipate potential cuts.”

    If I get fired from my job, my first response is not to sell my house. I look for another job, take out a loan, etc. The school board received cuts in state funding, were given a one-year break by the hard work and generosity of the community and now look to find a more permanent solution. The community gets to decide whether they would prefer to pay $120 more or see teachers fired and programs discontinued.

    “Measure W is up for support very soon after Q was passed. What do you mean you take exception? “

    I explained the difference between the two parcel taxes. Twice does not equate to constant.

    “Declining enrollment/inflation are common problems the school board must anticipate. Ergo they cannot spend $250,000 for the highest paid superintendent in Yolo County.”

    I was pretty sure he got a salary of $170,000, which puts him about at the same salary level of Bill Emlen, the City Manager. Regardless, the difference between his salary and the next person’s salary is a drop in the bucket compared to several million dollars.

    “Lastly, they pulled the $120 figure out of thin air based on what they thought they could get, not based on a specific need. This is what they said so in the Enterprise.”

    I agree with you there. I think $120 was a complete and total mistake. It should have been about $90. Only Gina Daleiden even questioned it. A number of people in the community have told me that they think the price was a huge mistake. Nevertheless voting against it is an even bigger mistake.

  32. Doug Paul Davis

    “You live within your means. Part of the school Board’s responsibility is to prioritize and anticipate potential cuts.”

    If I get fired from my job, my first response is not to sell my house. I look for another job, take out a loan, etc. The school board received cuts in state funding, were given a one-year break by the hard work and generosity of the community and now look to find a more permanent solution. The community gets to decide whether they would prefer to pay $120 more or see teachers fired and programs discontinued.

    “Measure W is up for support very soon after Q was passed. What do you mean you take exception? “

    I explained the difference between the two parcel taxes. Twice does not equate to constant.

    “Declining enrollment/inflation are common problems the school board must anticipate. Ergo they cannot spend $250,000 for the highest paid superintendent in Yolo County.”

    I was pretty sure he got a salary of $170,000, which puts him about at the same salary level of Bill Emlen, the City Manager. Regardless, the difference between his salary and the next person’s salary is a drop in the bucket compared to several million dollars.

    “Lastly, they pulled the $120 figure out of thin air based on what they thought they could get, not based on a specific need. This is what they said so in the Enterprise.”

    I agree with you there. I think $120 was a complete and total mistake. It should have been about $90. Only Gina Daleiden even questioned it. A number of people in the community have told me that they think the price was a huge mistake. Nevertheless voting against it is an even bigger mistake.

  33. yes on W

    85% of money that goes to the schools goes to fund teachers, whether they happen to be teaching at Willett, Emerson, Korematsu, DaVinci or elsewhere.

    Voting yes on parcel taxes is one of the strongest ways we can support our teachers and the excellent programs available to all K-12 students in Davis.

  34. yes on W

    85% of money that goes to the schools goes to fund teachers, whether they happen to be teaching at Willett, Emerson, Korematsu, DaVinci or elsewhere.

    Voting yes on parcel taxes is one of the strongest ways we can support our teachers and the excellent programs available to all K-12 students in Davis.

  35. yes on W

    85% of money that goes to the schools goes to fund teachers, whether they happen to be teaching at Willett, Emerson, Korematsu, DaVinci or elsewhere.

    Voting yes on parcel taxes is one of the strongest ways we can support our teachers and the excellent programs available to all K-12 students in Davis.

  36. yes on W

    85% of money that goes to the schools goes to fund teachers, whether they happen to be teaching at Willett, Emerson, Korematsu, DaVinci or elsewhere.

    Voting yes on parcel taxes is one of the strongest ways we can support our teachers and the excellent programs available to all K-12 students in Davis.

  37. Robin W

    The Board did not pull the $120 figure out of thin air. $120 per home and $50 per multi-dwelling unit is the amount calculated as necessary to avoid the cuts that were on the table this past spring. I believe it is equal to the amount raised by Davis Schools Foundation. The Board decided to ask for the full amount needed to avoid teacher lay-offs, additional school closures and major program cuts because they knew there would be hell to pay if a parcel tax were passed now but lay-offs, school closures and major program cuts were necessary anyway.

    To the person who doesn’t want Emerson closed — Pass the parcel tax. Otherwise closing Emerson will be unavoidable, along with many other cuts.

    As for an oversight committee — read the proposed parcel tax measure. It’s in there. The programs that will be supported by the parcel tax are also identified specifically in the parcel tax measure. Stop expressing anger about things you erroneously claim are missing because you haven’t done your homework.

    The need to close an elementary school resulted from faulty growth projections many years ago (which led to overbuilding elementary schools). These projections were made by an expert who is no longer used by the school district, who reported to district administrators who are no longer district employees, who reported to a School Board that has since been replaced. It was a big mistake. How many years of Davis kids are you going to punish for this mistake?

    I am tired of hearing about decreasing enrollment in the Davis school systems. While there was a recent enrollment drop compared to 4 years ago, the total has been relatively stable over the past 10 years. Projections for the near future are for a stable elementary population and only a slight drop at the secondary level.

    The budget problems are not related to opening Da Vinci or any other schools. Da Vinci has one part-time principal, who also teaches, and no Vice Principals. The number of teachers needed district-wide is driven by the number of students, regardless how they are divided up between schools.

    The reason the district is short millions of dollars is simply because the state has cut funding. Stop blaming a new School Board and administration for the actions of the state. It takes a lot of gall to take your misdirected anger out on the children.

  38. Robin W

    The Board did not pull the $120 figure out of thin air. $120 per home and $50 per multi-dwelling unit is the amount calculated as necessary to avoid the cuts that were on the table this past spring. I believe it is equal to the amount raised by Davis Schools Foundation. The Board decided to ask for the full amount needed to avoid teacher lay-offs, additional school closures and major program cuts because they knew there would be hell to pay if a parcel tax were passed now but lay-offs, school closures and major program cuts were necessary anyway.

    To the person who doesn’t want Emerson closed — Pass the parcel tax. Otherwise closing Emerson will be unavoidable, along with many other cuts.

    As for an oversight committee — read the proposed parcel tax measure. It’s in there. The programs that will be supported by the parcel tax are also identified specifically in the parcel tax measure. Stop expressing anger about things you erroneously claim are missing because you haven’t done your homework.

    The need to close an elementary school resulted from faulty growth projections many years ago (which led to overbuilding elementary schools). These projections were made by an expert who is no longer used by the school district, who reported to district administrators who are no longer district employees, who reported to a School Board that has since been replaced. It was a big mistake. How many years of Davis kids are you going to punish for this mistake?

    I am tired of hearing about decreasing enrollment in the Davis school systems. While there was a recent enrollment drop compared to 4 years ago, the total has been relatively stable over the past 10 years. Projections for the near future are for a stable elementary population and only a slight drop at the secondary level.

    The budget problems are not related to opening Da Vinci or any other schools. Da Vinci has one part-time principal, who also teaches, and no Vice Principals. The number of teachers needed district-wide is driven by the number of students, regardless how they are divided up between schools.

    The reason the district is short millions of dollars is simply because the state has cut funding. Stop blaming a new School Board and administration for the actions of the state. It takes a lot of gall to take your misdirected anger out on the children.

  39. Robin W

    The Board did not pull the $120 figure out of thin air. $120 per home and $50 per multi-dwelling unit is the amount calculated as necessary to avoid the cuts that were on the table this past spring. I believe it is equal to the amount raised by Davis Schools Foundation. The Board decided to ask for the full amount needed to avoid teacher lay-offs, additional school closures and major program cuts because they knew there would be hell to pay if a parcel tax were passed now but lay-offs, school closures and major program cuts were necessary anyway.

    To the person who doesn’t want Emerson closed — Pass the parcel tax. Otherwise closing Emerson will be unavoidable, along with many other cuts.

    As for an oversight committee — read the proposed parcel tax measure. It’s in there. The programs that will be supported by the parcel tax are also identified specifically in the parcel tax measure. Stop expressing anger about things you erroneously claim are missing because you haven’t done your homework.

    The need to close an elementary school resulted from faulty growth projections many years ago (which led to overbuilding elementary schools). These projections were made by an expert who is no longer used by the school district, who reported to district administrators who are no longer district employees, who reported to a School Board that has since been replaced. It was a big mistake. How many years of Davis kids are you going to punish for this mistake?

    I am tired of hearing about decreasing enrollment in the Davis school systems. While there was a recent enrollment drop compared to 4 years ago, the total has been relatively stable over the past 10 years. Projections for the near future are for a stable elementary population and only a slight drop at the secondary level.

    The budget problems are not related to opening Da Vinci or any other schools. Da Vinci has one part-time principal, who also teaches, and no Vice Principals. The number of teachers needed district-wide is driven by the number of students, regardless how they are divided up between schools.

    The reason the district is short millions of dollars is simply because the state has cut funding. Stop blaming a new School Board and administration for the actions of the state. It takes a lot of gall to take your misdirected anger out on the children.

  40. Robin W

    The Board did not pull the $120 figure out of thin air. $120 per home and $50 per multi-dwelling unit is the amount calculated as necessary to avoid the cuts that were on the table this past spring. I believe it is equal to the amount raised by Davis Schools Foundation. The Board decided to ask for the full amount needed to avoid teacher lay-offs, additional school closures and major program cuts because they knew there would be hell to pay if a parcel tax were passed now but lay-offs, school closures and major program cuts were necessary anyway.

    To the person who doesn’t want Emerson closed — Pass the parcel tax. Otherwise closing Emerson will be unavoidable, along with many other cuts.

    As for an oversight committee — read the proposed parcel tax measure. It’s in there. The programs that will be supported by the parcel tax are also identified specifically in the parcel tax measure. Stop expressing anger about things you erroneously claim are missing because you haven’t done your homework.

    The need to close an elementary school resulted from faulty growth projections many years ago (which led to overbuilding elementary schools). These projections were made by an expert who is no longer used by the school district, who reported to district administrators who are no longer district employees, who reported to a School Board that has since been replaced. It was a big mistake. How many years of Davis kids are you going to punish for this mistake?

    I am tired of hearing about decreasing enrollment in the Davis school systems. While there was a recent enrollment drop compared to 4 years ago, the total has been relatively stable over the past 10 years. Projections for the near future are for a stable elementary population and only a slight drop at the secondary level.

    The budget problems are not related to opening Da Vinci or any other schools. Da Vinci has one part-time principal, who also teaches, and no Vice Principals. The number of teachers needed district-wide is driven by the number of students, regardless how they are divided up between schools.

    The reason the district is short millions of dollars is simply because the state has cut funding. Stop blaming a new School Board and administration for the actions of the state. It takes a lot of gall to take your misdirected anger out on the children.

  41. Hooray for mediocrity!

    Last election: “The sky is falling!! The sky is falling!! Vote yes for more parcel tax money for the schools!!”

    Outcome: “It passed! Phew.”

    Result: Davis Schools Foundation raises a crap-load of money to save a few positions for one year.”

    Next election: “The sky is falling!! The sky is falling!! Vote yes for more parcel tax money for the schools!!”

    Outcome: Lather, rinse, repeat…

    Every group has SCREAMED to the School Board that their kid’s special interest group needs to be saved. As Garrison Keillor said, “Every kid is above average.” Every kid in Davis is so special that no kid is special.

    I can’t wait for my kid to grow up normal and boring. Hoo-rray for mediocrity!

  42. Hooray for mediocrity!

    Last election: “The sky is falling!! The sky is falling!! Vote yes for more parcel tax money for the schools!!”

    Outcome: “It passed! Phew.”

    Result: Davis Schools Foundation raises a crap-load of money to save a few positions for one year.”

    Next election: “The sky is falling!! The sky is falling!! Vote yes for more parcel tax money for the schools!!”

    Outcome: Lather, rinse, repeat…

    Every group has SCREAMED to the School Board that their kid’s special interest group needs to be saved. As Garrison Keillor said, “Every kid is above average.” Every kid in Davis is so special that no kid is special.

    I can’t wait for my kid to grow up normal and boring. Hoo-rray for mediocrity!

  43. Hooray for mediocrity!

    Last election: “The sky is falling!! The sky is falling!! Vote yes for more parcel tax money for the schools!!”

    Outcome: “It passed! Phew.”

    Result: Davis Schools Foundation raises a crap-load of money to save a few positions for one year.”

    Next election: “The sky is falling!! The sky is falling!! Vote yes for more parcel tax money for the schools!!”

    Outcome: Lather, rinse, repeat…

    Every group has SCREAMED to the School Board that their kid’s special interest group needs to be saved. As Garrison Keillor said, “Every kid is above average.” Every kid in Davis is so special that no kid is special.

    I can’t wait for my kid to grow up normal and boring. Hoo-rray for mediocrity!

  44. Hooray for mediocrity!

    Last election: “The sky is falling!! The sky is falling!! Vote yes for more parcel tax money for the schools!!”

    Outcome: “It passed! Phew.”

    Result: Davis Schools Foundation raises a crap-load of money to save a few positions for one year.”

    Next election: “The sky is falling!! The sky is falling!! Vote yes for more parcel tax money for the schools!!”

    Outcome: Lather, rinse, repeat…

    Every group has SCREAMED to the School Board that their kid’s special interest group needs to be saved. As Garrison Keillor said, “Every kid is above average.” Every kid in Davis is so special that no kid is special.

    I can’t wait for my kid to grow up normal and boring. Hoo-rray for mediocrity!

  45. Im tired of this, people you sound uneducated...

    Your post shows a fundamental misunderstanding for the what Parcel Tax that was passed in 2007 was supposed to do. This was not done in anticipation of budget cuts, rather it was simply a continuation of the previous parcel tax, passed four years before, with the amount adjusted for inflation.

    The actions of the Davis Schools Foundation had absolutely nothing to do with the parcel tax in 2007. The schools foundation arose in response to severe budget cuts backs by the state, the lack of cola, and the one-time larger than expected drop in enrollment.

    Your string of events betrays the fact that you really neither understand school financing nor do you understand the district’s fiscal situation or the role of the parcel tax.

  46. Im tired of this, people you

    Your post shows a fundamental misunderstanding for the what Parcel Tax that was passed in 2007 was supposed to do. This was not done in anticipation of budget cuts, rather it was simply a continuation of the previous parcel tax, passed four years before, with the amount adjusted for inflation.

    The actions of the Davis Schools Foundation had absolutely nothing to do with the parcel tax in 2007. The schools foundation arose in response to severe budget cuts backs by the state, the lack of cola, and the one-time larger than expected drop in enrollment.

    Your string of events betrays the fact that you really neither understand school financing nor do you understand the district’s fiscal situation or the role of the parcel tax.

  47. Im tired of this, people you

    Your post shows a fundamental misunderstanding for the what Parcel Tax that was passed in 2007 was supposed to do. This was not done in anticipation of budget cuts, rather it was simply a continuation of the previous parcel tax, passed four years before, with the amount adjusted for inflation.

    The actions of the Davis Schools Foundation had absolutely nothing to do with the parcel tax in 2007. The schools foundation arose in response to severe budget cuts backs by the state, the lack of cola, and the one-time larger than expected drop in enrollment.

    Your string of events betrays the fact that you really neither understand school financing nor do you understand the district’s fiscal situation or the role of the parcel tax.

  48. Im tired of this, people you

    Your post shows a fundamental misunderstanding for the what Parcel Tax that was passed in 2007 was supposed to do. This was not done in anticipation of budget cuts, rather it was simply a continuation of the previous parcel tax, passed four years before, with the amount adjusted for inflation.

    The actions of the Davis Schools Foundation had absolutely nothing to do with the parcel tax in 2007. The schools foundation arose in response to severe budget cuts backs by the state, the lack of cola, and the one-time larger than expected drop in enrollment.

    Your string of events betrays the fact that you really neither understand school financing nor do you understand the district’s fiscal situation or the role of the parcel tax.

  49. Anonymous

    “What lesson are we teaching them when the school board does not have to do this and can count on constant increases to pull them out of the fire? And these people are educating our kids?”

    I subscribe to the philosophy of holding children harmless in face of tough economies. Maybe I will eat more beans instead of steak, but I will not dilute the baby formula.

    These kids are passing this way only once, and we had best do it right by them with their education.

  50. Anonymous

    “What lesson are we teaching them when the school board does not have to do this and can count on constant increases to pull them out of the fire? And these people are educating our kids?”

    I subscribe to the philosophy of holding children harmless in face of tough economies. Maybe I will eat more beans instead of steak, but I will not dilute the baby formula.

    These kids are passing this way only once, and we had best do it right by them with their education.

  51. Anonymous

    “What lesson are we teaching them when the school board does not have to do this and can count on constant increases to pull them out of the fire? And these people are educating our kids?”

    I subscribe to the philosophy of holding children harmless in face of tough economies. Maybe I will eat more beans instead of steak, but I will not dilute the baby formula.

    These kids are passing this way only once, and we had best do it right by them with their education.

  52. Anonymous

    “What lesson are we teaching them when the school board does not have to do this and can count on constant increases to pull them out of the fire? And these people are educating our kids?”

    I subscribe to the philosophy of holding children harmless in face of tough economies. Maybe I will eat more beans instead of steak, but I will not dilute the baby formula.

    These kids are passing this way only once, and we had best do it right by them with their education.

  53. Are You Listening?

    Since the Yes on Wers don’t get it, no matter how logical the argument, let me show them the way. The bottom line is this – the School Board spent taxpayer dollars to hire a consultant, that told them that a parcel tax of any more than $90 would not pass. So one has to wonder at the School Board/District’s judgment in choosing the $120 figure, which they know is very unlikely to pass?

    I have two speculations:
    1) The School District/Board is arrogant enough to think they can scare citizens into paying again in less than one year;
    2) They really don’t want Measure W to pass.

    I would believe the School District/Board is arrogant enough to think they can somehow “educate” us stupid folks who just can’t seem to understand up until now. I could believe they don’t want Measure W to pass as an excuse to close Emerson – which they wanted to do anyway, but didn’t care to in face of the vociferous opposition they faced, while trying to raise millions in donor dollars.

    Furthermore, I would note Woodland was smart enough not to have to lay off any teachers. So what is Woodland doing right that we are not? Using commercial tax dollars to fund its schools, rather than state funding? Not selling off assets to cover expenses? Being more careful about not instituting frills in the first place?

    What is the School Board/District doing about: not relying so heavily on state funding; weathering the normal fluctuations of enrollment; better projecting what is needed for the future?

    Now I am sure Yes on Wers are going to put forth all sorts of “expert” arguments to shoot me down, which just goes to show how ignorant and arrogant they are. Listen to what No on Wers are saying, address those issues to their satisfaction, and just maybe you might get a parcel tax passed.

    For instance, if you framed the parcel tax in such a way as to “save Emerson”, I bet it would pass with flying colors. The fact that the School Board is not willing to save Emerson, when they know that is what the public wants, speaks volumes.

    What the public wants – which is more streamlining, not closing old schools to make way for new schools, accountability, MEANINGFUL oversight – is being totally ignored by the School Board/District. So give us a GOOD reason to pay attention to the arrogant and unheeding School Board/District?

    Flushing down the toilet good money after bad, without putting systems in place to guarantee the taxpayer is not going to continually get hosed, is a losing strategy. HELLO, ANYBODY LISTENING OUT THERE????????????

  54. Are You Listening?

    Since the Yes on Wers don’t get it, no matter how logical the argument, let me show them the way. The bottom line is this – the School Board spent taxpayer dollars to hire a consultant, that told them that a parcel tax of any more than $90 would not pass. So one has to wonder at the School Board/District’s judgment in choosing the $120 figure, which they know is very unlikely to pass?

    I have two speculations:
    1) The School District/Board is arrogant enough to think they can scare citizens into paying again in less than one year;
    2) They really don’t want Measure W to pass.

    I would believe the School District/Board is arrogant enough to think they can somehow “educate” us stupid folks who just can’t seem to understand up until now. I could believe they don’t want Measure W to pass as an excuse to close Emerson – which they wanted to do anyway, but didn’t care to in face of the vociferous opposition they faced, while trying to raise millions in donor dollars.

    Furthermore, I would note Woodland was smart enough not to have to lay off any teachers. So what is Woodland doing right that we are not? Using commercial tax dollars to fund its schools, rather than state funding? Not selling off assets to cover expenses? Being more careful about not instituting frills in the first place?

    What is the School Board/District doing about: not relying so heavily on state funding; weathering the normal fluctuations of enrollment; better projecting what is needed for the future?

    Now I am sure Yes on Wers are going to put forth all sorts of “expert” arguments to shoot me down, which just goes to show how ignorant and arrogant they are. Listen to what No on Wers are saying, address those issues to their satisfaction, and just maybe you might get a parcel tax passed.

    For instance, if you framed the parcel tax in such a way as to “save Emerson”, I bet it would pass with flying colors. The fact that the School Board is not willing to save Emerson, when they know that is what the public wants, speaks volumes.

    What the public wants – which is more streamlining, not closing old schools to make way for new schools, accountability, MEANINGFUL oversight – is being totally ignored by the School Board/District. So give us a GOOD reason to pay attention to the arrogant and unheeding School Board/District?

    Flushing down the toilet good money after bad, without putting systems in place to guarantee the taxpayer is not going to continually get hosed, is a losing strategy. HELLO, ANYBODY LISTENING OUT THERE????????????

  55. Are You Listening?

    Since the Yes on Wers don’t get it, no matter how logical the argument, let me show them the way. The bottom line is this – the School Board spent taxpayer dollars to hire a consultant, that told them that a parcel tax of any more than $90 would not pass. So one has to wonder at the School Board/District’s judgment in choosing the $120 figure, which they know is very unlikely to pass?

    I have two speculations:
    1) The School District/Board is arrogant enough to think they can scare citizens into paying again in less than one year;
    2) They really don’t want Measure W to pass.

    I would believe the School District/Board is arrogant enough to think they can somehow “educate” us stupid folks who just can’t seem to understand up until now. I could believe they don’t want Measure W to pass as an excuse to close Emerson – which they wanted to do anyway, but didn’t care to in face of the vociferous opposition they faced, while trying to raise millions in donor dollars.

    Furthermore, I would note Woodland was smart enough not to have to lay off any teachers. So what is Woodland doing right that we are not? Using commercial tax dollars to fund its schools, rather than state funding? Not selling off assets to cover expenses? Being more careful about not instituting frills in the first place?

    What is the School Board/District doing about: not relying so heavily on state funding; weathering the normal fluctuations of enrollment; better projecting what is needed for the future?

    Now I am sure Yes on Wers are going to put forth all sorts of “expert” arguments to shoot me down, which just goes to show how ignorant and arrogant they are. Listen to what No on Wers are saying, address those issues to their satisfaction, and just maybe you might get a parcel tax passed.

    For instance, if you framed the parcel tax in such a way as to “save Emerson”, I bet it would pass with flying colors. The fact that the School Board is not willing to save Emerson, when they know that is what the public wants, speaks volumes.

    What the public wants – which is more streamlining, not closing old schools to make way for new schools, accountability, MEANINGFUL oversight – is being totally ignored by the School Board/District. So give us a GOOD reason to pay attention to the arrogant and unheeding School Board/District?

    Flushing down the toilet good money after bad, without putting systems in place to guarantee the taxpayer is not going to continually get hosed, is a losing strategy. HELLO, ANYBODY LISTENING OUT THERE????????????

  56. Are You Listening?

    Since the Yes on Wers don’t get it, no matter how logical the argument, let me show them the way. The bottom line is this – the School Board spent taxpayer dollars to hire a consultant, that told them that a parcel tax of any more than $90 would not pass. So one has to wonder at the School Board/District’s judgment in choosing the $120 figure, which they know is very unlikely to pass?

    I have two speculations:
    1) The School District/Board is arrogant enough to think they can scare citizens into paying again in less than one year;
    2) They really don’t want Measure W to pass.

    I would believe the School District/Board is arrogant enough to think they can somehow “educate” us stupid folks who just can’t seem to understand up until now. I could believe they don’t want Measure W to pass as an excuse to close Emerson – which they wanted to do anyway, but didn’t care to in face of the vociferous opposition they faced, while trying to raise millions in donor dollars.

    Furthermore, I would note Woodland was smart enough not to have to lay off any teachers. So what is Woodland doing right that we are not? Using commercial tax dollars to fund its schools, rather than state funding? Not selling off assets to cover expenses? Being more careful about not instituting frills in the first place?

    What is the School Board/District doing about: not relying so heavily on state funding; weathering the normal fluctuations of enrollment; better projecting what is needed for the future?

    Now I am sure Yes on Wers are going to put forth all sorts of “expert” arguments to shoot me down, which just goes to show how ignorant and arrogant they are. Listen to what No on Wers are saying, address those issues to their satisfaction, and just maybe you might get a parcel tax passed.

    For instance, if you framed the parcel tax in such a way as to “save Emerson”, I bet it would pass with flying colors. The fact that the School Board is not willing to save Emerson, when they know that is what the public wants, speaks volumes.

    What the public wants – which is more streamlining, not closing old schools to make way for new schools, accountability, MEANINGFUL oversight – is being totally ignored by the School Board/District. So give us a GOOD reason to pay attention to the arrogant and unheeding School Board/District?

    Flushing down the toilet good money after bad, without putting systems in place to guarantee the taxpayer is not going to continually get hosed, is a losing strategy. HELLO, ANYBODY LISTENING OUT THERE????????????

  57. Doug Paul Davis

    It is important to be clear here. The consultant never told them that the $120 level would lose. He also never advised them against doing it. All the consultant said is what the polls said, if the election were held now $120 would not pass. Guess what, neither would $90.

    So what the school board did was instead of deciding how much they could get, they determined how much they would need to have to make no cuts. That number turned out to be $120.

    Is it going to be difficult for them to get that passed? I think so.

    On the other hand, and this came to me yesterday as I was having this conversation with someone else–say they did go for $90, and then they had to still cut programs and lay off teachers, people like you would be screaming bloody hell for them passing a parcel tax and still needing to make cuts. And you’d be right. So from that angle, I see their point. I’m not sure if I would have made the same decision as they made.

    I back the parcel tax 100% because it is the only way to ensure that teachers do not get fired and program do not get cut.

    Here by the way is the list of programs that would be cut if the parcel tax does not pass. Plus they would likely close Emerson in order to avoid some of the cuts.

    Programs Funded by Proposed Parcel Tax

  58. Doug Paul Davis

    It is important to be clear here. The consultant never told them that the $120 level would lose. He also never advised them against doing it. All the consultant said is what the polls said, if the election were held now $120 would not pass. Guess what, neither would $90.

    So what the school board did was instead of deciding how much they could get, they determined how much they would need to have to make no cuts. That number turned out to be $120.

    Is it going to be difficult for them to get that passed? I think so.

    On the other hand, and this came to me yesterday as I was having this conversation with someone else–say they did go for $90, and then they had to still cut programs and lay off teachers, people like you would be screaming bloody hell for them passing a parcel tax and still needing to make cuts. And you’d be right. So from that angle, I see their point. I’m not sure if I would have made the same decision as they made.

    I back the parcel tax 100% because it is the only way to ensure that teachers do not get fired and program do not get cut.

    Here by the way is the list of programs that would be cut if the parcel tax does not pass. Plus they would likely close Emerson in order to avoid some of the cuts.

    Programs Funded by Proposed Parcel Tax

  59. Doug Paul Davis

    It is important to be clear here. The consultant never told them that the $120 level would lose. He also never advised them against doing it. All the consultant said is what the polls said, if the election were held now $120 would not pass. Guess what, neither would $90.

    So what the school board did was instead of deciding how much they could get, they determined how much they would need to have to make no cuts. That number turned out to be $120.

    Is it going to be difficult for them to get that passed? I think so.

    On the other hand, and this came to me yesterday as I was having this conversation with someone else–say they did go for $90, and then they had to still cut programs and lay off teachers, people like you would be screaming bloody hell for them passing a parcel tax and still needing to make cuts. And you’d be right. So from that angle, I see their point. I’m not sure if I would have made the same decision as they made.

    I back the parcel tax 100% because it is the only way to ensure that teachers do not get fired and program do not get cut.

    Here by the way is the list of programs that would be cut if the parcel tax does not pass. Plus they would likely close Emerson in order to avoid some of the cuts.

    Programs Funded by Proposed Parcel Tax

  60. Doug Paul Davis

    It is important to be clear here. The consultant never told them that the $120 level would lose. He also never advised them against doing it. All the consultant said is what the polls said, if the election were held now $120 would not pass. Guess what, neither would $90.

    So what the school board did was instead of deciding how much they could get, they determined how much they would need to have to make no cuts. That number turned out to be $120.

    Is it going to be difficult for them to get that passed? I think so.

    On the other hand, and this came to me yesterday as I was having this conversation with someone else–say they did go for $90, and then they had to still cut programs and lay off teachers, people like you would be screaming bloody hell for them passing a parcel tax and still needing to make cuts. And you’d be right. So from that angle, I see their point. I’m not sure if I would have made the same decision as they made.

    I back the parcel tax 100% because it is the only way to ensure that teachers do not get fired and program do not get cut.

    Here by the way is the list of programs that would be cut if the parcel tax does not pass. Plus they would likely close Emerson in order to avoid some of the cuts.

    Programs Funded by Proposed Parcel Tax

  61. Anonymous

    This School Board is in a bind, and it’s because of a mess they have to clean up. They didn’t make the mess, they inherited it.

    Of course you won’t catch any board member pointing fingers, they’re too politically savvy for that. It can’t blame past members, as many of those members are still held in high regard by the community. Hell, two former school board members represent Davis on the City Council and on the County Board of Supervisors. No one is winning brownie points by sheltering former School Boards. In fact, this School Board is facing the heat for dumb decisions (we can say with 20/20 hindsight) made years ago.

    So what do you want to do, punish elementary students for dumb decisions made years ago? That’s big of you. Take your $10 a month that your entire household will save, $4 for your entire apartment, and buy yourself something nice. You deserve it—at least that’s what you tell yourself—selfish sob.

  62. Anonymous

    This School Board is in a bind, and it’s because of a mess they have to clean up. They didn’t make the mess, they inherited it.

    Of course you won’t catch any board member pointing fingers, they’re too politically savvy for that. It can’t blame past members, as many of those members are still held in high regard by the community. Hell, two former school board members represent Davis on the City Council and on the County Board of Supervisors. No one is winning brownie points by sheltering former School Boards. In fact, this School Board is facing the heat for dumb decisions (we can say with 20/20 hindsight) made years ago.

    So what do you want to do, punish elementary students for dumb decisions made years ago? That’s big of you. Take your $10 a month that your entire household will save, $4 for your entire apartment, and buy yourself something nice. You deserve it—at least that’s what you tell yourself—selfish sob.

  63. Anonymous

    This School Board is in a bind, and it’s because of a mess they have to clean up. They didn’t make the mess, they inherited it.

    Of course you won’t catch any board member pointing fingers, they’re too politically savvy for that. It can’t blame past members, as many of those members are still held in high regard by the community. Hell, two former school board members represent Davis on the City Council and on the County Board of Supervisors. No one is winning brownie points by sheltering former School Boards. In fact, this School Board is facing the heat for dumb decisions (we can say with 20/20 hindsight) made years ago.

    So what do you want to do, punish elementary students for dumb decisions made years ago? That’s big of you. Take your $10 a month that your entire household will save, $4 for your entire apartment, and buy yourself something nice. You deserve it—at least that’s what you tell yourself—selfish sob.

  64. Anonymous

    This School Board is in a bind, and it’s because of a mess they have to clean up. They didn’t make the mess, they inherited it.

    Of course you won’t catch any board member pointing fingers, they’re too politically savvy for that. It can’t blame past members, as many of those members are still held in high regard by the community. Hell, two former school board members represent Davis on the City Council and on the County Board of Supervisors. No one is winning brownie points by sheltering former School Boards. In fact, this School Board is facing the heat for dumb decisions (we can say with 20/20 hindsight) made years ago.

    So what do you want to do, punish elementary students for dumb decisions made years ago? That’s big of you. Take your $10 a month that your entire household will save, $4 for your entire apartment, and buy yourself something nice. You deserve it—at least that’s what you tell yourself—selfish sob.

  65. Anonymous

    DPD,

    Thanks for posting the link to the proposed cuts.

    I’m comfortable with losing those if the tax doesn’t pass. I’m sure the school foundation will be funded to a certain extent every year and will buy back the more important ones. Some of them are fluff and should be cut if the state doesn’t send the funding.

    Anonymous 8/4/08 1:09,

    Put you name on your post and watch your mouth.

    -Bob Kohler

  66. Anonymous

    DPD,

    Thanks for posting the link to the proposed cuts.

    I’m comfortable with losing those if the tax doesn’t pass. I’m sure the school foundation will be funded to a certain extent every year and will buy back the more important ones. Some of them are fluff and should be cut if the state doesn’t send the funding.

    Anonymous 8/4/08 1:09,

    Put you name on your post and watch your mouth.

    -Bob Kohler

  67. Anonymous

    DPD,

    Thanks for posting the link to the proposed cuts.

    I’m comfortable with losing those if the tax doesn’t pass. I’m sure the school foundation will be funded to a certain extent every year and will buy back the more important ones. Some of them are fluff and should be cut if the state doesn’t send the funding.

    Anonymous 8/4/08 1:09,

    Put you name on your post and watch your mouth.

    -Bob Kohler

  68. Anonymous

    DPD,

    Thanks for posting the link to the proposed cuts.

    I’m comfortable with losing those if the tax doesn’t pass. I’m sure the school foundation will be funded to a certain extent every year and will buy back the more important ones. Some of them are fluff and should be cut if the state doesn’t send the funding.

    Anonymous 8/4/08 1:09,

    Put you name on your post and watch your mouth.

    -Bob Kohler

  69. Not Surprised

    “I back the parcel tax 100% because it is the only way to ensure that teachers do not get fired and program do not get cut.
    Here by the way is the list of programs that would be cut if the parcel tax does not pass. Plus they would likely close Emerson in order to avoid some of the cuts.”

    DPD, your problem is you haven’t lived in this town long enough to see this same scenario play itself out over and over again. We keep forking over money, and it still results in poor planning.

    By the way, I thought you said the School Board/District had told you the closing of Emerson was not likely anymore. Gone back on their word to you already? I’m not surprised!

  70. Not Surprised

    “I back the parcel tax 100% because it is the only way to ensure that teachers do not get fired and program do not get cut.
    Here by the way is the list of programs that would be cut if the parcel tax does not pass. Plus they would likely close Emerson in order to avoid some of the cuts.”

    DPD, your problem is you haven’t lived in this town long enough to see this same scenario play itself out over and over again. We keep forking over money, and it still results in poor planning.

    By the way, I thought you said the School Board/District had told you the closing of Emerson was not likely anymore. Gone back on their word to you already? I’m not surprised!

  71. Not Surprised

    “I back the parcel tax 100% because it is the only way to ensure that teachers do not get fired and program do not get cut.
    Here by the way is the list of programs that would be cut if the parcel tax does not pass. Plus they would likely close Emerson in order to avoid some of the cuts.”

    DPD, your problem is you haven’t lived in this town long enough to see this same scenario play itself out over and over again. We keep forking over money, and it still results in poor planning.

    By the way, I thought you said the School Board/District had told you the closing of Emerson was not likely anymore. Gone back on their word to you already? I’m not surprised!

  72. Not Surprised

    “I back the parcel tax 100% because it is the only way to ensure that teachers do not get fired and program do not get cut.
    Here by the way is the list of programs that would be cut if the parcel tax does not pass. Plus they would likely close Emerson in order to avoid some of the cuts.”

    DPD, your problem is you haven’t lived in this town long enough to see this same scenario play itself out over and over again. We keep forking over money, and it still results in poor planning.

    By the way, I thought you said the School Board/District had told you the closing of Emerson was not likely anymore. Gone back on their word to you already? I’m not surprised!

  73. Doug Paul Davis

    How long do I have to have lived here? And can you provide specific examples of them gong back on their word?

    CLARIFICATION: If the parcel tax passes, they will not close it. However, what I said was that if they have a choice between laying off teachers and closing a school, all bets are off.

  74. Doug Paul Davis

    How long do I have to have lived here? And can you provide specific examples of them gong back on their word?

    CLARIFICATION: If the parcel tax passes, they will not close it. However, what I said was that if they have a choice between laying off teachers and closing a school, all bets are off.

  75. Doug Paul Davis

    How long do I have to have lived here? And can you provide specific examples of them gong back on their word?

    CLARIFICATION: If the parcel tax passes, they will not close it. However, what I said was that if they have a choice between laying off teachers and closing a school, all bets are off.

  76. Doug Paul Davis

    How long do I have to have lived here? And can you provide specific examples of them gong back on their word?

    CLARIFICATION: If the parcel tax passes, they will not close it. However, what I said was that if they have a choice between laying off teachers and closing a school, all bets are off.

  77. Anonymous

    “What the public wants – which is more streamlining, not closing old schools to make way for new schools, accountability, MEANINGFUL oversight – is being totally ignored by the School Board/District. So give us a GOOD reason to pay attention to the arrogant and unheeding School Board/District?”

    It is clear that any meaningful argument offered to support Measure W would never convince you.

    I am convinced that almost everyone on the school board is doing their very best to do a good job with the schools. You do not usually run for these positions with the intention to be corrupt and incompetent.

    If you are so sure of what the public wants, that the Davis school system is so screwed up, and you spend this much time blogging over it, then you really need to run for school board and throw your vision into the real arena of public discussion and let the voters decide if they agree with you.

    You have a little more than a year to get ready.

  78. Anonymous

    “What the public wants – which is more streamlining, not closing old schools to make way for new schools, accountability, MEANINGFUL oversight – is being totally ignored by the School Board/District. So give us a GOOD reason to pay attention to the arrogant and unheeding School Board/District?”

    It is clear that any meaningful argument offered to support Measure W would never convince you.

    I am convinced that almost everyone on the school board is doing their very best to do a good job with the schools. You do not usually run for these positions with the intention to be corrupt and incompetent.

    If you are so sure of what the public wants, that the Davis school system is so screwed up, and you spend this much time blogging over it, then you really need to run for school board and throw your vision into the real arena of public discussion and let the voters decide if they agree with you.

    You have a little more than a year to get ready.

  79. Anonymous

    “What the public wants – which is more streamlining, not closing old schools to make way for new schools, accountability, MEANINGFUL oversight – is being totally ignored by the School Board/District. So give us a GOOD reason to pay attention to the arrogant and unheeding School Board/District?”

    It is clear that any meaningful argument offered to support Measure W would never convince you.

    I am convinced that almost everyone on the school board is doing their very best to do a good job with the schools. You do not usually run for these positions with the intention to be corrupt and incompetent.

    If you are so sure of what the public wants, that the Davis school system is so screwed up, and you spend this much time blogging over it, then you really need to run for school board and throw your vision into the real arena of public discussion and let the voters decide if they agree with you.

    You have a little more than a year to get ready.

  80. Anonymous

    “What the public wants – which is more streamlining, not closing old schools to make way for new schools, accountability, MEANINGFUL oversight – is being totally ignored by the School Board/District. So give us a GOOD reason to pay attention to the arrogant and unheeding School Board/District?”

    It is clear that any meaningful argument offered to support Measure W would never convince you.

    I am convinced that almost everyone on the school board is doing their very best to do a good job with the schools. You do not usually run for these positions with the intention to be corrupt and incompetent.

    If you are so sure of what the public wants, that the Davis school system is so screwed up, and you spend this much time blogging over it, then you really need to run for school board and throw your vision into the real arena of public discussion and let the voters decide if they agree with you.

    You have a little more than a year to get ready.

  81. wondering

    Where will Bill Storm and Steve Kelleher be teaching next year?

    I heard very good things about them as teachers.

    They taught at Valley Oak last year, and I heard that none of the district elementary teachers ended up being laid off. So I suppose they will still be in the district next year.

  82. wondering

    Where will Bill Storm and Steve Kelleher be teaching next year?

    I heard very good things about them as teachers.

    They taught at Valley Oak last year, and I heard that none of the district elementary teachers ended up being laid off. So I suppose they will still be in the district next year.

  83. wondering

    Where will Bill Storm and Steve Kelleher be teaching next year?

    I heard very good things about them as teachers.

    They taught at Valley Oak last year, and I heard that none of the district elementary teachers ended up being laid off. So I suppose they will still be in the district next year.

  84. wondering

    Where will Bill Storm and Steve Kelleher be teaching next year?

    I heard very good things about them as teachers.

    They taught at Valley Oak last year, and I heard that none of the district elementary teachers ended up being laid off. So I suppose they will still be in the district next year.

  85. No On W

    “If you are so sure of what the public wants, that the Davis school system is so screwed up, and you spend this much time blogging over it, then you really need to run for school board and throw your vision into the real arena of public discussion and let the voters decide if they agree with you.”

    What are you saying? That if a person is not willing to run for School Board they cannot complain about the fiscal mismanagement going on in our school system? As it turns out, I couldn’t run for School Board bc I am medically disabled, not that it is any of your business or particularly relevant. This is the kind of argument that is used when one’s position is not defensible.

  86. No On W

    “If you are so sure of what the public wants, that the Davis school system is so screwed up, and you spend this much time blogging over it, then you really need to run for school board and throw your vision into the real arena of public discussion and let the voters decide if they agree with you.”

    What are you saying? That if a person is not willing to run for School Board they cannot complain about the fiscal mismanagement going on in our school system? As it turns out, I couldn’t run for School Board bc I am medically disabled, not that it is any of your business or particularly relevant. This is the kind of argument that is used when one’s position is not defensible.

  87. No On W

    “If you are so sure of what the public wants, that the Davis school system is so screwed up, and you spend this much time blogging over it, then you really need to run for school board and throw your vision into the real arena of public discussion and let the voters decide if they agree with you.”

    What are you saying? That if a person is not willing to run for School Board they cannot complain about the fiscal mismanagement going on in our school system? As it turns out, I couldn’t run for School Board bc I am medically disabled, not that it is any of your business or particularly relevant. This is the kind of argument that is used when one’s position is not defensible.

  88. No On W

    “If you are so sure of what the public wants, that the Davis school system is so screwed up, and you spend this much time blogging over it, then you really need to run for school board and throw your vision into the real arena of public discussion and let the voters decide if they agree with you.”

    What are you saying? That if a person is not willing to run for School Board they cannot complain about the fiscal mismanagement going on in our school system? As it turns out, I couldn’t run for School Board bc I am medically disabled, not that it is any of your business or particularly relevant. This is the kind of argument that is used when one’s position is not defensible.

  89. NO ON R

    “How long do I have to have lived here? And can you provide specific examples of them gong back on their word?”

    I’ve lived here since 1987, and seen this same scenario played out too many times to count. However, this is the first time, since your reporting of Tahir Ahad and TSS, that I have more fully understood why this scenario keeps repeating itself. I wish I could give you more concrete examples, as you have requested. I just remember threats to cut all music programs if we didn’t cough up more money when my kids were attending elementary school years ago. It’s a bit mushy in my memory, but I do recall the tactics being the same – pay for frills, let basics go, then ask for more money for basics.

  90. NO ON R

    “How long do I have to have lived here? And can you provide specific examples of them gong back on their word?”

    I’ve lived here since 1987, and seen this same scenario played out too many times to count. However, this is the first time, since your reporting of Tahir Ahad and TSS, that I have more fully understood why this scenario keeps repeating itself. I wish I could give you more concrete examples, as you have requested. I just remember threats to cut all music programs if we didn’t cough up more money when my kids were attending elementary school years ago. It’s a bit mushy in my memory, but I do recall the tactics being the same – pay for frills, let basics go, then ask for more money for basics.

  91. NO ON R

    “How long do I have to have lived here? And can you provide specific examples of them gong back on their word?”

    I’ve lived here since 1987, and seen this same scenario played out too many times to count. However, this is the first time, since your reporting of Tahir Ahad and TSS, that I have more fully understood why this scenario keeps repeating itself. I wish I could give you more concrete examples, as you have requested. I just remember threats to cut all music programs if we didn’t cough up more money when my kids were attending elementary school years ago. It’s a bit mushy in my memory, but I do recall the tactics being the same – pay for frills, let basics go, then ask for more money for basics.

  92. NO ON R

    “How long do I have to have lived here? And can you provide specific examples of them gong back on their word?”

    I’ve lived here since 1987, and seen this same scenario played out too many times to count. However, this is the first time, since your reporting of Tahir Ahad and TSS, that I have more fully understood why this scenario keeps repeating itself. I wish I could give you more concrete examples, as you have requested. I just remember threats to cut all music programs if we didn’t cough up more money when my kids were attending elementary school years ago. It’s a bit mushy in my memory, but I do recall the tactics being the same – pay for frills, let basics go, then ask for more money for basics.

  93. Anonymous

    “What are you saying? That if a person is not willing to run for School Board they cannot complain about the fiscal mismanagement going on in our school system?”

    I think you exaggerate the sitation too much to the point where I don’t think that a majority of Davis voters would agree with you.

    Complain if you want; it’s your right. But if you really want the remedy that you seek, you will probably have to find a way to lead.

  94. Anonymous

    “What are you saying? That if a person is not willing to run for School Board they cannot complain about the fiscal mismanagement going on in our school system?”

    I think you exaggerate the sitation too much to the point where I don’t think that a majority of Davis voters would agree with you.

    Complain if you want; it’s your right. But if you really want the remedy that you seek, you will probably have to find a way to lead.

  95. Anonymous

    “What are you saying? That if a person is not willing to run for School Board they cannot complain about the fiscal mismanagement going on in our school system?”

    I think you exaggerate the sitation too much to the point where I don’t think that a majority of Davis voters would agree with you.

    Complain if you want; it’s your right. But if you really want the remedy that you seek, you will probably have to find a way to lead.

  96. Anonymous

    “What are you saying? That if a person is not willing to run for School Board they cannot complain about the fiscal mismanagement going on in our school system?”

    I think you exaggerate the sitation too much to the point where I don’t think that a majority of Davis voters would agree with you.

    Complain if you want; it’s your right. But if you really want the remedy that you seek, you will probably have to find a way to lead.

  97. No On W

    “Complain if you want; it’s your right. But if you really want the remedy that you seek, you will probably have to find a way to lead.”

    I am leading. I am trying to defeat any new parcel tax! So far, so good!

  98. No On W

    “Complain if you want; it’s your right. But if you really want the remedy that you seek, you will probably have to find a way to lead.”

    I am leading. I am trying to defeat any new parcel tax! So far, so good!

  99. No On W

    “Complain if you want; it’s your right. But if you really want the remedy that you seek, you will probably have to find a way to lead.”

    I am leading. I am trying to defeat any new parcel tax! So far, so good!

  100. No On W

    “Complain if you want; it’s your right. But if you really want the remedy that you seek, you will probably have to find a way to lead.”

    I am leading. I am trying to defeat any new parcel tax! So far, so good!

  101. Anonymous

    To: NOT SURPRISED,

    DPD lives in an apartment. DPD’s tax will be MUCH lower than a real homeowners taxes. DPD is willing to support a heavy tax against others but knows he will escape the bigger burden. Self Serving?

  102. Anonymous

    To: NOT SURPRISED,

    DPD lives in an apartment. DPD’s tax will be MUCH lower than a real homeowners taxes. DPD is willing to support a heavy tax against others but knows he will escape the bigger burden. Self Serving?

  103. Anonymous

    To: NOT SURPRISED,

    DPD lives in an apartment. DPD’s tax will be MUCH lower than a real homeowners taxes. DPD is willing to support a heavy tax against others but knows he will escape the bigger burden. Self Serving?

  104. Anonymous

    To: NOT SURPRISED,

    DPD lives in an apartment. DPD’s tax will be MUCH lower than a real homeowners taxes. DPD is willing to support a heavy tax against others but knows he will escape the bigger burden. Self Serving?

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