State Budget Bad News For Davis Schools?

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At first glance one might believe that passing the state budget without the cuts to education that the Governor originally proposed would be good news for schools around the state.

However, at the school board meeting on Thursday night, Superintendent James Hammond reported that the district’s budget outlook remains uncertain and even gloomy.

The first problem is that the budget contains within it the authority for the governor to make midyear budget cuts. That was one of the sticking points for the Governor and it makes it very difficult for school districts to plan. Imagine the expectation of state money and to have that state money cut in the middle of a school year. Suddenly the district could be scrambling around for money that it had planned on having. Districts like Davis have almost no margin for error. Across the state, school districts are very concerned about this possibility.

School Board member Richard Harris who also works as a lobbyist in the state Capitol said that he thinks the district is probably worse off now than before the budget was adopted.

The second problem is that there will be little or no cost-of-living adjustments for school districts from the state. Basically that means that while inflation is occurring, the state is not adjusting the amount of money which is equivalent to a budget cut along the rate of inflation in a given district.

The worst problem by far is that the state budget does not address the state’s own structural budget deficit. It merely punts the problem until next year’s budget. And making matters even worse, the economic condition in the state does not appear to be improving any. Thus the state budget picture looks worse next year than it was this year.

For a district like Davis, that makes it even more imperative that the local voters pass the parcel to enable the school district to continue to operate at current levels. The good news for a district like Davis that resident have been generous in the past with support for the schools in the form of parcel taxes and bond measures.

However, many districts across the state are not so fortunate. School dodged a large bullet when the May revised budget forecast put back a lot of the money that the Governor was threatening to take out in January. The budget largely mirrored the May revise. However, with the prospect for midyear cuts and a worse budget forecast looming for next year, schools are hardly out of the woods. Those districts and students who are most vulnerable will take the brunt of this.

While from the standpoint of many, having a state budget passed was a good thing. At the end of the day, they did not resolve any of the tough issues. As a result, school districts will once again have to look for ways to cut money without cutting teachers and programs, a prospect that will become more and more difficult as time goes on. Luckily for Davis, the voters have the opportunity this fall to bypass many of those problems by approving a modest $120 per year increase in the parcel tax that will enable the Davis schools to continue to function at their present high level.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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184 thoughts on “State Budget Bad News For Davis Schools?”

  1. Doug Paul Davis

    One thing I like to do especially when it’s an issue that extends beyond Davis is google for news across the state. This is a good example because across the state, district are really concerned about this budget on a number of fronts.

    Well-timed? The budget was just agreed to this week, how could that be the work of the school district timing this for the election?

  2. Doug Paul Davis

    One thing I like to do especially when it’s an issue that extends beyond Davis is google for news across the state. This is a good example because across the state, district are really concerned about this budget on a number of fronts.

    Well-timed? The budget was just agreed to this week, how could that be the work of the school district timing this for the election?

  3. Doug Paul Davis

    One thing I like to do especially when it’s an issue that extends beyond Davis is google for news across the state. This is a good example because across the state, district are really concerned about this budget on a number of fronts.

    Well-timed? The budget was just agreed to this week, how could that be the work of the school district timing this for the election?

  4. Doug Paul Davis

    One thing I like to do especially when it’s an issue that extends beyond Davis is google for news across the state. This is a good example because across the state, district are really concerned about this budget on a number of fronts.

    Well-timed? The budget was just agreed to this week, how could that be the work of the school district timing this for the election?

  5. supporting Measure W

    Well timed? DPD – is this person who wrote on the comment saying or claiming that this was timed with the LATE passage of the CA state budget? Did DJUSD manuver this to their advantage? Oh please!

    I agree with you DPD we need to support our schools and support Measure W.

  6. supporting Measure W

    Well timed? DPD – is this person who wrote on the comment saying or claiming that this was timed with the LATE passage of the CA state budget? Did DJUSD manuver this to their advantage? Oh please!

    I agree with you DPD we need to support our schools and support Measure W.

  7. supporting Measure W

    Well timed? DPD – is this person who wrote on the comment saying or claiming that this was timed with the LATE passage of the CA state budget? Did DJUSD manuver this to their advantage? Oh please!

    I agree with you DPD we need to support our schools and support Measure W.

  8. supporting Measure W

    Well timed? DPD – is this person who wrote on the comment saying or claiming that this was timed with the LATE passage of the CA state budget? Did DJUSD manuver this to their advantage? Oh please!

    I agree with you DPD we need to support our schools and support Measure W.

  9. Against Frivolities

    Do you honestly think a $120 parcel tax is going to solve the school budget problem in Davis? Hammond insisting that things look gloomy foreshadows yet another call for money when the school district claims the $120 didn’t cover all the expenses and shortfalls of the state budget.

    Yet did you notice in the last few weeks, there has been an admission $1.1 million dollars was trimmed without laying off any teachers – but of course that wasn’t administrative bloat, right? The school also admitted saving about $200K in energy savings (can’t remember the exact figure). Interesting how, when financial times are tough, the school district finds ways of paring down costs. My question is why wasn’t this being done all along to build up reserves for tough budgetary times?

    I’ll tell you why – bc taxpayers keep voting in parcel taxes w little accountability. And an oversight committee handpicked by the school board is not my idea of accountability.

    Did you notice the article in the Davis Enterprise about the Crunch Lunch program? Somehow it costs a chunk of money to feed our kids local fresh fruits and vegetables. Why? Because it has to be set up like a salad bar and “staffed” by someone. What, the cafeteria people are incapable of making a simple salad for kids to eat? Another collosal waste of money in tight budgetary times. The school cafeteria is not a high class restaurant with waiters/waitresses.

    It isn’t necessarily the parcel tax I am against per se, as much as it is the elitist wasteage that is going on. Good grief!

  10. Against Frivolities

    Do you honestly think a $120 parcel tax is going to solve the school budget problem in Davis? Hammond insisting that things look gloomy foreshadows yet another call for money when the school district claims the $120 didn’t cover all the expenses and shortfalls of the state budget.

    Yet did you notice in the last few weeks, there has been an admission $1.1 million dollars was trimmed without laying off any teachers – but of course that wasn’t administrative bloat, right? The school also admitted saving about $200K in energy savings (can’t remember the exact figure). Interesting how, when financial times are tough, the school district finds ways of paring down costs. My question is why wasn’t this being done all along to build up reserves for tough budgetary times?

    I’ll tell you why – bc taxpayers keep voting in parcel taxes w little accountability. And an oversight committee handpicked by the school board is not my idea of accountability.

    Did you notice the article in the Davis Enterprise about the Crunch Lunch program? Somehow it costs a chunk of money to feed our kids local fresh fruits and vegetables. Why? Because it has to be set up like a salad bar and “staffed” by someone. What, the cafeteria people are incapable of making a simple salad for kids to eat? Another collosal waste of money in tight budgetary times. The school cafeteria is not a high class restaurant with waiters/waitresses.

    It isn’t necessarily the parcel tax I am against per se, as much as it is the elitist wasteage that is going on. Good grief!

  11. Against Frivolities

    Do you honestly think a $120 parcel tax is going to solve the school budget problem in Davis? Hammond insisting that things look gloomy foreshadows yet another call for money when the school district claims the $120 didn’t cover all the expenses and shortfalls of the state budget.

    Yet did you notice in the last few weeks, there has been an admission $1.1 million dollars was trimmed without laying off any teachers – but of course that wasn’t administrative bloat, right? The school also admitted saving about $200K in energy savings (can’t remember the exact figure). Interesting how, when financial times are tough, the school district finds ways of paring down costs. My question is why wasn’t this being done all along to build up reserves for tough budgetary times?

    I’ll tell you why – bc taxpayers keep voting in parcel taxes w little accountability. And an oversight committee handpicked by the school board is not my idea of accountability.

    Did you notice the article in the Davis Enterprise about the Crunch Lunch program? Somehow it costs a chunk of money to feed our kids local fresh fruits and vegetables. Why? Because it has to be set up like a salad bar and “staffed” by someone. What, the cafeteria people are incapable of making a simple salad for kids to eat? Another collosal waste of money in tight budgetary times. The school cafeteria is not a high class restaurant with waiters/waitresses.

    It isn’t necessarily the parcel tax I am against per se, as much as it is the elitist wasteage that is going on. Good grief!

  12. Against Frivolities

    Do you honestly think a $120 parcel tax is going to solve the school budget problem in Davis? Hammond insisting that things look gloomy foreshadows yet another call for money when the school district claims the $120 didn’t cover all the expenses and shortfalls of the state budget.

    Yet did you notice in the last few weeks, there has been an admission $1.1 million dollars was trimmed without laying off any teachers – but of course that wasn’t administrative bloat, right? The school also admitted saving about $200K in energy savings (can’t remember the exact figure). Interesting how, when financial times are tough, the school district finds ways of paring down costs. My question is why wasn’t this being done all along to build up reserves for tough budgetary times?

    I’ll tell you why – bc taxpayers keep voting in parcel taxes w little accountability. And an oversight committee handpicked by the school board is not my idea of accountability.

    Did you notice the article in the Davis Enterprise about the Crunch Lunch program? Somehow it costs a chunk of money to feed our kids local fresh fruits and vegetables. Why? Because it has to be set up like a salad bar and “staffed” by someone. What, the cafeteria people are incapable of making a simple salad for kids to eat? Another collosal waste of money in tight budgetary times. The school cafeteria is not a high class restaurant with waiters/waitresses.

    It isn’t necessarily the parcel tax I am against per se, as much as it is the elitist wasteage that is going on. Good grief!

  13. Anonymous

    Parcel tax monies by law must be spent on the items as detailed in the ballot measure language. Yes, there is an oversight committee, but anyone can ask to see the funding lines, and the district doesn’t have a choice, it has to go to the categories defined.

  14. Anonymous

    Parcel tax monies by law must be spent on the items as detailed in the ballot measure language. Yes, there is an oversight committee, but anyone can ask to see the funding lines, and the district doesn’t have a choice, it has to go to the categories defined.

  15. Anonymous

    Parcel tax monies by law must be spent on the items as detailed in the ballot measure language. Yes, there is an oversight committee, but anyone can ask to see the funding lines, and the district doesn’t have a choice, it has to go to the categories defined.

  16. Anonymous

    Parcel tax monies by law must be spent on the items as detailed in the ballot measure language. Yes, there is an oversight committee, but anyone can ask to see the funding lines, and the district doesn’t have a choice, it has to go to the categories defined.

  17. against frivolities

    “Parcel tax monies by law must be spent on the items as detailed in the ballot measure language. Yes, there is an oversight committee, but anyone can ask to see the funding lines, and the district doesn’t have a choice, it has to go to the categories defined.”

    What does this have to do with my comment that the money is being wasted? Skip the “staffing” of the salad bar, and give the kids a fresh salad every day. And it still would probably be cheaper than what they are doing now. Leave it to DJUSD to find the most expensive way to do things…

  18. against frivolities

    “Parcel tax monies by law must be spent on the items as detailed in the ballot measure language. Yes, there is an oversight committee, but anyone can ask to see the funding lines, and the district doesn’t have a choice, it has to go to the categories defined.”

    What does this have to do with my comment that the money is being wasted? Skip the “staffing” of the salad bar, and give the kids a fresh salad every day. And it still would probably be cheaper than what they are doing now. Leave it to DJUSD to find the most expensive way to do things…

  19. against frivolities

    “Parcel tax monies by law must be spent on the items as detailed in the ballot measure language. Yes, there is an oversight committee, but anyone can ask to see the funding lines, and the district doesn’t have a choice, it has to go to the categories defined.”

    What does this have to do with my comment that the money is being wasted? Skip the “staffing” of the salad bar, and give the kids a fresh salad every day. And it still would probably be cheaper than what they are doing now. Leave it to DJUSD to find the most expensive way to do things…

  20. against frivolities

    “Parcel tax monies by law must be spent on the items as detailed in the ballot measure language. Yes, there is an oversight committee, but anyone can ask to see the funding lines, and the district doesn’t have a choice, it has to go to the categories defined.”

    What does this have to do with my comment that the money is being wasted? Skip the “staffing” of the salad bar, and give the kids a fresh salad every day. And it still would probably be cheaper than what they are doing now. Leave it to DJUSD to find the most expensive way to do things…

  21. Anonymous

    It had to do with your comment about the oversight board.

    I’m sure there is some money that could be cut from the budget, they spent six months trying to do so before. But just because they found $1.1 million to cut (that you call a waste, I’m not as sure about that) doesn’t mean there is another $2.4 million.

    I hope they can cut more money as well. They still need the parcel tax, however. More so now than last week.

  22. Anonymous

    It had to do with your comment about the oversight board.

    I’m sure there is some money that could be cut from the budget, they spent six months trying to do so before. But just because they found $1.1 million to cut (that you call a waste, I’m not as sure about that) doesn’t mean there is another $2.4 million.

    I hope they can cut more money as well. They still need the parcel tax, however. More so now than last week.

  23. Anonymous

    It had to do with your comment about the oversight board.

    I’m sure there is some money that could be cut from the budget, they spent six months trying to do so before. But just because they found $1.1 million to cut (that you call a waste, I’m not as sure about that) doesn’t mean there is another $2.4 million.

    I hope they can cut more money as well. They still need the parcel tax, however. More so now than last week.

  24. Anonymous

    It had to do with your comment about the oversight board.

    I’m sure there is some money that could be cut from the budget, they spent six months trying to do so before. But just because they found $1.1 million to cut (that you call a waste, I’m not as sure about that) doesn’t mean there is another $2.4 million.

    I hope they can cut more money as well. They still need the parcel tax, however. More so now than last week.

  25. Anonymous

    “Did you notice the article in the Davis Enterprise about the Crunch Lunch program? Somehow it costs a chunk of money to feed our kids local fresh fruits and vegetables. Why? Because it has to be set up like a salad bar and “staffed” by someone. What, the cafeteria people are incapable of making a simple salad for kids to eat? Another collosal waste of money in tight budgetary times. The school cafeteria is not a high class restaurant with waiters/waitresses.”

    I wholeheartedly agree with “against frivolities”!

    Isn’t it aweful that the district is actually serving fresh fruits and vegetables to the kids? I remember when I was a kids that my school district could get away with serving wilted lettuce that no one would eat. It saved on staff, too.

    The cafeteria could also save money if they would serve more of this item they used to serve when I was in the Navy. It was commonly called, “s— on a shingle”, substitute an alliterative word for the first blank. I’m sure it cost very little to prepare and serve.

    Now my kid comes home and says she wants to eat crunch lunch instead of sandwiches from home. Isn’t it aweful this trend to healthy eating that’s going on these days?

    During tough budget times, let the kids eat crappy cafeteria food! “Against frivolities” says that in tough budget times, we should accept mediocrity in our education. I agree with her! We can afford to cut corners and refuse to adequately serve a few students who are at risk.

  26. Anonymous

    “Did you notice the article in the Davis Enterprise about the Crunch Lunch program? Somehow it costs a chunk of money to feed our kids local fresh fruits and vegetables. Why? Because it has to be set up like a salad bar and “staffed” by someone. What, the cafeteria people are incapable of making a simple salad for kids to eat? Another collosal waste of money in tight budgetary times. The school cafeteria is not a high class restaurant with waiters/waitresses.”

    I wholeheartedly agree with “against frivolities”!

    Isn’t it aweful that the district is actually serving fresh fruits and vegetables to the kids? I remember when I was a kids that my school district could get away with serving wilted lettuce that no one would eat. It saved on staff, too.

    The cafeteria could also save money if they would serve more of this item they used to serve when I was in the Navy. It was commonly called, “s— on a shingle”, substitute an alliterative word for the first blank. I’m sure it cost very little to prepare and serve.

    Now my kid comes home and says she wants to eat crunch lunch instead of sandwiches from home. Isn’t it aweful this trend to healthy eating that’s going on these days?

    During tough budget times, let the kids eat crappy cafeteria food! “Against frivolities” says that in tough budget times, we should accept mediocrity in our education. I agree with her! We can afford to cut corners and refuse to adequately serve a few students who are at risk.

  27. Anonymous

    “Did you notice the article in the Davis Enterprise about the Crunch Lunch program? Somehow it costs a chunk of money to feed our kids local fresh fruits and vegetables. Why? Because it has to be set up like a salad bar and “staffed” by someone. What, the cafeteria people are incapable of making a simple salad for kids to eat? Another collosal waste of money in tight budgetary times. The school cafeteria is not a high class restaurant with waiters/waitresses.”

    I wholeheartedly agree with “against frivolities”!

    Isn’t it aweful that the district is actually serving fresh fruits and vegetables to the kids? I remember when I was a kids that my school district could get away with serving wilted lettuce that no one would eat. It saved on staff, too.

    The cafeteria could also save money if they would serve more of this item they used to serve when I was in the Navy. It was commonly called, “s— on a shingle”, substitute an alliterative word for the first blank. I’m sure it cost very little to prepare and serve.

    Now my kid comes home and says she wants to eat crunch lunch instead of sandwiches from home. Isn’t it aweful this trend to healthy eating that’s going on these days?

    During tough budget times, let the kids eat crappy cafeteria food! “Against frivolities” says that in tough budget times, we should accept mediocrity in our education. I agree with her! We can afford to cut corners and refuse to adequately serve a few students who are at risk.

  28. Anonymous

    “Did you notice the article in the Davis Enterprise about the Crunch Lunch program? Somehow it costs a chunk of money to feed our kids local fresh fruits and vegetables. Why? Because it has to be set up like a salad bar and “staffed” by someone. What, the cafeteria people are incapable of making a simple salad for kids to eat? Another collosal waste of money in tight budgetary times. The school cafeteria is not a high class restaurant with waiters/waitresses.”

    I wholeheartedly agree with “against frivolities”!

    Isn’t it aweful that the district is actually serving fresh fruits and vegetables to the kids? I remember when I was a kids that my school district could get away with serving wilted lettuce that no one would eat. It saved on staff, too.

    The cafeteria could also save money if they would serve more of this item they used to serve when I was in the Navy. It was commonly called, “s— on a shingle”, substitute an alliterative word for the first blank. I’m sure it cost very little to prepare and serve.

    Now my kid comes home and says she wants to eat crunch lunch instead of sandwiches from home. Isn’t it aweful this trend to healthy eating that’s going on these days?

    During tough budget times, let the kids eat crappy cafeteria food! “Against frivolities” says that in tough budget times, we should accept mediocrity in our education. I agree with her! We can afford to cut corners and refuse to adequately serve a few students who are at risk.

  29. FastFwed

    How did the fool and his money get together in the first place?? They’re both in Davis and doing quite well passing yet another parcel tax. We don’t really care what happens in or around our schools, we substitute parcel taxes increases instead.

  30. FastFwed

    How did the fool and his money get together in the first place?? They’re both in Davis and doing quite well passing yet another parcel tax. We don’t really care what happens in or around our schools, we substitute parcel taxes increases instead.

  31. FastFwed

    How did the fool and his money get together in the first place?? They’re both in Davis and doing quite well passing yet another parcel tax. We don’t really care what happens in or around our schools, we substitute parcel taxes increases instead.

  32. FastFwed

    How did the fool and his money get together in the first place?? They’re both in Davis and doing quite well passing yet another parcel tax. We don’t really care what happens in or around our schools, we substitute parcel taxes increases instead.

  33. Anonymous

    “How did the fool and his money get together in the first place?? They’re both in Davis and doing quite well passing yet another parcel tax. We don’t really care what happens in or around our schools, we substitute parcel taxes increases instead.”

    Another proponent of mediocrity, here.

    You will find that a lot of parents care very much what goes on in the schools. Many more volunteer in Davis schools than in other school districts. They see firsthand where money would make a difference.

    Davis schools run more programs on fewer dollars than other districts. They spend, as a percentage, fewer dollars on administration than most other districts. Davis students perform better than most.

    Since when was public education so well funded, and such a lucrative profession that people would go around proclaiming bloat and waste?

  34. Anonymous

    “How did the fool and his money get together in the first place?? They’re both in Davis and doing quite well passing yet another parcel tax. We don’t really care what happens in or around our schools, we substitute parcel taxes increases instead.”

    Another proponent of mediocrity, here.

    You will find that a lot of parents care very much what goes on in the schools. Many more volunteer in Davis schools than in other school districts. They see firsthand where money would make a difference.

    Davis schools run more programs on fewer dollars than other districts. They spend, as a percentage, fewer dollars on administration than most other districts. Davis students perform better than most.

    Since when was public education so well funded, and such a lucrative profession that people would go around proclaiming bloat and waste?

  35. Anonymous

    “How did the fool and his money get together in the first place?? They’re both in Davis and doing quite well passing yet another parcel tax. We don’t really care what happens in or around our schools, we substitute parcel taxes increases instead.”

    Another proponent of mediocrity, here.

    You will find that a lot of parents care very much what goes on in the schools. Many more volunteer in Davis schools than in other school districts. They see firsthand where money would make a difference.

    Davis schools run more programs on fewer dollars than other districts. They spend, as a percentage, fewer dollars on administration than most other districts. Davis students perform better than most.

    Since when was public education so well funded, and such a lucrative profession that people would go around proclaiming bloat and waste?

  36. Anonymous

    “How did the fool and his money get together in the first place?? They’re both in Davis and doing quite well passing yet another parcel tax. We don’t really care what happens in or around our schools, we substitute parcel taxes increases instead.”

    Another proponent of mediocrity, here.

    You will find that a lot of parents care very much what goes on in the schools. Many more volunteer in Davis schools than in other school districts. They see firsthand where money would make a difference.

    Davis schools run more programs on fewer dollars than other districts. They spend, as a percentage, fewer dollars on administration than most other districts. Davis students perform better than most.

    Since when was public education so well funded, and such a lucrative profession that people would go around proclaiming bloat and waste?

  37. Doug Paul Davis

    BTW, it is interesting that the individual mentions $1.1 million in “bloat.”

    If this individual is who I think it is, they are a bit supporter of Valley Oak. A good chunk of that savings came from the closure of Valley Oak. Is that the kind of bloat you want to cut?

    And btw, it is true they didn’t lay off teachers to achieve this saving, however, they did allow teachers to retire and not replace them. They did the same with some administrative positions and they let an assistant superintendent go.

  38. Doug Paul Davis

    BTW, it is interesting that the individual mentions $1.1 million in “bloat.”

    If this individual is who I think it is, they are a bit supporter of Valley Oak. A good chunk of that savings came from the closure of Valley Oak. Is that the kind of bloat you want to cut?

    And btw, it is true they didn’t lay off teachers to achieve this saving, however, they did allow teachers to retire and not replace them. They did the same with some administrative positions and they let an assistant superintendent go.

  39. Doug Paul Davis

    BTW, it is interesting that the individual mentions $1.1 million in “bloat.”

    If this individual is who I think it is, they are a bit supporter of Valley Oak. A good chunk of that savings came from the closure of Valley Oak. Is that the kind of bloat you want to cut?

    And btw, it is true they didn’t lay off teachers to achieve this saving, however, they did allow teachers to retire and not replace them. They did the same with some administrative positions and they let an assistant superintendent go.

  40. Doug Paul Davis

    BTW, it is interesting that the individual mentions $1.1 million in “bloat.”

    If this individual is who I think it is, they are a bit supporter of Valley Oak. A good chunk of that savings came from the closure of Valley Oak. Is that the kind of bloat you want to cut?

    And btw, it is true they didn’t lay off teachers to achieve this saving, however, they did allow teachers to retire and not replace them. They did the same with some administrative positions and they let an assistant superintendent go.

  41. Anonymous

    I do not think it costs staff time for serving the Crunch Lunch salad bars. I remember seeing requests for parent volunteers to help serve food during these days, and several years ago when they had this program, they used student volunteers to help serve.

    From what I have seen, there is much less waste with the Crunch Lunch program. I’ve seen a lot of carrots, pre-packaged salads, and broccoli bites go to waste, whereas the children appear to waste less when they are picking it from the salad bar.

  42. Anonymous

    I do not think it costs staff time for serving the Crunch Lunch salad bars. I remember seeing requests for parent volunteers to help serve food during these days, and several years ago when they had this program, they used student volunteers to help serve.

    From what I have seen, there is much less waste with the Crunch Lunch program. I’ve seen a lot of carrots, pre-packaged salads, and broccoli bites go to waste, whereas the children appear to waste less when they are picking it from the salad bar.

  43. Anonymous

    I do not think it costs staff time for serving the Crunch Lunch salad bars. I remember seeing requests for parent volunteers to help serve food during these days, and several years ago when they had this program, they used student volunteers to help serve.

    From what I have seen, there is much less waste with the Crunch Lunch program. I’ve seen a lot of carrots, pre-packaged salads, and broccoli bites go to waste, whereas the children appear to waste less when they are picking it from the salad bar.

  44. Anonymous

    I do not think it costs staff time for serving the Crunch Lunch salad bars. I remember seeing requests for parent volunteers to help serve food during these days, and several years ago when they had this program, they used student volunteers to help serve.

    From what I have seen, there is much less waste with the Crunch Lunch program. I’ve seen a lot of carrots, pre-packaged salads, and broccoli bites go to waste, whereas the children appear to waste less when they are picking it from the salad bar.

  45. Anonymous

    I am a new homeowner in Davis and I have my hands full w/ my mortgage & property taxes. I am a big proponent of being responsible with the money that you have, and I honestly do not understand why the school district is in so much trouble out here. Did the teachers get an exorbitant raise recently? Did the district build a new school or facility? Why the financial crisis out here?

    This all sounds like taxpayers being the ultimate bailout to financial irresponsibility on the part of the DJUSD. If someone can fill me in on why the sudden dramatic & impending catastrophic failure of the schools out here, I'-) appreciate it.

    Be responsible with the money you have. Schools of course make this town great, but I will vote no on this measure unless I can understand why the sudden crisis & what CHANGES will be implemented to prevent a future crisis. Thanks.

  46. Anonymous

    I am a new homeowner in Davis and I have my hands full w/ my mortgage & property taxes. I am a big proponent of being responsible with the money that you have, and I honestly do not understand why the school district is in so much trouble out here. Did the teachers get an exorbitant raise recently? Did the district build a new school or facility? Why the financial crisis out here?

    This all sounds like taxpayers being the ultimate bailout to financial irresponsibility on the part of the DJUSD. If someone can fill me in on why the sudden dramatic & impending catastrophic failure of the schools out here, I'-) appreciate it.

    Be responsible with the money you have. Schools of course make this town great, but I will vote no on this measure unless I can understand why the sudden crisis & what CHANGES will be implemented to prevent a future crisis. Thanks.

  47. Anonymous

    I am a new homeowner in Davis and I have my hands full w/ my mortgage & property taxes. I am a big proponent of being responsible with the money that you have, and I honestly do not understand why the school district is in so much trouble out here. Did the teachers get an exorbitant raise recently? Did the district build a new school or facility? Why the financial crisis out here?

    This all sounds like taxpayers being the ultimate bailout to financial irresponsibility on the part of the DJUSD. If someone can fill me in on why the sudden dramatic & impending catastrophic failure of the schools out here, I'-) appreciate it.

    Be responsible with the money you have. Schools of course make this town great, but I will vote no on this measure unless I can understand why the sudden crisis & what CHANGES will be implemented to prevent a future crisis. Thanks.

  48. Anonymous

    I am a new homeowner in Davis and I have my hands full w/ my mortgage & property taxes. I am a big proponent of being responsible with the money that you have, and I honestly do not understand why the school district is in so much trouble out here. Did the teachers get an exorbitant raise recently? Did the district build a new school or facility? Why the financial crisis out here?

    This all sounds like taxpayers being the ultimate bailout to financial irresponsibility on the part of the DJUSD. If someone can fill me in on why the sudden dramatic & impending catastrophic failure of the schools out here, I'-) appreciate it.

    Be responsible with the money you have. Schools of course make this town great, but I will vote no on this measure unless I can understand why the sudden crisis & what CHANGES will be implemented to prevent a future crisis. Thanks.

  49. Davis schools supporter

    Basically what you see happening with the state budget ultimately has consequences at the local level. The state has not fully-funded education in this year’s budget, so that trickles down to local schools.

    Davis schools run more programs on fewer dollars (on a per student basis) than other districts — a librarian (who works 1/2 time) at each campus every day, science program in grades 4-6 taught by credentialed science teachers instead of general-credentialed elementary classrom teachers, elementary instrumental music program, smaller class sizes for certain math and English classes, among otherthings. Many of those programs are in part why families choose to live in Davis and buy homes here. Programs like these contribute to student success — test scores, graduation rates, matriculation to college.

    You can cut those programs “temporarily”, but ultimately pay more in the long run to start them up again. Plus potentially negative affect students currently attending.

    DJUSD spends, as a percentage, fewer dollars on administration than most other districts. Davis students perform better than most, based on standardized tests.

    Davis has students who come from poor families. Almost 20% of the student population is in the reduced lunch program. In particular, those students will be most negatively affected for lack of programs like this.

    By having good, appropriately-dunded schools, Davis home owners have found that their homes have retained more of their value than neighboring communities. Good schools contribute to lowering rates of juvenile crime and delinquency. Good schools attract businesses looking for a supportive workforce.

    Thanks for asking, and welcome to California.

  50. Davis schools supporter

    Basically what you see happening with the state budget ultimately has consequences at the local level. The state has not fully-funded education in this year’s budget, so that trickles down to local schools.

    Davis schools run more programs on fewer dollars (on a per student basis) than other districts — a librarian (who works 1/2 time) at each campus every day, science program in grades 4-6 taught by credentialed science teachers instead of general-credentialed elementary classrom teachers, elementary instrumental music program, smaller class sizes for certain math and English classes, among otherthings. Many of those programs are in part why families choose to live in Davis and buy homes here. Programs like these contribute to student success — test scores, graduation rates, matriculation to college.

    You can cut those programs “temporarily”, but ultimately pay more in the long run to start them up again. Plus potentially negative affect students currently attending.

    DJUSD spends, as a percentage, fewer dollars on administration than most other districts. Davis students perform better than most, based on standardized tests.

    Davis has students who come from poor families. Almost 20% of the student population is in the reduced lunch program. In particular, those students will be most negatively affected for lack of programs like this.

    By having good, appropriately-dunded schools, Davis home owners have found that their homes have retained more of their value than neighboring communities. Good schools contribute to lowering rates of juvenile crime and delinquency. Good schools attract businesses looking for a supportive workforce.

    Thanks for asking, and welcome to California.

  51. Davis schools supporter

    Basically what you see happening with the state budget ultimately has consequences at the local level. The state has not fully-funded education in this year’s budget, so that trickles down to local schools.

    Davis schools run more programs on fewer dollars (on a per student basis) than other districts — a librarian (who works 1/2 time) at each campus every day, science program in grades 4-6 taught by credentialed science teachers instead of general-credentialed elementary classrom teachers, elementary instrumental music program, smaller class sizes for certain math and English classes, among otherthings. Many of those programs are in part why families choose to live in Davis and buy homes here. Programs like these contribute to student success — test scores, graduation rates, matriculation to college.

    You can cut those programs “temporarily”, but ultimately pay more in the long run to start them up again. Plus potentially negative affect students currently attending.

    DJUSD spends, as a percentage, fewer dollars on administration than most other districts. Davis students perform better than most, based on standardized tests.

    Davis has students who come from poor families. Almost 20% of the student population is in the reduced lunch program. In particular, those students will be most negatively affected for lack of programs like this.

    By having good, appropriately-dunded schools, Davis home owners have found that their homes have retained more of their value than neighboring communities. Good schools contribute to lowering rates of juvenile crime and delinquency. Good schools attract businesses looking for a supportive workforce.

    Thanks for asking, and welcome to California.

  52. Davis schools supporter

    Basically what you see happening with the state budget ultimately has consequences at the local level. The state has not fully-funded education in this year’s budget, so that trickles down to local schools.

    Davis schools run more programs on fewer dollars (on a per student basis) than other districts — a librarian (who works 1/2 time) at each campus every day, science program in grades 4-6 taught by credentialed science teachers instead of general-credentialed elementary classrom teachers, elementary instrumental music program, smaller class sizes for certain math and English classes, among otherthings. Many of those programs are in part why families choose to live in Davis and buy homes here. Programs like these contribute to student success — test scores, graduation rates, matriculation to college.

    You can cut those programs “temporarily”, but ultimately pay more in the long run to start them up again. Plus potentially negative affect students currently attending.

    DJUSD spends, as a percentage, fewer dollars on administration than most other districts. Davis students perform better than most, based on standardized tests.

    Davis has students who come from poor families. Almost 20% of the student population is in the reduced lunch program. In particular, those students will be most negatively affected for lack of programs like this.

    By having good, appropriately-dunded schools, Davis home owners have found that their homes have retained more of their value than neighboring communities. Good schools contribute to lowering rates of juvenile crime and delinquency. Good schools attract businesses looking for a supportive workforce.

    Thanks for asking, and welcome to California.

  53. wdf

    One cost cutting program in the schools that has been lauded on this blog is the effort to cut down on waste removal costs by encouraging recycling programs in the schools. I believe recently that the savings was quoted at a school board meeting in the 10s of thousands of dollars.

    At the same time, there is at least one blogger here who is fond of criticizing Measure Q because it includes funds to supplement the purchase of fresh fruits and vegetables in school cafeterias(once called “crunch lunch”).

    Both of these programs are promoted by the Davis Farm to School Connection, which is connected to the Davis Farmers Market Foundation.

    They have been at these programs for quite awhile, and the promoters include a number of current and former Davis parents. You can read about them here.

    If anyone has a problem with these and other programs in our schools, I’m sure that they would welcome discussion and would certainly provide greater context than has currently been provided in these blog comments.

  54. wdf

    One cost cutting program in the schools that has been lauded on this blog is the effort to cut down on waste removal costs by encouraging recycling programs in the schools. I believe recently that the savings was quoted at a school board meeting in the 10s of thousands of dollars.

    At the same time, there is at least one blogger here who is fond of criticizing Measure Q because it includes funds to supplement the purchase of fresh fruits and vegetables in school cafeterias(once called “crunch lunch”).

    Both of these programs are promoted by the Davis Farm to School Connection, which is connected to the Davis Farmers Market Foundation.

    They have been at these programs for quite awhile, and the promoters include a number of current and former Davis parents. You can read about them here.

    If anyone has a problem with these and other programs in our schools, I’m sure that they would welcome discussion and would certainly provide greater context than has currently been provided in these blog comments.

  55. wdf

    One cost cutting program in the schools that has been lauded on this blog is the effort to cut down on waste removal costs by encouraging recycling programs in the schools. I believe recently that the savings was quoted at a school board meeting in the 10s of thousands of dollars.

    At the same time, there is at least one blogger here who is fond of criticizing Measure Q because it includes funds to supplement the purchase of fresh fruits and vegetables in school cafeterias(once called “crunch lunch”).

    Both of these programs are promoted by the Davis Farm to School Connection, which is connected to the Davis Farmers Market Foundation.

    They have been at these programs for quite awhile, and the promoters include a number of current and former Davis parents. You can read about them here.

    If anyone has a problem with these and other programs in our schools, I’m sure that they would welcome discussion and would certainly provide greater context than has currently been provided in these blog comments.

  56. wdf

    One cost cutting program in the schools that has been lauded on this blog is the effort to cut down on waste removal costs by encouraging recycling programs in the schools. I believe recently that the savings was quoted at a school board meeting in the 10s of thousands of dollars.

    At the same time, there is at least one blogger here who is fond of criticizing Measure Q because it includes funds to supplement the purchase of fresh fruits and vegetables in school cafeterias(once called “crunch lunch”).

    Both of these programs are promoted by the Davis Farm to School Connection, which is connected to the Davis Farmers Market Foundation.

    They have been at these programs for quite awhile, and the promoters include a number of current and former Davis parents. You can read about them here.

    If anyone has a problem with these and other programs in our schools, I’m sure that they would welcome discussion and would certainly provide greater context than has currently been provided in these blog comments.

  57. Anonymous

    Both of these programs are promoted by the Davis Farm to School Connection, which is connected to the Davis Farmers Market Foundation.

    DPD–here’s a research project for you: How much profit is the Davis Farmers’ Market Foundation making from administering this program?
    Why not enable Davis school cafeteria personnel deal direct with local farmers?

  58. Anonymous

    Both of these programs are promoted by the Davis Farm to School Connection, which is connected to the Davis Farmers Market Foundation.

    DPD–here’s a research project for you: How much profit is the Davis Farmers’ Market Foundation making from administering this program?
    Why not enable Davis school cafeteria personnel deal direct with local farmers?

  59. Anonymous

    Both of these programs are promoted by the Davis Farm to School Connection, which is connected to the Davis Farmers Market Foundation.

    DPD–here’s a research project for you: How much profit is the Davis Farmers’ Market Foundation making from administering this program?
    Why not enable Davis school cafeteria personnel deal direct with local farmers?

  60. Anonymous

    Both of these programs are promoted by the Davis Farm to School Connection, which is connected to the Davis Farmers Market Foundation.

    DPD–here’s a research project for you: How much profit is the Davis Farmers’ Market Foundation making from administering this program?
    Why not enable Davis school cafeteria personnel deal direct with local farmers?

  61. wdf

    DPD–here’s a research project for you: How much profit is the Davis Farmers’ Market Foundation making from administering this program? Why not enable Davis school cafeteria personnel deal direct with local farmers?

    Are you making this claim on any solid evidence?

    Did you go to their website and check them out? Did you contact anyone there to ask questions? Dorothy Peterson is their president, and she is a very nice lady to chat with, and she has put in plenty of her time and efforts to try to make the Davis schools better.

    I said that this organization *promotes* not *administers* these programs. The Davis Farm to School Connection actually makes donations to the school to help support these programs. You yourself can make a contribution to them if you so wanted.

    If DPD has a slow news interval, I hope that he would do a piece on them. I think he would probably find a lot of good work going on with them and the schools.

    Davis schools and California schools in general need more proactive relationships like this. Groups that work through partnerships to promote a vision instead of sitting around and complaining about what’s wrong.

    If there is anything nefarious going on, please offer specific evidence rather than throwing out unfounded claims to trash the reputation of others.

  62. wdf

    DPD–here’s a research project for you: How much profit is the Davis Farmers’ Market Foundation making from administering this program? Why not enable Davis school cafeteria personnel deal direct with local farmers?

    Are you making this claim on any solid evidence?

    Did you go to their website and check them out? Did you contact anyone there to ask questions? Dorothy Peterson is their president, and she is a very nice lady to chat with, and she has put in plenty of her time and efforts to try to make the Davis schools better.

    I said that this organization *promotes* not *administers* these programs. The Davis Farm to School Connection actually makes donations to the school to help support these programs. You yourself can make a contribution to them if you so wanted.

    If DPD has a slow news interval, I hope that he would do a piece on them. I think he would probably find a lot of good work going on with them and the schools.

    Davis schools and California schools in general need more proactive relationships like this. Groups that work through partnerships to promote a vision instead of sitting around and complaining about what’s wrong.

    If there is anything nefarious going on, please offer specific evidence rather than throwing out unfounded claims to trash the reputation of others.

  63. wdf

    DPD–here’s a research project for you: How much profit is the Davis Farmers’ Market Foundation making from administering this program? Why not enable Davis school cafeteria personnel deal direct with local farmers?

    Are you making this claim on any solid evidence?

    Did you go to their website and check them out? Did you contact anyone there to ask questions? Dorothy Peterson is their president, and she is a very nice lady to chat with, and she has put in plenty of her time and efforts to try to make the Davis schools better.

    I said that this organization *promotes* not *administers* these programs. The Davis Farm to School Connection actually makes donations to the school to help support these programs. You yourself can make a contribution to them if you so wanted.

    If DPD has a slow news interval, I hope that he would do a piece on them. I think he would probably find a lot of good work going on with them and the schools.

    Davis schools and California schools in general need more proactive relationships like this. Groups that work through partnerships to promote a vision instead of sitting around and complaining about what’s wrong.

    If there is anything nefarious going on, please offer specific evidence rather than throwing out unfounded claims to trash the reputation of others.

  64. wdf

    DPD–here’s a research project for you: How much profit is the Davis Farmers’ Market Foundation making from administering this program? Why not enable Davis school cafeteria personnel deal direct with local farmers?

    Are you making this claim on any solid evidence?

    Did you go to their website and check them out? Did you contact anyone there to ask questions? Dorothy Peterson is their president, and she is a very nice lady to chat with, and she has put in plenty of her time and efforts to try to make the Davis schools better.

    I said that this organization *promotes* not *administers* these programs. The Davis Farm to School Connection actually makes donations to the school to help support these programs. You yourself can make a contribution to them if you so wanted.

    If DPD has a slow news interval, I hope that he would do a piece on them. I think he would probably find a lot of good work going on with them and the schools.

    Davis schools and California schools in general need more proactive relationships like this. Groups that work through partnerships to promote a vision instead of sitting around and complaining about what’s wrong.

    If there is anything nefarious going on, please offer specific evidence rather than throwing out unfounded claims to trash the reputation of others.

  65. Anonymous

    TO WDF,

    Having read this blog a number of times I thought that is what this blog is about. Throwing out unfounded facts without any facts and the trashing of others who don’t like what you say or think.

  66. Anonymous

    TO WDF,

    Having read this blog a number of times I thought that is what this blog is about. Throwing out unfounded facts without any facts and the trashing of others who don’t like what you say or think.

  67. Anonymous

    TO WDF,

    Having read this blog a number of times I thought that is what this blog is about. Throwing out unfounded facts without any facts and the trashing of others who don’t like what you say or think.

  68. Anonymous

    TO WDF,

    Having read this blog a number of times I thought that is what this blog is about. Throwing out unfounded facts without any facts and the trashing of others who don’t like what you say or think.

  69. Anonymous

    DPD–here’s a research project for you: How much profit is the Davis Farmers’ Market Foundation making from administering this program? Why not enable Davis school cafeteria personnel deal direct with local farmers?

    WDF — those are just basic Journalism 101 type questions. I don’t see the value judgments in them that you are reacting to. Questions such as these are simply starting points an investigative journalist would ask themselves before embarking on an investigative journey. Which would entail far more than “visiting websites.” But rather, calling people, knocking on doors, finding out where these questions lead.
    Having an “administrator” apparently set up as some sort of middleman between student eaters and farmers seems interesting. Why can’t the cafeteria personnel and farmers get together without this middleperson (bureaucratic entity) seems a valid question to ask.

  70. Anonymous

    DPD–here’s a research project for you: How much profit is the Davis Farmers’ Market Foundation making from administering this program? Why not enable Davis school cafeteria personnel deal direct with local farmers?

    WDF — those are just basic Journalism 101 type questions. I don’t see the value judgments in them that you are reacting to. Questions such as these are simply starting points an investigative journalist would ask themselves before embarking on an investigative journey. Which would entail far more than “visiting websites.” But rather, calling people, knocking on doors, finding out where these questions lead.
    Having an “administrator” apparently set up as some sort of middleman between student eaters and farmers seems interesting. Why can’t the cafeteria personnel and farmers get together without this middleperson (bureaucratic entity) seems a valid question to ask.

  71. Anonymous

    DPD–here’s a research project for you: How much profit is the Davis Farmers’ Market Foundation making from administering this program? Why not enable Davis school cafeteria personnel deal direct with local farmers?

    WDF — those are just basic Journalism 101 type questions. I don’t see the value judgments in them that you are reacting to. Questions such as these are simply starting points an investigative journalist would ask themselves before embarking on an investigative journey. Which would entail far more than “visiting websites.” But rather, calling people, knocking on doors, finding out where these questions lead.
    Having an “administrator” apparently set up as some sort of middleman between student eaters and farmers seems interesting. Why can’t the cafeteria personnel and farmers get together without this middleperson (bureaucratic entity) seems a valid question to ask.

  72. Anonymous

    DPD–here’s a research project for you: How much profit is the Davis Farmers’ Market Foundation making from administering this program? Why not enable Davis school cafeteria personnel deal direct with local farmers?

    WDF — those are just basic Journalism 101 type questions. I don’t see the value judgments in them that you are reacting to. Questions such as these are simply starting points an investigative journalist would ask themselves before embarking on an investigative journey. Which would entail far more than “visiting websites.” But rather, calling people, knocking on doors, finding out where these questions lead.
    Having an “administrator” apparently set up as some sort of middleman between student eaters and farmers seems interesting. Why can’t the cafeteria personnel and farmers get together without this middleperson (bureaucratic entity) seems a valid question to ask.

  73. Old Skool Davis

    Davis citizens: welcome to your creation. Congratulations, to all the measure J folks. Yes, your artifically inflated greed has now fully exterminated the formerly important “middle class” in this town.

    So, what do we have left? 75 affluent families that pine for the high academic standards of excellence of the “good ol days”?

    What a shame that the majority of students now in the DJUSD come from several pockets of subsidized housing. For they can afford to live in Davis!!

    Let’s not forget, the several students who daily through various covert methods are funneled into the DJUSD from Woodland, Dixon, etc. Inserted and extracted by parents who clean daily the proverbial “pompous sterns” of the Davis elite.

    And all the fearful DJUSD personnel cast a blind eye to the influx of out of district students. As we know, no students, no jobs, no school.

    Hey! No need for that extra tax!
    Not on my poor old blue collar back you won’t.

    The glory days of real estate sales, posterior kissing about the Davis schools has passed.

    Welcome to your new town!!!

  74. Old Skool Davis

    Davis citizens: welcome to your creation. Congratulations, to all the measure J folks. Yes, your artifically inflated greed has now fully exterminated the formerly important “middle class” in this town.

    So, what do we have left? 75 affluent families that pine for the high academic standards of excellence of the “good ol days”?

    What a shame that the majority of students now in the DJUSD come from several pockets of subsidized housing. For they can afford to live in Davis!!

    Let’s not forget, the several students who daily through various covert methods are funneled into the DJUSD from Woodland, Dixon, etc. Inserted and extracted by parents who clean daily the proverbial “pompous sterns” of the Davis elite.

    And all the fearful DJUSD personnel cast a blind eye to the influx of out of district students. As we know, no students, no jobs, no school.

    Hey! No need for that extra tax!
    Not on my poor old blue collar back you won’t.

    The glory days of real estate sales, posterior kissing about the Davis schools has passed.

    Welcome to your new town!!!

  75. Old Skool Davis

    Davis citizens: welcome to your creation. Congratulations, to all the measure J folks. Yes, your artifically inflated greed has now fully exterminated the formerly important “middle class” in this town.

    So, what do we have left? 75 affluent families that pine for the high academic standards of excellence of the “good ol days”?

    What a shame that the majority of students now in the DJUSD come from several pockets of subsidized housing. For they can afford to live in Davis!!

    Let’s not forget, the several students who daily through various covert methods are funneled into the DJUSD from Woodland, Dixon, etc. Inserted and extracted by parents who clean daily the proverbial “pompous sterns” of the Davis elite.

    And all the fearful DJUSD personnel cast a blind eye to the influx of out of district students. As we know, no students, no jobs, no school.

    Hey! No need for that extra tax!
    Not on my poor old blue collar back you won’t.

    The glory days of real estate sales, posterior kissing about the Davis schools has passed.

    Welcome to your new town!!!

  76. Old Skool Davis

    Davis citizens: welcome to your creation. Congratulations, to all the measure J folks. Yes, your artifically inflated greed has now fully exterminated the formerly important “middle class” in this town.

    So, what do we have left? 75 affluent families that pine for the high academic standards of excellence of the “good ol days”?

    What a shame that the majority of students now in the DJUSD come from several pockets of subsidized housing. For they can afford to live in Davis!!

    Let’s not forget, the several students who daily through various covert methods are funneled into the DJUSD from Woodland, Dixon, etc. Inserted and extracted by parents who clean daily the proverbial “pompous sterns” of the Davis elite.

    And all the fearful DJUSD personnel cast a blind eye to the influx of out of district students. As we know, no students, no jobs, no school.

    Hey! No need for that extra tax!
    Not on my poor old blue collar back you won’t.

    The glory days of real estate sales, posterior kissing about the Davis schools has passed.

    Welcome to your new town!!!

  77. Anonymous

    I hope there will be enough qualified doctors and health care workers to take care of you in the future, with the steadily growing elderly population creating an increasing demand for those services. Maybe if we skimp on funding education, we could figure out a way to bring in foreign immigrants with the right qualifications.

  78. Anonymous

    I hope there will be enough qualified doctors and health care workers to take care of you in the future, with the steadily growing elderly population creating an increasing demand for those services. Maybe if we skimp on funding education, we could figure out a way to bring in foreign immigrants with the right qualifications.

  79. Anonymous

    I hope there will be enough qualified doctors and health care workers to take care of you in the future, with the steadily growing elderly population creating an increasing demand for those services. Maybe if we skimp on funding education, we could figure out a way to bring in foreign immigrants with the right qualifications.

  80. Anonymous

    I hope there will be enough qualified doctors and health care workers to take care of you in the future, with the steadily growing elderly population creating an increasing demand for those services. Maybe if we skimp on funding education, we could figure out a way to bring in foreign immigrants with the right qualifications.

  81. Black Bart

    Old Skool you almost have it right. Yes the progressives who have always been for progressive real estate prices and nothing else and their measure J have caused enrollment to dive but for another 10 bucks a month you can save the schools and all those blue collar teaching jobs until attrition brings the budget in line while maintaining the quality of education for the kids. Measure W is a bridge to that day.

    As for those kids being brought in, they are also helping to prop up the schools that have overcapacity, without them the contraction would be even worse.

    Yes on W

  82. Black Bart

    Old Skool you almost have it right. Yes the progressives who have always been for progressive real estate prices and nothing else and their measure J have caused enrollment to dive but for another 10 bucks a month you can save the schools and all those blue collar teaching jobs until attrition brings the budget in line while maintaining the quality of education for the kids. Measure W is a bridge to that day.

    As for those kids being brought in, they are also helping to prop up the schools that have overcapacity, without them the contraction would be even worse.

    Yes on W

  83. Black Bart

    Old Skool you almost have it right. Yes the progressives who have always been for progressive real estate prices and nothing else and their measure J have caused enrollment to dive but for another 10 bucks a month you can save the schools and all those blue collar teaching jobs until attrition brings the budget in line while maintaining the quality of education for the kids. Measure W is a bridge to that day.

    As for those kids being brought in, they are also helping to prop up the schools that have overcapacity, without them the contraction would be even worse.

    Yes on W

  84. Black Bart

    Old Skool you almost have it right. Yes the progressives who have always been for progressive real estate prices and nothing else and their measure J have caused enrollment to dive but for another 10 bucks a month you can save the schools and all those blue collar teaching jobs until attrition brings the budget in line while maintaining the quality of education for the kids. Measure W is a bridge to that day.

    As for those kids being brought in, they are also helping to prop up the schools that have overcapacity, without them the contraction would be even worse.

    Yes on W

  85. from the Darkside

    told you so.

    I warned everyone here that measure “R” was coming. I knew the school board would have a litany of excuses as to why they shouldn’t have to manage a budget, including in bad economic times like the rest of us. Here we are, and measure R is called measure W. I don’t believe for one minute that measure W is the end of it either. They will shake us down for every penny we R worth. Yet every time they promise this $ will “save programs” yet these programs get threatened if we don’t pass their latest measure.

  86. from the Darkside

    told you so.

    I warned everyone here that measure “R” was coming. I knew the school board would have a litany of excuses as to why they shouldn’t have to manage a budget, including in bad economic times like the rest of us. Here we are, and measure R is called measure W. I don’t believe for one minute that measure W is the end of it either. They will shake us down for every penny we R worth. Yet every time they promise this $ will “save programs” yet these programs get threatened if we don’t pass their latest measure.

  87. from the Darkside

    told you so.

    I warned everyone here that measure “R” was coming. I knew the school board would have a litany of excuses as to why they shouldn’t have to manage a budget, including in bad economic times like the rest of us. Here we are, and measure R is called measure W. I don’t believe for one minute that measure W is the end of it either. They will shake us down for every penny we R worth. Yet every time they promise this $ will “save programs” yet these programs get threatened if we don’t pass their latest measure.

  88. from the Darkside

    told you so.

    I warned everyone here that measure “R” was coming. I knew the school board would have a litany of excuses as to why they shouldn’t have to manage a budget, including in bad economic times like the rest of us. Here we are, and measure R is called measure W. I don’t believe for one minute that measure W is the end of it either. They will shake us down for every penny we R worth. Yet every time they promise this $ will “save programs” yet these programs get threatened if we don’t pass their latest measure.

  89. Old Skool Davis

    I’m considering strapping a bullhorn to the top of my car and taking several runs through through the neighboring cities.

    I will be hailing loudly “Free Crunch Lunch in Davis” “Come get your Crunch Lunch” “compliments of your friendly Davis tax payers”.

    I will stop my car periodically at dirt lots near big box stores and distribute leaflets. I will explain to the interested masses that they can enroll their kids in the Davis schools through various contrived means.

    That we the Davis citizens and tax payers will look the other way at the appearance of any fraudulent enrollment.

    I will caution them that this offer is only good for the next 6 years as we will by then through normal attrition, downsized our school system and uncorrupted our real estate marketing.

  90. Old Skool Davis

    I’m considering strapping a bullhorn to the top of my car and taking several runs through through the neighboring cities.

    I will be hailing loudly “Free Crunch Lunch in Davis” “Come get your Crunch Lunch” “compliments of your friendly Davis tax payers”.

    I will stop my car periodically at dirt lots near big box stores and distribute leaflets. I will explain to the interested masses that they can enroll their kids in the Davis schools through various contrived means.

    That we the Davis citizens and tax payers will look the other way at the appearance of any fraudulent enrollment.

    I will caution them that this offer is only good for the next 6 years as we will by then through normal attrition, downsized our school system and uncorrupted our real estate marketing.

  91. Old Skool Davis

    I’m considering strapping a bullhorn to the top of my car and taking several runs through through the neighboring cities.

    I will be hailing loudly “Free Crunch Lunch in Davis” “Come get your Crunch Lunch” “compliments of your friendly Davis tax payers”.

    I will stop my car periodically at dirt lots near big box stores and distribute leaflets. I will explain to the interested masses that they can enroll their kids in the Davis schools through various contrived means.

    That we the Davis citizens and tax payers will look the other way at the appearance of any fraudulent enrollment.

    I will caution them that this offer is only good for the next 6 years as we will by then through normal attrition, downsized our school system and uncorrupted our real estate marketing.

  92. Old Skool Davis

    I’m considering strapping a bullhorn to the top of my car and taking several runs through through the neighboring cities.

    I will be hailing loudly “Free Crunch Lunch in Davis” “Come get your Crunch Lunch” “compliments of your friendly Davis tax payers”.

    I will stop my car periodically at dirt lots near big box stores and distribute leaflets. I will explain to the interested masses that they can enroll their kids in the Davis schools through various contrived means.

    That we the Davis citizens and tax payers will look the other way at the appearance of any fraudulent enrollment.

    I will caution them that this offer is only good for the next 6 years as we will by then through normal attrition, downsized our school system and uncorrupted our real estate marketing.

  93. Anonymous

    Isn’t part of managing a budget finding more revenue when you lose revenue from the state? If you have a paycut, do you just cut my spending or do I try to get another job or take a loan?

  94. Anonymous

    Isn’t part of managing a budget finding more revenue when you lose revenue from the state? If you have a paycut, do you just cut my spending or do I try to get another job or take a loan?

  95. Anonymous

    Isn’t part of managing a budget finding more revenue when you lose revenue from the state? If you have a paycut, do you just cut my spending or do I try to get another job or take a loan?

  96. Anonymous

    Isn’t part of managing a budget finding more revenue when you lose revenue from the state? If you have a paycut, do you just cut my spending or do I try to get another job or take a loan?

  97. Anonymous

    Come to the comments section of the Davis Vanguard to find the old skool grumpy crew exercise their constitutional right to spew lies and misinformation:

    *”Crunch lunch” isn’t free.

    *The district had an increase in interdistrict transfers, but it doesn’t account for the increase in total enrollment in the district.

    Several months ago, there were cries on this blog that the district try to encourage more interdistrict transfers. The district succeeded and was fortunate to see a rise in enrollment from local enrollment and interdistrict transfers, and you get this old skool garbage.

    Let no good deed go unpunished!!

    Find more creative ways to rip on success!

  98. Anonymous

    Come to the comments section of the Davis Vanguard to find the old skool grumpy crew exercise their constitutional right to spew lies and misinformation:

    *”Crunch lunch” isn’t free.

    *The district had an increase in interdistrict transfers, but it doesn’t account for the increase in total enrollment in the district.

    Several months ago, there were cries on this blog that the district try to encourage more interdistrict transfers. The district succeeded and was fortunate to see a rise in enrollment from local enrollment and interdistrict transfers, and you get this old skool garbage.

    Let no good deed go unpunished!!

    Find more creative ways to rip on success!

  99. Anonymous

    Come to the comments section of the Davis Vanguard to find the old skool grumpy crew exercise their constitutional right to spew lies and misinformation:

    *”Crunch lunch” isn’t free.

    *The district had an increase in interdistrict transfers, but it doesn’t account for the increase in total enrollment in the district.

    Several months ago, there were cries on this blog that the district try to encourage more interdistrict transfers. The district succeeded and was fortunate to see a rise in enrollment from local enrollment and interdistrict transfers, and you get this old skool garbage.

    Let no good deed go unpunished!!

    Find more creative ways to rip on success!

  100. Anonymous

    Come to the comments section of the Davis Vanguard to find the old skool grumpy crew exercise their constitutional right to spew lies and misinformation:

    *”Crunch lunch” isn’t free.

    *The district had an increase in interdistrict transfers, but it doesn’t account for the increase in total enrollment in the district.

    Several months ago, there were cries on this blog that the district try to encourage more interdistrict transfers. The district succeeded and was fortunate to see a rise in enrollment from local enrollment and interdistrict transfers, and you get this old skool garbage.

    Let no good deed go unpunished!!

    Find more creative ways to rip on success!

  101. No on Salad Bars

    From the Davis Enterprise “Crunch Lunch is making a comeback…The popular midday salad bar – featuring locally grown fresh fruits and vegetables – is returning two days a week…Measure Q…allowed this to happen…Helping with the upgrades to the school lunch program is Georgeanne Brennan, a food writer and cookbook author who lives in Yolo County. (…Brennan write[s] a monthly food column in The Enterprise.) Brennan is giving the district’s student nutrition staff monthly cooking lessons using fresh local produce in hot and cold offerings…the costs associated with the salad bar (including a second person working in the lunch line) caused the district in 2004 to gradually cut back on salad bar service at elementary schools. The salad bar has continued at junior high schools and Davis High.”

    1) Why must our schools have a separate salad bar. School cafeterias are not restaurants. In tough budgetary times, it would seem to me the regular cafeteria workers can make a healthy salad made from local produce. That would save on having to have a salad bar staff person.
    2) How much, if anything, is being paid to give cafeteria staff cooking lessons. Seems to me cafeteria staff should already know how to cook.

    This is the epitome of elitist Davis – where every program, and I mean EVERY PROGRAM, is considered a necessity. If this is how parcel tax money is being spent, then I vote NO ON MEASURE W!

  102. No on Salad Bars

    From the Davis Enterprise “Crunch Lunch is making a comeback…The popular midday salad bar – featuring locally grown fresh fruits and vegetables – is returning two days a week…Measure Q…allowed this to happen…Helping with the upgrades to the school lunch program is Georgeanne Brennan, a food writer and cookbook author who lives in Yolo County. (…Brennan write[s] a monthly food column in The Enterprise.) Brennan is giving the district’s student nutrition staff monthly cooking lessons using fresh local produce in hot and cold offerings…the costs associated with the salad bar (including a second person working in the lunch line) caused the district in 2004 to gradually cut back on salad bar service at elementary schools. The salad bar has continued at junior high schools and Davis High.”

    1) Why must our schools have a separate salad bar. School cafeterias are not restaurants. In tough budgetary times, it would seem to me the regular cafeteria workers can make a healthy salad made from local produce. That would save on having to have a salad bar staff person.
    2) How much, if anything, is being paid to give cafeteria staff cooking lessons. Seems to me cafeteria staff should already know how to cook.

    This is the epitome of elitist Davis – where every program, and I mean EVERY PROGRAM, is considered a necessity. If this is how parcel tax money is being spent, then I vote NO ON MEASURE W!

  103. No on Salad Bars

    From the Davis Enterprise “Crunch Lunch is making a comeback…The popular midday salad bar – featuring locally grown fresh fruits and vegetables – is returning two days a week…Measure Q…allowed this to happen…Helping with the upgrades to the school lunch program is Georgeanne Brennan, a food writer and cookbook author who lives in Yolo County. (…Brennan write[s] a monthly food column in The Enterprise.) Brennan is giving the district’s student nutrition staff monthly cooking lessons using fresh local produce in hot and cold offerings…the costs associated with the salad bar (including a second person working in the lunch line) caused the district in 2004 to gradually cut back on salad bar service at elementary schools. The salad bar has continued at junior high schools and Davis High.”

    1) Why must our schools have a separate salad bar. School cafeterias are not restaurants. In tough budgetary times, it would seem to me the regular cafeteria workers can make a healthy salad made from local produce. That would save on having to have a salad bar staff person.
    2) How much, if anything, is being paid to give cafeteria staff cooking lessons. Seems to me cafeteria staff should already know how to cook.

    This is the epitome of elitist Davis – where every program, and I mean EVERY PROGRAM, is considered a necessity. If this is how parcel tax money is being spent, then I vote NO ON MEASURE W!

  104. No on Salad Bars

    From the Davis Enterprise “Crunch Lunch is making a comeback…The popular midday salad bar – featuring locally grown fresh fruits and vegetables – is returning two days a week…Measure Q…allowed this to happen…Helping with the upgrades to the school lunch program is Georgeanne Brennan, a food writer and cookbook author who lives in Yolo County. (…Brennan write[s] a monthly food column in The Enterprise.) Brennan is giving the district’s student nutrition staff monthly cooking lessons using fresh local produce in hot and cold offerings…the costs associated with the salad bar (including a second person working in the lunch line) caused the district in 2004 to gradually cut back on salad bar service at elementary schools. The salad bar has continued at junior high schools and Davis High.”

    1) Why must our schools have a separate salad bar. School cafeterias are not restaurants. In tough budgetary times, it would seem to me the regular cafeteria workers can make a healthy salad made from local produce. That would save on having to have a salad bar staff person.
    2) How much, if anything, is being paid to give cafeteria staff cooking lessons. Seems to me cafeteria staff should already know how to cook.

    This is the epitome of elitist Davis – where every program, and I mean EVERY PROGRAM, is considered a necessity. If this is how parcel tax money is being spent, then I vote NO ON MEASURE W!

  105. Anon

    BTW, it is interesting that the individual mentions $1.1 million in “bloat.”

    If this individual is who I think it is, they are a bit supporter of Valley Oak. A good chunk of that savings came from the closure of Valley Oak. Is that the kind of bloat you want to cut?

    Whoa, back the truck up! According to the school district, when VO closed, no one was laid off, so there was no savings there. They are still using the building as an “education center”, so nothing was saved with respect to running the facility either. So how did any significant savings come from the closure of VO?

  106. Anon

    BTW, it is interesting that the individual mentions $1.1 million in “bloat.”

    If this individual is who I think it is, they are a bit supporter of Valley Oak. A good chunk of that savings came from the closure of Valley Oak. Is that the kind of bloat you want to cut?

    Whoa, back the truck up! According to the school district, when VO closed, no one was laid off, so there was no savings there. They are still using the building as an “education center”, so nothing was saved with respect to running the facility either. So how did any significant savings come from the closure of VO?

  107. Anon

    BTW, it is interesting that the individual mentions $1.1 million in “bloat.”

    If this individual is who I think it is, they are a bit supporter of Valley Oak. A good chunk of that savings came from the closure of Valley Oak. Is that the kind of bloat you want to cut?

    Whoa, back the truck up! According to the school district, when VO closed, no one was laid off, so there was no savings there. They are still using the building as an “education center”, so nothing was saved with respect to running the facility either. So how did any significant savings come from the closure of VO?

  108. Anon

    BTW, it is interesting that the individual mentions $1.1 million in “bloat.”

    If this individual is who I think it is, they are a bit supporter of Valley Oak. A good chunk of that savings came from the closure of Valley Oak. Is that the kind of bloat you want to cut?

    Whoa, back the truck up! According to the school district, when VO closed, no one was laid off, so there was no savings there. They are still using the building as an “education center”, so nothing was saved with respect to running the facility either. So how did any significant savings come from the closure of VO?

  109. No End In Sight

    According to the Davis Enterprise,
    “the district [saved]… $177,798 in 2007-08 and another $74,175 in June and July” in energy conservation measures. Why wasn’t this done before asking for more money, when the DJUSD insisted there was nowhere in the budget they could save any money? And they want us to pony up more? What happens when that isn’t enough? Ask for more? And when that isn’t enough? When does it end?

  110. No End In Sight

    According to the Davis Enterprise,
    “the district [saved]… $177,798 in 2007-08 and another $74,175 in June and July” in energy conservation measures. Why wasn’t this done before asking for more money, when the DJUSD insisted there was nowhere in the budget they could save any money? And they want us to pony up more? What happens when that isn’t enough? Ask for more? And when that isn’t enough? When does it end?

  111. No End In Sight

    According to the Davis Enterprise,
    “the district [saved]… $177,798 in 2007-08 and another $74,175 in June and July” in energy conservation measures. Why wasn’t this done before asking for more money, when the DJUSD insisted there was nowhere in the budget they could save any money? And they want us to pony up more? What happens when that isn’t enough? Ask for more? And when that isn’t enough? When does it end?

  112. No End In Sight

    According to the Davis Enterprise,
    “the district [saved]… $177,798 in 2007-08 and another $74,175 in June and July” in energy conservation measures. Why wasn’t this done before asking for more money, when the DJUSD insisted there was nowhere in the budget they could save any money? And they want us to pony up more? What happens when that isn’t enough? Ask for more? And when that isn’t enough? When does it end?

  113. Doug Paul Davis

    “According to the school district, when VO closed, no one was laid off, so there was no savings there. They are still using the building as an “education center”, so nothing was saved with respect to running the facility either.”

    This is not true, neither statement. Facility costs are substantial reduction here. And it is true that faculty was not laid off as the result of the closure, the economies scale enabled the district to save money. The District is still saving money on administration and secretary time and by not using half of the facility.

  114. Doug Paul Davis

    “According to the school district, when VO closed, no one was laid off, so there was no savings there. They are still using the building as an “education center”, so nothing was saved with respect to running the facility either.”

    This is not true, neither statement. Facility costs are substantial reduction here. And it is true that faculty was not laid off as the result of the closure, the economies scale enabled the district to save money. The District is still saving money on administration and secretary time and by not using half of the facility.

  115. Doug Paul Davis

    “According to the school district, when VO closed, no one was laid off, so there was no savings there. They are still using the building as an “education center”, so nothing was saved with respect to running the facility either.”

    This is not true, neither statement. Facility costs are substantial reduction here. And it is true that faculty was not laid off as the result of the closure, the economies scale enabled the district to save money. The District is still saving money on administration and secretary time and by not using half of the facility.

  116. Doug Paul Davis

    “According to the school district, when VO closed, no one was laid off, so there was no savings there. They are still using the building as an “education center”, so nothing was saved with respect to running the facility either.”

    This is not true, neither statement. Facility costs are substantial reduction here. And it is true that faculty was not laid off as the result of the closure, the economies scale enabled the district to save money. The District is still saving money on administration and secretary time and by not using half of the facility.

  117. Doug Paul Davis

    “Why wasn’t this done before asking for more money, when the DJUSD insisted there was nowhere in the budget they could save any money?”

    The district never claimed that there was nowhere in the budget they could save money. They cut as others have referenced around $1.1 million in various ways. This is one of them. However, that does not approach the additional $2.4 million needed to bridge the gap.

  118. Doug Paul Davis

    “Why wasn’t this done before asking for more money, when the DJUSD insisted there was nowhere in the budget they could save any money?”

    The district never claimed that there was nowhere in the budget they could save money. They cut as others have referenced around $1.1 million in various ways. This is one of them. However, that does not approach the additional $2.4 million needed to bridge the gap.

  119. Doug Paul Davis

    “Why wasn’t this done before asking for more money, when the DJUSD insisted there was nowhere in the budget they could save any money?”

    The district never claimed that there was nowhere in the budget they could save money. They cut as others have referenced around $1.1 million in various ways. This is one of them. However, that does not approach the additional $2.4 million needed to bridge the gap.

  120. Doug Paul Davis

    “Why wasn’t this done before asking for more money, when the DJUSD insisted there was nowhere in the budget they could save any money?”

    The district never claimed that there was nowhere in the budget they could save money. They cut as others have referenced around $1.1 million in various ways. This is one of them. However, that does not approach the additional $2.4 million needed to bridge the gap.

  121. Wait a minute?

    I thought there wasn’t enough $ to keep Valley Oak open, period. Now $ exists to open half of it as an “education center?” I thought there wasn’t enough $? I’m sorry, but I cannot support measure W until there is some honesty here.

  122. Wait a minute?

    I thought there wasn’t enough $ to keep Valley Oak open, period. Now $ exists to open half of it as an “education center?” I thought there wasn’t enough $? I’m sorry, but I cannot support measure W until there is some honesty here.

  123. Wait a minute?

    I thought there wasn’t enough $ to keep Valley Oak open, period. Now $ exists to open half of it as an “education center?” I thought there wasn’t enough $? I’m sorry, but I cannot support measure W until there is some honesty here.

  124. Wait a minute?

    I thought there wasn’t enough $ to keep Valley Oak open, period. Now $ exists to open half of it as an “education center?” I thought there wasn’t enough $? I’m sorry, but I cannot support measure W until there is some honesty here.

  125. Doug Paul Davis

    I’ll explain this more fully tomorrow, Valley Oak is the location where they have moved a few programs that were located elsewhere. It doesn’t involve the expenses that it would take to run a school and the move has saved the district several hundred thousand per year which is part of the $1.1 million in savings.

  126. Doug Paul Davis

    I’ll explain this more fully tomorrow, Valley Oak is the location where they have moved a few programs that were located elsewhere. It doesn’t involve the expenses that it would take to run a school and the move has saved the district several hundred thousand per year which is part of the $1.1 million in savings.

  127. Doug Paul Davis

    I’ll explain this more fully tomorrow, Valley Oak is the location where they have moved a few programs that were located elsewhere. It doesn’t involve the expenses that it would take to run a school and the move has saved the district several hundred thousand per year which is part of the $1.1 million in savings.

  128. Doug Paul Davis

    I’ll explain this more fully tomorrow, Valley Oak is the location where they have moved a few programs that were located elsewhere. It doesn’t involve the expenses that it would take to run a school and the move has saved the district several hundred thousand per year which is part of the $1.1 million in savings.

  129. Anonymous

    “…here’s a research project for you: How much profit is the Davis Farmers’ Market Foundation making from administering this program?
    Why not enable Davis school cafeteria personnel deal direct with local farmers?”

    Yes, here could be a great way to save money.
    PS: On another note: if Korematsu had never been built Valley Oak would still be viable today, at a greatly reduced cost…

  130. Anonymous

    “…here’s a research project for you: How much profit is the Davis Farmers’ Market Foundation making from administering this program?
    Why not enable Davis school cafeteria personnel deal direct with local farmers?”

    Yes, here could be a great way to save money.
    PS: On another note: if Korematsu had never been built Valley Oak would still be viable today, at a greatly reduced cost…

  131. Anonymous

    “…here’s a research project for you: How much profit is the Davis Farmers’ Market Foundation making from administering this program?
    Why not enable Davis school cafeteria personnel deal direct with local farmers?”

    Yes, here could be a great way to save money.
    PS: On another note: if Korematsu had never been built Valley Oak would still be viable today, at a greatly reduced cost…

  132. Anonymous

    “…here’s a research project for you: How much profit is the Davis Farmers’ Market Foundation making from administering this program?
    Why not enable Davis school cafeteria personnel deal direct with local farmers?”

    Yes, here could be a great way to save money.
    PS: On another note: if Korematsu had never been built Valley Oak would still be viable today, at a greatly reduced cost…

  133. Anonymous

    “Salad bars in schools. Whatever happened to brown bagging it? That is what we used to do in my day! Kids are spoiled today!”

    Agreed!

    In my day, cafeteria food was mystery meat, soggy overcooked peas, and wilted lettuce.

    That kept about half of us brown bagging it. The rest just suffered or went hungry.

    Imagine the audacity of a cafeteria or a school district trying to provide healthy, edible food!!

    There goes the neighborhood!

    When I was little we used to walk two miles to school in the snow, uphill in both directions, blah blah blah.

  134. Anonymous

    “Salad bars in schools. Whatever happened to brown bagging it? That is what we used to do in my day! Kids are spoiled today!”

    Agreed!

    In my day, cafeteria food was mystery meat, soggy overcooked peas, and wilted lettuce.

    That kept about half of us brown bagging it. The rest just suffered or went hungry.

    Imagine the audacity of a cafeteria or a school district trying to provide healthy, edible food!!

    There goes the neighborhood!

    When I was little we used to walk two miles to school in the snow, uphill in both directions, blah blah blah.

  135. Anonymous

    “Salad bars in schools. Whatever happened to brown bagging it? That is what we used to do in my day! Kids are spoiled today!”

    Agreed!

    In my day, cafeteria food was mystery meat, soggy overcooked peas, and wilted lettuce.

    That kept about half of us brown bagging it. The rest just suffered or went hungry.

    Imagine the audacity of a cafeteria or a school district trying to provide healthy, edible food!!

    There goes the neighborhood!

    When I was little we used to walk two miles to school in the snow, uphill in both directions, blah blah blah.

  136. Anonymous

    “Salad bars in schools. Whatever happened to brown bagging it? That is what we used to do in my day! Kids are spoiled today!”

    Agreed!

    In my day, cafeteria food was mystery meat, soggy overcooked peas, and wilted lettuce.

    That kept about half of us brown bagging it. The rest just suffered or went hungry.

    Imagine the audacity of a cafeteria or a school district trying to provide healthy, edible food!!

    There goes the neighborhood!

    When I was little we used to walk two miles to school in the snow, uphill in both directions, blah blah blah.

  137. s.o.b.

    You know, when those textbooks for health class encouraged a diet that included fresh fruits and vegetables, they only meant in theory.

    I’m sure they didn’t really mean for schools to take it seriously and put it into practice.

  138. s.o.b.

    You know, when those textbooks for health class encouraged a diet that included fresh fruits and vegetables, they only meant in theory.

    I’m sure they didn’t really mean for schools to take it seriously and put it into practice.

  139. s.o.b.

    You know, when those textbooks for health class encouraged a diet that included fresh fruits and vegetables, they only meant in theory.

    I’m sure they didn’t really mean for schools to take it seriously and put it into practice.

  140. s.o.b.

    You know, when those textbooks for health class encouraged a diet that included fresh fruits and vegetables, they only meant in theory.

    I’m sure they didn’t really mean for schools to take it seriously and put it into practice.

  141. Bring on the Crunch!

    1) Why must our schools have a separate salad bar. School cafeterias are not restaurants. In tough budgetary times, it would seem to me the regular cafeteria workers can make a healthy salad made from local produce. That would save on having to have a salad bar staff person.
    ———————-
    Speaking only from elementary-school experience, they do offer so-called “healthy” salads and other vegetables on non-salad-bar days. These usually consist of “Sponge Bob Squarepants” baby carrots, broccoli bites, or a small pre-packaged salad made with what appears to be iceberg lettuce, a few measly shreds of carrots, and one cherry tomato.

    Much of this goes to waste, or is put on the “community table” for sharing.

    The Crunch Lunch salad bar provides a wider range of healthy options, and from my (admittedly anecdotal) experience, less waste.

    ——————-
    2) How much, if anything, is being paid to give cafeteria staff cooking lessons. Seems to me cafeteria staff should already know how to cook.
    ————

    From what I have seen, no “cooking” goes on at each individual school site. Again, I am speaking only from what I have seen the past four years at one elementary school (NDE). The “kitchen” is a room roughly the size of two of my bathrooms, and does not appear to have an oven, let alone the caliber of kitchen equipment I remember our school cafeteria having when I was growing up.

    In fact, this can hardly be called a cafeteria at all.

    The first school lunch my daughter had at NDE (when she was in kindergarten) consisted of: a frozen, re-heated “Jose Ole” bean burrito, a scoop of peanut butter roughly the size of a baseball, some pallid chunks of pineapple, and a carton of milk.

    Granted, this was four years ago, but the menu of entrees hasn’t improved much since then. They regularly feature “Weinerschnitzel” brand hot dogs, greasy pizza, and the like.

    Over the past year or two, however, they have started offering rice bowls with fresh-made chicken and vegetables, hot fresh-made soups, and (this year) the Crunch Lunch salad bar.

    IMHO, this is a step in the right direction. And while people can–of course–send brown-bag lunches for their children, not everyone will end up with something healthy (or with anything at all, if it weren’t for the school lunch program in some cases).

    Nutrition is too important to skimp on. I’m identifying nutrition services as one “necessity” that we should not lose.

  142. Bring on the Crunch!

    1) Why must our schools have a separate salad bar. School cafeterias are not restaurants. In tough budgetary times, it would seem to me the regular cafeteria workers can make a healthy salad made from local produce. That would save on having to have a salad bar staff person.
    ———————-
    Speaking only from elementary-school experience, they do offer so-called “healthy” salads and other vegetables on non-salad-bar days. These usually consist of “Sponge Bob Squarepants” baby carrots, broccoli bites, or a small pre-packaged salad made with what appears to be iceberg lettuce, a few measly shreds of carrots, and one cherry tomato.

    Much of this goes to waste, or is put on the “community table” for sharing.

    The Crunch Lunch salad bar provides a wider range of healthy options, and from my (admittedly anecdotal) experience, less waste.

    ——————-
    2) How much, if anything, is being paid to give cafeteria staff cooking lessons. Seems to me cafeteria staff should already know how to cook.
    ————

    From what I have seen, no “cooking” goes on at each individual school site. Again, I am speaking only from what I have seen the past four years at one elementary school (NDE). The “kitchen” is a room roughly the size of two of my bathrooms, and does not appear to have an oven, let alone the caliber of kitchen equipment I remember our school cafeteria having when I was growing up.

    In fact, this can hardly be called a cafeteria at all.

    The first school lunch my daughter had at NDE (when she was in kindergarten) consisted of: a frozen, re-heated “Jose Ole” bean burrito, a scoop of peanut butter roughly the size of a baseball, some pallid chunks of pineapple, and a carton of milk.

    Granted, this was four years ago, but the menu of entrees hasn’t improved much since then. They regularly feature “Weinerschnitzel” brand hot dogs, greasy pizza, and the like.

    Over the past year or two, however, they have started offering rice bowls with fresh-made chicken and vegetables, hot fresh-made soups, and (this year) the Crunch Lunch salad bar.

    IMHO, this is a step in the right direction. And while people can–of course–send brown-bag lunches for their children, not everyone will end up with something healthy (or with anything at all, if it weren’t for the school lunch program in some cases).

    Nutrition is too important to skimp on. I’m identifying nutrition services as one “necessity” that we should not lose.

  143. Bring on the Crunch!

    1) Why must our schools have a separate salad bar. School cafeterias are not restaurants. In tough budgetary times, it would seem to me the regular cafeteria workers can make a healthy salad made from local produce. That would save on having to have a salad bar staff person.
    ———————-
    Speaking only from elementary-school experience, they do offer so-called “healthy” salads and other vegetables on non-salad-bar days. These usually consist of “Sponge Bob Squarepants” baby carrots, broccoli bites, or a small pre-packaged salad made with what appears to be iceberg lettuce, a few measly shreds of carrots, and one cherry tomato.

    Much of this goes to waste, or is put on the “community table” for sharing.

    The Crunch Lunch salad bar provides a wider range of healthy options, and from my (admittedly anecdotal) experience, less waste.

    ——————-
    2) How much, if anything, is being paid to give cafeteria staff cooking lessons. Seems to me cafeteria staff should already know how to cook.
    ————

    From what I have seen, no “cooking” goes on at each individual school site. Again, I am speaking only from what I have seen the past four years at one elementary school (NDE). The “kitchen” is a room roughly the size of two of my bathrooms, and does not appear to have an oven, let alone the caliber of kitchen equipment I remember our school cafeteria having when I was growing up.

    In fact, this can hardly be called a cafeteria at all.

    The first school lunch my daughter had at NDE (when she was in kindergarten) consisted of: a frozen, re-heated “Jose Ole” bean burrito, a scoop of peanut butter roughly the size of a baseball, some pallid chunks of pineapple, and a carton of milk.

    Granted, this was four years ago, but the menu of entrees hasn’t improved much since then. They regularly feature “Weinerschnitzel” brand hot dogs, greasy pizza, and the like.

    Over the past year or two, however, they have started offering rice bowls with fresh-made chicken and vegetables, hot fresh-made soups, and (this year) the Crunch Lunch salad bar.

    IMHO, this is a step in the right direction. And while people can–of course–send brown-bag lunches for their children, not everyone will end up with something healthy (or with anything at all, if it weren’t for the school lunch program in some cases).

    Nutrition is too important to skimp on. I’m identifying nutrition services as one “necessity” that we should not lose.

  144. Bring on the Crunch!

    1) Why must our schools have a separate salad bar. School cafeterias are not restaurants. In tough budgetary times, it would seem to me the regular cafeteria workers can make a healthy salad made from local produce. That would save on having to have a salad bar staff person.
    ———————-
    Speaking only from elementary-school experience, they do offer so-called “healthy” salads and other vegetables on non-salad-bar days. These usually consist of “Sponge Bob Squarepants” baby carrots, broccoli bites, or a small pre-packaged salad made with what appears to be iceberg lettuce, a few measly shreds of carrots, and one cherry tomato.

    Much of this goes to waste, or is put on the “community table” for sharing.

    The Crunch Lunch salad bar provides a wider range of healthy options, and from my (admittedly anecdotal) experience, less waste.

    ——————-
    2) How much, if anything, is being paid to give cafeteria staff cooking lessons. Seems to me cafeteria staff should already know how to cook.
    ————

    From what I have seen, no “cooking” goes on at each individual school site. Again, I am speaking only from what I have seen the past four years at one elementary school (NDE). The “kitchen” is a room roughly the size of two of my bathrooms, and does not appear to have an oven, let alone the caliber of kitchen equipment I remember our school cafeteria having when I was growing up.

    In fact, this can hardly be called a cafeteria at all.

    The first school lunch my daughter had at NDE (when she was in kindergarten) consisted of: a frozen, re-heated “Jose Ole” bean burrito, a scoop of peanut butter roughly the size of a baseball, some pallid chunks of pineapple, and a carton of milk.

    Granted, this was four years ago, but the menu of entrees hasn’t improved much since then. They regularly feature “Weinerschnitzel” brand hot dogs, greasy pizza, and the like.

    Over the past year or two, however, they have started offering rice bowls with fresh-made chicken and vegetables, hot fresh-made soups, and (this year) the Crunch Lunch salad bar.

    IMHO, this is a step in the right direction. And while people can–of course–send brown-bag lunches for their children, not everyone will end up with something healthy (or with anything at all, if it weren’t for the school lunch program in some cases).

    Nutrition is too important to skimp on. I’m identifying nutrition services as one “necessity” that we should not lose.

  145. pro-nutrition

    “1) Why must our schools have a separate salad bar. School cafeterias are not restaurants. In tough budgetary times, it would seem to me the regular cafeteria workers can make a healthy salad made from local produce. That would save on having to have a salad bar staff person.

    This is the epitome of elitist Davis – where every program, and I mean EVERY PROGRAM, is considered a necessity. If this is how parcel tax money is being spent, then I vote NO ON MEASURE W!”

    Wow! It is getting really hard to take this thread of criticism seriously.

    Go forth and proclaim school district waste and corruption over cafeteria salad!

    I’m supposed to be outraged that kids are being fed fresh fruits and vegetables?

    Is this some kind of a liberal guilt complex? Because kids are starving in Africa, Davis school cafeterias really need to be serving gruel.

    Fresh salad would just seem way too elitist by comparison. Oh, the arrogance over daring to serve salad!

    Give me a break!

  146. pro-nutrition

    “1) Why must our schools have a separate salad bar. School cafeterias are not restaurants. In tough budgetary times, it would seem to me the regular cafeteria workers can make a healthy salad made from local produce. That would save on having to have a salad bar staff person.

    This is the epitome of elitist Davis – where every program, and I mean EVERY PROGRAM, is considered a necessity. If this is how parcel tax money is being spent, then I vote NO ON MEASURE W!”

    Wow! It is getting really hard to take this thread of criticism seriously.

    Go forth and proclaim school district waste and corruption over cafeteria salad!

    I’m supposed to be outraged that kids are being fed fresh fruits and vegetables?

    Is this some kind of a liberal guilt complex? Because kids are starving in Africa, Davis school cafeterias really need to be serving gruel.

    Fresh salad would just seem way too elitist by comparison. Oh, the arrogance over daring to serve salad!

    Give me a break!

  147. pro-nutrition

    “1) Why must our schools have a separate salad bar. School cafeterias are not restaurants. In tough budgetary times, it would seem to me the regular cafeteria workers can make a healthy salad made from local produce. That would save on having to have a salad bar staff person.

    This is the epitome of elitist Davis – where every program, and I mean EVERY PROGRAM, is considered a necessity. If this is how parcel tax money is being spent, then I vote NO ON MEASURE W!”

    Wow! It is getting really hard to take this thread of criticism seriously.

    Go forth and proclaim school district waste and corruption over cafeteria salad!

    I’m supposed to be outraged that kids are being fed fresh fruits and vegetables?

    Is this some kind of a liberal guilt complex? Because kids are starving in Africa, Davis school cafeterias really need to be serving gruel.

    Fresh salad would just seem way too elitist by comparison. Oh, the arrogance over daring to serve salad!

    Give me a break!

  148. pro-nutrition

    “1) Why must our schools have a separate salad bar. School cafeterias are not restaurants. In tough budgetary times, it would seem to me the regular cafeteria workers can make a healthy salad made from local produce. That would save on having to have a salad bar staff person.

    This is the epitome of elitist Davis – where every program, and I mean EVERY PROGRAM, is considered a necessity. If this is how parcel tax money is being spent, then I vote NO ON MEASURE W!”

    Wow! It is getting really hard to take this thread of criticism seriously.

    Go forth and proclaim school district waste and corruption over cafeteria salad!

    I’m supposed to be outraged that kids are being fed fresh fruits and vegetables?

    Is this some kind of a liberal guilt complex? Because kids are starving in Africa, Davis school cafeterias really need to be serving gruel.

    Fresh salad would just seem way too elitist by comparison. Oh, the arrogance over daring to serve salad!

    Give me a break!

  149. Entitled to my opinion

    “Fresh salad would just seem way too elitist by comparison. Oh, the arrogance over daring to serve salad! Give me a break!”

    I did not advocate against fresh salad. I think a salad bar staffed by someone at the elementary school level is ridiculous. We can agree to disagee on this one. However, I suspect you are one of those who inisist every program in Davis schools is a necessity and must be saved. What about the EL program at VO? Why wasn’t that worth saving? Why wasn’t an entire neighborhood school worth saving?

  150. Entitled to my opinion

    “Fresh salad would just seem way too elitist by comparison. Oh, the arrogance over daring to serve salad! Give me a break!”

    I did not advocate against fresh salad. I think a salad bar staffed by someone at the elementary school level is ridiculous. We can agree to disagee on this one. However, I suspect you are one of those who inisist every program in Davis schools is a necessity and must be saved. What about the EL program at VO? Why wasn’t that worth saving? Why wasn’t an entire neighborhood school worth saving?

  151. Entitled to my opinion

    “Fresh salad would just seem way too elitist by comparison. Oh, the arrogance over daring to serve salad! Give me a break!”

    I did not advocate against fresh salad. I think a salad bar staffed by someone at the elementary school level is ridiculous. We can agree to disagee on this one. However, I suspect you are one of those who inisist every program in Davis schools is a necessity and must be saved. What about the EL program at VO? Why wasn’t that worth saving? Why wasn’t an entire neighborhood school worth saving?

  152. Entitled to my opinion

    “Fresh salad would just seem way too elitist by comparison. Oh, the arrogance over daring to serve salad! Give me a break!”

    I did not advocate against fresh salad. I think a salad bar staffed by someone at the elementary school level is ridiculous. We can agree to disagee on this one. However, I suspect you are one of those who inisist every program in Davis schools is a necessity and must be saved. What about the EL program at VO? Why wasn’t that worth saving? Why wasn’t an entire neighborhood school worth saving?

  153. curious

    “What about the EL program at VO?”

    Where are the EL teachers who used to work at VO? Are they working in the district this year?

    Can they continue their fine work at a different campus?

  154. curious

    “What about the EL program at VO?”

    Where are the EL teachers who used to work at VO? Are they working in the district this year?

    Can they continue their fine work at a different campus?

  155. curious

    “What about the EL program at VO?”

    Where are the EL teachers who used to work at VO? Are they working in the district this year?

    Can they continue their fine work at a different campus?

  156. curious

    “What about the EL program at VO?”

    Where are the EL teachers who used to work at VO? Are they working in the district this year?

    Can they continue their fine work at a different campus?

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