Davis Crunch Lunch: Isn’t Nutrition for Kids Its Own Reward?

For some reason the Davis Crunch Lunch program has become the target of those who believe that the district is wasting taxpayer money.

The argument against such a program seems to be that having and establishing good eating habits among students, particularly low income students is not its own reward and that we should continue to provide cheap and prepackaged food as a cost saver.

It may actually turnout that both premises are incorrect.

The idea behind this program is that good nutrition and a healthy diet are related to positive academic and behavioral student performance in the classroom. Thus a school program that “integrates educational curriculum with garden activities, nutrition education, and healthy food choices in the school lunch program will contribute to improved health and overall student achievement.”

As a study suggests:

A number of studies have shown the correlation between learning difficulties and diet. For many children in the public schools, breakfast (if it is served) and lunch are the only nutritionally balanced meals they receive during the day. Although the National School Lunch program ensures a minimum standard of nutrition for meals served in schools, many children select à la carte items, which are currently not held to the same standards. During the last decade, school nutrition services departments have been under tremendous pressure to remain financially solvent. Labor costs and rising food costs have prompted food service directors to seek alternative methods of cutting costs. One of those ways is to contract with outside companies, such as pizza, taco, and soft drink companies, to sell food in the school. Oftentimes, these companies offer schools large sums of money for the opportunity to sell on campuses. Students respond to these products because of the intense advertising that surrounds them every day on television and in the culture at large.

As a recent alternative to this situation, some school districts have developed salad bar programs that offer students the option of eating fresh fruits and vegetables. The assumption is that this not only reinforces life-long healthy eating habits, but improves their overall school performance. Sometimes these salad bars are an integrated component of a comprehensive Farm-to-School program that includes produce purchased from local farmers, visits to local farms, school gardening, cooking lessons, and enhanced nutrition education.

Back in 2001, Davis had a relatively low proportion of low-income families. A small percentage of students were eligible for free and reduced meals under the National School Lunch Program–13% free and 3% reduced.

This year the program has been expanded thanks to Measure Q and the Farm to School Program. We now have an Elementary School Salad Bar and Korematsu hot lunch and Salad Bar.

Most of the food services budget is a separate fund from the general fund with the exception of the Measure Q enhancement. The district needs to sell more food in order to break even in this program. The way to do that is to serve the kind of quality food that crunch lunch provides.

The results are promising. Normally meals average between 15 and 18 percent of total students. On pizza day and BBQ day, it goes up to as much as a third of the total students.

Those numbers have increased with the new program however. On Salad Bar Days to 10% in meals served and Korematsu has seen a 30 percent plus increase in the number of students served since the new program was implemented or 70 percent more meals.

On the other other, a lot of the pre-packaged salads are going unsold. Many school districts have tried to increase their sales by providing more popular but less nutritious food. This is in my opinion the wrong approach.

As we have discussed before, the crunch lunch program does not require additional staff. So there cost is not there to the district in terms of additional staff. This inaccurate statement has been repeated on a continual basis in the comment section. So I reiterate, the crunch lunch program requires no additional staff.

Davis Farm to Schools is a partner in this program. However, they are non-profit. No district funds flow through that organization.

The bottom line here that this program has the potential to be cost neutral. That is achieved because the school district has seen vastly improved sales on the days when the Salad Bar Days are served and the days when the Korematsu hot lunch days are served.

Right now, the district is implementing this on a pilot basis. They are rotating the programs between the schools on a daily basis in order to minimize stat-up costs while they assess the usage. Given the fact that the early results are so promising, we can expect the district to expand these lunch services and if they do, they will be more likely to break even or even have a net revenue. It is all based on providing a service that is needed–providing healthy and nutritious lunches to students who need to form good eating habits from day one. This is the type of program that we should be encouraging, not discouraging.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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208 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    I have no problem with this program and think it should be expanded. I do not mind if we need to subsidize this program. Healthy food for kids…what’s there not to like?

  2. Anonymous

    I have no problem with this program and think it should be expanded. I do not mind if we need to subsidize this program. Healthy food for kids…what’s there not to like?

  3. Anonymous

    I have no problem with this program and think it should be expanded. I do not mind if we need to subsidize this program. Healthy food for kids…what’s there not to like?

  4. Anonymous

    I have no problem with this program and think it should be expanded. I do not mind if we need to subsidize this program. Healthy food for kids…what’s there not to like?

  5. Excuse me..

    but DSHS , emerson and other schools have been selling junk as far back as I can remember. Maybe if they sold off their junk to fund nutrition, they wouldn’t need taxpayer dollars.

    Suddenly nutrition is important to them? Give me a break!!

  6. Excuse me..

    but DSHS , emerson and other schools have been selling junk as far back as I can remember. Maybe if they sold off their junk to fund nutrition, they wouldn’t need taxpayer dollars.

    Suddenly nutrition is important to them? Give me a break!!

  7. Excuse me..

    but DSHS , emerson and other schools have been selling junk as far back as I can remember. Maybe if they sold off their junk to fund nutrition, they wouldn’t need taxpayer dollars.

    Suddenly nutrition is important to them? Give me a break!!

  8. Excuse me..

    but DSHS , emerson and other schools have been selling junk as far back as I can remember. Maybe if they sold off their junk to fund nutrition, they wouldn’t need taxpayer dollars.

    Suddenly nutrition is important to them? Give me a break!!

  9. Take a trip

    Just take a field trip to DHS and Emerson. See all the junk you are a ble to buy.

    Excuse me, but the school board should stop insulting my intelligence by pretending to care about kids health.

  10. Take a trip

    Just take a field trip to DHS and Emerson. See all the junk you are a ble to buy.

    Excuse me, but the school board should stop insulting my intelligence by pretending to care about kids health.

  11. Take a trip

    Just take a field trip to DHS and Emerson. See all the junk you are a ble to buy.

    Excuse me, but the school board should stop insulting my intelligence by pretending to care about kids health.

  12. Take a trip

    Just take a field trip to DHS and Emerson. See all the junk you are a ble to buy.

    Excuse me, but the school board should stop insulting my intelligence by pretending to care about kids health.

  13. Cut out Pizza Day

    On pizza day and BBQ day, it goes up to as much as a third of the total students.

    If you cut out Pizza Day and pay for fruits and vegetables, problem solved.

  14. Cut out Pizza Day

    On pizza day and BBQ day, it goes up to as much as a third of the total students.

    If you cut out Pizza Day and pay for fruits and vegetables, problem solved.

  15. Cut out Pizza Day

    On pizza day and BBQ day, it goes up to as much as a third of the total students.

    If you cut out Pizza Day and pay for fruits and vegetables, problem solved.

  16. Cut out Pizza Day

    On pizza day and BBQ day, it goes up to as much as a third of the total students.

    If you cut out Pizza Day and pay for fruits and vegetables, problem solved.

  17. Doug Paul Davis

    I’ve been to the HS a number of times in the last year and as far as I can tell they don’t sell junk food. The vending machines only have milk and juice for instance, not soda.

    “the school board should stop insulting my intelligence by pretending to care about kids health”

    Let me just ask you so I’m clear on their motivations, if they don’t actual care about kids’ health, why are they promoting the program?

  18. Doug Paul Davis

    I’ve been to the HS a number of times in the last year and as far as I can tell they don’t sell junk food. The vending machines only have milk and juice for instance, not soda.

    “the school board should stop insulting my intelligence by pretending to care about kids health”

    Let me just ask you so I’m clear on their motivations, if they don’t actual care about kids’ health, why are they promoting the program?

  19. Doug Paul Davis

    I’ve been to the HS a number of times in the last year and as far as I can tell they don’t sell junk food. The vending machines only have milk and juice for instance, not soda.

    “the school board should stop insulting my intelligence by pretending to care about kids health”

    Let me just ask you so I’m clear on their motivations, if they don’t actual care about kids’ health, why are they promoting the program?

  20. Doug Paul Davis

    I’ve been to the HS a number of times in the last year and as far as I can tell they don’t sell junk food. The vending machines only have milk and juice for instance, not soda.

    “the school board should stop insulting my intelligence by pretending to care about kids health”

    Let me just ask you so I’m clear on their motivations, if they don’t actual care about kids’ health, why are they promoting the program?

  21. against measure Wrong

    We serve our kids junk in schools, i.e. Pizza day, then we have to fix the obesity problem you created with pizza day by forcing the taxpayer to pay for a crunch lunch program to undo the damage you just did.

  22. against measure Wrong

    We serve our kids junk in schools, i.e. Pizza day, then we have to fix the obesity problem you created with pizza day by forcing the taxpayer to pay for a crunch lunch program to undo the damage you just did.

  23. against measure Wrong

    We serve our kids junk in schools, i.e. Pizza day, then we have to fix the obesity problem you created with pizza day by forcing the taxpayer to pay for a crunch lunch program to undo the damage you just did.

  24. against measure Wrong

    We serve our kids junk in schools, i.e. Pizza day, then we have to fix the obesity problem you created with pizza day by forcing the taxpayer to pay for a crunch lunch program to undo the damage you just did.

  25. Dollar signs

    Let me just ask you so I’m clear on their motivations, if they don’t actual care about kids’ health, why are they promoting the program?

    because they see dollar signs.

  26. Dollar signs

    Let me just ask you so I’m clear on their motivations, if they don’t actual care about kids’ health, why are they promoting the program?

    because they see dollar signs.

  27. Dollar signs

    Let me just ask you so I’m clear on their motivations, if they don’t actual care about kids’ health, why are they promoting the program?

    because they see dollar signs.

  28. Dollar signs

    Let me just ask you so I’m clear on their motivations, if they don’t actual care about kids’ health, why are they promoting the program?

    because they see dollar signs.

  29. adjust your eyes.

    I’ve been to the HS a number of times in the last year and as far as I can tell they don’t sell junk food. The vending machines only have milk and juice for instance, not soda.

    then adjust your eyes. I saw chips and cookies.

  30. adjust your eyes.

    I’ve been to the HS a number of times in the last year and as far as I can tell they don’t sell junk food. The vending machines only have milk and juice for instance, not soda.

    then adjust your eyes. I saw chips and cookies.

  31. adjust your eyes.

    I’ve been to the HS a number of times in the last year and as far as I can tell they don’t sell junk food. The vending machines only have milk and juice for instance, not soda.

    then adjust your eyes. I saw chips and cookies.

  32. adjust your eyes.

    I’ve been to the HS a number of times in the last year and as far as I can tell they don’t sell junk food. The vending machines only have milk and juice for instance, not soda.

    then adjust your eyes. I saw chips and cookies.

  33. Glad you asked

    “then adjust your eyes. I saw chips and cookies.”

    Really, when and where?

    Glad you asked. At DSHS I saw them both in the vending machine inside the MPR. Also, go visit the snack bar outside the MPR. See what you find.

  34. Glad you asked

    “then adjust your eyes. I saw chips and cookies.”

    Really, when and where?

    Glad you asked. At DSHS I saw them both in the vending machine inside the MPR. Also, go visit the snack bar outside the MPR. See what you find.

  35. Glad you asked

    “then adjust your eyes. I saw chips and cookies.”

    Really, when and where?

    Glad you asked. At DSHS I saw them both in the vending machine inside the MPR. Also, go visit the snack bar outside the MPR. See what you find.

  36. Glad you asked

    “then adjust your eyes. I saw chips and cookies.”

    Really, when and where?

    Glad you asked. At DSHS I saw them both in the vending machine inside the MPR. Also, go visit the snack bar outside the MPR. See what you find.

  37. different view

    but DSHS , emerson and other schools have been selling junk as far back as I can remember. Maybe if they sold off their junk to fund nutrition, they wouldn’t need taxpayer dollars.

    Suddenly nutrition is important to them? Give me a break!!

    It has been such a long time since I remember vending machines at Emerson that I had to look it up.

    Up until 2003 for the worst offenders — soft drinks, donuts, etc. — in the Davis schools. I recommend searching on “vending machines” and “school” at the Infoweb site. This is a free service to those with a Yolo County Library card.

    You have to click on “California Newspapers” and “Davis Enterprise” before doing your search.

    You will also find very familiar language from a familiar character on the Vanguard blog if you check out a July 29, 2007 letter to the editor on the same topic through that same search.

    Maybe five years isn’t long enough to prove commitment to something for some people, but I would say that we’re making some progress to get school lunches to where they need to be.

    I hope further improvements to school nutrition will not be met with the same standard disparagements. It seems like a “damned of you do/damned if you don’t” world.

  38. different view

    but DSHS , emerson and other schools have been selling junk as far back as I can remember. Maybe if they sold off their junk to fund nutrition, they wouldn’t need taxpayer dollars.

    Suddenly nutrition is important to them? Give me a break!!

    It has been such a long time since I remember vending machines at Emerson that I had to look it up.

    Up until 2003 for the worst offenders — soft drinks, donuts, etc. — in the Davis schools. I recommend searching on “vending machines” and “school” at the Infoweb site. This is a free service to those with a Yolo County Library card.

    You have to click on “California Newspapers” and “Davis Enterprise” before doing your search.

    You will also find very familiar language from a familiar character on the Vanguard blog if you check out a July 29, 2007 letter to the editor on the same topic through that same search.

    Maybe five years isn’t long enough to prove commitment to something for some people, but I would say that we’re making some progress to get school lunches to where they need to be.

    I hope further improvements to school nutrition will not be met with the same standard disparagements. It seems like a “damned of you do/damned if you don’t” world.

  39. different view

    but DSHS , emerson and other schools have been selling junk as far back as I can remember. Maybe if they sold off their junk to fund nutrition, they wouldn’t need taxpayer dollars.

    Suddenly nutrition is important to them? Give me a break!!

    It has been such a long time since I remember vending machines at Emerson that I had to look it up.

    Up until 2003 for the worst offenders — soft drinks, donuts, etc. — in the Davis schools. I recommend searching on “vending machines” and “school” at the Infoweb site. This is a free service to those with a Yolo County Library card.

    You have to click on “California Newspapers” and “Davis Enterprise” before doing your search.

    You will also find very familiar language from a familiar character on the Vanguard blog if you check out a July 29, 2007 letter to the editor on the same topic through that same search.

    Maybe five years isn’t long enough to prove commitment to something for some people, but I would say that we’re making some progress to get school lunches to where they need to be.

    I hope further improvements to school nutrition will not be met with the same standard disparagements. It seems like a “damned of you do/damned if you don’t” world.

  40. different view

    but DSHS , emerson and other schools have been selling junk as far back as I can remember. Maybe if they sold off their junk to fund nutrition, they wouldn’t need taxpayer dollars.

    Suddenly nutrition is important to them? Give me a break!!

    It has been such a long time since I remember vending machines at Emerson that I had to look it up.

    Up until 2003 for the worst offenders — soft drinks, donuts, etc. — in the Davis schools. I recommend searching on “vending machines” and “school” at the Infoweb site. This is a free service to those with a Yolo County Library card.

    You have to click on “California Newspapers” and “Davis Enterprise” before doing your search.

    You will also find very familiar language from a familiar character on the Vanguard blog if you check out a July 29, 2007 letter to the editor on the same topic through that same search.

    Maybe five years isn’t long enough to prove commitment to something for some people, but I would say that we’re making some progress to get school lunches to where they need to be.

    I hope further improvements to school nutrition will not be met with the same standard disparagements. It seems like a “damned of you do/damned if you don’t” world.

  41. nutrition matters

    “Suddenly nutrition is important to them? Give me a break!!”

    So you have a problem with offering salad now, because in the past the District’s food offerings were not all that they might be?

    Gee, that makes a lot of sense.

  42. nutrition matters

    “Suddenly nutrition is important to them? Give me a break!!”

    So you have a problem with offering salad now, because in the past the District’s food offerings were not all that they might be?

    Gee, that makes a lot of sense.

  43. nutrition matters

    “Suddenly nutrition is important to them? Give me a break!!”

    So you have a problem with offering salad now, because in the past the District’s food offerings were not all that they might be?

    Gee, that makes a lot of sense.

  44. nutrition matters

    “Suddenly nutrition is important to them? Give me a break!!”

    So you have a problem with offering salad now, because in the past the District’s food offerings were not all that they might be?

    Gee, that makes a lot of sense.

  45. Bob

    “For many children in the public schools, breakfast (if it is served) and lunch are the only nutritionally balanced meals they receive during the day.”

    What is the role of parents? Why are people who cannot even feed children properly squeezing out and raising kids? It’s no wonder we have crowded prisons.

    It’s not the children’s fault that they got stuck with stupid parents, so I am all for the schools and government making sure these children get a proper diet. That said, I think the nutritional education program ought to be geared at the parents. If they expect taxpayers to feed their children, then they ought to at least have to attend nutrition classes and (unless they are disabled) do some unpaid labor to pay society back.

  46. Bob

    “For many children in the public schools, breakfast (if it is served) and lunch are the only nutritionally balanced meals they receive during the day.”

    What is the role of parents? Why are people who cannot even feed children properly squeezing out and raising kids? It’s no wonder we have crowded prisons.

    It’s not the children’s fault that they got stuck with stupid parents, so I am all for the schools and government making sure these children get a proper diet. That said, I think the nutritional education program ought to be geared at the parents. If they expect taxpayers to feed their children, then they ought to at least have to attend nutrition classes and (unless they are disabled) do some unpaid labor to pay society back.

  47. Bob

    “For many children in the public schools, breakfast (if it is served) and lunch are the only nutritionally balanced meals they receive during the day.”

    What is the role of parents? Why are people who cannot even feed children properly squeezing out and raising kids? It’s no wonder we have crowded prisons.

    It’s not the children’s fault that they got stuck with stupid parents, so I am all for the schools and government making sure these children get a proper diet. That said, I think the nutritional education program ought to be geared at the parents. If they expect taxpayers to feed their children, then they ought to at least have to attend nutrition classes and (unless they are disabled) do some unpaid labor to pay society back.

  48. Bob

    “For many children in the public schools, breakfast (if it is served) and lunch are the only nutritionally balanced meals they receive during the day.”

    What is the role of parents? Why are people who cannot even feed children properly squeezing out and raising kids? It’s no wonder we have crowded prisons.

    It’s not the children’s fault that they got stuck with stupid parents, so I am all for the schools and government making sure these children get a proper diet. That said, I think the nutritional education program ought to be geared at the parents. If they expect taxpayers to feed their children, then they ought to at least have to attend nutrition classes and (unless they are disabled) do some unpaid labor to pay society back.

  49. Doug Paul Davis

    Good point nutrition matters… I think this ties in with today’s other story about the extra duty police program. Do you not want the city to clean up their finances when they discover a problem? By the same token, do we not want the school district to improve the nutrition and taste of the food they provide the children? I just don’t get it. I don’t.

    And as somebody pointed out this has nothing to do with Measure W. The money that was allocated by Measure Q to augment nutrition is locked into place. The school board has no say over how that money is spent. It is general fund money that acts as though it were categorical or restricted. The rest of the nutrition budget is not even general fund money, it is money that can only be spent on lunches. There is no discretion here except for how best to spend that money and produce the best possible food and nutrition for our students.

  50. Doug Paul Davis

    Good point nutrition matters… I think this ties in with today’s other story about the extra duty police program. Do you not want the city to clean up their finances when they discover a problem? By the same token, do we not want the school district to improve the nutrition and taste of the food they provide the children? I just don’t get it. I don’t.

    And as somebody pointed out this has nothing to do with Measure W. The money that was allocated by Measure Q to augment nutrition is locked into place. The school board has no say over how that money is spent. It is general fund money that acts as though it were categorical or restricted. The rest of the nutrition budget is not even general fund money, it is money that can only be spent on lunches. There is no discretion here except for how best to spend that money and produce the best possible food and nutrition for our students.

  51. Doug Paul Davis

    Good point nutrition matters… I think this ties in with today’s other story about the extra duty police program. Do you not want the city to clean up their finances when they discover a problem? By the same token, do we not want the school district to improve the nutrition and taste of the food they provide the children? I just don’t get it. I don’t.

    And as somebody pointed out this has nothing to do with Measure W. The money that was allocated by Measure Q to augment nutrition is locked into place. The school board has no say over how that money is spent. It is general fund money that acts as though it were categorical or restricted. The rest of the nutrition budget is not even general fund money, it is money that can only be spent on lunches. There is no discretion here except for how best to spend that money and produce the best possible food and nutrition for our students.

  52. Doug Paul Davis

    Good point nutrition matters… I think this ties in with today’s other story about the extra duty police program. Do you not want the city to clean up their finances when they discover a problem? By the same token, do we not want the school district to improve the nutrition and taste of the food they provide the children? I just don’t get it. I don’t.

    And as somebody pointed out this has nothing to do with Measure W. The money that was allocated by Measure Q to augment nutrition is locked into place. The school board has no say over how that money is spent. It is general fund money that acts as though it were categorical or restricted. The rest of the nutrition budget is not even general fund money, it is money that can only be spent on lunches. There is no discretion here except for how best to spend that money and produce the best possible food and nutrition for our students.

  53. barbara

    My kids always have taken a home-made lunch to school so that WE can remain “financially solvent”. Now I find out that part of my school bond money is paying to feed other peoples’ kids. That’s a social welfare program, not an educational program, in my opinion.

    There are many more things the school district could implement to help students be more successful in school. Why not enforce a standard bedtime for all students? Better yet, just have the kids sleep in the MPRs. And what about those pesky televisions and video games? We could really do a lot more to help our kids succeed in school than we do and all it takes is a little more money!

    Seriously though, it’s just the fact that the crunch lunch cannot be 100% paid for by the participants that bugs me. I really do pack my kids’ lunches to save money!

  54. barbara

    My kids always have taken a home-made lunch to school so that WE can remain “financially solvent”. Now I find out that part of my school bond money is paying to feed other peoples’ kids. That’s a social welfare program, not an educational program, in my opinion.

    There are many more things the school district could implement to help students be more successful in school. Why not enforce a standard bedtime for all students? Better yet, just have the kids sleep in the MPRs. And what about those pesky televisions and video games? We could really do a lot more to help our kids succeed in school than we do and all it takes is a little more money!

    Seriously though, it’s just the fact that the crunch lunch cannot be 100% paid for by the participants that bugs me. I really do pack my kids’ lunches to save money!

  55. barbara

    My kids always have taken a home-made lunch to school so that WE can remain “financially solvent”. Now I find out that part of my school bond money is paying to feed other peoples’ kids. That’s a social welfare program, not an educational program, in my opinion.

    There are many more things the school district could implement to help students be more successful in school. Why not enforce a standard bedtime for all students? Better yet, just have the kids sleep in the MPRs. And what about those pesky televisions and video games? We could really do a lot more to help our kids succeed in school than we do and all it takes is a little more money!

    Seriously though, it’s just the fact that the crunch lunch cannot be 100% paid for by the participants that bugs me. I really do pack my kids’ lunches to save money!

  56. barbara

    My kids always have taken a home-made lunch to school so that WE can remain “financially solvent”. Now I find out that part of my school bond money is paying to feed other peoples’ kids. That’s a social welfare program, not an educational program, in my opinion.

    There are many more things the school district could implement to help students be more successful in school. Why not enforce a standard bedtime for all students? Better yet, just have the kids sleep in the MPRs. And what about those pesky televisions and video games? We could really do a lot more to help our kids succeed in school than we do and all it takes is a little more money!

    Seriously though, it’s just the fact that the crunch lunch cannot be 100% paid for by the participants that bugs me. I really do pack my kids’ lunches to save money!

  57. Doug Paul Davis

    “Now I find out that part of my school bond money is paying to feed other peoples’ kids. That’s a social welfare program, not an educational program, in my opinion.”

    Just so you know Barbara, that’s actually not true. The portion of the funding that goes to low income children comes from state sources not local ones. Those are restricted monies that go only for those programs and are mandated by law.

  58. Doug Paul Davis

    “Now I find out that part of my school bond money is paying to feed other peoples’ kids. That’s a social welfare program, not an educational program, in my opinion.”

    Just so you know Barbara, that’s actually not true. The portion of the funding that goes to low income children comes from state sources not local ones. Those are restricted monies that go only for those programs and are mandated by law.

  59. Doug Paul Davis

    “Now I find out that part of my school bond money is paying to feed other peoples’ kids. That’s a social welfare program, not an educational program, in my opinion.”

    Just so you know Barbara, that’s actually not true. The portion of the funding that goes to low income children comes from state sources not local ones. Those are restricted monies that go only for those programs and are mandated by law.

  60. Doug Paul Davis

    “Now I find out that part of my school bond money is paying to feed other peoples’ kids. That’s a social welfare program, not an educational program, in my opinion.”

    Just so you know Barbara, that’s actually not true. The portion of the funding that goes to low income children comes from state sources not local ones. Those are restricted monies that go only for those programs and are mandated by law.

  61. Anonymous

    The district is required to offer a lunch program by law. But state/federal money only partially covers the cost. So the district usually loses money on the cafeteria program.

    So the district could do nothing and continue losing money, or they could risk putting unrestricted money in to see if the improvements attract more customers. In a year like this, I’m sure critics would be quick to criticize the district for taking unrestricted money for that when teachers’ jobs are threatened.

    The district is doing the best it can with the situation. If you want to criticize a school or school district, the cafeteria food program always offers a juicy target in one way or another.

    The “crunch lunch” program is a minor part of Measure Q. As it is, it appears to help the district to break even so that money can be available for other things that might actually be important to you.

    I pack my kids’ lunches, too, to save money. Once in awhile I let them have money to eat at school. This program gives me some peace of mind that there are some healthy choices available.

  62. Anonymous

    The district is required to offer a lunch program by law. But state/federal money only partially covers the cost. So the district usually loses money on the cafeteria program.

    So the district could do nothing and continue losing money, or they could risk putting unrestricted money in to see if the improvements attract more customers. In a year like this, I’m sure critics would be quick to criticize the district for taking unrestricted money for that when teachers’ jobs are threatened.

    The district is doing the best it can with the situation. If you want to criticize a school or school district, the cafeteria food program always offers a juicy target in one way or another.

    The “crunch lunch” program is a minor part of Measure Q. As it is, it appears to help the district to break even so that money can be available for other things that might actually be important to you.

    I pack my kids’ lunches, too, to save money. Once in awhile I let them have money to eat at school. This program gives me some peace of mind that there are some healthy choices available.

  63. Anonymous

    The district is required to offer a lunch program by law. But state/federal money only partially covers the cost. So the district usually loses money on the cafeteria program.

    So the district could do nothing and continue losing money, or they could risk putting unrestricted money in to see if the improvements attract more customers. In a year like this, I’m sure critics would be quick to criticize the district for taking unrestricted money for that when teachers’ jobs are threatened.

    The district is doing the best it can with the situation. If you want to criticize a school or school district, the cafeteria food program always offers a juicy target in one way or another.

    The “crunch lunch” program is a minor part of Measure Q. As it is, it appears to help the district to break even so that money can be available for other things that might actually be important to you.

    I pack my kids’ lunches, too, to save money. Once in awhile I let them have money to eat at school. This program gives me some peace of mind that there are some healthy choices available.

  64. Anonymous

    The district is required to offer a lunch program by law. But state/federal money only partially covers the cost. So the district usually loses money on the cafeteria program.

    So the district could do nothing and continue losing money, or they could risk putting unrestricted money in to see if the improvements attract more customers. In a year like this, I’m sure critics would be quick to criticize the district for taking unrestricted money for that when teachers’ jobs are threatened.

    The district is doing the best it can with the situation. If you want to criticize a school or school district, the cafeteria food program always offers a juicy target in one way or another.

    The “crunch lunch” program is a minor part of Measure Q. As it is, it appears to help the district to break even so that money can be available for other things that might actually be important to you.

    I pack my kids’ lunches, too, to save money. Once in awhile I let them have money to eat at school. This program gives me some peace of mind that there are some healthy choices available.

  65. Anonymous

    Hey DPD , nothing like spouting off and adding to the frustration level by spreading falsehoods as fast as you can type . Yes , your the responsible one , take a look at yourself and the image you project.

  66. Anonymous

    Hey DPD , nothing like spouting off and adding to the frustration level by spreading falsehoods as fast as you can type . Yes , your the responsible one , take a look at yourself and the image you project.

  67. Anonymous

    Hey DPD , nothing like spouting off and adding to the frustration level by spreading falsehoods as fast as you can type . Yes , your the responsible one , take a look at yourself and the image you project.

  68. Anonymous

    Hey DPD , nothing like spouting off and adding to the frustration level by spreading falsehoods as fast as you can type . Yes , your the responsible one , take a look at yourself and the image you project.

  69. Anonymous

    “Hey DPD , nothing like spouting off and adding to the frustration level by spreading falsehoods as fast as you can type . Yes , your the responsible one , take a look at yourself and the image you project.”

    This adds nothing useful to the discussion.

    This is the grown-up equivalent of saying, “liar, liar, pants on fire.”

  70. Anonymous

    “Hey DPD , nothing like spouting off and adding to the frustration level by spreading falsehoods as fast as you can type . Yes , your the responsible one , take a look at yourself and the image you project.”

    This adds nothing useful to the discussion.

    This is the grown-up equivalent of saying, “liar, liar, pants on fire.”

  71. Anonymous

    “Hey DPD , nothing like spouting off and adding to the frustration level by spreading falsehoods as fast as you can type . Yes , your the responsible one , take a look at yourself and the image you project.”

    This adds nothing useful to the discussion.

    This is the grown-up equivalent of saying, “liar, liar, pants on fire.”

  72. Anonymous

    “Hey DPD , nothing like spouting off and adding to the frustration level by spreading falsehoods as fast as you can type . Yes , your the responsible one , take a look at yourself and the image you project.”

    This adds nothing useful to the discussion.

    This is the grown-up equivalent of saying, “liar, liar, pants on fire.”

  73. Doug Paul Davis

    If I’m wrong about something it would be interesting to know where I’m wrong, I spent a good deal of time tracking down information on this topic and learning about the budget process. I wish people could articulate their opinions and back them up with some sort of evidence.

  74. Doug Paul Davis

    If I’m wrong about something it would be interesting to know where I’m wrong, I spent a good deal of time tracking down information on this topic and learning about the budget process. I wish people could articulate their opinions and back them up with some sort of evidence.

  75. Doug Paul Davis

    If I’m wrong about something it would be interesting to know where I’m wrong, I spent a good deal of time tracking down information on this topic and learning about the budget process. I wish people could articulate their opinions and back them up with some sort of evidence.

  76. Doug Paul Davis

    If I’m wrong about something it would be interesting to know where I’m wrong, I spent a good deal of time tracking down information on this topic and learning about the budget process. I wish people could articulate their opinions and back them up with some sort of evidence.

  77. Old Skool Davis

    I tip my hat to Barbara. I admire her courage and tenacity. People like her make this country great.

    I have no objection to the proper feeding of children. What I object to is the structure being built in Davis to facilitate this.

    These structures have names: like “New Harmony”, etc., etc.
    You see, this is the Davis way of artificially creating some growth numbers that will protect the real big time property owners.

    This is also the Davis vehicle to keep some antiquated school programs and teachers afloat.

    Since Davis will make no sincere attempt to accommodate the middle class, they instead choose to prop up a corrupt real estate market.

    These are some really stupid growth moves the city is perpetuating. Here it comes! Are you insular Davisites ready? Stand ready to embrace your greedy creation: Major social ills.

    For the uninitiated let me elaborate: child abuse, teen pregnancy, substance abuse, vandalism, theft, truancy, physical assaults, severe learning disabilities etc.

    So, with the new Davis growth plan the school system issues will be resolved in about another 3 years.

    Thats going to be about the amount of time that the affluent self important Davis families need to flee, and I mean flee! To schools of private education!!

  78. Old Skool Davis

    I tip my hat to Barbara. I admire her courage and tenacity. People like her make this country great.

    I have no objection to the proper feeding of children. What I object to is the structure being built in Davis to facilitate this.

    These structures have names: like “New Harmony”, etc., etc.
    You see, this is the Davis way of artificially creating some growth numbers that will protect the real big time property owners.

    This is also the Davis vehicle to keep some antiquated school programs and teachers afloat.

    Since Davis will make no sincere attempt to accommodate the middle class, they instead choose to prop up a corrupt real estate market.

    These are some really stupid growth moves the city is perpetuating. Here it comes! Are you insular Davisites ready? Stand ready to embrace your greedy creation: Major social ills.

    For the uninitiated let me elaborate: child abuse, teen pregnancy, substance abuse, vandalism, theft, truancy, physical assaults, severe learning disabilities etc.

    So, with the new Davis growth plan the school system issues will be resolved in about another 3 years.

    Thats going to be about the amount of time that the affluent self important Davis families need to flee, and I mean flee! To schools of private education!!

  79. Old Skool Davis

    I tip my hat to Barbara. I admire her courage and tenacity. People like her make this country great.

    I have no objection to the proper feeding of children. What I object to is the structure being built in Davis to facilitate this.

    These structures have names: like “New Harmony”, etc., etc.
    You see, this is the Davis way of artificially creating some growth numbers that will protect the real big time property owners.

    This is also the Davis vehicle to keep some antiquated school programs and teachers afloat.

    Since Davis will make no sincere attempt to accommodate the middle class, they instead choose to prop up a corrupt real estate market.

    These are some really stupid growth moves the city is perpetuating. Here it comes! Are you insular Davisites ready? Stand ready to embrace your greedy creation: Major social ills.

    For the uninitiated let me elaborate: child abuse, teen pregnancy, substance abuse, vandalism, theft, truancy, physical assaults, severe learning disabilities etc.

    So, with the new Davis growth plan the school system issues will be resolved in about another 3 years.

    Thats going to be about the amount of time that the affluent self important Davis families need to flee, and I mean flee! To schools of private education!!

  80. Old Skool Davis

    I tip my hat to Barbara. I admire her courage and tenacity. People like her make this country great.

    I have no objection to the proper feeding of children. What I object to is the structure being built in Davis to facilitate this.

    These structures have names: like “New Harmony”, etc., etc.
    You see, this is the Davis way of artificially creating some growth numbers that will protect the real big time property owners.

    This is also the Davis vehicle to keep some antiquated school programs and teachers afloat.

    Since Davis will make no sincere attempt to accommodate the middle class, they instead choose to prop up a corrupt real estate market.

    These are some really stupid growth moves the city is perpetuating. Here it comes! Are you insular Davisites ready? Stand ready to embrace your greedy creation: Major social ills.

    For the uninitiated let me elaborate: child abuse, teen pregnancy, substance abuse, vandalism, theft, truancy, physical assaults, severe learning disabilities etc.

    So, with the new Davis growth plan the school system issues will be resolved in about another 3 years.

    Thats going to be about the amount of time that the affluent self important Davis families need to flee, and I mean flee! To schools of private education!!

  81. davis parent

    I don’t usually post stuff, but this last comment from ‘old skool’ above just got me going.

    I don’t recognize those comments in the sentiments of my neighbors. I live in an enclave of duplexes and detached houses, definitely middle class. I definitely don’t see myself as anything above middle class, and I’m probably closer to lower middle class.

    I attended my neighborhood party last Sunday, and Measure W came up in conversation. As best I could tell, everyone around that conversation (maybe 8-10) was enthusiastic about Measure W and the schools.

    I have lived in Davis and in other places long enough to know that Davis has a really good thing with respect to its schools.

    Maybe you can say that this is all about greed of affluent Davisites, but the conversation I heard last weekend reflected the theme that it was a good thing for everyone in Davis, middle class, affluent, low income, whatever. It is hard to think of other communities that are as supportive of the schools.

    I’ve been around long enough to know that you can always find something to criticize about schools, government, or social ills.

    One of my children has a severe learning disability, and it hasn’t been easy for him. But I do know that it would have been more difficult for him in a lot of other districts.

    You can oppose funding of public schools to spite one group or another, but ultimately you do affect everyone, and it is harder to build up something good than it is to tear it down.

  82. davis parent

    I don’t usually post stuff, but this last comment from ‘old skool’ above just got me going.

    I don’t recognize those comments in the sentiments of my neighbors. I live in an enclave of duplexes and detached houses, definitely middle class. I definitely don’t see myself as anything above middle class, and I’m probably closer to lower middle class.

    I attended my neighborhood party last Sunday, and Measure W came up in conversation. As best I could tell, everyone around that conversation (maybe 8-10) was enthusiastic about Measure W and the schools.

    I have lived in Davis and in other places long enough to know that Davis has a really good thing with respect to its schools.

    Maybe you can say that this is all about greed of affluent Davisites, but the conversation I heard last weekend reflected the theme that it was a good thing for everyone in Davis, middle class, affluent, low income, whatever. It is hard to think of other communities that are as supportive of the schools.

    I’ve been around long enough to know that you can always find something to criticize about schools, government, or social ills.

    One of my children has a severe learning disability, and it hasn’t been easy for him. But I do know that it would have been more difficult for him in a lot of other districts.

    You can oppose funding of public schools to spite one group or another, but ultimately you do affect everyone, and it is harder to build up something good than it is to tear it down.

  83. davis parent

    I don’t usually post stuff, but this last comment from ‘old skool’ above just got me going.

    I don’t recognize those comments in the sentiments of my neighbors. I live in an enclave of duplexes and detached houses, definitely middle class. I definitely don’t see myself as anything above middle class, and I’m probably closer to lower middle class.

    I attended my neighborhood party last Sunday, and Measure W came up in conversation. As best I could tell, everyone around that conversation (maybe 8-10) was enthusiastic about Measure W and the schools.

    I have lived in Davis and in other places long enough to know that Davis has a really good thing with respect to its schools.

    Maybe you can say that this is all about greed of affluent Davisites, but the conversation I heard last weekend reflected the theme that it was a good thing for everyone in Davis, middle class, affluent, low income, whatever. It is hard to think of other communities that are as supportive of the schools.

    I’ve been around long enough to know that you can always find something to criticize about schools, government, or social ills.

    One of my children has a severe learning disability, and it hasn’t been easy for him. But I do know that it would have been more difficult for him in a lot of other districts.

    You can oppose funding of public schools to spite one group or another, but ultimately you do affect everyone, and it is harder to build up something good than it is to tear it down.

  84. davis parent

    I don’t usually post stuff, but this last comment from ‘old skool’ above just got me going.

    I don’t recognize those comments in the sentiments of my neighbors. I live in an enclave of duplexes and detached houses, definitely middle class. I definitely don’t see myself as anything above middle class, and I’m probably closer to lower middle class.

    I attended my neighborhood party last Sunday, and Measure W came up in conversation. As best I could tell, everyone around that conversation (maybe 8-10) was enthusiastic about Measure W and the schools.

    I have lived in Davis and in other places long enough to know that Davis has a really good thing with respect to its schools.

    Maybe you can say that this is all about greed of affluent Davisites, but the conversation I heard last weekend reflected the theme that it was a good thing for everyone in Davis, middle class, affluent, low income, whatever. It is hard to think of other communities that are as supportive of the schools.

    I’ve been around long enough to know that you can always find something to criticize about schools, government, or social ills.

    One of my children has a severe learning disability, and it hasn’t been easy for him. But I do know that it would have been more difficult for him in a lot of other districts.

    You can oppose funding of public schools to spite one group or another, but ultimately you do affect everyone, and it is harder to build up something good than it is to tear it down.

  85. Anonymous

    I’m not following all of the cynical and angry postings here. They are generally a big turn off for me.

    Hungry kids are disruptive kids. Improperly fed kids can also be disruptive kids. Parents should be responsible to see that their children are fed properly, but why make the learning environment suffer for all when they don’t. Personally, I think that the district should get rid of “Pizza Day” as this is not good modeling by adults. This may be what kids want, but since when do I let my kids decide what food I put on the table?

    Crunch lunch should be expanded and become the mainstay of our cafeteria meals. Fresh fruit and vegetables are always the more expensive items in my grocery cart, but this doesn’t mean that I don’t buy them.

  86. Anonymous

    I’m not following all of the cynical and angry postings here. They are generally a big turn off for me.

    Hungry kids are disruptive kids. Improperly fed kids can also be disruptive kids. Parents should be responsible to see that their children are fed properly, but why make the learning environment suffer for all when they don’t. Personally, I think that the district should get rid of “Pizza Day” as this is not good modeling by adults. This may be what kids want, but since when do I let my kids decide what food I put on the table?

    Crunch lunch should be expanded and become the mainstay of our cafeteria meals. Fresh fruit and vegetables are always the more expensive items in my grocery cart, but this doesn’t mean that I don’t buy them.

  87. Anonymous

    I’m not following all of the cynical and angry postings here. They are generally a big turn off for me.

    Hungry kids are disruptive kids. Improperly fed kids can also be disruptive kids. Parents should be responsible to see that their children are fed properly, but why make the learning environment suffer for all when they don’t. Personally, I think that the district should get rid of “Pizza Day” as this is not good modeling by adults. This may be what kids want, but since when do I let my kids decide what food I put on the table?

    Crunch lunch should be expanded and become the mainstay of our cafeteria meals. Fresh fruit and vegetables are always the more expensive items in my grocery cart, but this doesn’t mean that I don’t buy them.

  88. Anonymous

    I’m not following all of the cynical and angry postings here. They are generally a big turn off for me.

    Hungry kids are disruptive kids. Improperly fed kids can also be disruptive kids. Parents should be responsible to see that their children are fed properly, but why make the learning environment suffer for all when they don’t. Personally, I think that the district should get rid of “Pizza Day” as this is not good modeling by adults. This may be what kids want, but since when do I let my kids decide what food I put on the table?

    Crunch lunch should be expanded and become the mainstay of our cafeteria meals. Fresh fruit and vegetables are always the more expensive items in my grocery cart, but this doesn’t mean that I don’t buy them.

  89. Doug Paul Davis

    I don’t have a problem if they want to have an ocassional pizza day as a special treat. That’s part of teaching good eating–it’s okay to have pizza once in a while, it’s not okay to have pizza every day. I unfortunately learned this lesson as an adult the hard way.

  90. Doug Paul Davis

    I don’t have a problem if they want to have an ocassional pizza day as a special treat. That’s part of teaching good eating–it’s okay to have pizza once in a while, it’s not okay to have pizza every day. I unfortunately learned this lesson as an adult the hard way.

  91. Doug Paul Davis

    I don’t have a problem if they want to have an ocassional pizza day as a special treat. That’s part of teaching good eating–it’s okay to have pizza once in a while, it’s not okay to have pizza every day. I unfortunately learned this lesson as an adult the hard way.

  92. Doug Paul Davis

    I don’t have a problem if they want to have an ocassional pizza day as a special treat. That’s part of teaching good eating–it’s okay to have pizza once in a while, it’s not okay to have pizza every day. I unfortunately learned this lesson as an adult the hard way.

  93. No Fool

    DPD, was the Davis author who is supposedly teaching school employees how to cook in regard to the Crunch Lunch program, paid anything??? I still have not gotten that question answered. Also, in the Davis Enterprise, it noted an extra staff person was required to man the salad bar. Is this not true, and the Davis Enterprise got that wrong too?

    The Crunch Lunch program is costing us $70,000 a year, according to the Davis Enterprise – not necessarily to improve the nutrition of our children, which I would be all for. It is so our kids can have nutritious food served in salad bar form, as if the cafeterias were a restaurant. Big difference.

    You choose to assume the $70,000 is being spent on fresh fruits and vegetables. But that is not necessarily true. It sounds to me from what I READ that some of the money may be going to serve it up as a salad bar, and for cooking lessons. In hard economic times, this sort of nonsense needs to be curtailed.

    Now if you are going to come back and tell me that I have got it all wrong, then tell it to the Davis Enterprise and the School District. Because one of the biggest problems with the School District, is when they get caught out in waste, they promptly change their story, to “fix” whatever it is that was pointed out as a fault.

    Remember VO? It was closed bc of “declining enrollement”. When the School District proved to be wrong, and the enrollment actually went up, they suddenly cooked up other reasons why VO was closed. Frankly, this has become a credibility issue for me. And the School District/Board has NONE in my book!

  94. No Fool

    DPD, was the Davis author who is supposedly teaching school employees how to cook in regard to the Crunch Lunch program, paid anything??? I still have not gotten that question answered. Also, in the Davis Enterprise, it noted an extra staff person was required to man the salad bar. Is this not true, and the Davis Enterprise got that wrong too?

    The Crunch Lunch program is costing us $70,000 a year, according to the Davis Enterprise – not necessarily to improve the nutrition of our children, which I would be all for. It is so our kids can have nutritious food served in salad bar form, as if the cafeterias were a restaurant. Big difference.

    You choose to assume the $70,000 is being spent on fresh fruits and vegetables. But that is not necessarily true. It sounds to me from what I READ that some of the money may be going to serve it up as a salad bar, and for cooking lessons. In hard economic times, this sort of nonsense needs to be curtailed.

    Now if you are going to come back and tell me that I have got it all wrong, then tell it to the Davis Enterprise and the School District. Because one of the biggest problems with the School District, is when they get caught out in waste, they promptly change their story, to “fix” whatever it is that was pointed out as a fault.

    Remember VO? It was closed bc of “declining enrollement”. When the School District proved to be wrong, and the enrollment actually went up, they suddenly cooked up other reasons why VO was closed. Frankly, this has become a credibility issue for me. And the School District/Board has NONE in my book!

  95. No Fool

    DPD, was the Davis author who is supposedly teaching school employees how to cook in regard to the Crunch Lunch program, paid anything??? I still have not gotten that question answered. Also, in the Davis Enterprise, it noted an extra staff person was required to man the salad bar. Is this not true, and the Davis Enterprise got that wrong too?

    The Crunch Lunch program is costing us $70,000 a year, according to the Davis Enterprise – not necessarily to improve the nutrition of our children, which I would be all for. It is so our kids can have nutritious food served in salad bar form, as if the cafeterias were a restaurant. Big difference.

    You choose to assume the $70,000 is being spent on fresh fruits and vegetables. But that is not necessarily true. It sounds to me from what I READ that some of the money may be going to serve it up as a salad bar, and for cooking lessons. In hard economic times, this sort of nonsense needs to be curtailed.

    Now if you are going to come back and tell me that I have got it all wrong, then tell it to the Davis Enterprise and the School District. Because one of the biggest problems with the School District, is when they get caught out in waste, they promptly change their story, to “fix” whatever it is that was pointed out as a fault.

    Remember VO? It was closed bc of “declining enrollement”. When the School District proved to be wrong, and the enrollment actually went up, they suddenly cooked up other reasons why VO was closed. Frankly, this has become a credibility issue for me. And the School District/Board has NONE in my book!

  96. No Fool

    DPD, was the Davis author who is supposedly teaching school employees how to cook in regard to the Crunch Lunch program, paid anything??? I still have not gotten that question answered. Also, in the Davis Enterprise, it noted an extra staff person was required to man the salad bar. Is this not true, and the Davis Enterprise got that wrong too?

    The Crunch Lunch program is costing us $70,000 a year, according to the Davis Enterprise – not necessarily to improve the nutrition of our children, which I would be all for. It is so our kids can have nutritious food served in salad bar form, as if the cafeterias were a restaurant. Big difference.

    You choose to assume the $70,000 is being spent on fresh fruits and vegetables. But that is not necessarily true. It sounds to me from what I READ that some of the money may be going to serve it up as a salad bar, and for cooking lessons. In hard economic times, this sort of nonsense needs to be curtailed.

    Now if you are going to come back and tell me that I have got it all wrong, then tell it to the Davis Enterprise and the School District. Because one of the biggest problems with the School District, is when they get caught out in waste, they promptly change their story, to “fix” whatever it is that was pointed out as a fault.

    Remember VO? It was closed bc of “declining enrollement”. When the School District proved to be wrong, and the enrollment actually went up, they suddenly cooked up other reasons why VO was closed. Frankly, this has become a credibility issue for me. And the School District/Board has NONE in my book!

  97. Doug Paul Davis

    No Fool:

    I don’t have all the answers, but I will try to get at least some of them.

    I saw the figure $90,000 for the crunch lunch program, assuming that you only get 30 students from each elementary school on average per day to buy it, that would be a cost of around $1.50 per student per day for the food when you compute it out over a school year. That seems a low estimate for the number of student buyers based on the numbers I have heard. So I’m not sure I would assume it is buying more than food.

    I was told that there is no additional staff requirement for this program, until someone at the district tells me differently, I will continue to believe that.

    “not necessarily to improve the nutrition of our children, which I would be all for. It is so our kids can have nutritious food served in salad bar form, as if the cafeterias were a restaurant. Big difference.”

    This is where I think critics of this program (a very minor expenditure) have really a faulty understanding of the purpose of the program.

    Kids were not buying the pre-packaged food. The crunch lunch program was popular and a good way to encourage students to buy the food. Does kids no good to provide them nutritional food that they will not eat.

    Moreover, the more the students buy the food, the more it pays for itself. The schools were losing money on the nutritional program previously, now they can break even. That’s a net plus.

    “It was closed bc of “declining enrollement”. When the School District proved to be wrong”

    I was against the closing of Valley Oak, but the district was not proven wrong. They projected over a period of time declining enrollment that would not necessitate keeping a 9th school open, they argued that even at the current rate of attendadence, they could not afford to keep nine elementary schools. A one year increase in enrollment does not prove them wrong, nor does a one-year decrease in temperatures disprove the global warming theory. Now I disagree with their calculations here, I believe that there was an intrinsic benefit to the students regardless of the finances, but that’s not the same as saying the district was wrong in terms of their belief that enrollment will as a whole not be sufficient to support 9 elementary schools.

  98. Doug Paul Davis

    No Fool:

    I don’t have all the answers, but I will try to get at least some of them.

    I saw the figure $90,000 for the crunch lunch program, assuming that you only get 30 students from each elementary school on average per day to buy it, that would be a cost of around $1.50 per student per day for the food when you compute it out over a school year. That seems a low estimate for the number of student buyers based on the numbers I have heard. So I’m not sure I would assume it is buying more than food.

    I was told that there is no additional staff requirement for this program, until someone at the district tells me differently, I will continue to believe that.

    “not necessarily to improve the nutrition of our children, which I would be all for. It is so our kids can have nutritious food served in salad bar form, as if the cafeterias were a restaurant. Big difference.”

    This is where I think critics of this program (a very minor expenditure) have really a faulty understanding of the purpose of the program.

    Kids were not buying the pre-packaged food. The crunch lunch program was popular and a good way to encourage students to buy the food. Does kids no good to provide them nutritional food that they will not eat.

    Moreover, the more the students buy the food, the more it pays for itself. The schools were losing money on the nutritional program previously, now they can break even. That’s a net plus.

    “It was closed bc of “declining enrollement”. When the School District proved to be wrong”

    I was against the closing of Valley Oak, but the district was not proven wrong. They projected over a period of time declining enrollment that would not necessitate keeping a 9th school open, they argued that even at the current rate of attendadence, they could not afford to keep nine elementary schools. A one year increase in enrollment does not prove them wrong, nor does a one-year decrease in temperatures disprove the global warming theory. Now I disagree with their calculations here, I believe that there was an intrinsic benefit to the students regardless of the finances, but that’s not the same as saying the district was wrong in terms of their belief that enrollment will as a whole not be sufficient to support 9 elementary schools.

  99. Doug Paul Davis

    No Fool:

    I don’t have all the answers, but I will try to get at least some of them.

    I saw the figure $90,000 for the crunch lunch program, assuming that you only get 30 students from each elementary school on average per day to buy it, that would be a cost of around $1.50 per student per day for the food when you compute it out over a school year. That seems a low estimate for the number of student buyers based on the numbers I have heard. So I’m not sure I would assume it is buying more than food.

    I was told that there is no additional staff requirement for this program, until someone at the district tells me differently, I will continue to believe that.

    “not necessarily to improve the nutrition of our children, which I would be all for. It is so our kids can have nutritious food served in salad bar form, as if the cafeterias were a restaurant. Big difference.”

    This is where I think critics of this program (a very minor expenditure) have really a faulty understanding of the purpose of the program.

    Kids were not buying the pre-packaged food. The crunch lunch program was popular and a good way to encourage students to buy the food. Does kids no good to provide them nutritional food that they will not eat.

    Moreover, the more the students buy the food, the more it pays for itself. The schools were losing money on the nutritional program previously, now they can break even. That’s a net plus.

    “It was closed bc of “declining enrollement”. When the School District proved to be wrong”

    I was against the closing of Valley Oak, but the district was not proven wrong. They projected over a period of time declining enrollment that would not necessitate keeping a 9th school open, they argued that even at the current rate of attendadence, they could not afford to keep nine elementary schools. A one year increase in enrollment does not prove them wrong, nor does a one-year decrease in temperatures disprove the global warming theory. Now I disagree with their calculations here, I believe that there was an intrinsic benefit to the students regardless of the finances, but that’s not the same as saying the district was wrong in terms of their belief that enrollment will as a whole not be sufficient to support 9 elementary schools.

  100. Doug Paul Davis

    No Fool:

    I don’t have all the answers, but I will try to get at least some of them.

    I saw the figure $90,000 for the crunch lunch program, assuming that you only get 30 students from each elementary school on average per day to buy it, that would be a cost of around $1.50 per student per day for the food when you compute it out over a school year. That seems a low estimate for the number of student buyers based on the numbers I have heard. So I’m not sure I would assume it is buying more than food.

    I was told that there is no additional staff requirement for this program, until someone at the district tells me differently, I will continue to believe that.

    “not necessarily to improve the nutrition of our children, which I would be all for. It is so our kids can have nutritious food served in salad bar form, as if the cafeterias were a restaurant. Big difference.”

    This is where I think critics of this program (a very minor expenditure) have really a faulty understanding of the purpose of the program.

    Kids were not buying the pre-packaged food. The crunch lunch program was popular and a good way to encourage students to buy the food. Does kids no good to provide them nutritional food that they will not eat.

    Moreover, the more the students buy the food, the more it pays for itself. The schools were losing money on the nutritional program previously, now they can break even. That’s a net plus.

    “It was closed bc of “declining enrollement”. When the School District proved to be wrong”

    I was against the closing of Valley Oak, but the district was not proven wrong. They projected over a period of time declining enrollment that would not necessitate keeping a 9th school open, they argued that even at the current rate of attendadence, they could not afford to keep nine elementary schools. A one year increase in enrollment does not prove them wrong, nor does a one-year decrease in temperatures disprove the global warming theory. Now I disagree with their calculations here, I believe that there was an intrinsic benefit to the students regardless of the finances, but that’s not the same as saying the district was wrong in terms of their belief that enrollment will as a whole not be sufficient to support 9 elementary schools.

  101. Gas Hog

    was against the closing of Valley Oak, but the district was not proven wrong. They projected over a period of time declining enrollment that would not necessitate keeping a 9th school open, they argued that even at the current rate of attendadence, they could not afford to keep nine elementary schools. A one year increase in enrollment does not prove them wrong, nor does a one-year decrease in temperatures disprove the global warming theory. Now I disagree with their calculations here, I believe that there was an intrinsic benefit to the students regardless of the finances, but that’s not the same as saying the district was wrong in terms of their belief that enrollment will as a whole not be sufficient to support 9 elementary schools.

    Global Warming: There was a decrease in avg. earth’s temperatures from 1940-1970. The history of fossil fuel use dates back only less than a century. That is far beyond a 2 or three percent margin of error. So it is not “one year” out of a hundred.

    Valley Oak: You say you were against Valley Oak’s closing, but then you are full of excuses for the board making the wrong decision.

  102. Gas Hog

    was against the closing of Valley Oak, but the district was not proven wrong. They projected over a period of time declining enrollment that would not necessitate keeping a 9th school open, they argued that even at the current rate of attendadence, they could not afford to keep nine elementary schools. A one year increase in enrollment does not prove them wrong, nor does a one-year decrease in temperatures disprove the global warming theory. Now I disagree with their calculations here, I believe that there was an intrinsic benefit to the students regardless of the finances, but that’s not the same as saying the district was wrong in terms of their belief that enrollment will as a whole not be sufficient to support 9 elementary schools.

    Global Warming: There was a decrease in avg. earth’s temperatures from 1940-1970. The history of fossil fuel use dates back only less than a century. That is far beyond a 2 or three percent margin of error. So it is not “one year” out of a hundred.

    Valley Oak: You say you were against Valley Oak’s closing, but then you are full of excuses for the board making the wrong decision.

  103. Gas Hog

    was against the closing of Valley Oak, but the district was not proven wrong. They projected over a period of time declining enrollment that would not necessitate keeping a 9th school open, they argued that even at the current rate of attendadence, they could not afford to keep nine elementary schools. A one year increase in enrollment does not prove them wrong, nor does a one-year decrease in temperatures disprove the global warming theory. Now I disagree with their calculations here, I believe that there was an intrinsic benefit to the students regardless of the finances, but that’s not the same as saying the district was wrong in terms of their belief that enrollment will as a whole not be sufficient to support 9 elementary schools.

    Global Warming: There was a decrease in avg. earth’s temperatures from 1940-1970. The history of fossil fuel use dates back only less than a century. That is far beyond a 2 or three percent margin of error. So it is not “one year” out of a hundred.

    Valley Oak: You say you were against Valley Oak’s closing, but then you are full of excuses for the board making the wrong decision.

  104. Gas Hog

    was against the closing of Valley Oak, but the district was not proven wrong. They projected over a period of time declining enrollment that would not necessitate keeping a 9th school open, they argued that even at the current rate of attendadence, they could not afford to keep nine elementary schools. A one year increase in enrollment does not prove them wrong, nor does a one-year decrease in temperatures disprove the global warming theory. Now I disagree with their calculations here, I believe that there was an intrinsic benefit to the students regardless of the finances, but that’s not the same as saying the district was wrong in terms of their belief that enrollment will as a whole not be sufficient to support 9 elementary schools.

    Global Warming: There was a decrease in avg. earth’s temperatures from 1940-1970. The history of fossil fuel use dates back only less than a century. That is far beyond a 2 or three percent margin of error. So it is not “one year” out of a hundred.

    Valley Oak: You say you were against Valley Oak’s closing, but then you are full of excuses for the board making the wrong decision.

  105. Doug Paul Davis

    No excuses for them, I could lay out my rationale here, but imo, there is no excuse for using faulty and illogical and plain wrong arguments against the decision. The board was not proven wrong on the issue of declining enrollment, because they never argued that the enrollment for 08-09 was their rationale.

    What I think they were wrong on is that they used fiscal reasoning as a rationale for closing a school that in my view provided a unique educational opportunity for the most vulnerable students in this district. I would have eaten those cost savings and worked to enhance revenue in other ways that Davis OPEN and later the Charter Folks suggested.

    I wrote 72 articles on Valley Oak, I believe you will be hard pressed to find any that provide a rationale for the district to close the program.

    Frankly, I am consistent on this point–I believe we need to provide the best possible education and find the money for it. I supported that for Valley Oak. I support that with Measure W. If you supported Valley Oak, you should support Measure W, the first people that get hurt when we have to cut money are the most vulnerable kids.

  106. Doug Paul Davis

    No excuses for them, I could lay out my rationale here, but imo, there is no excuse for using faulty and illogical and plain wrong arguments against the decision. The board was not proven wrong on the issue of declining enrollment, because they never argued that the enrollment for 08-09 was their rationale.

    What I think they were wrong on is that they used fiscal reasoning as a rationale for closing a school that in my view provided a unique educational opportunity for the most vulnerable students in this district. I would have eaten those cost savings and worked to enhance revenue in other ways that Davis OPEN and later the Charter Folks suggested.

    I wrote 72 articles on Valley Oak, I believe you will be hard pressed to find any that provide a rationale for the district to close the program.

    Frankly, I am consistent on this point–I believe we need to provide the best possible education and find the money for it. I supported that for Valley Oak. I support that with Measure W. If you supported Valley Oak, you should support Measure W, the first people that get hurt when we have to cut money are the most vulnerable kids.

  107. Doug Paul Davis

    No excuses for them, I could lay out my rationale here, but imo, there is no excuse for using faulty and illogical and plain wrong arguments against the decision. The board was not proven wrong on the issue of declining enrollment, because they never argued that the enrollment for 08-09 was their rationale.

    What I think they were wrong on is that they used fiscal reasoning as a rationale for closing a school that in my view provided a unique educational opportunity for the most vulnerable students in this district. I would have eaten those cost savings and worked to enhance revenue in other ways that Davis OPEN and later the Charter Folks suggested.

    I wrote 72 articles on Valley Oak, I believe you will be hard pressed to find any that provide a rationale for the district to close the program.

    Frankly, I am consistent on this point–I believe we need to provide the best possible education and find the money for it. I supported that for Valley Oak. I support that with Measure W. If you supported Valley Oak, you should support Measure W, the first people that get hurt when we have to cut money are the most vulnerable kids.

  108. Doug Paul Davis

    No excuses for them, I could lay out my rationale here, but imo, there is no excuse for using faulty and illogical and plain wrong arguments against the decision. The board was not proven wrong on the issue of declining enrollment, because they never argued that the enrollment for 08-09 was their rationale.

    What I think they were wrong on is that they used fiscal reasoning as a rationale for closing a school that in my view provided a unique educational opportunity for the most vulnerable students in this district. I would have eaten those cost savings and worked to enhance revenue in other ways that Davis OPEN and later the Charter Folks suggested.

    I wrote 72 articles on Valley Oak, I believe you will be hard pressed to find any that provide a rationale for the district to close the program.

    Frankly, I am consistent on this point–I believe we need to provide the best possible education and find the money for it. I supported that for Valley Oak. I support that with Measure W. If you supported Valley Oak, you should support Measure W, the first people that get hurt when we have to cut money are the most vulnerable kids.

  109. Just wondering

    No Fool:

    Just wondering, here.

    If things are so awful in Davis, what is it that keeps you here?

    What good do you see in Davis?

    Are you capable of compliments and positive statements?

    Or are you a bitter, angry, negative person by nature?

  110. Just wondering

    No Fool:

    Just wondering, here.

    If things are so awful in Davis, what is it that keeps you here?

    What good do you see in Davis?

    Are you capable of compliments and positive statements?

    Or are you a bitter, angry, negative person by nature?

  111. Just wondering

    No Fool:

    Just wondering, here.

    If things are so awful in Davis, what is it that keeps you here?

    What good do you see in Davis?

    Are you capable of compliments and positive statements?

    Or are you a bitter, angry, negative person by nature?

  112. Just wondering

    No Fool:

    Just wondering, here.

    If things are so awful in Davis, what is it that keeps you here?

    What good do you see in Davis?

    Are you capable of compliments and positive statements?

    Or are you a bitter, angry, negative person by nature?

  113. Gagging

    “I was against the closing of Valley Oak, but the district was not proven wrong. They projected over a period of time declining enrollment that would not necessitate keeping a 9th school open, they argued that even at the current rate of attendadence, they could not afford to keep nine elementary schools. A one year increase in enrollment does not prove them wrong,…”

    You are rewriting history here. Declining enrollment was the reason the school district gave for closing VO, period. Enrollment actually went up. Now the argument has changed – OOOOOOh, the “fact” of the matter is we built one too many schools and could not afford to keep VO open anyway bc we want to save programs and the children from VO will do just fine in the other schools and ohmygosh I am so happy that my child will be attending the new fully stocked and staffed Karamatsu…

    GAG ME WITH A SPOON!

  114. Gagging

    “I was against the closing of Valley Oak, but the district was not proven wrong. They projected over a period of time declining enrollment that would not necessitate keeping a 9th school open, they argued that even at the current rate of attendadence, they could not afford to keep nine elementary schools. A one year increase in enrollment does not prove them wrong,…”

    You are rewriting history here. Declining enrollment was the reason the school district gave for closing VO, period. Enrollment actually went up. Now the argument has changed – OOOOOOh, the “fact” of the matter is we built one too many schools and could not afford to keep VO open anyway bc we want to save programs and the children from VO will do just fine in the other schools and ohmygosh I am so happy that my child will be attending the new fully stocked and staffed Karamatsu…

    GAG ME WITH A SPOON!

  115. Gagging

    “I was against the closing of Valley Oak, but the district was not proven wrong. They projected over a period of time declining enrollment that would not necessitate keeping a 9th school open, they argued that even at the current rate of attendadence, they could not afford to keep nine elementary schools. A one year increase in enrollment does not prove them wrong,…”

    You are rewriting history here. Declining enrollment was the reason the school district gave for closing VO, period. Enrollment actually went up. Now the argument has changed – OOOOOOh, the “fact” of the matter is we built one too many schools and could not afford to keep VO open anyway bc we want to save programs and the children from VO will do just fine in the other schools and ohmygosh I am so happy that my child will be attending the new fully stocked and staffed Karamatsu…

    GAG ME WITH A SPOON!

  116. Gagging

    “I was against the closing of Valley Oak, but the district was not proven wrong. They projected over a period of time declining enrollment that would not necessitate keeping a 9th school open, they argued that even at the current rate of attendadence, they could not afford to keep nine elementary schools. A one year increase in enrollment does not prove them wrong,…”

    You are rewriting history here. Declining enrollment was the reason the school district gave for closing VO, period. Enrollment actually went up. Now the argument has changed – OOOOOOh, the “fact” of the matter is we built one too many schools and could not afford to keep VO open anyway bc we want to save programs and the children from VO will do just fine in the other schools and ohmygosh I am so happy that my child will be attending the new fully stocked and staffed Karamatsu…

    GAG ME WITH A SPOON!

  117. Just Wondering

    “I was told that there is no additional staff requirement for this program, until someone at the district tells me differently, I will continue to believe that.”

    How come the Enterprise said differently?

  118. Just Wondering

    “I was told that there is no additional staff requirement for this program, until someone at the district tells me differently, I will continue to believe that.”

    How come the Enterprise said differently?

  119. Just Wondering

    “I was told that there is no additional staff requirement for this program, until someone at the district tells me differently, I will continue to believe that.”

    How come the Enterprise said differently?

  120. Just Wondering

    “I was told that there is no additional staff requirement for this program, until someone at the district tells me differently, I will continue to believe that.”

    How come the Enterprise said differently?

  121. Doug Paul Davis

    Gagging: I think you are oversimplifying the arguments put forth by the district.

    Just wondering: You would have to ask them, no? I’ve built this blog, in a sense, disagreeing with the Enterprise.

  122. Doug Paul Davis

    Gagging: I think you are oversimplifying the arguments put forth by the district.

    Just wondering: You would have to ask them, no? I’ve built this blog, in a sense, disagreeing with the Enterprise.

  123. Doug Paul Davis

    Gagging: I think you are oversimplifying the arguments put forth by the district.

    Just wondering: You would have to ask them, no? I’ve built this blog, in a sense, disagreeing with the Enterprise.

  124. Doug Paul Davis

    Gagging: I think you are oversimplifying the arguments put forth by the district.

    Just wondering: You would have to ask them, no? I’ve built this blog, in a sense, disagreeing with the Enterprise.

  125. Not Biting

    “Kids were not buying the pre-packaged food. The crunch lunch program was popular and a good way to encourage students to buy the food. Does kids no good to provide them nutritional food that they will not eat.”

    Yet the school district had no problem dispensing junk food from vending machines!

    Why is providing kids with fresh fruits and vegetables costing us $70,000 per year? I’ll tell you why. Because it is being served up salad bar style. Bet you my bottom dollar kids would eat healthy no matter what if all the choices they had in the cafeteria were healthy.

    Instead, what are they served? Look at the lunch menu sometime. Pizza, chicken nuggets, nacho cheese and chips, corn dogs.

    If kids are offered junk food to eat, and packaged salad with nothing with it like interesting toppings, what do you think will happen? Most people don’t like packaged salad plain.

    Give them cherry tomatoes, carrots or broccoli with dressing and sprinkles, and they eat almost any vegetable whether it is served up salad bar style or not. And for heaven’s sake, why do the cooks in the kitchen need cooking lessons from a local celebrity? What, the cafeteria workers don’t know their jobs?

    I can’t believe you swallow this malarkey from the school district!

  126. Not Biting

    “Kids were not buying the pre-packaged food. The crunch lunch program was popular and a good way to encourage students to buy the food. Does kids no good to provide them nutritional food that they will not eat.”

    Yet the school district had no problem dispensing junk food from vending machines!

    Why is providing kids with fresh fruits and vegetables costing us $70,000 per year? I’ll tell you why. Because it is being served up salad bar style. Bet you my bottom dollar kids would eat healthy no matter what if all the choices they had in the cafeteria were healthy.

    Instead, what are they served? Look at the lunch menu sometime. Pizza, chicken nuggets, nacho cheese and chips, corn dogs.

    If kids are offered junk food to eat, and packaged salad with nothing with it like interesting toppings, what do you think will happen? Most people don’t like packaged salad plain.

    Give them cherry tomatoes, carrots or broccoli with dressing and sprinkles, and they eat almost any vegetable whether it is served up salad bar style or not. And for heaven’s sake, why do the cooks in the kitchen need cooking lessons from a local celebrity? What, the cafeteria workers don’t know their jobs?

    I can’t believe you swallow this malarkey from the school district!

  127. Not Biting

    “Kids were not buying the pre-packaged food. The crunch lunch program was popular and a good way to encourage students to buy the food. Does kids no good to provide them nutritional food that they will not eat.”

    Yet the school district had no problem dispensing junk food from vending machines!

    Why is providing kids with fresh fruits and vegetables costing us $70,000 per year? I’ll tell you why. Because it is being served up salad bar style. Bet you my bottom dollar kids would eat healthy no matter what if all the choices they had in the cafeteria were healthy.

    Instead, what are they served? Look at the lunch menu sometime. Pizza, chicken nuggets, nacho cheese and chips, corn dogs.

    If kids are offered junk food to eat, and packaged salad with nothing with it like interesting toppings, what do you think will happen? Most people don’t like packaged salad plain.

    Give them cherry tomatoes, carrots or broccoli with dressing and sprinkles, and they eat almost any vegetable whether it is served up salad bar style or not. And for heaven’s sake, why do the cooks in the kitchen need cooking lessons from a local celebrity? What, the cafeteria workers don’t know their jobs?

    I can’t believe you swallow this malarkey from the school district!

  128. Not Biting

    “Kids were not buying the pre-packaged food. The crunch lunch program was popular and a good way to encourage students to buy the food. Does kids no good to provide them nutritional food that they will not eat.”

    Yet the school district had no problem dispensing junk food from vending machines!

    Why is providing kids with fresh fruits and vegetables costing us $70,000 per year? I’ll tell you why. Because it is being served up salad bar style. Bet you my bottom dollar kids would eat healthy no matter what if all the choices they had in the cafeteria were healthy.

    Instead, what are they served? Look at the lunch menu sometime. Pizza, chicken nuggets, nacho cheese and chips, corn dogs.

    If kids are offered junk food to eat, and packaged salad with nothing with it like interesting toppings, what do you think will happen? Most people don’t like packaged salad plain.

    Give them cherry tomatoes, carrots or broccoli with dressing and sprinkles, and they eat almost any vegetable whether it is served up salad bar style or not. And for heaven’s sake, why do the cooks in the kitchen need cooking lessons from a local celebrity? What, the cafeteria workers don’t know their jobs?

    I can’t believe you swallow this malarkey from the school district!

  129. Lightbulb

    I’ve got an idea! Why not let local restaurants sell healthy food just outside the campus – like vegetarian pizza, rice bowls, etc? Close the cafeteria, give low income kids chits for money. Save lots of school funding that way! Leave it to Davis schools to institute some pricey way of serving up food like the Crunch Lunch program!

  130. Lightbulb

    I’ve got an idea! Why not let local restaurants sell healthy food just outside the campus – like vegetarian pizza, rice bowls, etc? Close the cafeteria, give low income kids chits for money. Save lots of school funding that way! Leave it to Davis schools to institute some pricey way of serving up food like the Crunch Lunch program!

  131. Lightbulb

    I’ve got an idea! Why not let local restaurants sell healthy food just outside the campus – like vegetarian pizza, rice bowls, etc? Close the cafeteria, give low income kids chits for money. Save lots of school funding that way! Leave it to Davis schools to institute some pricey way of serving up food like the Crunch Lunch program!

  132. Lightbulb

    I’ve got an idea! Why not let local restaurants sell healthy food just outside the campus – like vegetarian pizza, rice bowls, etc? Close the cafeteria, give low income kids chits for money. Save lots of school funding that way! Leave it to Davis schools to institute some pricey way of serving up food like the Crunch Lunch program!

  133. More Accountability

    “the first people that get hurt when we have to cut money are the most vulnerable kids.”

    THE FIRST PEOPLE THAT GET HURT WHEN WE GIVE MORE MONEY TO THE SCHOOL DISTRICT WITHOUT MEANINGFUL ACCOUNTABILITY ARE THE MOST VULNERABLE KIDS. We gave money in the past, and the School Board/District messed things up royally. Tahir Ahad had a ball with taxpayers’ money, lining his own pockets.

    Until we get meaningful accountability, I am not willing to give one thin dime to the school district. Now you can argue that has been done. I don’t agree – not enough had been done to reassure me. It is much like the fed gov’t bailout. Many in Congress were ready to give OPM away with no safeguards, until the public starting phoning in and DEMANDING BETTER.

    I’m DEMANDING BETTER!

  134. More Accountability

    “the first people that get hurt when we have to cut money are the most vulnerable kids.”

    THE FIRST PEOPLE THAT GET HURT WHEN WE GIVE MORE MONEY TO THE SCHOOL DISTRICT WITHOUT MEANINGFUL ACCOUNTABILITY ARE THE MOST VULNERABLE KIDS. We gave money in the past, and the School Board/District messed things up royally. Tahir Ahad had a ball with taxpayers’ money, lining his own pockets.

    Until we get meaningful accountability, I am not willing to give one thin dime to the school district. Now you can argue that has been done. I don’t agree – not enough had been done to reassure me. It is much like the fed gov’t bailout. Many in Congress were ready to give OPM away with no safeguards, until the public starting phoning in and DEMANDING BETTER.

    I’m DEMANDING BETTER!

  135. More Accountability

    “the first people that get hurt when we have to cut money are the most vulnerable kids.”

    THE FIRST PEOPLE THAT GET HURT WHEN WE GIVE MORE MONEY TO THE SCHOOL DISTRICT WITHOUT MEANINGFUL ACCOUNTABILITY ARE THE MOST VULNERABLE KIDS. We gave money in the past, and the School Board/District messed things up royally. Tahir Ahad had a ball with taxpayers’ money, lining his own pockets.

    Until we get meaningful accountability, I am not willing to give one thin dime to the school district. Now you can argue that has been done. I don’t agree – not enough had been done to reassure me. It is much like the fed gov’t bailout. Many in Congress were ready to give OPM away with no safeguards, until the public starting phoning in and DEMANDING BETTER.

    I’m DEMANDING BETTER!

  136. More Accountability

    “the first people that get hurt when we have to cut money are the most vulnerable kids.”

    THE FIRST PEOPLE THAT GET HURT WHEN WE GIVE MORE MONEY TO THE SCHOOL DISTRICT WITHOUT MEANINGFUL ACCOUNTABILITY ARE THE MOST VULNERABLE KIDS. We gave money in the past, and the School Board/District messed things up royally. Tahir Ahad had a ball with taxpayers’ money, lining his own pockets.

    Until we get meaningful accountability, I am not willing to give one thin dime to the school district. Now you can argue that has been done. I don’t agree – not enough had been done to reassure me. It is much like the fed gov’t bailout. Many in Congress were ready to give OPM away with no safeguards, until the public starting phoning in and DEMANDING BETTER.

    I’m DEMANDING BETTER!

  137. Ive Got It

    “No Fool: Just wondering, here.
    If things are so awful in Davis, what is it that keeps you here?”

    If you don’t speak up and just accept the status quo, nothing changes for the better. Get it?

  138. Ive Got It

    “No Fool: Just wondering, here.
    If things are so awful in Davis, what is it that keeps you here?”

    If you don’t speak up and just accept the status quo, nothing changes for the better. Get it?

  139. Ive Got It

    “No Fool: Just wondering, here.
    If things are so awful in Davis, what is it that keeps you here?”

    If you don’t speak up and just accept the status quo, nothing changes for the better. Get it?

  140. Ive Got It

    “No Fool: Just wondering, here.
    If things are so awful in Davis, what is it that keeps you here?”

    If you don’t speak up and just accept the status quo, nothing changes for the better. Get it?

  141. My $.02

    I agree with accountability. This is rediculous. They have their hands out all the time now. They get our measure Q $, they get all kinds of fundraising from Davis Schools Foundation and $ drives, and yet we keep hearing excuse after excuse each election cycle. It’s not their fault for not spending $ to benefit our kids, its OUR fault for not simply trusting them to spend our $ on the kids. Secondly, I refuse to be blackmailed into voting yes. “Don’t punish our students” is a way of saying “if you don’t give us what we want, I’ll make sure the kids will suffer as a way of getting back at you for not forking over your life savings to us.”

  142. My $.02

    I agree with accountability. This is rediculous. They have their hands out all the time now. They get our measure Q $, they get all kinds of fundraising from Davis Schools Foundation and $ drives, and yet we keep hearing excuse after excuse each election cycle. It’s not their fault for not spending $ to benefit our kids, its OUR fault for not simply trusting them to spend our $ on the kids. Secondly, I refuse to be blackmailed into voting yes. “Don’t punish our students” is a way of saying “if you don’t give us what we want, I’ll make sure the kids will suffer as a way of getting back at you for not forking over your life savings to us.”

  143. My $.02

    I agree with accountability. This is rediculous. They have their hands out all the time now. They get our measure Q $, they get all kinds of fundraising from Davis Schools Foundation and $ drives, and yet we keep hearing excuse after excuse each election cycle. It’s not their fault for not spending $ to benefit our kids, its OUR fault for not simply trusting them to spend our $ on the kids. Secondly, I refuse to be blackmailed into voting yes. “Don’t punish our students” is a way of saying “if you don’t give us what we want, I’ll make sure the kids will suffer as a way of getting back at you for not forking over your life savings to us.”

  144. My $.02

    I agree with accountability. This is rediculous. They have their hands out all the time now. They get our measure Q $, they get all kinds of fundraising from Davis Schools Foundation and $ drives, and yet we keep hearing excuse after excuse each election cycle. It’s not their fault for not spending $ to benefit our kids, its OUR fault for not simply trusting them to spend our $ on the kids. Secondly, I refuse to be blackmailed into voting yes. “Don’t punish our students” is a way of saying “if you don’t give us what we want, I’ll make sure the kids will suffer as a way of getting back at you for not forking over your life savings to us.”

  145. just wondering

    “”No Fool: Just wondering, here.
    If things are so awful in Davis, what is it that keeps you here?”

    If you don’t speak up and just accept the status quo, nothing changes for the better. Get it?”

    I’m not advocating being a rah-rah section for Davis, but I note that the negative tone in some personalities on this blog gets to the point where you figure that some people just criticize because they love to complain.

    Criticism has a little more credibility with me if it is put into the context of what is going right.

    Plus an occasional plug for what is going right isn’t a bad thing, just to note what to keep.

    The criticisms of the lunch/nutrition component of Measure Q (labeled “salad rants” in other comment sections) strike me as rather extreme, quite frankly.

    I understand that the origin of many components of Measure Q was community input and discussion. School nutrition as a community concern would be a no-brainer, to my way of thinking.

    Given that Measure Q passed and is committed to implementation for the next 4 years, a more constructive time for review would be toward the end of this school year.

    If a person is so animated against this nutrition program to the point of disparaging it as just a program to grow 35-pound cabbages, before we’ve even had a chance to see if the kids can even grow 5-pound cabbages, just strikes me as a rather petty criticism from a mindset for pathological complaining.

    And this very criticism seems to continue in spite of DPD and others’ repeated investigations and clarifications to correct such misinformation.

    Of all the major topics out there to address — Presidential and California politics, $700 billion bailouts, city and school budgets — having to argue over a program to improve the nutritional value school lunches seems a bit circus-like in the context of these other issues.

    I feel like I’m watching Monty Python, here. At least it offers some amusement.

  146. just wondering

    “”No Fool: Just wondering, here.
    If things are so awful in Davis, what is it that keeps you here?”

    If you don’t speak up and just accept the status quo, nothing changes for the better. Get it?”

    I’m not advocating being a rah-rah section for Davis, but I note that the negative tone in some personalities on this blog gets to the point where you figure that some people just criticize because they love to complain.

    Criticism has a little more credibility with me if it is put into the context of what is going right.

    Plus an occasional plug for what is going right isn’t a bad thing, just to note what to keep.

    The criticisms of the lunch/nutrition component of Measure Q (labeled “salad rants” in other comment sections) strike me as rather extreme, quite frankly.

    I understand that the origin of many components of Measure Q was community input and discussion. School nutrition as a community concern would be a no-brainer, to my way of thinking.

    Given that Measure Q passed and is committed to implementation for the next 4 years, a more constructive time for review would be toward the end of this school year.

    If a person is so animated against this nutrition program to the point of disparaging it as just a program to grow 35-pound cabbages, before we’ve even had a chance to see if the kids can even grow 5-pound cabbages, just strikes me as a rather petty criticism from a mindset for pathological complaining.

    And this very criticism seems to continue in spite of DPD and others’ repeated investigations and clarifications to correct such misinformation.

    Of all the major topics out there to address — Presidential and California politics, $700 billion bailouts, city and school budgets — having to argue over a program to improve the nutritional value school lunches seems a bit circus-like in the context of these other issues.

    I feel like I’m watching Monty Python, here. At least it offers some amusement.

  147. just wondering

    “”No Fool: Just wondering, here.
    If things are so awful in Davis, what is it that keeps you here?”

    If you don’t speak up and just accept the status quo, nothing changes for the better. Get it?”

    I’m not advocating being a rah-rah section for Davis, but I note that the negative tone in some personalities on this blog gets to the point where you figure that some people just criticize because they love to complain.

    Criticism has a little more credibility with me if it is put into the context of what is going right.

    Plus an occasional plug for what is going right isn’t a bad thing, just to note what to keep.

    The criticisms of the lunch/nutrition component of Measure Q (labeled “salad rants” in other comment sections) strike me as rather extreme, quite frankly.

    I understand that the origin of many components of Measure Q was community input and discussion. School nutrition as a community concern would be a no-brainer, to my way of thinking.

    Given that Measure Q passed and is committed to implementation for the next 4 years, a more constructive time for review would be toward the end of this school year.

    If a person is so animated against this nutrition program to the point of disparaging it as just a program to grow 35-pound cabbages, before we’ve even had a chance to see if the kids can even grow 5-pound cabbages, just strikes me as a rather petty criticism from a mindset for pathological complaining.

    And this very criticism seems to continue in spite of DPD and others’ repeated investigations and clarifications to correct such misinformation.

    Of all the major topics out there to address — Presidential and California politics, $700 billion bailouts, city and school budgets — having to argue over a program to improve the nutritional value school lunches seems a bit circus-like in the context of these other issues.

    I feel like I’m watching Monty Python, here. At least it offers some amusement.

  148. just wondering

    “”No Fool: Just wondering, here.
    If things are so awful in Davis, what is it that keeps you here?”

    If you don’t speak up and just accept the status quo, nothing changes for the better. Get it?”

    I’m not advocating being a rah-rah section for Davis, but I note that the negative tone in some personalities on this blog gets to the point where you figure that some people just criticize because they love to complain.

    Criticism has a little more credibility with me if it is put into the context of what is going right.

    Plus an occasional plug for what is going right isn’t a bad thing, just to note what to keep.

    The criticisms of the lunch/nutrition component of Measure Q (labeled “salad rants” in other comment sections) strike me as rather extreme, quite frankly.

    I understand that the origin of many components of Measure Q was community input and discussion. School nutrition as a community concern would be a no-brainer, to my way of thinking.

    Given that Measure Q passed and is committed to implementation for the next 4 years, a more constructive time for review would be toward the end of this school year.

    If a person is so animated against this nutrition program to the point of disparaging it as just a program to grow 35-pound cabbages, before we’ve even had a chance to see if the kids can even grow 5-pound cabbages, just strikes me as a rather petty criticism from a mindset for pathological complaining.

    And this very criticism seems to continue in spite of DPD and others’ repeated investigations and clarifications to correct such misinformation.

    Of all the major topics out there to address — Presidential and California politics, $700 billion bailouts, city and school budgets — having to argue over a program to improve the nutritional value school lunches seems a bit circus-like in the context of these other issues.

    I feel like I’m watching Monty Python, here. At least it offers some amusement.

  149. my $.02

    If a person is so animated against this nutrition program to the point of disparaging it as just a program to grow 35-pound cabbages, before we’ve even had a chance to see if the kids can even grow 5-pound cabbages, just strikes me as a rather petty criticism from a mindset for pathological complaining.

    excuse me, but if I am going to spend my $ on a program I want full disclosure and a reassurance that that program is worthwhile. If I am getting an impression that it is otherwise, then chances are that other progams are too. By not demanding accountability from the school board, you are just furthering waste, which translates into making our kids suffer. Open your eyes. Sticking your head in the sand does not help our kids.

  150. my $.02

    If a person is so animated against this nutrition program to the point of disparaging it as just a program to grow 35-pound cabbages, before we’ve even had a chance to see if the kids can even grow 5-pound cabbages, just strikes me as a rather petty criticism from a mindset for pathological complaining.

    excuse me, but if I am going to spend my $ on a program I want full disclosure and a reassurance that that program is worthwhile. If I am getting an impression that it is otherwise, then chances are that other progams are too. By not demanding accountability from the school board, you are just furthering waste, which translates into making our kids suffer. Open your eyes. Sticking your head in the sand does not help our kids.

  151. my $.02

    If a person is so animated against this nutrition program to the point of disparaging it as just a program to grow 35-pound cabbages, before we’ve even had a chance to see if the kids can even grow 5-pound cabbages, just strikes me as a rather petty criticism from a mindset for pathological complaining.

    excuse me, but if I am going to spend my $ on a program I want full disclosure and a reassurance that that program is worthwhile. If I am getting an impression that it is otherwise, then chances are that other progams are too. By not demanding accountability from the school board, you are just furthering waste, which translates into making our kids suffer. Open your eyes. Sticking your head in the sand does not help our kids.

  152. my $.02

    If a person is so animated against this nutrition program to the point of disparaging it as just a program to grow 35-pound cabbages, before we’ve even had a chance to see if the kids can even grow 5-pound cabbages, just strikes me as a rather petty criticism from a mindset for pathological complaining.

    excuse me, but if I am going to spend my $ on a program I want full disclosure and a reassurance that that program is worthwhile. If I am getting an impression that it is otherwise, then chances are that other progams are too. By not demanding accountability from the school board, you are just furthering waste, which translates into making our kids suffer. Open your eyes. Sticking your head in the sand does not help our kids.

  153. Salad Supporter

    “Give them cherry tomatoes, carrots or broccoli with dressing and sprinkles, and they eat almost any vegetable whether it is served up salad bar style or not.”

    I call BS on this. I’ve eaten with my daughter at NDE, and the salads that were/are served when the Crunch Lunch bar is not in effect are ridiculous. They look like iceberg lettuce with a few anemic chips of carrot, a -single- cherry tomato, and some pallid broccoli (one piece).

    Most of these are thrown away.

    I think the discrepancy between the Davis Enterprise account of Crunch Lunch staffing and what DPD is saying is that the Crunch Lunch bar does require a staffer to help, but it’s not a -dedicated- staffer. That is, a teacher or someone who is already being paid helps out, and receives no additional money for helping with the salad bar.

    I say keep the Crunch Lunch bar.

  154. Salad Supporter

    “Give them cherry tomatoes, carrots or broccoli with dressing and sprinkles, and they eat almost any vegetable whether it is served up salad bar style or not.”

    I call BS on this. I’ve eaten with my daughter at NDE, and the salads that were/are served when the Crunch Lunch bar is not in effect are ridiculous. They look like iceberg lettuce with a few anemic chips of carrot, a -single- cherry tomato, and some pallid broccoli (one piece).

    Most of these are thrown away.

    I think the discrepancy between the Davis Enterprise account of Crunch Lunch staffing and what DPD is saying is that the Crunch Lunch bar does require a staffer to help, but it’s not a -dedicated- staffer. That is, a teacher or someone who is already being paid helps out, and receives no additional money for helping with the salad bar.

    I say keep the Crunch Lunch bar.

  155. Salad Supporter

    “Give them cherry tomatoes, carrots or broccoli with dressing and sprinkles, and they eat almost any vegetable whether it is served up salad bar style or not.”

    I call BS on this. I’ve eaten with my daughter at NDE, and the salads that were/are served when the Crunch Lunch bar is not in effect are ridiculous. They look like iceberg lettuce with a few anemic chips of carrot, a -single- cherry tomato, and some pallid broccoli (one piece).

    Most of these are thrown away.

    I think the discrepancy between the Davis Enterprise account of Crunch Lunch staffing and what DPD is saying is that the Crunch Lunch bar does require a staffer to help, but it’s not a -dedicated- staffer. That is, a teacher or someone who is already being paid helps out, and receives no additional money for helping with the salad bar.

    I say keep the Crunch Lunch bar.

  156. Salad Supporter

    “Give them cherry tomatoes, carrots or broccoli with dressing and sprinkles, and they eat almost any vegetable whether it is served up salad bar style or not.”

    I call BS on this. I’ve eaten with my daughter at NDE, and the salads that were/are served when the Crunch Lunch bar is not in effect are ridiculous. They look like iceberg lettuce with a few anemic chips of carrot, a -single- cherry tomato, and some pallid broccoli (one piece).

    Most of these are thrown away.

    I think the discrepancy between the Davis Enterprise account of Crunch Lunch staffing and what DPD is saying is that the Crunch Lunch bar does require a staffer to help, but it’s not a -dedicated- staffer. That is, a teacher or someone who is already being paid helps out, and receives no additional money for helping with the salad bar.

    I say keep the Crunch Lunch bar.

  157. Salad Supporter

    “I’ve got an idea! Why not let local restaurants sell healthy food just outside the campus – like vegetarian pizza, rice bowls, etc? Close the cafeteria, give low income kids chits for money. Save lots of school funding that way!”

    And the schools will lose money from cafeteria funding and the School Lunch Program. I think the research DPD has done shows that the schools are or will soon be making a net profit on lunches.

    The problem with going to your suggested model is the slippery slope. Why not, then, offer “pouring rights” to Snapple in exchange for big bucks to the schools? Let “private enterprise” take care of it, right?

    Bad idea.

  158. Salad Supporter

    “I’ve got an idea! Why not let local restaurants sell healthy food just outside the campus – like vegetarian pizza, rice bowls, etc? Close the cafeteria, give low income kids chits for money. Save lots of school funding that way!”

    And the schools will lose money from cafeteria funding and the School Lunch Program. I think the research DPD has done shows that the schools are or will soon be making a net profit on lunches.

    The problem with going to your suggested model is the slippery slope. Why not, then, offer “pouring rights” to Snapple in exchange for big bucks to the schools? Let “private enterprise” take care of it, right?

    Bad idea.

  159. Salad Supporter

    “I’ve got an idea! Why not let local restaurants sell healthy food just outside the campus – like vegetarian pizza, rice bowls, etc? Close the cafeteria, give low income kids chits for money. Save lots of school funding that way!”

    And the schools will lose money from cafeteria funding and the School Lunch Program. I think the research DPD has done shows that the schools are or will soon be making a net profit on lunches.

    The problem with going to your suggested model is the slippery slope. Why not, then, offer “pouring rights” to Snapple in exchange for big bucks to the schools? Let “private enterprise” take care of it, right?

    Bad idea.

  160. Salad Supporter

    “I’ve got an idea! Why not let local restaurants sell healthy food just outside the campus – like vegetarian pizza, rice bowls, etc? Close the cafeteria, give low income kids chits for money. Save lots of school funding that way!”

    And the schools will lose money from cafeteria funding and the School Lunch Program. I think the research DPD has done shows that the schools are or will soon be making a net profit on lunches.

    The problem with going to your suggested model is the slippery slope. Why not, then, offer “pouring rights” to Snapple in exchange for big bucks to the schools? Let “private enterprise” take care of it, right?

    Bad idea.

  161. enjoying the circus

    I really love the Davis Vanguard.

    Because of Matt Rexroad’s ire over the Flatlander, I picked up a copy and read it for the first time.

    And now I’m rereading it to figure out why someone like him would blow a gasket over this.

    And now because of the Vanguard’s resident food critic, I’m looking to see if I can try out this new crunch lunch with my child one day to see if the program rises to this justified level of outrage.

    If DPD wants to run yet another story on Davis schools cafeteria, I am willing to provide photos of my experience.

    Personally, though, I think many more Davisites are more worried about their retirement investments right now than they are over crunch lunch.

  162. enjoying the circus

    I really love the Davis Vanguard.

    Because of Matt Rexroad’s ire over the Flatlander, I picked up a copy and read it for the first time.

    And now I’m rereading it to figure out why someone like him would blow a gasket over this.

    And now because of the Vanguard’s resident food critic, I’m looking to see if I can try out this new crunch lunch with my child one day to see if the program rises to this justified level of outrage.

    If DPD wants to run yet another story on Davis schools cafeteria, I am willing to provide photos of my experience.

    Personally, though, I think many more Davisites are more worried about their retirement investments right now than they are over crunch lunch.

  163. enjoying the circus

    I really love the Davis Vanguard.

    Because of Matt Rexroad’s ire over the Flatlander, I picked up a copy and read it for the first time.

    And now I’m rereading it to figure out why someone like him would blow a gasket over this.

    And now because of the Vanguard’s resident food critic, I’m looking to see if I can try out this new crunch lunch with my child one day to see if the program rises to this justified level of outrage.

    If DPD wants to run yet another story on Davis schools cafeteria, I am willing to provide photos of my experience.

    Personally, though, I think many more Davisites are more worried about their retirement investments right now than they are over crunch lunch.

  164. enjoying the circus

    I really love the Davis Vanguard.

    Because of Matt Rexroad’s ire over the Flatlander, I picked up a copy and read it for the first time.

    And now I’m rereading it to figure out why someone like him would blow a gasket over this.

    And now because of the Vanguard’s resident food critic, I’m looking to see if I can try out this new crunch lunch with my child one day to see if the program rises to this justified level of outrage.

    If DPD wants to run yet another story on Davis schools cafeteria, I am willing to provide photos of my experience.

    Personally, though, I think many more Davisites are more worried about their retirement investments right now than they are over crunch lunch.

  165. just wondering

    “excuse me, but if I am going to spend my $ on a program I want full disclosure and a reassurance that that program is worthwhile. If I am getting an impression that it is otherwise, then chances are that other progams are too. By not demanding accountability from the school board, you are just furthering waste, which translates into making our kids suffer. Open your eyes. Sticking your head in the sand does not help our kids.”

    No, but standing up and advocating when you see a good thing does help our kids.

    So I take it that DPD’s and others’ investigations and reassurances have not been reassuring to you. That you pre-packaged vegetable mix is the way to go, even though the cafeteria program has been losing money. That a person (employee?) is standing near a salad stand in newspaper photo as certain evidence that an extra person is being paid.

    Did you register your concerns to the school board when they initially discussed what the components of Measure Q would be in ~summer of 2007?

  166. just wondering

    “excuse me, but if I am going to spend my $ on a program I want full disclosure and a reassurance that that program is worthwhile. If I am getting an impression that it is otherwise, then chances are that other progams are too. By not demanding accountability from the school board, you are just furthering waste, which translates into making our kids suffer. Open your eyes. Sticking your head in the sand does not help our kids.”

    No, but standing up and advocating when you see a good thing does help our kids.

    So I take it that DPD’s and others’ investigations and reassurances have not been reassuring to you. That you pre-packaged vegetable mix is the way to go, even though the cafeteria program has been losing money. That a person (employee?) is standing near a salad stand in newspaper photo as certain evidence that an extra person is being paid.

    Did you register your concerns to the school board when they initially discussed what the components of Measure Q would be in ~summer of 2007?

  167. just wondering

    “excuse me, but if I am going to spend my $ on a program I want full disclosure and a reassurance that that program is worthwhile. If I am getting an impression that it is otherwise, then chances are that other progams are too. By not demanding accountability from the school board, you are just furthering waste, which translates into making our kids suffer. Open your eyes. Sticking your head in the sand does not help our kids.”

    No, but standing up and advocating when you see a good thing does help our kids.

    So I take it that DPD’s and others’ investigations and reassurances have not been reassuring to you. That you pre-packaged vegetable mix is the way to go, even though the cafeteria program has been losing money. That a person (employee?) is standing near a salad stand in newspaper photo as certain evidence that an extra person is being paid.

    Did you register your concerns to the school board when they initially discussed what the components of Measure Q would be in ~summer of 2007?

  168. just wondering

    “excuse me, but if I am going to spend my $ on a program I want full disclosure and a reassurance that that program is worthwhile. If I am getting an impression that it is otherwise, then chances are that other progams are too. By not demanding accountability from the school board, you are just furthering waste, which translates into making our kids suffer. Open your eyes. Sticking your head in the sand does not help our kids.”

    No, but standing up and advocating when you see a good thing does help our kids.

    So I take it that DPD’s and others’ investigations and reassurances have not been reassuring to you. That you pre-packaged vegetable mix is the way to go, even though the cafeteria program has been losing money. That a person (employee?) is standing near a salad stand in newspaper photo as certain evidence that an extra person is being paid.

    Did you register your concerns to the school board when they initially discussed what the components of Measure Q would be in ~summer of 2007?

  169. Old Skool Davis

    enjoying the circus: Has made an excellent observation.

    “I think many more Davisites are more worried about their retirement investments right now than they are over crunch lunch.”

    This really lends itself to the new mission an ideals of the core citizenry of Davis. Davis as a retirement community for sure resonates. These people are long term residents.

    They fed, clothed and educated their children during the glorious Richard Brunelle era. And Davis had a well deserved reputation for public school excellence.

    Today a new reputation is taking shape and the word is spreading: “Davis a great place to come get a handout”

  170. Old Skool Davis

    enjoying the circus: Has made an excellent observation.

    “I think many more Davisites are more worried about their retirement investments right now than they are over crunch lunch.”

    This really lends itself to the new mission an ideals of the core citizenry of Davis. Davis as a retirement community for sure resonates. These people are long term residents.

    They fed, clothed and educated their children during the glorious Richard Brunelle era. And Davis had a well deserved reputation for public school excellence.

    Today a new reputation is taking shape and the word is spreading: “Davis a great place to come get a handout”

  171. Old Skool Davis

    enjoying the circus: Has made an excellent observation.

    “I think many more Davisites are more worried about their retirement investments right now than they are over crunch lunch.”

    This really lends itself to the new mission an ideals of the core citizenry of Davis. Davis as a retirement community for sure resonates. These people are long term residents.

    They fed, clothed and educated their children during the glorious Richard Brunelle era. And Davis had a well deserved reputation for public school excellence.

    Today a new reputation is taking shape and the word is spreading: “Davis a great place to come get a handout”

  172. Old Skool Davis

    enjoying the circus: Has made an excellent observation.

    “I think many more Davisites are more worried about their retirement investments right now than they are over crunch lunch.”

    This really lends itself to the new mission an ideals of the core citizenry of Davis. Davis as a retirement community for sure resonates. These people are long term residents.

    They fed, clothed and educated their children during the glorious Richard Brunelle era. And Davis had a well deserved reputation for public school excellence.

    Today a new reputation is taking shape and the word is spreading: “Davis a great place to come get a handout”

  173. and so it goes...

    old skool sure voices the growing, and steadily retiring baby boomer generation.

    The “me” generation from the beginning to the end. Now that the retiring generation is growing, we just don’t have the time, money, or interest in the younger generation.

    But it will be the younger generation that will somehow have to help finance their retirement package. Better make sure that they can do it!

  174. and so it goes...

    old skool sure voices the growing, and steadily retiring baby boomer generation.

    The “me” generation from the beginning to the end. Now that the retiring generation is growing, we just don’t have the time, money, or interest in the younger generation.

    But it will be the younger generation that will somehow have to help finance their retirement package. Better make sure that they can do it!

  175. and so it goes...

    old skool sure voices the growing, and steadily retiring baby boomer generation.

    The “me” generation from the beginning to the end. Now that the retiring generation is growing, we just don’t have the time, money, or interest in the younger generation.

    But it will be the younger generation that will somehow have to help finance their retirement package. Better make sure that they can do it!

  176. and so it goes...

    old skool sure voices the growing, and steadily retiring baby boomer generation.

    The “me” generation from the beginning to the end. Now that the retiring generation is growing, we just don’t have the time, money, or interest in the younger generation.

    But it will be the younger generation that will somehow have to help finance their retirement package. Better make sure that they can do it!

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