District Chief Business Officer Makes Case For Parcel Tax

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The Davis Enterprise on Sunday carried an op-ed by Bruce Colby, the chief business officer of the Davis Joint Unified School District and Jim Belenis, a financial planner and a member of the school district’s Business Advisory Committee. In it they lay out the situation facing this district–we either need to pass Measure W or face pretty steep budget cuts.

As they put it:

This year’s state budget battle – which is still ongoing – put us on notice that we face a new reality. For at least the near future, funding from the state of California will not be adequate to maintain the quality education programs we currently offer to Davis children and teens.

It is a pretty basic but accurate point–the state is cutting its budget, if the Davis public wants to maintain the current education programs, then we have to pony up and replace state funding. If we do not, then we will see cuts.

Last year we were able to bridge the gap with a combination of fundraising from the Davis Schools Foundation and “rainy day” funds.

“The gap between the education our students need and the money we have was bridged this year by two sources of one-time money: $1.5 million from the fundraising drive led by the Davis Schools Foundation and $1.2 million from ‘rainy day’ funds. This allowed us to rescind more than 100 layoff notices that were given to our teachers and save our programs.”

They then lay out exactly what would be cut:

“On the chopping block would be drastic cuts to our elementary school science program; class periods for core science, math, English and social sciences; librarians; our music program; class size reduction in ninth- and 10th-grade English and ninth-grade math; foreign language; and other classes that prepare our children for college or to transition to the workplace.”

There are two options then: increase revenue or cut spending.

“Measure W, on the ballot Nov. 4, will let voters decide whether to pursue the first option, increasing revenue.

Measure W assesses homeowners $120 per year, with a voluntary exemption for residents who are 65 or older. Apartments are assessed at a lower rate. The tax will last for three years and expenditures require review by a citizens oversight committee. The parcel tax requires a two-thirds Davis voters majority for approval.

Funds raised by Measure W will go only to preserve these classroom instruction programs and librarians that are threatened by state cutbacks; no new programs will be funded.”

If increasing revenue does not happen, then we have to cut roughly $2.4 million from the districts funding next year.

“If Measure W does not pass, we must find ways to slash $2.4 million from the district’s general fund early next year. Last spring, district staff, board members, parents and community members struggled mightily to make cuts in the budget that would have minimal impact on students. In order to preserve program and reduce our spending deficit, the district has already reduced its ongoing budget by $1.1 million annually through belt-tightening in administration, operations and staffing.”

As we demonstrated before, a huge amount of district money goes directly to the classrooms. That means any cuts have to come from the classrooms.

“The financial reality is that 82 percent of the district’s budget goes straight into direct student support in classrooms, counseling offices, school offices and libraries. With maintenance and utilities included, the district spends more than 91 percent of its budget on teaching students and operating schools.”

Mr. Colby and Mr. Belenis argue that the district is among the best in the state at putting money directly in the classroom and that the district has done well at containing costs over the past five years.

“This record of delivering funds directly to classroom learning and minimizing administrative overhead is one of the best in the state. If forced to make deep reductions, we have few remaining options that avoid negative impacts to our students.

The district also has worked to keep spending under control, relying on extraordinary staff and community support to maintain excellent schools. Over a five-year period, from 2003-04 to the approved budget for 2008-09, total spending rose only minimally, keeping pace with inflation.”

For those who think we can reach these goals by trimming fat, that has been tried and no one has been able to find enough fat to cut.

“Participants in a community budget workshop found little fat to cut. More than 100 community members gathered at the Veterans’ Memorial Center on April 7 to answer difficult questions about budget priorities. What was more important: science or math, music or English? Reduced class sizes for 10th-grade English or librarians?”

Bottom line:

“Today we are at a crossroads. Either we find and support additional local funds for our schools, or vital educational programs will be cut. That is the choice we now face in Measure W: Protect what we have today, or begin slicing away at educational programs in our schools.”

Commentary on Emerson School Closure

For regular readers of the Vanguard, neither these arguments nor the figures are new. The case for Measure W is very basic. The public is going to have to make a choice as to what their priorities are here. And the choice is a simple one. For $120 per year additional taxes, they can keep the same level of educational funding that we have had the last few years. That means teachers remain in the classroom and schools remain open.

Last week there was a rumor floating around that Emerson would be closed regardless of what happens with Measure W and that the school board had already made that decision.

As near as I can tell, that rumor is completely false. First of all, that would be a Brown Act violation since the board members are unable to discuss policy matters outside of the formal meeting structure. Of course, the Brown Act gets violated from time-to-time. But I have seen no evidence to suggest this has occurred in this case.

Second, I do not see three votes right now to close Emerson let alone some kind of consensus. I do not really want to guess with names, but in the last round it seemed there were three members of the board who were just not going to close that school under almost any circumstance and that was during the budget crisis. I certainly do not see the will to do it if Measure W passes and the district is on sound fiscal standing.

But third, if your top fear is closing Emerson, and I can understand that if you are a resident of West Davis and have a child who is Junior High age, then the most likely way to protect Emerson is to pass the parcel tax. Will that guarantee it remaining open? No. There are no guarantees in life and certainly none in the case of Emerson Junior High. There are issues that could arise that have nothing to do with the fiscal situation that may necessitate its closure. That would have to do with costs to repair and the necessity of making those repairs.

However, if Measure W does not pass, then the district again faces $2.4 million in budget cuts. Last time they figured out they could save roughly a quarter of that by closing Emerson and playing the shuffle game with students across the other two junior high schools. Faced with the prospect of laying off additional teachers or closing a school, the district under those conditions would be far more likely to close a school. Even then, it is unclear that they would. Of course part of the rationale for delaying a decision on closing the school was the speed with which they would have to do it and the impact on the children and parents.

Bottom line, the safest course of action if you are concerned with closing a school is to keep the district at full funding. A budget crunch makes it far more likely to close a school even if full funding does not guarantee it remains open.

The last thing the board wants to do is have more people marching against it after they get the parcel tax passed. It was very difficult for them last year. In private, board members have told me that they did not sign up to be board members to close schools and that anyone who has been through the process would never want to go through it again.

Again from my perspective the best way to keep schools open is to ensure full funding. Last year the Davis Schools Foundation was able to save us from a horrific situation. I do not really get the sense that some of the people who post regularly on this blog realize how bad the situation was or would have been had the cuts actually gone through.

I sat through a lot of those board meetings until the wee hours of the morning. I sat with anxious parents who feared their children’s programs would be cut and teachers would be laid off. I sat next to high school students who came out in support of their teachers and their schools.

There is something tragic about a student having to come to a board meeting and staying until late on a school night in hopes that they keep their school open and their teacher employed. I think if more people had been through this and saw the looks on their faces and feel the anguish and anxiety that they experienced, they would see this situation through very different eyes.

Frankly it is something I never want to experience again as an interested observer. There have been good times covering community events and there have been bad times. What happened last spring was by far the most difficult times.

The students, the teachers, and the parents deserve not to have to go through this again next spring.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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252 thoughts on “District Chief Business Officer Makes Case For Parcel Tax”

  1. Anonymous

    Again, I saw no mention of Measure Q; did you?
    Glad they are not promising NO closure of Emerson…that is what got us in trouble in Mace Ranch; a promise of a school…..and Walnut Park a promise of a pool….ha.

  2. Anonymous

    Again, I saw no mention of Measure Q; did you?
    Glad they are not promising NO closure of Emerson…that is what got us in trouble in Mace Ranch; a promise of a school…..and Walnut Park a promise of a pool….ha.

  3. Anonymous

    Again, I saw no mention of Measure Q; did you?
    Glad they are not promising NO closure of Emerson…that is what got us in trouble in Mace Ranch; a promise of a school…..and Walnut Park a promise of a pool….ha.

  4. Anonymous

    Again, I saw no mention of Measure Q; did you?
    Glad they are not promising NO closure of Emerson…that is what got us in trouble in Mace Ranch; a promise of a school…..and Walnut Park a promise of a pool….ha.

  5. Doug Paul Davis

    I don’t know why you would expect to see a mention of Measure Q, they really have little to do with each other. The money that went to Measure Q is by law locked in for the programs listed on the ballot. The facts remain that if Measure W, irrespective of Measure Q, does not pass, the programs outline by Bruce Colby will have to be cut and that means teacher layoffs and I would say likely Emerson closing.

  6. Doug Paul Davis

    I don’t know why you would expect to see a mention of Measure Q, they really have little to do with each other. The money that went to Measure Q is by law locked in for the programs listed on the ballot. The facts remain that if Measure W, irrespective of Measure Q, does not pass, the programs outline by Bruce Colby will have to be cut and that means teacher layoffs and I would say likely Emerson closing.

  7. Doug Paul Davis

    I don’t know why you would expect to see a mention of Measure Q, they really have little to do with each other. The money that went to Measure Q is by law locked in for the programs listed on the ballot. The facts remain that if Measure W, irrespective of Measure Q, does not pass, the programs outline by Bruce Colby will have to be cut and that means teacher layoffs and I would say likely Emerson closing.

  8. Doug Paul Davis

    I don’t know why you would expect to see a mention of Measure Q, they really have little to do with each other. The money that went to Measure Q is by law locked in for the programs listed on the ballot. The facts remain that if Measure W, irrespective of Measure Q, does not pass, the programs outline by Bruce Colby will have to be cut and that means teacher layoffs and I would say likely Emerson closing.

  9. Anonymous

    Colby leaves the Emerson closing moot, states that the issue is cost and necessity of repairs and has nothing to do with the measure W monies. These are hard FACTS that can be clearly evaluated NOW and it is curious(?) that these facts have still not been nailed down.

  10. Anonymous

    Colby leaves the Emerson closing moot, states that the issue is cost and necessity of repairs and has nothing to do with the measure W monies. These are hard FACTS that can be clearly evaluated NOW and it is curious(?) that these facts have still not been nailed down.

  11. Anonymous

    Colby leaves the Emerson closing moot, states that the issue is cost and necessity of repairs and has nothing to do with the measure W monies. These are hard FACTS that can be clearly evaluated NOW and it is curious(?) that these facts have still not been nailed down.

  12. Anonymous

    Colby leaves the Emerson closing moot, states that the issue is cost and necessity of repairs and has nothing to do with the measure W monies. These are hard FACTS that can be clearly evaluated NOW and it is curious(?) that these facts have still not been nailed down.

  13. school board observer

    “Colby leaves the Emerson closing moot, states that the issue is cost and necessity of repairs and has nothing to do with the measure W monies. These are hard FACTS that can be clearly evaluated NOW and it is curious(?) that these facts have still not been nailed down.”

    Have you raised this issue in public comment at a school board meeting? It is a simple question to ask that could be done easily within 2 or 3 minutes.

    Raising it in public at a meeting will put it on the public record, and you can make sure that everyone (board members and administrators) hears the same question.

    Although no one is obligated to give you an answer to comments raised during public comment, it does raise the pressure on them for public communication and discussion.

    I have not seen the past two school board meetings, because I’m waiting for the video archive to be posted. So maybe it has been mentioned recently.

  14. school board observer

    “Colby leaves the Emerson closing moot, states that the issue is cost and necessity of repairs and has nothing to do with the measure W monies. These are hard FACTS that can be clearly evaluated NOW and it is curious(?) that these facts have still not been nailed down.”

    Have you raised this issue in public comment at a school board meeting? It is a simple question to ask that could be done easily within 2 or 3 minutes.

    Raising it in public at a meeting will put it on the public record, and you can make sure that everyone (board members and administrators) hears the same question.

    Although no one is obligated to give you an answer to comments raised during public comment, it does raise the pressure on them for public communication and discussion.

    I have not seen the past two school board meetings, because I’m waiting for the video archive to be posted. So maybe it has been mentioned recently.

  15. school board observer

    “Colby leaves the Emerson closing moot, states that the issue is cost and necessity of repairs and has nothing to do with the measure W monies. These are hard FACTS that can be clearly evaluated NOW and it is curious(?) that these facts have still not been nailed down.”

    Have you raised this issue in public comment at a school board meeting? It is a simple question to ask that could be done easily within 2 or 3 minutes.

    Raising it in public at a meeting will put it on the public record, and you can make sure that everyone (board members and administrators) hears the same question.

    Although no one is obligated to give you an answer to comments raised during public comment, it does raise the pressure on them for public communication and discussion.

    I have not seen the past two school board meetings, because I’m waiting for the video archive to be posted. So maybe it has been mentioned recently.

  16. school board observer

    “Colby leaves the Emerson closing moot, states that the issue is cost and necessity of repairs and has nothing to do with the measure W monies. These are hard FACTS that can be clearly evaluated NOW and it is curious(?) that these facts have still not been nailed down.”

    Have you raised this issue in public comment at a school board meeting? It is a simple question to ask that could be done easily within 2 or 3 minutes.

    Raising it in public at a meeting will put it on the public record, and you can make sure that everyone (board members and administrators) hears the same question.

    Although no one is obligated to give you an answer to comments raised during public comment, it does raise the pressure on them for public communication and discussion.

    I have not seen the past two school board meetings, because I’m waiting for the video archive to be posted. So maybe it has been mentioned recently.

  17. Anonymous

    Money from W and Q is operating. Money to fix Emerson is capital – a different source of funds. If Emerson is repaired, the operating costs are relevant to W, Q and the rest of the budget

  18. Anonymous

    Money from W and Q is operating. Money to fix Emerson is capital – a different source of funds. If Emerson is repaired, the operating costs are relevant to W, Q and the rest of the budget

  19. Anonymous

    Money from W and Q is operating. Money to fix Emerson is capital – a different source of funds. If Emerson is repaired, the operating costs are relevant to W, Q and the rest of the budget

  20. Anonymous

    Money from W and Q is operating. Money to fix Emerson is capital – a different source of funds. If Emerson is repaired, the operating costs are relevant to W, Q and the rest of the budget

  21. money questions

    Anon. 10:38 is exactly correct, the cost of fixing Emerson is NOT something that either Measure Q or W (or any other parcel tax) could be used for, based on California education code. Operating costs are separate from facilities costs.

    Parcel tax money is used for running the schools, paying teachers and staff, etc. It cannot be used to fix or build a school.

  22. money questions

    Anon. 10:38 is exactly correct, the cost of fixing Emerson is NOT something that either Measure Q or W (or any other parcel tax) could be used for, based on California education code. Operating costs are separate from facilities costs.

    Parcel tax money is used for running the schools, paying teachers and staff, etc. It cannot be used to fix or build a school.

  23. money questions

    Anon. 10:38 is exactly correct, the cost of fixing Emerson is NOT something that either Measure Q or W (or any other parcel tax) could be used for, based on California education code. Operating costs are separate from facilities costs.

    Parcel tax money is used for running the schools, paying teachers and staff, etc. It cannot be used to fix or build a school.

  24. money questions

    Anon. 10:38 is exactly correct, the cost of fixing Emerson is NOT something that either Measure Q or W (or any other parcel tax) could be used for, based on California education code. Operating costs are separate from facilities costs.

    Parcel tax money is used for running the schools, paying teachers and staff, etc. It cannot be used to fix or build a school.

  25. Have more questions than answers

    DPD, there is one point you are missing. You believe what the School Board/District tells you. You take them at face value. I don’t. I’ve lived here since 1987, had three children go through these schools, and have an entirely different perspective from hard experiece. Just to note a few recent things:
    1) Valley Oak was closed bc of “declining enrollment”. In fact, enrollment has increased by 75 students. So in my book, that means Valley Oak was closed for nothing. For the School Board to now say they never want to go through closing a school again is hypocrisy at its highest, since Emerson was on the chopping block until parents raised an unbelievable stink. Some on the School Board have higher political aspirations, so saw the writing on the wall and pulled back on the Emerson issue.
    2. Notice how the School District managed to somehow shave $1.1 million in administrative costs and staff – tightened its proverbial belt. We didn’t notice much of a difference in services after this budget cut as far as I can tell. Let’s face it – the DJUSD bureaucracy was bloated – and the state budget cuts finally forced DJUSD to do some honest to gosh budgeting, just like the rest of us have to do.
    3. Notice Da Vince is talking about becoming a charter school. Good for them. That is exactly what we need to do. Put the funding of the schools in the hands of parents and teachers, who will do a much better job, because they have a more personal stake in whether the school survives. More schools ought to become charter. How much has DJUSD done to become state funding independent? I would guess zilch!
    4. Since 75 new students have been infused into the school system, that means more state money will come in. Where has that been taken into account in the budgeting? We are still seeing the same numbers for the debt ratio/demand for funding.
    5. I have not seen any attempt to determine what courses are considered “core curricula”. All the current School Board/District are doing is trying to save every single program we already have, whether it be good, bad or indifferent. All of the courses are considered “core curricula”. This is wrongheaded and irresponsible. Had things been different, a course to teach elementary school children how to grow 35 lb cabbages would have been instituted with parcel tax funding. Once in place, it would have been considered essential, i.e. “core curricula”. I have not seen any program the DJUSD did not consider “essential”.
    6. You yourself admit the closure of Emerson is still very much possible. Don’t be fooled by the nonsense about its being in need of an update. A lot of schools in Davis are in need of an update. So is my house. But one waits until one has the money to make any repairs that are not absolutely essential. To say that 3 votes are absolutely against closing Emerson on the School Board is really not the point. That could change in a heartbeat and on a whim, depending on what nonsense the School District puts out as the current state of budget affairs.
    7. I can almost guarantee you there is plenty of bloat in the budget, but it is obfuscated in such a way that is almost impossible for anyone to make heads nor tails of it, including School District staff themselves – much as the City of Davis does (as you pointed out recently with respect to Sparky). Someone went onto the school district website and tried to make sense of its budgeting process, but it is purposely ambiguous in how it is laid out. Now why is that, do you think?

    I have not heard a single apology from the School Board for closing Valley Oak for nothing. Notice how they quickly used the building for a new “education center”, to make sure the Valley Oak Charter School proponents would remain dead in the water to ever start it up. Yet the entire closure was not necessary at all. How shameful…

  26. Have more questions than answe

    DPD, there is one point you are missing. You believe what the School Board/District tells you. You take them at face value. I don’t. I’ve lived here since 1987, had three children go through these schools, and have an entirely different perspective from hard experiece. Just to note a few recent things:
    1) Valley Oak was closed bc of “declining enrollment”. In fact, enrollment has increased by 75 students. So in my book, that means Valley Oak was closed for nothing. For the School Board to now say they never want to go through closing a school again is hypocrisy at its highest, since Emerson was on the chopping block until parents raised an unbelievable stink. Some on the School Board have higher political aspirations, so saw the writing on the wall and pulled back on the Emerson issue.
    2. Notice how the School District managed to somehow shave $1.1 million in administrative costs and staff – tightened its proverbial belt. We didn’t notice much of a difference in services after this budget cut as far as I can tell. Let’s face it – the DJUSD bureaucracy was bloated – and the state budget cuts finally forced DJUSD to do some honest to gosh budgeting, just like the rest of us have to do.
    3. Notice Da Vince is talking about becoming a charter school. Good for them. That is exactly what we need to do. Put the funding of the schools in the hands of parents and teachers, who will do a much better job, because they have a more personal stake in whether the school survives. More schools ought to become charter. How much has DJUSD done to become state funding independent? I would guess zilch!
    4. Since 75 new students have been infused into the school system, that means more state money will come in. Where has that been taken into account in the budgeting? We are still seeing the same numbers for the debt ratio/demand for funding.
    5. I have not seen any attempt to determine what courses are considered “core curricula”. All the current School Board/District are doing is trying to save every single program we already have, whether it be good, bad or indifferent. All of the courses are considered “core curricula”. This is wrongheaded and irresponsible. Had things been different, a course to teach elementary school children how to grow 35 lb cabbages would have been instituted with parcel tax funding. Once in place, it would have been considered essential, i.e. “core curricula”. I have not seen any program the DJUSD did not consider “essential”.
    6. You yourself admit the closure of Emerson is still very much possible. Don’t be fooled by the nonsense about its being in need of an update. A lot of schools in Davis are in need of an update. So is my house. But one waits until one has the money to make any repairs that are not absolutely essential. To say that 3 votes are absolutely against closing Emerson on the School Board is really not the point. That could change in a heartbeat and on a whim, depending on what nonsense the School District puts out as the current state of budget affairs.
    7. I can almost guarantee you there is plenty of bloat in the budget, but it is obfuscated in such a way that is almost impossible for anyone to make heads nor tails of it, including School District staff themselves – much as the City of Davis does (as you pointed out recently with respect to Sparky). Someone went onto the school district website and tried to make sense of its budgeting process, but it is purposely ambiguous in how it is laid out. Now why is that, do you think?

    I have not heard a single apology from the School Board for closing Valley Oak for nothing. Notice how they quickly used the building for a new “education center”, to make sure the Valley Oak Charter School proponents would remain dead in the water to ever start it up. Yet the entire closure was not necessary at all. How shameful…

  27. Have more questions than answe

    DPD, there is one point you are missing. You believe what the School Board/District tells you. You take them at face value. I don’t. I’ve lived here since 1987, had three children go through these schools, and have an entirely different perspective from hard experiece. Just to note a few recent things:
    1) Valley Oak was closed bc of “declining enrollment”. In fact, enrollment has increased by 75 students. So in my book, that means Valley Oak was closed for nothing. For the School Board to now say they never want to go through closing a school again is hypocrisy at its highest, since Emerson was on the chopping block until parents raised an unbelievable stink. Some on the School Board have higher political aspirations, so saw the writing on the wall and pulled back on the Emerson issue.
    2. Notice how the School District managed to somehow shave $1.1 million in administrative costs and staff – tightened its proverbial belt. We didn’t notice much of a difference in services after this budget cut as far as I can tell. Let’s face it – the DJUSD bureaucracy was bloated – and the state budget cuts finally forced DJUSD to do some honest to gosh budgeting, just like the rest of us have to do.
    3. Notice Da Vince is talking about becoming a charter school. Good for them. That is exactly what we need to do. Put the funding of the schools in the hands of parents and teachers, who will do a much better job, because they have a more personal stake in whether the school survives. More schools ought to become charter. How much has DJUSD done to become state funding independent? I would guess zilch!
    4. Since 75 new students have been infused into the school system, that means more state money will come in. Where has that been taken into account in the budgeting? We are still seeing the same numbers for the debt ratio/demand for funding.
    5. I have not seen any attempt to determine what courses are considered “core curricula”. All the current School Board/District are doing is trying to save every single program we already have, whether it be good, bad or indifferent. All of the courses are considered “core curricula”. This is wrongheaded and irresponsible. Had things been different, a course to teach elementary school children how to grow 35 lb cabbages would have been instituted with parcel tax funding. Once in place, it would have been considered essential, i.e. “core curricula”. I have not seen any program the DJUSD did not consider “essential”.
    6. You yourself admit the closure of Emerson is still very much possible. Don’t be fooled by the nonsense about its being in need of an update. A lot of schools in Davis are in need of an update. So is my house. But one waits until one has the money to make any repairs that are not absolutely essential. To say that 3 votes are absolutely against closing Emerson on the School Board is really not the point. That could change in a heartbeat and on a whim, depending on what nonsense the School District puts out as the current state of budget affairs.
    7. I can almost guarantee you there is plenty of bloat in the budget, but it is obfuscated in such a way that is almost impossible for anyone to make heads nor tails of it, including School District staff themselves – much as the City of Davis does (as you pointed out recently with respect to Sparky). Someone went onto the school district website and tried to make sense of its budgeting process, but it is purposely ambiguous in how it is laid out. Now why is that, do you think?

    I have not heard a single apology from the School Board for closing Valley Oak for nothing. Notice how they quickly used the building for a new “education center”, to make sure the Valley Oak Charter School proponents would remain dead in the water to ever start it up. Yet the entire closure was not necessary at all. How shameful…

  28. Have more questions than answe

    DPD, there is one point you are missing. You believe what the School Board/District tells you. You take them at face value. I don’t. I’ve lived here since 1987, had three children go through these schools, and have an entirely different perspective from hard experiece. Just to note a few recent things:
    1) Valley Oak was closed bc of “declining enrollment”. In fact, enrollment has increased by 75 students. So in my book, that means Valley Oak was closed for nothing. For the School Board to now say they never want to go through closing a school again is hypocrisy at its highest, since Emerson was on the chopping block until parents raised an unbelievable stink. Some on the School Board have higher political aspirations, so saw the writing on the wall and pulled back on the Emerson issue.
    2. Notice how the School District managed to somehow shave $1.1 million in administrative costs and staff – tightened its proverbial belt. We didn’t notice much of a difference in services after this budget cut as far as I can tell. Let’s face it – the DJUSD bureaucracy was bloated – and the state budget cuts finally forced DJUSD to do some honest to gosh budgeting, just like the rest of us have to do.
    3. Notice Da Vince is talking about becoming a charter school. Good for them. That is exactly what we need to do. Put the funding of the schools in the hands of parents and teachers, who will do a much better job, because they have a more personal stake in whether the school survives. More schools ought to become charter. How much has DJUSD done to become state funding independent? I would guess zilch!
    4. Since 75 new students have been infused into the school system, that means more state money will come in. Where has that been taken into account in the budgeting? We are still seeing the same numbers for the debt ratio/demand for funding.
    5. I have not seen any attempt to determine what courses are considered “core curricula”. All the current School Board/District are doing is trying to save every single program we already have, whether it be good, bad or indifferent. All of the courses are considered “core curricula”. This is wrongheaded and irresponsible. Had things been different, a course to teach elementary school children how to grow 35 lb cabbages would have been instituted with parcel tax funding. Once in place, it would have been considered essential, i.e. “core curricula”. I have not seen any program the DJUSD did not consider “essential”.
    6. You yourself admit the closure of Emerson is still very much possible. Don’t be fooled by the nonsense about its being in need of an update. A lot of schools in Davis are in need of an update. So is my house. But one waits until one has the money to make any repairs that are not absolutely essential. To say that 3 votes are absolutely against closing Emerson on the School Board is really not the point. That could change in a heartbeat and on a whim, depending on what nonsense the School District puts out as the current state of budget affairs.
    7. I can almost guarantee you there is plenty of bloat in the budget, but it is obfuscated in such a way that is almost impossible for anyone to make heads nor tails of it, including School District staff themselves – much as the City of Davis does (as you pointed out recently with respect to Sparky). Someone went onto the school district website and tried to make sense of its budgeting process, but it is purposely ambiguous in how it is laid out. Now why is that, do you think?

    I have not heard a single apology from the School Board for closing Valley Oak for nothing. Notice how they quickly used the building for a new “education center”, to make sure the Valley Oak Charter School proponents would remain dead in the water to ever start it up. Yet the entire closure was not necessary at all. How shameful…

  29. Where Have You Been?

    “Have you raised this issue in public comment at a school board meeting? It is a simple question to ask that could be done easily within 2 or 3 minutes.”

    Where have you been? The possible closure of Emerson has been mentioned in School Bd meetings, in the Davis Enterprise, on this blog!

  30. Where Have You Been?

    “Have you raised this issue in public comment at a school board meeting? It is a simple question to ask that could be done easily within 2 or 3 minutes.”

    Where have you been? The possible closure of Emerson has been mentioned in School Bd meetings, in the Davis Enterprise, on this blog!

  31. Where Have You Been?

    “Have you raised this issue in public comment at a school board meeting? It is a simple question to ask that could be done easily within 2 or 3 minutes.”

    Where have you been? The possible closure of Emerson has been mentioned in School Bd meetings, in the Davis Enterprise, on this blog!

  32. Where Have You Been?

    “Have you raised this issue in public comment at a school board meeting? It is a simple question to ask that could be done easily within 2 or 3 minutes.”

    Where have you been? The possible closure of Emerson has been mentioned in School Bd meetings, in the Davis Enterprise, on this blog!

  33. Fed Up

    “Anon. 10:38 is exactly correct, the cost of fixing Emerson is NOT something that either Measure Q or W (or any other parcel tax) could be used for, based on California education code. Operating costs are separate from facilities costs.
    Parcel tax money is used for running the schools, paying teachers and staff, etc. It cannot be used to fix or build a school.”

    And is the reason why the School Board/District could put it on the chopping block for either reason: 1) Emerson needs overhauling;
    2) Budget cuts require closing the school to save operating expense money

    But you will notice the School District/Board will often conflate the two. On the one hand they have said it needs to be closed to save $600,000 in operating expenses, then justify that decision by saying, “Well it needed expensive overhauls anyway.”

    It becomes a cynical game of convoluted reasoning – and when the public calls them on it, the School District/Board has the audacity to claim the public just does not understand the difference between facilities funding and operating expenses! Of course we don’t – since it is the School Board/District that produced the confusion in the first place!

  34. Fed Up

    “Anon. 10:38 is exactly correct, the cost of fixing Emerson is NOT something that either Measure Q or W (or any other parcel tax) could be used for, based on California education code. Operating costs are separate from facilities costs.
    Parcel tax money is used for running the schools, paying teachers and staff, etc. It cannot be used to fix or build a school.”

    And is the reason why the School Board/District could put it on the chopping block for either reason: 1) Emerson needs overhauling;
    2) Budget cuts require closing the school to save operating expense money

    But you will notice the School District/Board will often conflate the two. On the one hand they have said it needs to be closed to save $600,000 in operating expenses, then justify that decision by saying, “Well it needed expensive overhauls anyway.”

    It becomes a cynical game of convoluted reasoning – and when the public calls them on it, the School District/Board has the audacity to claim the public just does not understand the difference between facilities funding and operating expenses! Of course we don’t – since it is the School Board/District that produced the confusion in the first place!

  35. Fed Up

    “Anon. 10:38 is exactly correct, the cost of fixing Emerson is NOT something that either Measure Q or W (or any other parcel tax) could be used for, based on California education code. Operating costs are separate from facilities costs.
    Parcel tax money is used for running the schools, paying teachers and staff, etc. It cannot be used to fix or build a school.”

    And is the reason why the School Board/District could put it on the chopping block for either reason: 1) Emerson needs overhauling;
    2) Budget cuts require closing the school to save operating expense money

    But you will notice the School District/Board will often conflate the two. On the one hand they have said it needs to be closed to save $600,000 in operating expenses, then justify that decision by saying, “Well it needed expensive overhauls anyway.”

    It becomes a cynical game of convoluted reasoning – and when the public calls them on it, the School District/Board has the audacity to claim the public just does not understand the difference between facilities funding and operating expenses! Of course we don’t – since it is the School Board/District that produced the confusion in the first place!

  36. Fed Up

    “Anon. 10:38 is exactly correct, the cost of fixing Emerson is NOT something that either Measure Q or W (or any other parcel tax) could be used for, based on California education code. Operating costs are separate from facilities costs.
    Parcel tax money is used for running the schools, paying teachers and staff, etc. It cannot be used to fix or build a school.”

    And is the reason why the School Board/District could put it on the chopping block for either reason: 1) Emerson needs overhauling;
    2) Budget cuts require closing the school to save operating expense money

    But you will notice the School District/Board will often conflate the two. On the one hand they have said it needs to be closed to save $600,000 in operating expenses, then justify that decision by saying, “Well it needed expensive overhauls anyway.”

    It becomes a cynical game of convoluted reasoning – and when the public calls them on it, the School District/Board has the audacity to claim the public just does not understand the difference between facilities funding and operating expenses! Of course we don’t – since it is the School Board/District that produced the confusion in the first place!

  37. Doug Paul Davis

    “You believe what the School Board/District tells you. You take them at face value.”

    I believe what I can verify.

    “Valley Oak was closed bc of “declining enrollment”. In fact, enrollment has increased by 75 students. So in my book, that means Valley Oak was closed for nothing.”

    I’m not going to defend the closing of Valley Oak. However, a one year increase of student by 75 which followed a much larger decrease the previous year is hardly evidence that they were wrong. I’m not sure they got the demographics right. I certainly would have kept it open.

    Other than perhaps one person on the current board, I don’t see them as having higher political aspirations.

    “Notice how the School District managed to somehow shave $1.1 million in administrative costs and staff – tightened its proverbial belt. We didn’t notice much of a difference in services after this budget cut as far as I can tell.”

    Two points on that. First, you are not working in the office, so you do not know (nor do I) the impact of the staffing cuts.

    Second, a lot of the staffing cuts are just now taking effect. So how could we really say one way or another.

    “How much has DJUSD done to become state funding independent?”

    You’ve raised this point (I assume it’s you multiple times), but the only way they could become state funding independent would be to pass more local taxes. Yet you are opposing this one. That makes no sense.

    “Since 75 new students have been infused into the school system, that means more state money will come in. Where has that been taken into account in the budgeting?”

    That will be something that we have to look at.

    “I have not seen any attempt to determine what courses are considered “core curricula”.”

    They’ve done that long before now.

    “You yourself admit the closure of Emerson is still very much possible. Don’t be fooled by the nonsense about its being in need of an update.”

    I’m pretty sure the upgrades are legit.

    I think it’s unlikely that Emerson would close if the parcel tax passes for a number of reasons that include political ones. You will have trouble passing a parcel tax and then turning around to close a school. I think there would be mutiny. On the other hand, I think it almost certainly closes if the parcel tax fails. Again, I find your reasoning ironic.

    Bottom line for me, we need to pass this regardless of Emerson.

    “I can almost guarantee you there is plenty of bloat in the budget, but it is obfuscated in such a way that is almost impossible for anyone to make heads nor tails of it, including School District staff themselves – much as the City of Davis does (as you pointed out recently with respect to Sparky). Someone went onto the school district website and tried to make sense of its budgeting process, but it is purposely ambiguous in how it is laid out. Now why is that, do you think?”

    I don’t buy it, I know what the district has done to straighten out their books in the last few years. If they could have saved more money, they would have rather than alarming the community. If you think this is some invention to pass the parcel tax, I’m not buying it. Parcel tax at this point is borderline to pass at best. If they could have cleaned out more budget, they would have.

    I doubt whoever looked at the budget on the website had the expertise in school financing to make sense it. My recommendation would be to make an appointment with Bruce Colby and have him walk you through it.

    “I have not heard a single apology from the School Board for closing Valley Oak for nothing.”

    You are not going to hear an apology because they do not think it was the wrong thing to do. And frankly a single year increase in students is not changing their calculous.

  38. Doug Paul Davis

    “You believe what the School Board/District tells you. You take them at face value.”

    I believe what I can verify.

    “Valley Oak was closed bc of “declining enrollment”. In fact, enrollment has increased by 75 students. So in my book, that means Valley Oak was closed for nothing.”

    I’m not going to defend the closing of Valley Oak. However, a one year increase of student by 75 which followed a much larger decrease the previous year is hardly evidence that they were wrong. I’m not sure they got the demographics right. I certainly would have kept it open.

    Other than perhaps one person on the current board, I don’t see them as having higher political aspirations.

    “Notice how the School District managed to somehow shave $1.1 million in administrative costs and staff – tightened its proverbial belt. We didn’t notice much of a difference in services after this budget cut as far as I can tell.”

    Two points on that. First, you are not working in the office, so you do not know (nor do I) the impact of the staffing cuts.

    Second, a lot of the staffing cuts are just now taking effect. So how could we really say one way or another.

    “How much has DJUSD done to become state funding independent?”

    You’ve raised this point (I assume it’s you multiple times), but the only way they could become state funding independent would be to pass more local taxes. Yet you are opposing this one. That makes no sense.

    “Since 75 new students have been infused into the school system, that means more state money will come in. Where has that been taken into account in the budgeting?”

    That will be something that we have to look at.

    “I have not seen any attempt to determine what courses are considered “core curricula”.”

    They’ve done that long before now.

    “You yourself admit the closure of Emerson is still very much possible. Don’t be fooled by the nonsense about its being in need of an update.”

    I’m pretty sure the upgrades are legit.

    I think it’s unlikely that Emerson would close if the parcel tax passes for a number of reasons that include political ones. You will have trouble passing a parcel tax and then turning around to close a school. I think there would be mutiny. On the other hand, I think it almost certainly closes if the parcel tax fails. Again, I find your reasoning ironic.

    Bottom line for me, we need to pass this regardless of Emerson.

    “I can almost guarantee you there is plenty of bloat in the budget, but it is obfuscated in such a way that is almost impossible for anyone to make heads nor tails of it, including School District staff themselves – much as the City of Davis does (as you pointed out recently with respect to Sparky). Someone went onto the school district website and tried to make sense of its budgeting process, but it is purposely ambiguous in how it is laid out. Now why is that, do you think?”

    I don’t buy it, I know what the district has done to straighten out their books in the last few years. If they could have saved more money, they would have rather than alarming the community. If you think this is some invention to pass the parcel tax, I’m not buying it. Parcel tax at this point is borderline to pass at best. If they could have cleaned out more budget, they would have.

    I doubt whoever looked at the budget on the website had the expertise in school financing to make sense it. My recommendation would be to make an appointment with Bruce Colby and have him walk you through it.

    “I have not heard a single apology from the School Board for closing Valley Oak for nothing.”

    You are not going to hear an apology because they do not think it was the wrong thing to do. And frankly a single year increase in students is not changing their calculous.

  39. Doug Paul Davis

    “You believe what the School Board/District tells you. You take them at face value.”

    I believe what I can verify.

    “Valley Oak was closed bc of “declining enrollment”. In fact, enrollment has increased by 75 students. So in my book, that means Valley Oak was closed for nothing.”

    I’m not going to defend the closing of Valley Oak. However, a one year increase of student by 75 which followed a much larger decrease the previous year is hardly evidence that they were wrong. I’m not sure they got the demographics right. I certainly would have kept it open.

    Other than perhaps one person on the current board, I don’t see them as having higher political aspirations.

    “Notice how the School District managed to somehow shave $1.1 million in administrative costs and staff – tightened its proverbial belt. We didn’t notice much of a difference in services after this budget cut as far as I can tell.”

    Two points on that. First, you are not working in the office, so you do not know (nor do I) the impact of the staffing cuts.

    Second, a lot of the staffing cuts are just now taking effect. So how could we really say one way or another.

    “How much has DJUSD done to become state funding independent?”

    You’ve raised this point (I assume it’s you multiple times), but the only way they could become state funding independent would be to pass more local taxes. Yet you are opposing this one. That makes no sense.

    “Since 75 new students have been infused into the school system, that means more state money will come in. Where has that been taken into account in the budgeting?”

    That will be something that we have to look at.

    “I have not seen any attempt to determine what courses are considered “core curricula”.”

    They’ve done that long before now.

    “You yourself admit the closure of Emerson is still very much possible. Don’t be fooled by the nonsense about its being in need of an update.”

    I’m pretty sure the upgrades are legit.

    I think it’s unlikely that Emerson would close if the parcel tax passes for a number of reasons that include political ones. You will have trouble passing a parcel tax and then turning around to close a school. I think there would be mutiny. On the other hand, I think it almost certainly closes if the parcel tax fails. Again, I find your reasoning ironic.

    Bottom line for me, we need to pass this regardless of Emerson.

    “I can almost guarantee you there is plenty of bloat in the budget, but it is obfuscated in such a way that is almost impossible for anyone to make heads nor tails of it, including School District staff themselves – much as the City of Davis does (as you pointed out recently with respect to Sparky). Someone went onto the school district website and tried to make sense of its budgeting process, but it is purposely ambiguous in how it is laid out. Now why is that, do you think?”

    I don’t buy it, I know what the district has done to straighten out their books in the last few years. If they could have saved more money, they would have rather than alarming the community. If you think this is some invention to pass the parcel tax, I’m not buying it. Parcel tax at this point is borderline to pass at best. If they could have cleaned out more budget, they would have.

    I doubt whoever looked at the budget on the website had the expertise in school financing to make sense it. My recommendation would be to make an appointment with Bruce Colby and have him walk you through it.

    “I have not heard a single apology from the School Board for closing Valley Oak for nothing.”

    You are not going to hear an apology because they do not think it was the wrong thing to do. And frankly a single year increase in students is not changing their calculous.

  40. Doug Paul Davis

    “You believe what the School Board/District tells you. You take them at face value.”

    I believe what I can verify.

    “Valley Oak was closed bc of “declining enrollment”. In fact, enrollment has increased by 75 students. So in my book, that means Valley Oak was closed for nothing.”

    I’m not going to defend the closing of Valley Oak. However, a one year increase of student by 75 which followed a much larger decrease the previous year is hardly evidence that they were wrong. I’m not sure they got the demographics right. I certainly would have kept it open.

    Other than perhaps one person on the current board, I don’t see them as having higher political aspirations.

    “Notice how the School District managed to somehow shave $1.1 million in administrative costs and staff – tightened its proverbial belt. We didn’t notice much of a difference in services after this budget cut as far as I can tell.”

    Two points on that. First, you are not working in the office, so you do not know (nor do I) the impact of the staffing cuts.

    Second, a lot of the staffing cuts are just now taking effect. So how could we really say one way or another.

    “How much has DJUSD done to become state funding independent?”

    You’ve raised this point (I assume it’s you multiple times), but the only way they could become state funding independent would be to pass more local taxes. Yet you are opposing this one. That makes no sense.

    “Since 75 new students have been infused into the school system, that means more state money will come in. Where has that been taken into account in the budgeting?”

    That will be something that we have to look at.

    “I have not seen any attempt to determine what courses are considered “core curricula”.”

    They’ve done that long before now.

    “You yourself admit the closure of Emerson is still very much possible. Don’t be fooled by the nonsense about its being in need of an update.”

    I’m pretty sure the upgrades are legit.

    I think it’s unlikely that Emerson would close if the parcel tax passes for a number of reasons that include political ones. You will have trouble passing a parcel tax and then turning around to close a school. I think there would be mutiny. On the other hand, I think it almost certainly closes if the parcel tax fails. Again, I find your reasoning ironic.

    Bottom line for me, we need to pass this regardless of Emerson.

    “I can almost guarantee you there is plenty of bloat in the budget, but it is obfuscated in such a way that is almost impossible for anyone to make heads nor tails of it, including School District staff themselves – much as the City of Davis does (as you pointed out recently with respect to Sparky). Someone went onto the school district website and tried to make sense of its budgeting process, but it is purposely ambiguous in how it is laid out. Now why is that, do you think?”

    I don’t buy it, I know what the district has done to straighten out their books in the last few years. If they could have saved more money, they would have rather than alarming the community. If you think this is some invention to pass the parcel tax, I’m not buying it. Parcel tax at this point is borderline to pass at best. If they could have cleaned out more budget, they would have.

    I doubt whoever looked at the budget on the website had the expertise in school financing to make sense it. My recommendation would be to make an appointment with Bruce Colby and have him walk you through it.

    “I have not heard a single apology from the School Board for closing Valley Oak for nothing.”

    You are not going to hear an apology because they do not think it was the wrong thing to do. And frankly a single year increase in students is not changing their calculous.

  41. Doug Paul Davis

    “But you will notice the School District/Board will often conflate the two. On the one hand they have said it needs to be closed to save $600,000 in operating expenses, then justify that decision by saying, “Well it needed expensive overhauls anyway.””

    Actually I think you’re conflating the issue. There are two separate issues. For the operating budget, they figured they could save $600,000 by closing the school. One of the reasons that they considered doing it was that to keep it open would require facility upgrades that would have come from the facilities budget.

    All of this further bolsters the point, if you want to virtually ensure Emerson closes, defeat the parcel tax.

    I still find it extremely ironic that you use Emerson to oppose the parcel tax which would pretty much ensure that it closes.

  42. Anonymous

    “Valley Oak was closed bc of “declining enrollment”. In fact, enrollment has increased by 75 students. So in my book, that means Valley Oak was closed for nothing.”

    The 75 students – which, by the way, was across the city and across grade levels, not localized to the VO neighborhood in K-6 – still don’t even begin to make up for the 250-student gap in student neighborhood population between VO and other elementary schools once Korematsu opened.

  43. Doug Paul Davis

    “But you will notice the School District/Board will often conflate the two. On the one hand they have said it needs to be closed to save $600,000 in operating expenses, then justify that decision by saying, “Well it needed expensive overhauls anyway.””

    Actually I think you’re conflating the issue. There are two separate issues. For the operating budget, they figured they could save $600,000 by closing the school. One of the reasons that they considered doing it was that to keep it open would require facility upgrades that would have come from the facilities budget.

    All of this further bolsters the point, if you want to virtually ensure Emerson closes, defeat the parcel tax.

    I still find it extremely ironic that you use Emerson to oppose the parcel tax which would pretty much ensure that it closes.

  44. Anonymous

    “Valley Oak was closed bc of “declining enrollment”. In fact, enrollment has increased by 75 students. So in my book, that means Valley Oak was closed for nothing.”

    The 75 students – which, by the way, was across the city and across grade levels, not localized to the VO neighborhood in K-6 – still don’t even begin to make up for the 250-student gap in student neighborhood population between VO and other elementary schools once Korematsu opened.

  45. Doug Paul Davis

    “But you will notice the School District/Board will often conflate the two. On the one hand they have said it needs to be closed to save $600,000 in operating expenses, then justify that decision by saying, “Well it needed expensive overhauls anyway.””

    Actually I think you’re conflating the issue. There are two separate issues. For the operating budget, they figured they could save $600,000 by closing the school. One of the reasons that they considered doing it was that to keep it open would require facility upgrades that would have come from the facilities budget.

    All of this further bolsters the point, if you want to virtually ensure Emerson closes, defeat the parcel tax.

    I still find it extremely ironic that you use Emerson to oppose the parcel tax which would pretty much ensure that it closes.

  46. Anonymous

    “Valley Oak was closed bc of “declining enrollment”. In fact, enrollment has increased by 75 students. So in my book, that means Valley Oak was closed for nothing.”

    The 75 students – which, by the way, was across the city and across grade levels, not localized to the VO neighborhood in K-6 – still don’t even begin to make up for the 250-student gap in student neighborhood population between VO and other elementary schools once Korematsu opened.

  47. Doug Paul Davis

    “But you will notice the School District/Board will often conflate the two. On the one hand they have said it needs to be closed to save $600,000 in operating expenses, then justify that decision by saying, “Well it needed expensive overhauls anyway.””

    Actually I think you’re conflating the issue. There are two separate issues. For the operating budget, they figured they could save $600,000 by closing the school. One of the reasons that they considered doing it was that to keep it open would require facility upgrades that would have come from the facilities budget.

    All of this further bolsters the point, if you want to virtually ensure Emerson closes, defeat the parcel tax.

    I still find it extremely ironic that you use Emerson to oppose the parcel tax which would pretty much ensure that it closes.

  48. Anonymous

    “Valley Oak was closed bc of “declining enrollment”. In fact, enrollment has increased by 75 students. So in my book, that means Valley Oak was closed for nothing.”

    The 75 students – which, by the way, was across the city and across grade levels, not localized to the VO neighborhood in K-6 – still don’t even begin to make up for the 250-student gap in student neighborhood population between VO and other elementary schools once Korematsu opened.

  49. Anonymous

    Q and W: I realize different BUT if the School District and board does not make it very clear to us dense (but their bank) taxpayers…it appears that they assume we will believe anything. WHY won’t they make it clear? Isn’t it an obvious question ?
    It IS shameful to use VO for new use so charter can never open….why didn’t they consider selling then?

  50. Anonymous

    Q and W: I realize different BUT if the School District and board does not make it very clear to us dense (but their bank) taxpayers…it appears that they assume we will believe anything. WHY won’t they make it clear? Isn’t it an obvious question ?
    It IS shameful to use VO for new use so charter can never open….why didn’t they consider selling then?

  51. Anonymous

    Q and W: I realize different BUT if the School District and board does not make it very clear to us dense (but their bank) taxpayers…it appears that they assume we will believe anything. WHY won’t they make it clear? Isn’t it an obvious question ?
    It IS shameful to use VO for new use so charter can never open….why didn’t they consider selling then?

  52. Anonymous

    Q and W: I realize different BUT if the School District and board does not make it very clear to us dense (but their bank) taxpayers…it appears that they assume we will believe anything. WHY won’t they make it clear? Isn’t it an obvious question ?
    It IS shameful to use VO for new use so charter can never open….why didn’t they consider selling then?

  53. Anonymous

    Regarding declining enrollment, does anyone ever consider that perhaps there aren’t enough young children in the district because it’s too expensive to live here because of the ever-increasing number of fees and special taxes we keep tacking on?

    Davis mom

  54. Anonymous

    Regarding declining enrollment, does anyone ever consider that perhaps there aren’t enough young children in the district because it’s too expensive to live here because of the ever-increasing number of fees and special taxes we keep tacking on?

    Davis mom

  55. Anonymous

    Regarding declining enrollment, does anyone ever consider that perhaps there aren’t enough young children in the district because it’s too expensive to live here because of the ever-increasing number of fees and special taxes we keep tacking on?

    Davis mom

  56. Anonymous

    Regarding declining enrollment, does anyone ever consider that perhaps there aren’t enough young children in the district because it’s too expensive to live here because of the ever-increasing number of fees and special taxes we keep tacking on?

    Davis mom

  57. another Davis mom

    The parcel tax is a tiny, tiny percentage of the cost of living in Davis.

    Measure W will add $10 per month. How much in a month do you pay for either rent or mortgage and taxes? A lot more than that, I’m betting.

    It’s expensive here because it’s a desirable place to live with good schools. Of course, if you want to let the schools go down the drain, that would make it a lot more affordable.

  58. another Davis mom

    The parcel tax is a tiny, tiny percentage of the cost of living in Davis.

    Measure W will add $10 per month. How much in a month do you pay for either rent or mortgage and taxes? A lot more than that, I’m betting.

    It’s expensive here because it’s a desirable place to live with good schools. Of course, if you want to let the schools go down the drain, that would make it a lot more affordable.

  59. another Davis mom

    The parcel tax is a tiny, tiny percentage of the cost of living in Davis.

    Measure W will add $10 per month. How much in a month do you pay for either rent or mortgage and taxes? A lot more than that, I’m betting.

    It’s expensive here because it’s a desirable place to live with good schools. Of course, if you want to let the schools go down the drain, that would make it a lot more affordable.

  60. another Davis mom

    The parcel tax is a tiny, tiny percentage of the cost of living in Davis.

    Measure W will add $10 per month. How much in a month do you pay for either rent or mortgage and taxes? A lot more than that, I’m betting.

    It’s expensive here because it’s a desirable place to live with good schools. Of course, if you want to let the schools go down the drain, that would make it a lot more affordable.

  61. Vincente

    One of the reasons that the property values are so high here are the schools, so if you cut funding to the schools, property values will drop, and more young families can afford to move here.

  62. Vincente

    One of the reasons that the property values are so high here are the schools, so if you cut funding to the schools, property values will drop, and more young families can afford to move here.

  63. Vincente

    One of the reasons that the property values are so high here are the schools, so if you cut funding to the schools, property values will drop, and more young families can afford to move here.

  64. Vincente

    One of the reasons that the property values are so high here are the schools, so if you cut funding to the schools, property values will drop, and more young families can afford to move here.

  65. Anonymous

    “It’s expensive here because it’s a desirable place to live with good schools. Of course, if you want to let the schools go down the drain, that would make it a lot more affordable.”

    The Davis cost per student is quite reasonable, even with the parcel tax. The problem has nothing to do with costs – the real problem in sources of revenue. Until something is done to expand revenue sources the solution must be parcel taxes.

  66. Anonymous

    “It’s expensive here because it’s a desirable place to live with good schools. Of course, if you want to let the schools go down the drain, that would make it a lot more affordable.”

    The Davis cost per student is quite reasonable, even with the parcel tax. The problem has nothing to do with costs – the real problem in sources of revenue. Until something is done to expand revenue sources the solution must be parcel taxes.

  67. Anonymous

    “It’s expensive here because it’s a desirable place to live with good schools. Of course, if you want to let the schools go down the drain, that would make it a lot more affordable.”

    The Davis cost per student is quite reasonable, even with the parcel tax. The problem has nothing to do with costs – the real problem in sources of revenue. Until something is done to expand revenue sources the solution must be parcel taxes.

  68. Anonymous

    “It’s expensive here because it’s a desirable place to live with good schools. Of course, if you want to let the schools go down the drain, that would make it a lot more affordable.”

    The Davis cost per student is quite reasonable, even with the parcel tax. The problem has nothing to do with costs – the real problem in sources of revenue. Until something is done to expand revenue sources the solution must be parcel taxes.

  69. Anonymous

    “You will have trouble passing a parcel tax and then turning around to close a school. I think there would be mutiny. On the other hand, I think it almost certainly closes if the parcel tax fails….”

    The Emerson closing threat has the unpleasant smell of a kind of extortion. The Board leaves the issue moot with the implicit threat that Emerson will be closed unless West Davisites get on board with the Measure W parcel tax. Is it really the $600,000 Emerson closing savings that would drive the closing? Are the other monies necessary for the (mandatory?) repairs accounted for?

  70. Anonymous

    “You will have trouble passing a parcel tax and then turning around to close a school. I think there would be mutiny. On the other hand, I think it almost certainly closes if the parcel tax fails….”

    The Emerson closing threat has the unpleasant smell of a kind of extortion. The Board leaves the issue moot with the implicit threat that Emerson will be closed unless West Davisites get on board with the Measure W parcel tax. Is it really the $600,000 Emerson closing savings that would drive the closing? Are the other monies necessary for the (mandatory?) repairs accounted for?

  71. Anonymous

    “You will have trouble passing a parcel tax and then turning around to close a school. I think there would be mutiny. On the other hand, I think it almost certainly closes if the parcel tax fails….”

    The Emerson closing threat has the unpleasant smell of a kind of extortion. The Board leaves the issue moot with the implicit threat that Emerson will be closed unless West Davisites get on board with the Measure W parcel tax. Is it really the $600,000 Emerson closing savings that would drive the closing? Are the other monies necessary for the (mandatory?) repairs accounted for?

  72. Anonymous

    “You will have trouble passing a parcel tax and then turning around to close a school. I think there would be mutiny. On the other hand, I think it almost certainly closes if the parcel tax fails….”

    The Emerson closing threat has the unpleasant smell of a kind of extortion. The Board leaves the issue moot with the implicit threat that Emerson will be closed unless West Davisites get on board with the Measure W parcel tax. Is it really the $600,000 Emerson closing savings that would drive the closing? Are the other monies necessary for the (mandatory?) repairs accounted for?

  73. Anonymous

    David Greenwald, (Not DPD)

    What is it that you do not understand about; We are being taxed to death! I am on a fixed income. Along with the astronomical increase for gas there is also the soaring cost of food and other services.

    The school superintendants and those that have control over the system have done nothing but screw the taxpayers. I am all for a great educational system but cannot afford to be taken to the cleaners everytime the controllers give away money. Mandarin? Spanish Immersion? Educating Mexico’s children? No More.

  74. Anonymous

    David Greenwald, (Not DPD)

    What is it that you do not understand about; We are being taxed to death! I am on a fixed income. Along with the astronomical increase for gas there is also the soaring cost of food and other services.

    The school superintendants and those that have control over the system have done nothing but screw the taxpayers. I am all for a great educational system but cannot afford to be taken to the cleaners everytime the controllers give away money. Mandarin? Spanish Immersion? Educating Mexico’s children? No More.

  75. Anonymous

    David Greenwald, (Not DPD)

    What is it that you do not understand about; We are being taxed to death! I am on a fixed income. Along with the astronomical increase for gas there is also the soaring cost of food and other services.

    The school superintendants and those that have control over the system have done nothing but screw the taxpayers. I am all for a great educational system but cannot afford to be taken to the cleaners everytime the controllers give away money. Mandarin? Spanish Immersion? Educating Mexico’s children? No More.

  76. Anonymous

    David Greenwald, (Not DPD)

    What is it that you do not understand about; We are being taxed to death! I am on a fixed income. Along with the astronomical increase for gas there is also the soaring cost of food and other services.

    The school superintendants and those that have control over the system have done nothing but screw the taxpayers. I am all for a great educational system but cannot afford to be taken to the cleaners everytime the controllers give away money. Mandarin? Spanish Immersion? Educating Mexico’s children? No More.

  77. Stop Blackmailing me School Board

    I’m sick to death of the school board threatening to slash programs if its demands are not met. If the school board is not allowed to shake us down, then they will respond by making sure they destroy this program and this program if its demands are not met.

    This is blackmail. Notice how the school board’s first tactic is to blackmail us rather than bend over backwords to assure us our $ is well spent. Their token answer is “well… we’ll have an oversight committee” without doing much to assure us the committee will be guaranteed to be something other than a rubber stamp.

  78. Stop Blackmailing me School Bo

    I’m sick to death of the school board threatening to slash programs if its demands are not met. If the school board is not allowed to shake us down, then they will respond by making sure they destroy this program and this program if its demands are not met.

    This is blackmail. Notice how the school board’s first tactic is to blackmail us rather than bend over backwords to assure us our $ is well spent. Their token answer is “well… we’ll have an oversight committee” without doing much to assure us the committee will be guaranteed to be something other than a rubber stamp.

  79. Stop Blackmailing me School Bo

    I’m sick to death of the school board threatening to slash programs if its demands are not met. If the school board is not allowed to shake us down, then they will respond by making sure they destroy this program and this program if its demands are not met.

    This is blackmail. Notice how the school board’s first tactic is to blackmail us rather than bend over backwords to assure us our $ is well spent. Their token answer is “well… we’ll have an oversight committee” without doing much to assure us the committee will be guaranteed to be something other than a rubber stamp.

  80. Stop Blackmailing me School Bo

    I’m sick to death of the school board threatening to slash programs if its demands are not met. If the school board is not allowed to shake us down, then they will respond by making sure they destroy this program and this program if its demands are not met.

    This is blackmail. Notice how the school board’s first tactic is to blackmail us rather than bend over backwords to assure us our $ is well spent. Their token answer is “well… we’ll have an oversight committee” without doing much to assure us the committee will be guaranteed to be something other than a rubber stamp.

  81. Something isnt right...

    DPD, maybe this isn’t fair, but you were the one to put us on notice about the school board in the first place during Sallee/West, now you change your tune and want us to believe that we can trust our school board without any hesitation and just hand them a shiny new credit card.

    Maybe you can afford $120 here and there, but I cannot.

  82. Doug Paul Davis

    Responding to posts of three different anonymous posters:

    “The Emerson closing threat has the unpleasant smell of a kind of extortion.”

    I haven’t seen any threat from the school board on this issue.

    “What is it that you do not understand about; We are being taxed to death! I am on a fixed income. Along with the astronomical increase for gas there is also the soaring cost of food and other services.”

    If that’s the case, then you can request a waiver. $120 per year is not a lot of money to insure that programs continue.

    “I’m sick to death of the school board threatening to slash programs if its demands are not met.”

    What do you expect to happen if they lack the funding to pay for it?

  83. Something isnt right...

    DPD, maybe this isn’t fair, but you were the one to put us on notice about the school board in the first place during Sallee/West, now you change your tune and want us to believe that we can trust our school board without any hesitation and just hand them a shiny new credit card.

    Maybe you can afford $120 here and there, but I cannot.

  84. Doug Paul Davis

    Responding to posts of three different anonymous posters:

    “The Emerson closing threat has the unpleasant smell of a kind of extortion.”

    I haven’t seen any threat from the school board on this issue.

    “What is it that you do not understand about; We are being taxed to death! I am on a fixed income. Along with the astronomical increase for gas there is also the soaring cost of food and other services.”

    If that’s the case, then you can request a waiver. $120 per year is not a lot of money to insure that programs continue.

    “I’m sick to death of the school board threatening to slash programs if its demands are not met.”

    What do you expect to happen if they lack the funding to pay for it?

  85. Something isnt right...

    DPD, maybe this isn’t fair, but you were the one to put us on notice about the school board in the first place during Sallee/West, now you change your tune and want us to believe that we can trust our school board without any hesitation and just hand them a shiny new credit card.

    Maybe you can afford $120 here and there, but I cannot.

  86. Doug Paul Davis

    Responding to posts of three different anonymous posters:

    “The Emerson closing threat has the unpleasant smell of a kind of extortion.”

    I haven’t seen any threat from the school board on this issue.

    “What is it that you do not understand about; We are being taxed to death! I am on a fixed income. Along with the astronomical increase for gas there is also the soaring cost of food and other services.”

    If that’s the case, then you can request a waiver. $120 per year is not a lot of money to insure that programs continue.

    “I’m sick to death of the school board threatening to slash programs if its demands are not met.”

    What do you expect to happen if they lack the funding to pay for it?

  87. Something isnt right...

    DPD, maybe this isn’t fair, but you were the one to put us on notice about the school board in the first place during Sallee/West, now you change your tune and want us to believe that we can trust our school board without any hesitation and just hand them a shiny new credit card.

    Maybe you can afford $120 here and there, but I cannot.

  88. Doug Paul Davis

    Responding to posts of three different anonymous posters:

    “The Emerson closing threat has the unpleasant smell of a kind of extortion.”

    I haven’t seen any threat from the school board on this issue.

    “What is it that you do not understand about; We are being taxed to death! I am on a fixed income. Along with the astronomical increase for gas there is also the soaring cost of food and other services.”

    If that’s the case, then you can request a waiver. $120 per year is not a lot of money to insure that programs continue.

    “I’m sick to death of the school board threatening to slash programs if its demands are not met.”

    What do you expect to happen if they lack the funding to pay for it?

  89. Doug Paul Davis

    “DPD, maybe this isn’t fair, but you were the one to put us on notice about the school board in the first place during Sallee/West, now you change your tune and want us to believe that we can trust our school board without any hesitation and just hand them a shiny new credit card.”

    How have I changed my tune? I said in that series that changes had been made by the school board to prevent the problems from re-occurring. In case you didn’t notice, West and Sallee are gone.

    “Maybe you can afford $120 here and there, but I cannot.”

    I think most people can afford $10 per month to keep Davis schools running. If they cannot, you can apply for a waiver, I will post the link on the Vanguard for all to access if needed.

  90. Doug Paul Davis

    “DPD, maybe this isn’t fair, but you were the one to put us on notice about the school board in the first place during Sallee/West, now you change your tune and want us to believe that we can trust our school board without any hesitation and just hand them a shiny new credit card.”

    How have I changed my tune? I said in that series that changes had been made by the school board to prevent the problems from re-occurring. In case you didn’t notice, West and Sallee are gone.

    “Maybe you can afford $120 here and there, but I cannot.”

    I think most people can afford $10 per month to keep Davis schools running. If they cannot, you can apply for a waiver, I will post the link on the Vanguard for all to access if needed.

  91. Doug Paul Davis

    “DPD, maybe this isn’t fair, but you were the one to put us on notice about the school board in the first place during Sallee/West, now you change your tune and want us to believe that we can trust our school board without any hesitation and just hand them a shiny new credit card.”

    How have I changed my tune? I said in that series that changes had been made by the school board to prevent the problems from re-occurring. In case you didn’t notice, West and Sallee are gone.

    “Maybe you can afford $120 here and there, but I cannot.”

    I think most people can afford $10 per month to keep Davis schools running. If they cannot, you can apply for a waiver, I will post the link on the Vanguard for all to access if needed.

  92. Doug Paul Davis

    “DPD, maybe this isn’t fair, but you were the one to put us on notice about the school board in the first place during Sallee/West, now you change your tune and want us to believe that we can trust our school board without any hesitation and just hand them a shiny new credit card.”

    How have I changed my tune? I said in that series that changes had been made by the school board to prevent the problems from re-occurring. In case you didn’t notice, West and Sallee are gone.

    “Maybe you can afford $120 here and there, but I cannot.”

    I think most people can afford $10 per month to keep Davis schools running. If they cannot, you can apply for a waiver, I will post the link on the Vanguard for all to access if needed.

  93. Oh, come on.

    “How have I changed my tune? I said in that series that changes had been made by the school board to prevent the problems from re-occurring. In case you didn’t notice, West and Sallee are gone.”

    Excuse me, but Provenza didn’t exactly blow the whistle. He had to have known what was going on if the problem was as bad as you said it is. And so did everyone else that was working on the board.

  94. Oh, come on.

    “How have I changed my tune? I said in that series that changes had been made by the school board to prevent the problems from re-occurring. In case you didn’t notice, West and Sallee are gone.”

    Excuse me, but Provenza didn’t exactly blow the whistle. He had to have known what was going on if the problem was as bad as you said it is. And so did everyone else that was working on the board.

  95. Oh, come on.

    “How have I changed my tune? I said in that series that changes had been made by the school board to prevent the problems from re-occurring. In case you didn’t notice, West and Sallee are gone.”

    Excuse me, but Provenza didn’t exactly blow the whistle. He had to have known what was going on if the problem was as bad as you said it is. And so did everyone else that was working on the board.

  96. Oh, come on.

    “How have I changed my tune? I said in that series that changes had been made by the school board to prevent the problems from re-occurring. In case you didn’t notice, West and Sallee are gone.”

    Excuse me, but Provenza didn’t exactly blow the whistle. He had to have known what was going on if the problem was as bad as you said it is. And so did everyone else that was working on the board.

  97. Anonymous

    My anecdotal observation over the last 15 years is that Davis is getting grayer and more economically divided (more affluent retirees settling or staying in a vibrant university town, vs retirees on fixed incomes losing economic standing as expenses increase.) I wonder if there’s any recent demographic data on the graying of Davis. It is not an uncommon pattern for towns to follow Davis’ apparent demographic evolution and become affluent retiree towns – and an aging population doesn’t usually feel the need to fund schools. The loss of excellent schools would be a loss, but perhaps, it reflects the changing priorities of a changing population? If so, it’s not necessarily bad, just different. I wonder if the premise of the schools debate – that we must have great schools to continue to be a great town – is not demographically supported.

  98. Anonymous

    My anecdotal observation over the last 15 years is that Davis is getting grayer and more economically divided (more affluent retirees settling or staying in a vibrant university town, vs retirees on fixed incomes losing economic standing as expenses increase.) I wonder if there’s any recent demographic data on the graying of Davis. It is not an uncommon pattern for towns to follow Davis’ apparent demographic evolution and become affluent retiree towns – and an aging population doesn’t usually feel the need to fund schools. The loss of excellent schools would be a loss, but perhaps, it reflects the changing priorities of a changing population? If so, it’s not necessarily bad, just different. I wonder if the premise of the schools debate – that we must have great schools to continue to be a great town – is not demographically supported.

  99. Anonymous

    My anecdotal observation over the last 15 years is that Davis is getting grayer and more economically divided (more affluent retirees settling or staying in a vibrant university town, vs retirees on fixed incomes losing economic standing as expenses increase.) I wonder if there’s any recent demographic data on the graying of Davis. It is not an uncommon pattern for towns to follow Davis’ apparent demographic evolution and become affluent retiree towns – and an aging population doesn’t usually feel the need to fund schools. The loss of excellent schools would be a loss, but perhaps, it reflects the changing priorities of a changing population? If so, it’s not necessarily bad, just different. I wonder if the premise of the schools debate – that we must have great schools to continue to be a great town – is not demographically supported.

  100. Anonymous

    My anecdotal observation over the last 15 years is that Davis is getting grayer and more economically divided (more affluent retirees settling or staying in a vibrant university town, vs retirees on fixed incomes losing economic standing as expenses increase.) I wonder if there’s any recent demographic data on the graying of Davis. It is not an uncommon pattern for towns to follow Davis’ apparent demographic evolution and become affluent retiree towns – and an aging population doesn’t usually feel the need to fund schools. The loss of excellent schools would be a loss, but perhaps, it reflects the changing priorities of a changing population? If so, it’s not necessarily bad, just different. I wonder if the premise of the schools debate – that we must have great schools to continue to be a great town – is not demographically supported.

  101. Anonymous

    Further to my last anecdotal observation, re the assumption by some that great schools are the primary basis for the price premium paid for Davis homes over other communities: that’s certainly true, but it, too, may be shifting. Retirees seeking a vibrant college town in which to retire (or stay after their kids are grown) pay for the access to the town, UC Davis, the arts and the multi-generational richness of Davis and its community. The schools have been a large part of that, but they are not the only part, and they aren’t the part that the retiree cohort I’m describing is interested in. Result: Davis homes may continue to be premium priced, but for different reasons than in the past.
    I’m not saying it is so, I’m wondering if it is possible that we are in the midst of a demographic shift whose implications include, but are not limited to, resistance to the parcel tax.

    Just a thought.

  102. Anonymous

    Further to my last anecdotal observation, re the assumption by some that great schools are the primary basis for the price premium paid for Davis homes over other communities: that’s certainly true, but it, too, may be shifting. Retirees seeking a vibrant college town in which to retire (or stay after their kids are grown) pay for the access to the town, UC Davis, the arts and the multi-generational richness of Davis and its community. The schools have been a large part of that, but they are not the only part, and they aren’t the part that the retiree cohort I’m describing is interested in. Result: Davis homes may continue to be premium priced, but for different reasons than in the past.
    I’m not saying it is so, I’m wondering if it is possible that we are in the midst of a demographic shift whose implications include, but are not limited to, resistance to the parcel tax.

    Just a thought.

  103. Anonymous

    Further to my last anecdotal observation, re the assumption by some that great schools are the primary basis for the price premium paid for Davis homes over other communities: that’s certainly true, but it, too, may be shifting. Retirees seeking a vibrant college town in which to retire (or stay after their kids are grown) pay for the access to the town, UC Davis, the arts and the multi-generational richness of Davis and its community. The schools have been a large part of that, but they are not the only part, and they aren’t the part that the retiree cohort I’m describing is interested in. Result: Davis homes may continue to be premium priced, but for different reasons than in the past.
    I’m not saying it is so, I’m wondering if it is possible that we are in the midst of a demographic shift whose implications include, but are not limited to, resistance to the parcel tax.

    Just a thought.

  104. Anonymous

    Further to my last anecdotal observation, re the assumption by some that great schools are the primary basis for the price premium paid for Davis homes over other communities: that’s certainly true, but it, too, may be shifting. Retirees seeking a vibrant college town in which to retire (or stay after their kids are grown) pay for the access to the town, UC Davis, the arts and the multi-generational richness of Davis and its community. The schools have been a large part of that, but they are not the only part, and they aren’t the part that the retiree cohort I’m describing is interested in. Result: Davis homes may continue to be premium priced, but for different reasons than in the past.
    I’m not saying it is so, I’m wondering if it is possible that we are in the midst of a demographic shift whose implications include, but are not limited to, resistance to the parcel tax.

    Just a thought.

  105. Doug Paul Davis

    My opinion is that education just always has to be a priority. I’m willing to fight against the next city tax, fight against water rate increases, but you have to support education, these are young people’s lives you are messing with, they only get one shot at childhood.

  106. Doug Paul Davis

    My opinion is that education just always has to be a priority. I’m willing to fight against the next city tax, fight against water rate increases, but you have to support education, these are young people’s lives you are messing with, they only get one shot at childhood.

  107. Doug Paul Davis

    My opinion is that education just always has to be a priority. I’m willing to fight against the next city tax, fight against water rate increases, but you have to support education, these are young people’s lives you are messing with, they only get one shot at childhood.

  108. Doug Paul Davis

    My opinion is that education just always has to be a priority. I’m willing to fight against the next city tax, fight against water rate increases, but you have to support education, these are young people’s lives you are messing with, they only get one shot at childhood.

  109. Anonymous

    I was not necessarily referring to this proposed $120 tax, which, yes, only amounts to $10 a month. I was talking about the stack of tiny fees and taxes that add up to so much over the year. It’s $10 here and $10 there, whatever the city or the school board or pollsters think we will take. Those little increments really start to add up and begin to make Davis an expensive place to live.

    And yes, we too live here in part because of the schools. But please, don’t push Measure W and then X, Y and Z, and then wonder why there are no families with young kids moving to Davis or why our town has no diversity and no understanding of the real life of the working class.

    Davis mom

  110. Anonymous

    I was not necessarily referring to this proposed $120 tax, which, yes, only amounts to $10 a month. I was talking about the stack of tiny fees and taxes that add up to so much over the year. It’s $10 here and $10 there, whatever the city or the school board or pollsters think we will take. Those little increments really start to add up and begin to make Davis an expensive place to live.

    And yes, we too live here in part because of the schools. But please, don’t push Measure W and then X, Y and Z, and then wonder why there are no families with young kids moving to Davis or why our town has no diversity and no understanding of the real life of the working class.

    Davis mom

  111. Anonymous

    I was not necessarily referring to this proposed $120 tax, which, yes, only amounts to $10 a month. I was talking about the stack of tiny fees and taxes that add up to so much over the year. It’s $10 here and $10 there, whatever the city or the school board or pollsters think we will take. Those little increments really start to add up and begin to make Davis an expensive place to live.

    And yes, we too live here in part because of the schools. But please, don’t push Measure W and then X, Y and Z, and then wonder why there are no families with young kids moving to Davis or why our town has no diversity and no understanding of the real life of the working class.

    Davis mom

  112. Anonymous

    I was not necessarily referring to this proposed $120 tax, which, yes, only amounts to $10 a month. I was talking about the stack of tiny fees and taxes that add up to so much over the year. It’s $10 here and $10 there, whatever the city or the school board or pollsters think we will take. Those little increments really start to add up and begin to make Davis an expensive place to live.

    And yes, we too live here in part because of the schools. But please, don’t push Measure W and then X, Y and Z, and then wonder why there are no families with young kids moving to Davis or why our town has no diversity and no understanding of the real life of the working class.

    Davis mom

  113. shifting positions?

    “3. Notice Da Vince is talking about becoming a charter school. Good for them. That is exactly what we need to do. Put the funding of the schools in the hands of parents and teachers, who will do a much better job, because they have a more personal stake in whether the school survives. More schools ought to become charter. How much has DJUSD done to become state funding independent? I would guess zilch!”

    I thought you thought Da Vinci was a frill and unnecessary in light of other budget cuts. Have you changed your tune now that DVHS has discussed the idea of a charter?

  114. Old Skool Davis

    Hey! News flash!
    To: The last remaining vestiges of “old school Davis”.
    The party is over. Say goodbye to your ultra liberal arts educational enrichment programs.

    Say goodbye, to the sterling test scores once touted by the Davis Joint Unified School District.

    Say Hello! To the new “Gangsta Thug Era”.

    If it was’nt for large pockets of poorly managed subsidized housing adjacent to Emerson JHS, and the 60 or so students driven to the school’s curb daily from Woodland and Dixon. The schools attendance figures would be approx. 35 students.
    I’m not paying another dime in extra tax for this blighted oversight.

  115. shifting positions?

    “3. Notice Da Vince is talking about becoming a charter school. Good for them. That is exactly what we need to do. Put the funding of the schools in the hands of parents and teachers, who will do a much better job, because they have a more personal stake in whether the school survives. More schools ought to become charter. How much has DJUSD done to become state funding independent? I would guess zilch!”

    I thought you thought Da Vinci was a frill and unnecessary in light of other budget cuts. Have you changed your tune now that DVHS has discussed the idea of a charter?

  116. Old Skool Davis

    Hey! News flash!
    To: The last remaining vestiges of “old school Davis”.
    The party is over. Say goodbye to your ultra liberal arts educational enrichment programs.

    Say goodbye, to the sterling test scores once touted by the Davis Joint Unified School District.

    Say Hello! To the new “Gangsta Thug Era”.

    If it was’nt for large pockets of poorly managed subsidized housing adjacent to Emerson JHS, and the 60 or so students driven to the school’s curb daily from Woodland and Dixon. The schools attendance figures would be approx. 35 students.
    I’m not paying another dime in extra tax for this blighted oversight.

  117. shifting positions?

    “3. Notice Da Vince is talking about becoming a charter school. Good for them. That is exactly what we need to do. Put the funding of the schools in the hands of parents and teachers, who will do a much better job, because they have a more personal stake in whether the school survives. More schools ought to become charter. How much has DJUSD done to become state funding independent? I would guess zilch!”

    I thought you thought Da Vinci was a frill and unnecessary in light of other budget cuts. Have you changed your tune now that DVHS has discussed the idea of a charter?

  118. Old Skool Davis

    Hey! News flash!
    To: The last remaining vestiges of “old school Davis”.
    The party is over. Say goodbye to your ultra liberal arts educational enrichment programs.

    Say goodbye, to the sterling test scores once touted by the Davis Joint Unified School District.

    Say Hello! To the new “Gangsta Thug Era”.

    If it was’nt for large pockets of poorly managed subsidized housing adjacent to Emerson JHS, and the 60 or so students driven to the school’s curb daily from Woodland and Dixon. The schools attendance figures would be approx. 35 students.
    I’m not paying another dime in extra tax for this blighted oversight.

  119. shifting positions?

    “3. Notice Da Vince is talking about becoming a charter school. Good for them. That is exactly what we need to do. Put the funding of the schools in the hands of parents and teachers, who will do a much better job, because they have a more personal stake in whether the school survives. More schools ought to become charter. How much has DJUSD done to become state funding independent? I would guess zilch!”

    I thought you thought Da Vinci was a frill and unnecessary in light of other budget cuts. Have you changed your tune now that DVHS has discussed the idea of a charter?

  120. Old Skool Davis

    Hey! News flash!
    To: The last remaining vestiges of “old school Davis”.
    The party is over. Say goodbye to your ultra liberal arts educational enrichment programs.

    Say goodbye, to the sterling test scores once touted by the Davis Joint Unified School District.

    Say Hello! To the new “Gangsta Thug Era”.

    If it was’nt for large pockets of poorly managed subsidized housing adjacent to Emerson JHS, and the 60 or so students driven to the school’s curb daily from Woodland and Dixon. The schools attendance figures would be approx. 35 students.
    I’m not paying another dime in extra tax for this blighted oversight.

  121. Anonymous

    “If it was’nt for large pockets of poorly managed subsidized housing adjacent to Emerson JHS, and the 60 or so students driven to the school’s curb daily from Woodland and Dixon. The schools attendance figures would be approx. 35 students.
    I’m not paying another dime in extra tax for this blighted oversight.”

    Huh? I don’t understand the point of this comment. Poorly managed subsidized housing? Where?
    60 or so students coming in from Woodland/Dixon? that’s news to me.

    Sounds like more product from the rumor factory.

  122. Anonymous

    “If it was’nt for large pockets of poorly managed subsidized housing adjacent to Emerson JHS, and the 60 or so students driven to the school’s curb daily from Woodland and Dixon. The schools attendance figures would be approx. 35 students.
    I’m not paying another dime in extra tax for this blighted oversight.”

    Huh? I don’t understand the point of this comment. Poorly managed subsidized housing? Where?
    60 or so students coming in from Woodland/Dixon? that’s news to me.

    Sounds like more product from the rumor factory.

  123. Anonymous

    “If it was’nt for large pockets of poorly managed subsidized housing adjacent to Emerson JHS, and the 60 or so students driven to the school’s curb daily from Woodland and Dixon. The schools attendance figures would be approx. 35 students.
    I’m not paying another dime in extra tax for this blighted oversight.”

    Huh? I don’t understand the point of this comment. Poorly managed subsidized housing? Where?
    60 or so students coming in from Woodland/Dixon? that’s news to me.

    Sounds like more product from the rumor factory.

  124. Anonymous

    “If it was’nt for large pockets of poorly managed subsidized housing adjacent to Emerson JHS, and the 60 or so students driven to the school’s curb daily from Woodland and Dixon. The schools attendance figures would be approx. 35 students.
    I’m not paying another dime in extra tax for this blighted oversight.”

    Huh? I don’t understand the point of this comment. Poorly managed subsidized housing? Where?
    60 or so students coming in from Woodland/Dixon? that’s news to me.

    Sounds like more product from the rumor factory.

  125. Anonymous

    “Someone went onto the school district website and tried to make sense of its budgeting process, but it is purposely ambiguous in how it is laid out. Now why is that, do you think?”

    It must be a conspiracy theory!!!

  126. Anonymous

    “Someone went onto the school district website and tried to make sense of its budgeting process, but it is purposely ambiguous in how it is laid out. Now why is that, do you think?”

    It must be a conspiracy theory!!!

  127. Anonymous

    “Someone went onto the school district website and tried to make sense of its budgeting process, but it is purposely ambiguous in how it is laid out. Now why is that, do you think?”

    It must be a conspiracy theory!!!

  128. Anonymous

    “Someone went onto the school district website and tried to make sense of its budgeting process, but it is purposely ambiguous in how it is laid out. Now why is that, do you think?”

    It must be a conspiracy theory!!!

  129. wdf

    I have not seen any attempt to determine what courses are considered “core curricula”. All the current School Board/District are doing is trying to save every single program we already have, whether it be good, bad or indifferent. All of the courses are considered “core curricula”. This is wrongheaded and irresponsible.

    Are there bad or indifferent programs you would propose to eliminate?

    No Child Left Behind Act says this:
    “The term ‘core academic subjects’ means English, reading or language arts, mathematics, science, foreign languages, civics and government, economics, arts, history, and geography.”

    “Arts” is left up to the state to define. California, like many other states, defines arts to include visual and performing arts. Performing arts includes music, dance, and theater.

  130. wdf

    I have not seen any attempt to determine what courses are considered “core curricula”. All the current School Board/District are doing is trying to save every single program we already have, whether it be good, bad or indifferent. All of the courses are considered “core curricula”. This is wrongheaded and irresponsible.

    Are there bad or indifferent programs you would propose to eliminate?

    No Child Left Behind Act says this:
    “The term ‘core academic subjects’ means English, reading or language arts, mathematics, science, foreign languages, civics and government, economics, arts, history, and geography.”

    “Arts” is left up to the state to define. California, like many other states, defines arts to include visual and performing arts. Performing arts includes music, dance, and theater.

  131. wdf

    I have not seen any attempt to determine what courses are considered “core curricula”. All the current School Board/District are doing is trying to save every single program we already have, whether it be good, bad or indifferent. All of the courses are considered “core curricula”. This is wrongheaded and irresponsible.

    Are there bad or indifferent programs you would propose to eliminate?

    No Child Left Behind Act says this:
    “The term ‘core academic subjects’ means English, reading or language arts, mathematics, science, foreign languages, civics and government, economics, arts, history, and geography.”

    “Arts” is left up to the state to define. California, like many other states, defines arts to include visual and performing arts. Performing arts includes music, dance, and theater.

  132. wdf

    I have not seen any attempt to determine what courses are considered “core curricula”. All the current School Board/District are doing is trying to save every single program we already have, whether it be good, bad or indifferent. All of the courses are considered “core curricula”. This is wrongheaded and irresponsible.

    Are there bad or indifferent programs you would propose to eliminate?

    No Child Left Behind Act says this:
    “The term ‘core academic subjects’ means English, reading or language arts, mathematics, science, foreign languages, civics and government, economics, arts, history, and geography.”

    “Arts” is left up to the state to define. California, like many other states, defines arts to include visual and performing arts. Performing arts includes music, dance, and theater.

  133. Davis schools supporter

    “You believe what the School Board/District tells you. You take them at face value. I don’t. I’ve lived here since 1987, had three children go through these schools, and have an entirely different perspective from hard experiece.”

    I have lived here since 1988 and have also had three children go through these schools. Although I could spend equivalent space venting my gripes about things that didn’t go well for my kids, my overall perspective is with DPD.

    I have observed steady improvement in the overall quality of schools, especially when considering how my oldest and youngest child fared.

    I will support Measure W, because those programs have made a difference in my children’s education in Davis. Because education is so poorly funded and so poorly run statewide, but Davis schools come closer to getting it right. Because bloggers like “have more questions” above lose sight of the big picture in the midst smaller complaints as an excuse to deny school funding, as if that will fix something or send a message.

    If I’m allowed to use my age and experience as some kind of authority as she (“have more questions”) does, then I can say that all I’ve seen happen from denying adequate funding to schools is bigger classes, fewer offerings, less school accomodation for kids that need it, deteriorating quality in schools, and increased griping about the poor quality of the schools.

    It becomes a downward spiral. Denying funds leads to poorer schools leads to more griping leads to denying more funds, etc.

    The kids who need Measure W the most come from poorer families who dare to live in Davis because they want a better future for their kids. Yes, they are here in Davis.

  134. Davis schools supporter

    “You believe what the School Board/District tells you. You take them at face value. I don’t. I’ve lived here since 1987, had three children go through these schools, and have an entirely different perspective from hard experiece.”

    I have lived here since 1988 and have also had three children go through these schools. Although I could spend equivalent space venting my gripes about things that didn’t go well for my kids, my overall perspective is with DPD.

    I have observed steady improvement in the overall quality of schools, especially when considering how my oldest and youngest child fared.

    I will support Measure W, because those programs have made a difference in my children’s education in Davis. Because education is so poorly funded and so poorly run statewide, but Davis schools come closer to getting it right. Because bloggers like “have more questions” above lose sight of the big picture in the midst smaller complaints as an excuse to deny school funding, as if that will fix something or send a message.

    If I’m allowed to use my age and experience as some kind of authority as she (“have more questions”) does, then I can say that all I’ve seen happen from denying adequate funding to schools is bigger classes, fewer offerings, less school accomodation for kids that need it, deteriorating quality in schools, and increased griping about the poor quality of the schools.

    It becomes a downward spiral. Denying funds leads to poorer schools leads to more griping leads to denying more funds, etc.

    The kids who need Measure W the most come from poorer families who dare to live in Davis because they want a better future for their kids. Yes, they are here in Davis.

  135. Davis schools supporter

    “You believe what the School Board/District tells you. You take them at face value. I don’t. I’ve lived here since 1987, had three children go through these schools, and have an entirely different perspective from hard experiece.”

    I have lived here since 1988 and have also had three children go through these schools. Although I could spend equivalent space venting my gripes about things that didn’t go well for my kids, my overall perspective is with DPD.

    I have observed steady improvement in the overall quality of schools, especially when considering how my oldest and youngest child fared.

    I will support Measure W, because those programs have made a difference in my children’s education in Davis. Because education is so poorly funded and so poorly run statewide, but Davis schools come closer to getting it right. Because bloggers like “have more questions” above lose sight of the big picture in the midst smaller complaints as an excuse to deny school funding, as if that will fix something or send a message.

    If I’m allowed to use my age and experience as some kind of authority as she (“have more questions”) does, then I can say that all I’ve seen happen from denying adequate funding to schools is bigger classes, fewer offerings, less school accomodation for kids that need it, deteriorating quality in schools, and increased griping about the poor quality of the schools.

    It becomes a downward spiral. Denying funds leads to poorer schools leads to more griping leads to denying more funds, etc.

    The kids who need Measure W the most come from poorer families who dare to live in Davis because they want a better future for their kids. Yes, they are here in Davis.

  136. Davis schools supporter

    “You believe what the School Board/District tells you. You take them at face value. I don’t. I’ve lived here since 1987, had three children go through these schools, and have an entirely different perspective from hard experiece.”

    I have lived here since 1988 and have also had three children go through these schools. Although I could spend equivalent space venting my gripes about things that didn’t go well for my kids, my overall perspective is with DPD.

    I have observed steady improvement in the overall quality of schools, especially when considering how my oldest and youngest child fared.

    I will support Measure W, because those programs have made a difference in my children’s education in Davis. Because education is so poorly funded and so poorly run statewide, but Davis schools come closer to getting it right. Because bloggers like “have more questions” above lose sight of the big picture in the midst smaller complaints as an excuse to deny school funding, as if that will fix something or send a message.

    If I’m allowed to use my age and experience as some kind of authority as she (“have more questions”) does, then I can say that all I’ve seen happen from denying adequate funding to schools is bigger classes, fewer offerings, less school accomodation for kids that need it, deteriorating quality in schools, and increased griping about the poor quality of the schools.

    It becomes a downward spiral. Denying funds leads to poorer schools leads to more griping leads to denying more funds, etc.

    The kids who need Measure W the most come from poorer families who dare to live in Davis because they want a better future for their kids. Yes, they are here in Davis.

  137. Anonymous

    “I can almost guarantee you there is plenty of bloat in the budget, but it is obfuscated in such a way that is almost impossible for anyone to make heads nor tails of it, including School District staff themselves – much as the City of Davis does (as you pointed out recently with respect to Sparky).”

    So the argument is that the bloat is there, even if it can’t be seen. Sounds like the kind of argument made by a president about WMDs.

    But I think I have found the budget “bloat” she describes above.

    It comes from the expectation that district employees (especially teachers) should be living more on a diet of rice and beans!!

    I find it ridiculous to compare DJUSD budget practices to those of the City of Davis. Are district employees being paid as much as firefighters? Are teachers getting an equivalent pension package?

  138. Anonymous

    “I can almost guarantee you there is plenty of bloat in the budget, but it is obfuscated in such a way that is almost impossible for anyone to make heads nor tails of it, including School District staff themselves – much as the City of Davis does (as you pointed out recently with respect to Sparky).”

    So the argument is that the bloat is there, even if it can’t be seen. Sounds like the kind of argument made by a president about WMDs.

    But I think I have found the budget “bloat” she describes above.

    It comes from the expectation that district employees (especially teachers) should be living more on a diet of rice and beans!!

    I find it ridiculous to compare DJUSD budget practices to those of the City of Davis. Are district employees being paid as much as firefighters? Are teachers getting an equivalent pension package?

  139. Anonymous

    “I can almost guarantee you there is plenty of bloat in the budget, but it is obfuscated in such a way that is almost impossible for anyone to make heads nor tails of it, including School District staff themselves – much as the City of Davis does (as you pointed out recently with respect to Sparky).”

    So the argument is that the bloat is there, even if it can’t be seen. Sounds like the kind of argument made by a president about WMDs.

    But I think I have found the budget “bloat” she describes above.

    It comes from the expectation that district employees (especially teachers) should be living more on a diet of rice and beans!!

    I find it ridiculous to compare DJUSD budget practices to those of the City of Davis. Are district employees being paid as much as firefighters? Are teachers getting an equivalent pension package?

  140. Anonymous

    “I can almost guarantee you there is plenty of bloat in the budget, but it is obfuscated in such a way that is almost impossible for anyone to make heads nor tails of it, including School District staff themselves – much as the City of Davis does (as you pointed out recently with respect to Sparky).”

    So the argument is that the bloat is there, even if it can’t be seen. Sounds like the kind of argument made by a president about WMDs.

    But I think I have found the budget “bloat” she describes above.

    It comes from the expectation that district employees (especially teachers) should be living more on a diet of rice and beans!!

    I find it ridiculous to compare DJUSD budget practices to those of the City of Davis. Are district employees being paid as much as firefighters? Are teachers getting an equivalent pension package?

  141. More Questions

    “If I’m allowed to use my age and experience as some kind of authority as she (“have more questions”) does, then I can say that all I’ve seen happen from denying adequate funding to schools is bigger classes, fewer offerings, less school accomodation for kids that need it, deteriorating quality in schools, and increased griping about the poor quality of the schools.”

    Here is where you have misunderstood me. I haven’t said one way or the other whether I am for or against parcel taxes. We have paid various parcel taxes over the years, and what did we get for our trouble? The closure of Valley Oak for one. What I am pointing out is the obvious. We need better management of the funds we do give the schools, they are not getting it right if we are threatened with the closure of two schools, and there needs to be some sort of true accountability.

    How anyone can try and justify the closure of Valley Oak is beyond my comprehension. It was clearly a mistake. There is no other way to characterize it. Any other explanation is nothing more than rationalizations for blatant misjudgment.

  142. More Questions

    “If I’m allowed to use my age and experience as some kind of authority as she (“have more questions”) does, then I can say that all I’ve seen happen from denying adequate funding to schools is bigger classes, fewer offerings, less school accomodation for kids that need it, deteriorating quality in schools, and increased griping about the poor quality of the schools.”

    Here is where you have misunderstood me. I haven’t said one way or the other whether I am for or against parcel taxes. We have paid various parcel taxes over the years, and what did we get for our trouble? The closure of Valley Oak for one. What I am pointing out is the obvious. We need better management of the funds we do give the schools, they are not getting it right if we are threatened with the closure of two schools, and there needs to be some sort of true accountability.

    How anyone can try and justify the closure of Valley Oak is beyond my comprehension. It was clearly a mistake. There is no other way to characterize it. Any other explanation is nothing more than rationalizations for blatant misjudgment.

  143. More Questions

    “If I’m allowed to use my age and experience as some kind of authority as she (“have more questions”) does, then I can say that all I’ve seen happen from denying adequate funding to schools is bigger classes, fewer offerings, less school accomodation for kids that need it, deteriorating quality in schools, and increased griping about the poor quality of the schools.”

    Here is where you have misunderstood me. I haven’t said one way or the other whether I am for or against parcel taxes. We have paid various parcel taxes over the years, and what did we get for our trouble? The closure of Valley Oak for one. What I am pointing out is the obvious. We need better management of the funds we do give the schools, they are not getting it right if we are threatened with the closure of two schools, and there needs to be some sort of true accountability.

    How anyone can try and justify the closure of Valley Oak is beyond my comprehension. It was clearly a mistake. There is no other way to characterize it. Any other explanation is nothing more than rationalizations for blatant misjudgment.

  144. More Questions

    “If I’m allowed to use my age and experience as some kind of authority as she (“have more questions”) does, then I can say that all I’ve seen happen from denying adequate funding to schools is bigger classes, fewer offerings, less school accomodation for kids that need it, deteriorating quality in schools, and increased griping about the poor quality of the schools.”

    Here is where you have misunderstood me. I haven’t said one way or the other whether I am for or against parcel taxes. We have paid various parcel taxes over the years, and what did we get for our trouble? The closure of Valley Oak for one. What I am pointing out is the obvious. We need better management of the funds we do give the schools, they are not getting it right if we are threatened with the closure of two schools, and there needs to be some sort of true accountability.

    How anyone can try and justify the closure of Valley Oak is beyond my comprehension. It was clearly a mistake. There is no other way to characterize it. Any other explanation is nothing more than rationalizations for blatant misjudgment.

  145. Against Wastage

    “But I think I have found the budget “bloat” she describes above. It comes from the expectation that district employees (especially teachers) should be living more on a diet of rice and beans!!”

    Interesting how the School District itself somehow managed to find $1.1 million worth of bloat. Yet somehow when taxpayers demand better budgeting, suddenly the promoters of Measure W insist detractors want to stick it to teachers, don’t care about children, only care about facilities, etc. ad nauseum.

    Sorry DPD, but the implicit threat of the closure of Emerson if we don’t pass Measure W smells too much like extortion to me (a tactic used many times in the past). If it walks like a duck, quacks like a duck…

    Where is all that “education” that was supposed to be put out by the School District, to teach us poor dumb taxpayers why we have to vote for Measure W? Are you referring to Bruce Colby’s self-serving editorial that didn’t amount to diddly-squat?

    The problem is not necessarily another parcel tax per se. The difficulty is how it is going to be spent without any accountability. And don’t tell me the hand-picked committee already selected is any kind of meaningful accountability. Taxpayers are fed up with the wastage, pure and simple – and now they are being asked to pony up more dollars to be flushed down the hole…

  146. Against Wastage

    “But I think I have found the budget “bloat” she describes above. It comes from the expectation that district employees (especially teachers) should be living more on a diet of rice and beans!!”

    Interesting how the School District itself somehow managed to find $1.1 million worth of bloat. Yet somehow when taxpayers demand better budgeting, suddenly the promoters of Measure W insist detractors want to stick it to teachers, don’t care about children, only care about facilities, etc. ad nauseum.

    Sorry DPD, but the implicit threat of the closure of Emerson if we don’t pass Measure W smells too much like extortion to me (a tactic used many times in the past). If it walks like a duck, quacks like a duck…

    Where is all that “education” that was supposed to be put out by the School District, to teach us poor dumb taxpayers why we have to vote for Measure W? Are you referring to Bruce Colby’s self-serving editorial that didn’t amount to diddly-squat?

    The problem is not necessarily another parcel tax per se. The difficulty is how it is going to be spent without any accountability. And don’t tell me the hand-picked committee already selected is any kind of meaningful accountability. Taxpayers are fed up with the wastage, pure and simple – and now they are being asked to pony up more dollars to be flushed down the hole…

  147. Against Wastage

    “But I think I have found the budget “bloat” she describes above. It comes from the expectation that district employees (especially teachers) should be living more on a diet of rice and beans!!”

    Interesting how the School District itself somehow managed to find $1.1 million worth of bloat. Yet somehow when taxpayers demand better budgeting, suddenly the promoters of Measure W insist detractors want to stick it to teachers, don’t care about children, only care about facilities, etc. ad nauseum.

    Sorry DPD, but the implicit threat of the closure of Emerson if we don’t pass Measure W smells too much like extortion to me (a tactic used many times in the past). If it walks like a duck, quacks like a duck…

    Where is all that “education” that was supposed to be put out by the School District, to teach us poor dumb taxpayers why we have to vote for Measure W? Are you referring to Bruce Colby’s self-serving editorial that didn’t amount to diddly-squat?

    The problem is not necessarily another parcel tax per se. The difficulty is how it is going to be spent without any accountability. And don’t tell me the hand-picked committee already selected is any kind of meaningful accountability. Taxpayers are fed up with the wastage, pure and simple – and now they are being asked to pony up more dollars to be flushed down the hole…

  148. Against Wastage

    “But I think I have found the budget “bloat” she describes above. It comes from the expectation that district employees (especially teachers) should be living more on a diet of rice and beans!!”

    Interesting how the School District itself somehow managed to find $1.1 million worth of bloat. Yet somehow when taxpayers demand better budgeting, suddenly the promoters of Measure W insist detractors want to stick it to teachers, don’t care about children, only care about facilities, etc. ad nauseum.

    Sorry DPD, but the implicit threat of the closure of Emerson if we don’t pass Measure W smells too much like extortion to me (a tactic used many times in the past). If it walks like a duck, quacks like a duck…

    Where is all that “education” that was supposed to be put out by the School District, to teach us poor dumb taxpayers why we have to vote for Measure W? Are you referring to Bruce Colby’s self-serving editorial that didn’t amount to diddly-squat?

    The problem is not necessarily another parcel tax per se. The difficulty is how it is going to be spent without any accountability. And don’t tell me the hand-picked committee already selected is any kind of meaningful accountability. Taxpayers are fed up with the wastage, pure and simple – and now they are being asked to pony up more dollars to be flushed down the hole…

  149. Doug Paul Davis

    “Interesting how the School District itself somehow managed to find $1.1 million worth of bloat.”

    I don’t know that they did find $1.1 million worth of bloat.

  150. Doug Paul Davis

    “Interesting how the School District itself somehow managed to find $1.1 million worth of bloat.”

    I don’t know that they did find $1.1 million worth of bloat.

  151. Doug Paul Davis

    “Interesting how the School District itself somehow managed to find $1.1 million worth of bloat.”

    I don’t know that they did find $1.1 million worth of bloat.

  152. Doug Paul Davis

    “Interesting how the School District itself somehow managed to find $1.1 million worth of bloat.”

    I don’t know that they did find $1.1 million worth of bloat.

  153. They closed Valley Oak

    Excuse me, but these clowns didn’t ask for a bond measure to save valley oak. They fired Valley Oak in the blink of an eye. Now all of a sudden, teachers and programs are important to them. Like hell.

  154. They closed Valley Oak

    Excuse me, but these clowns didn’t ask for a bond measure to save valley oak. They fired Valley Oak in the blink of an eye. Now all of a sudden, teachers and programs are important to them. Like hell.

  155. They closed Valley Oak

    Excuse me, but these clowns didn’t ask for a bond measure to save valley oak. They fired Valley Oak in the blink of an eye. Now all of a sudden, teachers and programs are important to them. Like hell.

  156. They closed Valley Oak

    Excuse me, but these clowns didn’t ask for a bond measure to save valley oak. They fired Valley Oak in the blink of an eye. Now all of a sudden, teachers and programs are important to them. Like hell.

  157. Doug Paul Davis

    Actually you are incorrect there as well. They looked into a bond measure to save valley oak and found there wasn’t much support in the community. So all parties, even the two board members who supported keeping Valley Oak open and supported the charter school, agreed that was not the best option.

  158. Doug Paul Davis

    Actually you are incorrect there as well. They looked into a bond measure to save valley oak and found there wasn’t much support in the community. So all parties, even the two board members who supported keeping Valley Oak open and supported the charter school, agreed that was not the best option.

  159. Doug Paul Davis

    Actually you are incorrect there as well. They looked into a bond measure to save valley oak and found there wasn’t much support in the community. So all parties, even the two board members who supported keeping Valley Oak open and supported the charter school, agreed that was not the best option.

  160. Doug Paul Davis

    Actually you are incorrect there as well. They looked into a bond measure to save valley oak and found there wasn’t much support in the community. So all parties, even the two board members who supported keeping Valley Oak open and supported the charter school, agreed that was not the best option.

  161. God bless the public schools!

    “The difficulty is how it is going to be spent without any accountability.”

    Accountability is all around you. You just refuse to acknowledge it.

    The accountability has been showing up in the Enterprise recently with reports of steady increase scores on student standardized tests, if that’s suppose to be meaningful.

    Accountability is in the high rate of passage of the California Exit Exam.

    Accountability is in 75 more students enrolling in Davis schools, presumably because new parents like what they see here.

    Accountability is in the relatively low HS dropout rate in Davis, and in efforts to lower it even more.

    If I am paying taxes to the public schools, then those are the kind of accountable results that I want to see.

    If it would make you feel better, then go ask to sit on the parcel tax oversight committee where you could demand whatever kind of accountability that would make you happy.

    God bless the public schools!

  162. God bless the public schools!

    “The difficulty is how it is going to be spent without any accountability.”

    Accountability is all around you. You just refuse to acknowledge it.

    The accountability has been showing up in the Enterprise recently with reports of steady increase scores on student standardized tests, if that’s suppose to be meaningful.

    Accountability is in the high rate of passage of the California Exit Exam.

    Accountability is in 75 more students enrolling in Davis schools, presumably because new parents like what they see here.

    Accountability is in the relatively low HS dropout rate in Davis, and in efforts to lower it even more.

    If I am paying taxes to the public schools, then those are the kind of accountable results that I want to see.

    If it would make you feel better, then go ask to sit on the parcel tax oversight committee where you could demand whatever kind of accountability that would make you happy.

    God bless the public schools!

  163. God bless the public schools!

    “The difficulty is how it is going to be spent without any accountability.”

    Accountability is all around you. You just refuse to acknowledge it.

    The accountability has been showing up in the Enterprise recently with reports of steady increase scores on student standardized tests, if that’s suppose to be meaningful.

    Accountability is in the high rate of passage of the California Exit Exam.

    Accountability is in 75 more students enrolling in Davis schools, presumably because new parents like what they see here.

    Accountability is in the relatively low HS dropout rate in Davis, and in efforts to lower it even more.

    If I am paying taxes to the public schools, then those are the kind of accountable results that I want to see.

    If it would make you feel better, then go ask to sit on the parcel tax oversight committee where you could demand whatever kind of accountability that would make you happy.

    God bless the public schools!

  164. God bless the public schools!

    “The difficulty is how it is going to be spent without any accountability.”

    Accountability is all around you. You just refuse to acknowledge it.

    The accountability has been showing up in the Enterprise recently with reports of steady increase scores on student standardized tests, if that’s suppose to be meaningful.

    Accountability is in the high rate of passage of the California Exit Exam.

    Accountability is in 75 more students enrolling in Davis schools, presumably because new parents like what they see here.

    Accountability is in the relatively low HS dropout rate in Davis, and in efforts to lower it even more.

    If I am paying taxes to the public schools, then those are the kind of accountable results that I want to see.

    If it would make you feel better, then go ask to sit on the parcel tax oversight committee where you could demand whatever kind of accountability that would make you happy.

    God bless the public schools!

  165. Get the story straight

    Actually you are incorrect there as well. They looked into a bond measure to save valley oak and found there wasn’t much support in the community. So all parties, even the two board members who supported keeping Valley Oak open and supported the charter school, agreed that was not the best option.

    Umm, okay. Now you are excusing their decision to close valley oak. Oh, by the way they want to re-open it now. They have the $.

    They have the $ now to re-open valley oak. They didn’t before.

    Now in all of these budget cuts, they find the $ to re-open valley oak, which they couldn’t afford to keep open before the cuts.

    I’ll support measure W when the story stops changing.

  166. Get the story straight

    Actually you are incorrect there as well. They looked into a bond measure to save valley oak and found there wasn’t much support in the community. So all parties, even the two board members who supported keeping Valley Oak open and supported the charter school, agreed that was not the best option.

    Umm, okay. Now you are excusing their decision to close valley oak. Oh, by the way they want to re-open it now. They have the $.

    They have the $ now to re-open valley oak. They didn’t before.

    Now in all of these budget cuts, they find the $ to re-open valley oak, which they couldn’t afford to keep open before the cuts.

    I’ll support measure W when the story stops changing.

  167. Get the story straight

    Actually you are incorrect there as well. They looked into a bond measure to save valley oak and found there wasn’t much support in the community. So all parties, even the two board members who supported keeping Valley Oak open and supported the charter school, agreed that was not the best option.

    Umm, okay. Now you are excusing their decision to close valley oak. Oh, by the way they want to re-open it now. They have the $.

    They have the $ now to re-open valley oak. They didn’t before.

    Now in all of these budget cuts, they find the $ to re-open valley oak, which they couldn’t afford to keep open before the cuts.

    I’ll support measure W when the story stops changing.

  168. Get the story straight

    Actually you are incorrect there as well. They looked into a bond measure to save valley oak and found there wasn’t much support in the community. So all parties, even the two board members who supported keeping Valley Oak open and supported the charter school, agreed that was not the best option.

    Umm, okay. Now you are excusing their decision to close valley oak. Oh, by the way they want to re-open it now. They have the $.

    They have the $ now to re-open valley oak. They didn’t before.

    Now in all of these budget cuts, they find the $ to re-open valley oak, which they couldn’t afford to keep open before the cuts.

    I’ll support measure W when the story stops changing.

  169. Anonymous

    “Now in all of these budget cuts, they find the $ to re-open valley oak, which they couldn’t afford to keep open before the cuts.”

    What?!?

    So you are saying the district has hired a principal, secretaries, nurse and all the other standard support staff and there are kids going to Valley Oak?

    Explain yourself, because even Bruce Colby is far more articulate than you right now.

  170. Anonymous

    “Now in all of these budget cuts, they find the $ to re-open valley oak, which they couldn’t afford to keep open before the cuts.”

    What?!?

    So you are saying the district has hired a principal, secretaries, nurse and all the other standard support staff and there are kids going to Valley Oak?

    Explain yourself, because even Bruce Colby is far more articulate than you right now.

  171. Anonymous

    “Now in all of these budget cuts, they find the $ to re-open valley oak, which they couldn’t afford to keep open before the cuts.”

    What?!?

    So you are saying the district has hired a principal, secretaries, nurse and all the other standard support staff and there are kids going to Valley Oak?

    Explain yourself, because even Bruce Colby is far more articulate than you right now.

  172. Anonymous

    “Now in all of these budget cuts, they find the $ to re-open valley oak, which they couldn’t afford to keep open before the cuts.”

    What?!?

    So you are saying the district has hired a principal, secretaries, nurse and all the other standard support staff and there are kids going to Valley Oak?

    Explain yourself, because even Bruce Colby is far more articulate than you right now.

  173. Doug Paul Davis

    I don’t know the exact figure but when you figure out salary, benefits, and pension, $40,000 is way too low to pay for one new teacher.

    BTW, there was a point when Hammond offered to be superintendent and principal of an elementary school which would have saved considerably more for the district than a pay cut, but the school board told him no (and wisely so).

  174. Doug Paul Davis

    I don’t know the exact figure but when you figure out salary, benefits, and pension, $40,000 is way too low to pay for one new teacher.

    BTW, there was a point when Hammond offered to be superintendent and principal of an elementary school which would have saved considerably more for the district than a pay cut, but the school board told him no (and wisely so).

  175. Doug Paul Davis

    I don’t know the exact figure but when you figure out salary, benefits, and pension, $40,000 is way too low to pay for one new teacher.

    BTW, there was a point when Hammond offered to be superintendent and principal of an elementary school which would have saved considerably more for the district than a pay cut, but the school board told him no (and wisely so).

  176. Doug Paul Davis

    I don’t know the exact figure but when you figure out salary, benefits, and pension, $40,000 is way too low to pay for one new teacher.

    BTW, there was a point when Hammond offered to be superintendent and principal of an elementary school which would have saved considerably more for the district than a pay cut, but the school board told him no (and wisely so).

  177. wdf

    “How much of a pay cut do you propose?”

    How about $40,000, the cost of one new teacher?

    A Sept. 17, 2007 Davis Enterprise article listed Hammond’s salary, total annual compensation, at $208,500.

    The same article listed former Woodland superintendent Jacki Cottingim’s salary, total annual compensation, at $193,294. A difference of $15K. I don’t imagine any Davis superintendent salary realistically undercutting $193K these days, and a $15K difference isn’t enough for me to feel any outrage under these circumstances.

    For purposes of budget calculations, DJUSD uses a base rate of $60K per teacher/year. That’s meant to include salary, SS, and benefits.

  178. wdf

    “How much of a pay cut do you propose?”

    How about $40,000, the cost of one new teacher?

    A Sept. 17, 2007 Davis Enterprise article listed Hammond’s salary, total annual compensation, at $208,500.

    The same article listed former Woodland superintendent Jacki Cottingim’s salary, total annual compensation, at $193,294. A difference of $15K. I don’t imagine any Davis superintendent salary realistically undercutting $193K these days, and a $15K difference isn’t enough for me to feel any outrage under these circumstances.

    For purposes of budget calculations, DJUSD uses a base rate of $60K per teacher/year. That’s meant to include salary, SS, and benefits.

  179. wdf

    “How much of a pay cut do you propose?”

    How about $40,000, the cost of one new teacher?

    A Sept. 17, 2007 Davis Enterprise article listed Hammond’s salary, total annual compensation, at $208,500.

    The same article listed former Woodland superintendent Jacki Cottingim’s salary, total annual compensation, at $193,294. A difference of $15K. I don’t imagine any Davis superintendent salary realistically undercutting $193K these days, and a $15K difference isn’t enough for me to feel any outrage under these circumstances.

    For purposes of budget calculations, DJUSD uses a base rate of $60K per teacher/year. That’s meant to include salary, SS, and benefits.

  180. wdf

    “How much of a pay cut do you propose?”

    How about $40,000, the cost of one new teacher?

    A Sept. 17, 2007 Davis Enterprise article listed Hammond’s salary, total annual compensation, at $208,500.

    The same article listed former Woodland superintendent Jacki Cottingim’s salary, total annual compensation, at $193,294. A difference of $15K. I don’t imagine any Davis superintendent salary realistically undercutting $193K these days, and a $15K difference isn’t enough for me to feel any outrage under these circumstances.

    For purposes of budget calculations, DJUSD uses a base rate of $60K per teacher/year. That’s meant to include salary, SS, and benefits.

  181. wdf

    Interesting how the School District itself somehow managed to find $1.1 million worth of bloat. Yet somehow when taxpayers demand better budgeting, suddenly the promoters of Measure W insist detractors want to stick it to teachers, don’t care about children, only care about facilities, etc. ad nauseum.

    Do you think that this is the first time in recent history that the district has been forced to consider whether there is any “bloat”?

    At a school board meeting earlier this year, it was pointed out that the state has fully funded education (ADA-derived “Revenue Limit”) only 5 times in the past 15 years. That means the state obligates most districts to cut back regularly from what is supposed to be funded.

    Other districts have chosen to give up many programs that could substantially help kids attain the higher standards of education generally available in other states.

    Up to this point, the prevailing community value of this district has been to find a way to maintain funding of those programs, whether it is through parcel tax, spending one-time (“rainy day”) funds, or more recently, funding by educational foundations (DSF).

    If you want to make your budget points with the district, the next budget advisory meeting is next Wednesday. Public is invited. See district website for details, http://www.djusd.net.

  182. wdf

    Interesting how the School District itself somehow managed to find $1.1 million worth of bloat. Yet somehow when taxpayers demand better budgeting, suddenly the promoters of Measure W insist detractors want to stick it to teachers, don’t care about children, only care about facilities, etc. ad nauseum.

    Do you think that this is the first time in recent history that the district has been forced to consider whether there is any “bloat”?

    At a school board meeting earlier this year, it was pointed out that the state has fully funded education (ADA-derived “Revenue Limit”) only 5 times in the past 15 years. That means the state obligates most districts to cut back regularly from what is supposed to be funded.

    Other districts have chosen to give up many programs that could substantially help kids attain the higher standards of education generally available in other states.

    Up to this point, the prevailing community value of this district has been to find a way to maintain funding of those programs, whether it is through parcel tax, spending one-time (“rainy day”) funds, or more recently, funding by educational foundations (DSF).

    If you want to make your budget points with the district, the next budget advisory meeting is next Wednesday. Public is invited. See district website for details, http://www.djusd.net.

  183. wdf

    Interesting how the School District itself somehow managed to find $1.1 million worth of bloat. Yet somehow when taxpayers demand better budgeting, suddenly the promoters of Measure W insist detractors want to stick it to teachers, don’t care about children, only care about facilities, etc. ad nauseum.

    Do you think that this is the first time in recent history that the district has been forced to consider whether there is any “bloat”?

    At a school board meeting earlier this year, it was pointed out that the state has fully funded education (ADA-derived “Revenue Limit”) only 5 times in the past 15 years. That means the state obligates most districts to cut back regularly from what is supposed to be funded.

    Other districts have chosen to give up many programs that could substantially help kids attain the higher standards of education generally available in other states.

    Up to this point, the prevailing community value of this district has been to find a way to maintain funding of those programs, whether it is through parcel tax, spending one-time (“rainy day”) funds, or more recently, funding by educational foundations (DSF).

    If you want to make your budget points with the district, the next budget advisory meeting is next Wednesday. Public is invited. See district website for details, http://www.djusd.net.

  184. wdf

    Interesting how the School District itself somehow managed to find $1.1 million worth of bloat. Yet somehow when taxpayers demand better budgeting, suddenly the promoters of Measure W insist detractors want to stick it to teachers, don’t care about children, only care about facilities, etc. ad nauseum.

    Do you think that this is the first time in recent history that the district has been forced to consider whether there is any “bloat”?

    At a school board meeting earlier this year, it was pointed out that the state has fully funded education (ADA-derived “Revenue Limit”) only 5 times in the past 15 years. That means the state obligates most districts to cut back regularly from what is supposed to be funded.

    Other districts have chosen to give up many programs that could substantially help kids attain the higher standards of education generally available in other states.

    Up to this point, the prevailing community value of this district has been to find a way to maintain funding of those programs, whether it is through parcel tax, spending one-time (“rainy day”) funds, or more recently, funding by educational foundations (DSF).

    If you want to make your budget points with the district, the next budget advisory meeting is next Wednesday. Public is invited. See district website for details, http://www.djusd.net.

  185. Anon

    “If you want to make your budget points with the district, the next budget advisory meeting is next Wednesday. Public is invited. See district website for details, http://www.djusd.net.”

    I have, and it has fallen on deaf ears. Just as complaints about the closure of Valley Oak fell on deaf ears. And it turned out its closure was not necessary – enrollment did not decline as projected.

  186. Anon

    “If you want to make your budget points with the district, the next budget advisory meeting is next Wednesday. Public is invited. See district website for details, http://www.djusd.net.”

    I have, and it has fallen on deaf ears. Just as complaints about the closure of Valley Oak fell on deaf ears. And it turned out its closure was not necessary – enrollment did not decline as projected.

  187. Anon

    “If you want to make your budget points with the district, the next budget advisory meeting is next Wednesday. Public is invited. See district website for details, http://www.djusd.net.”

    I have, and it has fallen on deaf ears. Just as complaints about the closure of Valley Oak fell on deaf ears. And it turned out its closure was not necessary – enrollment did not decline as projected.

  188. Anon

    “If you want to make your budget points with the district, the next budget advisory meeting is next Wednesday. Public is invited. See district website for details, http://www.djusd.net.”

    I have, and it has fallen on deaf ears. Just as complaints about the closure of Valley Oak fell on deaf ears. And it turned out its closure was not necessary – enrollment did not decline as projected.

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