The Measure W Imperative

In just over a month, an election is going to be held that may be the most important election since 1932. I write those words with hesitation, because dare I say that every election I have ever been a part of, and that goes back only to 1992, they have said something like that.

And yet, for me that biggest lesson of my life occurred in 2000 because it was a realization that one cannot take things for granted. A scant few votes in a single state and some, if not voting irregularities, then anomalies determined the course of history of this nation. Not to mention a 5-4 Supreme Court decision.

Okay now let’s stop and dispense with the melodrama here. The fact of the matter is that there are a number of important elections coming up in just over a month from now. For me, the most important of the ones below the Presidential contest is Measure W. I have devoted much time and space to this measure.

I think it is one of the most important issues facing Davis right now for a lot of reasons.

Last week I criticized the Measure W effort and was rebuked (and that’s clearly too strong a word) by Measure W Campaign Coordinator Kingsley Melton.

My statement that drew his criticism:

“The concern that has been emerging has been that this campaign has been low-key.”

Mr. Melton responded on the blog:

“Sorry DPD, I have to take issue with this statement. Perhaps you have not been contacted by Measure W, and with good reason, you are identified as a supporter. We are running a targeted operation that is on track to contact every likely absentee voter prior their receiving a ballot.

As I sit here numerous volunteers are making the phonecalls and contacts essential to the Measure’s passage. We may not be a big budget operation, but we are a lean and mean machine. To learn more about volunteer opportunities and campaign activities, please visit our website, www.yesw.org.”

I hope my friend Kingsley Melton does not take this the wrong way, but I have to disagree with him. I am glad they are on track to contact every likely absentee voter, and I hope they are very effective, but I have seen some very effective grassroots campaigns of this sort. The most effective was a special election in 1998 for Lois Capps. I understand this is not going to be a million dollar campaign, but it still needs to be a high profile one. The efforts by the Davis Schools Foundation ring a bell as to how to organize on this kind of level.

The Capps campaign was able to mobilize over 50 percent in 1998 across the Christmas and New Year’s holidays by bombarding the voters not only with calls–we’re talking six, seven, eight calls across not a city but across a congressional district with hundreds of thousands of voters. We are talking huge amounts of volunteers, direct mail, vote-by-mail applications, etc. I am glad they are going to contact every voter, but they need to contact every voter about seven times for it to be effective. And I hope they do.

I do not want to be a downer, but I do not have a sense for that kind of coordinated effort at this point. And I only point this out because in my opinion, we cannot afford to lose this.

If I am looking for a spokesman, how about the elderstatesman of Davis–Dr. Herb Bauer.

Reading his words literally gives one chills.

He writes:

“Open your eyes for a moment and read Measure W for the coming election. Measure W protects children and their education alone, nothing else. Read the details to convince yourself. In a world full of flames, with war on earth and ill will to men, only well-educated children may hope to create a better world.”

If anyone in this entire community has been there and done that, it is Dr. Bauer.

Last week the Davis City Council unanimously passed a resolution supporting Measure W.

In part the resolution reads:

“DJUSD spend less on each child’s education than either the national or the state average, and the District has stretched every dollar to minimize overhead; and…. Measure W is needed to continue services such as reduced class size, enhanced reading and math programs, training for teachers, school-based technology support, school counselors, nurses and more; and… funds from Measure W will make a direct difference in increasing classroom resources for the children of Davis; and… Davis is a community that is defined by its commitment to our schools and our children, with Davis schools enhancing the quality of life for all residents…”

And as we reported last week, Former School Board Member John Munn and current President of the Yolo County Taxpayers Association sent a letter to the Davis Enterprise on behalf of the group in support of Measure W.

“The Yolo County Taxpayers Association board of directors has voted to support Measure W, the proposed parcel tax to maintain school programs in Davis. Although the association is not pleased by spending decisions that have contributed to the school district’s current financial situation, the need for Measure W is real; and opposition at this point would not be in the best interest of the community, where taxpayers have a clear interest in the education of Davis students.

This support, however, comes with a caveat. We expect that the school district and board members now understand how decisions about present spending can lead to future deficits. Therefore, the association will not support future tax measures to pay for deficits created by subsequent board decisions.

But this is for another day’s debate. Today, we must work together to keep the good things we have, which requires passing Measure W.”

There are so many reasons to continue to support Measure W–quality education is not a luxury in this world, it is a necessity. $120 is real money to people. But it pales in comparison with the costs of substandard education. There is simply too much at stake now to allow our schools to go by the wayside. Education is the ticket to a better life and maintaining a strong education is an imperative.

At the end of the day, we need to remember that this is about our children and their future. They only get one shot at this.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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100 Comments

  1. Kingsley Melton, Campaign Coordinator Measure W

    I’d love to get into your comments DPD, but I’ve got a ground campaign to run. Safe to say I think the readers of your blog are more than happy they’re not getting 7 or 8 dinner time phone calls about Measure W.

    That said, we could always use more volunteers. To volunteer, please sign up at our website, http://www.yesw.org or email me, meltonkl@yahoo.com.

    Cheers,

    Kingsley Melton
    Campaign Coordinator
    Measure W

  2. Kingsley Melton, Campaign Coor

    I’d love to get into your comments DPD, but I’ve got a ground campaign to run. Safe to say I think the readers of your blog are more than happy they’re not getting 7 or 8 dinner time phone calls about Measure W.

    That said, we could always use more volunteers. To volunteer, please sign up at our website, http://www.yesw.org or email me, meltonkl@yahoo.com.

    Cheers,

    Kingsley Melton
    Campaign Coordinator
    Measure W

  3. Kingsley Melton, Campaign Coor

    I’d love to get into your comments DPD, but I’ve got a ground campaign to run. Safe to say I think the readers of your blog are more than happy they’re not getting 7 or 8 dinner time phone calls about Measure W.

    That said, we could always use more volunteers. To volunteer, please sign up at our website, http://www.yesw.org or email me, meltonkl@yahoo.com.

    Cheers,

    Kingsley Melton
    Campaign Coordinator
    Measure W

  4. Kingsley Melton, Campaign Coor

    I’d love to get into your comments DPD, but I’ve got a ground campaign to run. Safe to say I think the readers of your blog are more than happy they’re not getting 7 or 8 dinner time phone calls about Measure W.

    That said, we could always use more volunteers. To volunteer, please sign up at our website, http://www.yesw.org or email me, meltonkl@yahoo.com.

    Cheers,

    Kingsley Melton
    Campaign Coordinator
    Measure W

  5. Anonymous

    DPD,

    For the sake of context for some readers with more of a Central Valley/N. California frame of mind, who was/is Lois Capps, and who was she(?) running against, and what seat? Was there anything about that election that attracted the grassroots support that you mention?

  6. Anonymous

    DPD,

    For the sake of context for some readers with more of a Central Valley/N. California frame of mind, who was/is Lois Capps, and who was she(?) running against, and what seat? Was there anything about that election that attracted the grassroots support that you mention?

  7. Anonymous

    DPD,

    For the sake of context for some readers with more of a Central Valley/N. California frame of mind, who was/is Lois Capps, and who was she(?) running against, and what seat? Was there anything about that election that attracted the grassroots support that you mention?

  8. Anonymous

    DPD,

    For the sake of context for some readers with more of a Central Valley/N. California frame of mind, who was/is Lois Capps, and who was she(?) running against, and what seat? Was there anything about that election that attracted the grassroots support that you mention?

  9. Doug Paul Davis

    Anonymous:

    Lois Capps ran for Congress in 1997-98 after her husband passed away late in 1997. He was elected in 1996 after narrowly losing in 1994. He was very popular UCSB professor. The district covers Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo Counties.

    The fact that it was a special election and he was popular led to the grassroots support.

    On the other hand, you already have a huge grassroots apparatus in place here in Davis for Measure W based on the work of the Davis Schools Foundation and all of the students and teachers who were mobilized this past winter and spring.

    I bring this up because I am very concerned about this election. One thing you learn in politics, people don’t like negative advertising but it works. People don’t like 7 or 8 dinner time calls, and some of the contacts can be direct mail rather than calls, but the fact of the matter is that when they get those calls they are more likely to come out and vote and vote for your candidate and issue. It bugs the crap out of them, but it works.

  10. Doug Paul Davis

    Anonymous:

    Lois Capps ran for Congress in 1997-98 after her husband passed away late in 1997. He was elected in 1996 after narrowly losing in 1994. He was very popular UCSB professor. The district covers Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo Counties.

    The fact that it was a special election and he was popular led to the grassroots support.

    On the other hand, you already have a huge grassroots apparatus in place here in Davis for Measure W based on the work of the Davis Schools Foundation and all of the students and teachers who were mobilized this past winter and spring.

    I bring this up because I am very concerned about this election. One thing you learn in politics, people don’t like negative advertising but it works. People don’t like 7 or 8 dinner time calls, and some of the contacts can be direct mail rather than calls, but the fact of the matter is that when they get those calls they are more likely to come out and vote and vote for your candidate and issue. It bugs the crap out of them, but it works.

  11. Doug Paul Davis

    Anonymous:

    Lois Capps ran for Congress in 1997-98 after her husband passed away late in 1997. He was elected in 1996 after narrowly losing in 1994. He was very popular UCSB professor. The district covers Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo Counties.

    The fact that it was a special election and he was popular led to the grassroots support.

    On the other hand, you already have a huge grassroots apparatus in place here in Davis for Measure W based on the work of the Davis Schools Foundation and all of the students and teachers who were mobilized this past winter and spring.

    I bring this up because I am very concerned about this election. One thing you learn in politics, people don’t like negative advertising but it works. People don’t like 7 or 8 dinner time calls, and some of the contacts can be direct mail rather than calls, but the fact of the matter is that when they get those calls they are more likely to come out and vote and vote for your candidate and issue. It bugs the crap out of them, but it works.

  12. Doug Paul Davis

    Anonymous:

    Lois Capps ran for Congress in 1997-98 after her husband passed away late in 1997. He was elected in 1996 after narrowly losing in 1994. He was very popular UCSB professor. The district covers Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo Counties.

    The fact that it was a special election and he was popular led to the grassroots support.

    On the other hand, you already have a huge grassroots apparatus in place here in Davis for Measure W based on the work of the Davis Schools Foundation and all of the students and teachers who were mobilized this past winter and spring.

    I bring this up because I am very concerned about this election. One thing you learn in politics, people don’t like negative advertising but it works. People don’t like 7 or 8 dinner time calls, and some of the contacts can be direct mail rather than calls, but the fact of the matter is that when they get those calls they are more likely to come out and vote and vote for your candidate and issue. It bugs the crap out of them, but it works.

  13. Rich Rifkin

    “He was elected in 1996 after narrowly losing in 1994. He was very popular UCSB professor.”

    Walter Capps was a Religious Studies prof and taught a hugely popular class called “Religion and the Impact of Vietnam.”

    I took Capps’s class in 1984. While it didn’t seem to fit into the “religious studies” field, it was a great course for that time. A large part of the theme was helping Vietnam Veterans to fully reintegrate into society and for society to embrace them. Back in the 1960s, Capps had been a leading anti-War activist at Yale.

    In ’85 or maybe ’86, the class was featured on 60 Minutes, when they travelled to DC to visit the Vietnam War Memorial (wall), which was only a few years old at that time.

    Capps was a very liberal Democrat, but that didn’t come across in his class. He consciously brought in people from all sorts of backgrounds and never preached his views, but led an interesting discussion. I liked him and think everyone who took his class felt the same way.

    One side note, which David knows about: Arianna Huiffington and her then husband, Michael Huffington, played a key role in making that congressional seat open, later to be filled by Walter and then Lois Capps.

    When I lived in Santa Barbara, the seat was held by a popular, moderate Republican, Bob Lagomarsino, from Ojai. He was nothing special, but his moderately conservative politics fit the district well at that time. (It has since been gerrymandered so that the more Republican communities are not in it.)

    To his great misfortune, the Huffingtons moved in and Mrs. Huffington decided to target Bob Lagomarsino. She was her husband’s campaign manager, and she set out to destroy Lagomarsino’s reputation. I have no idea if the rumors she was spreading were true or not, but it was floated by her that Lagomarsino was a homosexual*, a drunk and had enriched himself at the taxpayers’ expense.

    The Huffingtons, who had been close friends of the Bushes in Texas, both being oilers, also used the ultra-conservative churches to bring out a huge voter base in the Republican primary. That had never happened before in a primary election in Santa Barbara, but was old hat in Texas.

    It worked. Between the wild rumors and the high church turn-out, Lagomarsino was personally and politically destroyed by Mrs. Huffington.

    Two years later, her husband ran for the US Senate and the seat was won by an even more conservative Republican named Andrea Seastrand. And then Walter Capps beat Seastrand two years later.

    * I presume Arianna knew that her husband was gay when she was spreading rumors about Lagomarsino being gay. Ever since that campaign, I have thought that woman has no scruples, and never take anything she says to be her serious opinion, but instead more garbage to advance her career.

  14. Rich Rifkin

    “He was elected in 1996 after narrowly losing in 1994. He was very popular UCSB professor.”

    Walter Capps was a Religious Studies prof and taught a hugely popular class called “Religion and the Impact of Vietnam.”

    I took Capps’s class in 1984. While it didn’t seem to fit into the “religious studies” field, it was a great course for that time. A large part of the theme was helping Vietnam Veterans to fully reintegrate into society and for society to embrace them. Back in the 1960s, Capps had been a leading anti-War activist at Yale.

    In ’85 or maybe ’86, the class was featured on 60 Minutes, when they travelled to DC to visit the Vietnam War Memorial (wall), which was only a few years old at that time.

    Capps was a very liberal Democrat, but that didn’t come across in his class. He consciously brought in people from all sorts of backgrounds and never preached his views, but led an interesting discussion. I liked him and think everyone who took his class felt the same way.

    One side note, which David knows about: Arianna Huiffington and her then husband, Michael Huffington, played a key role in making that congressional seat open, later to be filled by Walter and then Lois Capps.

    When I lived in Santa Barbara, the seat was held by a popular, moderate Republican, Bob Lagomarsino, from Ojai. He was nothing special, but his moderately conservative politics fit the district well at that time. (It has since been gerrymandered so that the more Republican communities are not in it.)

    To his great misfortune, the Huffingtons moved in and Mrs. Huffington decided to target Bob Lagomarsino. She was her husband’s campaign manager, and she set out to destroy Lagomarsino’s reputation. I have no idea if the rumors she was spreading were true or not, but it was floated by her that Lagomarsino was a homosexual*, a drunk and had enriched himself at the taxpayers’ expense.

    The Huffingtons, who had been close friends of the Bushes in Texas, both being oilers, also used the ultra-conservative churches to bring out a huge voter base in the Republican primary. That had never happened before in a primary election in Santa Barbara, but was old hat in Texas.

    It worked. Between the wild rumors and the high church turn-out, Lagomarsino was personally and politically destroyed by Mrs. Huffington.

    Two years later, her husband ran for the US Senate and the seat was won by an even more conservative Republican named Andrea Seastrand. And then Walter Capps beat Seastrand two years later.

    * I presume Arianna knew that her husband was gay when she was spreading rumors about Lagomarsino being gay. Ever since that campaign, I have thought that woman has no scruples, and never take anything she says to be her serious opinion, but instead more garbage to advance her career.

  15. Rich Rifkin

    “He was elected in 1996 after narrowly losing in 1994. He was very popular UCSB professor.”

    Walter Capps was a Religious Studies prof and taught a hugely popular class called “Religion and the Impact of Vietnam.”

    I took Capps’s class in 1984. While it didn’t seem to fit into the “religious studies” field, it was a great course for that time. A large part of the theme was helping Vietnam Veterans to fully reintegrate into society and for society to embrace them. Back in the 1960s, Capps had been a leading anti-War activist at Yale.

    In ’85 or maybe ’86, the class was featured on 60 Minutes, when they travelled to DC to visit the Vietnam War Memorial (wall), which was only a few years old at that time.

    Capps was a very liberal Democrat, but that didn’t come across in his class. He consciously brought in people from all sorts of backgrounds and never preached his views, but led an interesting discussion. I liked him and think everyone who took his class felt the same way.

    One side note, which David knows about: Arianna Huiffington and her then husband, Michael Huffington, played a key role in making that congressional seat open, later to be filled by Walter and then Lois Capps.

    When I lived in Santa Barbara, the seat was held by a popular, moderate Republican, Bob Lagomarsino, from Ojai. He was nothing special, but his moderately conservative politics fit the district well at that time. (It has since been gerrymandered so that the more Republican communities are not in it.)

    To his great misfortune, the Huffingtons moved in and Mrs. Huffington decided to target Bob Lagomarsino. She was her husband’s campaign manager, and she set out to destroy Lagomarsino’s reputation. I have no idea if the rumors she was spreading were true or not, but it was floated by her that Lagomarsino was a homosexual*, a drunk and had enriched himself at the taxpayers’ expense.

    The Huffingtons, who had been close friends of the Bushes in Texas, both being oilers, also used the ultra-conservative churches to bring out a huge voter base in the Republican primary. That had never happened before in a primary election in Santa Barbara, but was old hat in Texas.

    It worked. Between the wild rumors and the high church turn-out, Lagomarsino was personally and politically destroyed by Mrs. Huffington.

    Two years later, her husband ran for the US Senate and the seat was won by an even more conservative Republican named Andrea Seastrand. And then Walter Capps beat Seastrand two years later.

    * I presume Arianna knew that her husband was gay when she was spreading rumors about Lagomarsino being gay. Ever since that campaign, I have thought that woman has no scruples, and never take anything she says to be her serious opinion, but instead more garbage to advance her career.

  16. Rich Rifkin

    “He was elected in 1996 after narrowly losing in 1994. He was very popular UCSB professor.”

    Walter Capps was a Religious Studies prof and taught a hugely popular class called “Religion and the Impact of Vietnam.”

    I took Capps’s class in 1984. While it didn’t seem to fit into the “religious studies” field, it was a great course for that time. A large part of the theme was helping Vietnam Veterans to fully reintegrate into society and for society to embrace them. Back in the 1960s, Capps had been a leading anti-War activist at Yale.

    In ’85 or maybe ’86, the class was featured on 60 Minutes, when they travelled to DC to visit the Vietnam War Memorial (wall), which was only a few years old at that time.

    Capps was a very liberal Democrat, but that didn’t come across in his class. He consciously brought in people from all sorts of backgrounds and never preached his views, but led an interesting discussion. I liked him and think everyone who took his class felt the same way.

    One side note, which David knows about: Arianna Huiffington and her then husband, Michael Huffington, played a key role in making that congressional seat open, later to be filled by Walter and then Lois Capps.

    When I lived in Santa Barbara, the seat was held by a popular, moderate Republican, Bob Lagomarsino, from Ojai. He was nothing special, but his moderately conservative politics fit the district well at that time. (It has since been gerrymandered so that the more Republican communities are not in it.)

    To his great misfortune, the Huffingtons moved in and Mrs. Huffington decided to target Bob Lagomarsino. She was her husband’s campaign manager, and she set out to destroy Lagomarsino’s reputation. I have no idea if the rumors she was spreading were true or not, but it was floated by her that Lagomarsino was a homosexual*, a drunk and had enriched himself at the taxpayers’ expense.

    The Huffingtons, who had been close friends of the Bushes in Texas, both being oilers, also used the ultra-conservative churches to bring out a huge voter base in the Republican primary. That had never happened before in a primary election in Santa Barbara, but was old hat in Texas.

    It worked. Between the wild rumors and the high church turn-out, Lagomarsino was personally and politically destroyed by Mrs. Huffington.

    Two years later, her husband ran for the US Senate and the seat was won by an even more conservative Republican named Andrea Seastrand. And then Walter Capps beat Seastrand two years later.

    * I presume Arianna knew that her husband was gay when she was spreading rumors about Lagomarsino being gay. Ever since that campaign, I have thought that woman has no scruples, and never take anything she says to be her serious opinion, but instead more garbage to advance her career.

  17. Defeat W.

    Send a message to the school board! our patience is at an end!
    their irresponsibility will not be tolerated!

    Don’t punish our students? They suffer because the school board refuses to be responsible with our $ and spend it for their benefit. They simply slap a label “reading program”, “nutrition program”, … to mask waste, and our students pay for it with closed schools.

    Defeat W!

  18. Defeat W.

    Send a message to the school board! our patience is at an end!
    their irresponsibility will not be tolerated!

    Don’t punish our students? They suffer because the school board refuses to be responsible with our $ and spend it for their benefit. They simply slap a label “reading program”, “nutrition program”, … to mask waste, and our students pay for it with closed schools.

    Defeat W!

  19. Defeat W.

    Send a message to the school board! our patience is at an end!
    their irresponsibility will not be tolerated!

    Don’t punish our students? They suffer because the school board refuses to be responsible with our $ and spend it for their benefit. They simply slap a label “reading program”, “nutrition program”, … to mask waste, and our students pay for it with closed schools.

    Defeat W!

  20. Defeat W.

    Send a message to the school board! our patience is at an end!
    their irresponsibility will not be tolerated!

    Don’t punish our students? They suffer because the school board refuses to be responsible with our $ and spend it for their benefit. They simply slap a label “reading program”, “nutrition program”, … to mask waste, and our students pay for it with closed schools.

    Defeat W!

  21. Anonymous

    “They simply slap a label “reading program”, “nutrition program”,”

    Oh, boy.

    I think we’re in for another “salad rant” from someone who thinks schools should be run like they were 40+ years ago.

  22. Anonymous

    “They simply slap a label “reading program”, “nutrition program”,”

    Oh, boy.

    I think we’re in for another “salad rant” from someone who thinks schools should be run like they were 40+ years ago.

  23. Anonymous

    “They simply slap a label “reading program”, “nutrition program”,”

    Oh, boy.

    I think we’re in for another “salad rant” from someone who thinks schools should be run like they were 40+ years ago.

  24. Anonymous

    “They simply slap a label “reading program”, “nutrition program”,”

    Oh, boy.

    I think we’re in for another “salad rant” from someone who thinks schools should be run like they were 40+ years ago.

  25. Anonymous

    “They simply slap a label “reading program”, “nutrition program”, … to mask waste, and our students pay for it with closed schools.”

    You heard it here first … hiring reading teachers is wasteful!

    It’s not worth my hard earned $10 a month to give kids extra help with reading.

  26. Anonymous

    “They simply slap a label “reading program”, “nutrition program”, … to mask waste, and our students pay for it with closed schools.”

    You heard it here first … hiring reading teachers is wasteful!

    It’s not worth my hard earned $10 a month to give kids extra help with reading.

  27. Anonymous

    “They simply slap a label “reading program”, “nutrition program”, … to mask waste, and our students pay for it with closed schools.”

    You heard it here first … hiring reading teachers is wasteful!

    It’s not worth my hard earned $10 a month to give kids extra help with reading.

  28. Anonymous

    “They simply slap a label “reading program”, “nutrition program”, … to mask waste, and our students pay for it with closed schools.”

    You heard it here first … hiring reading teachers is wasteful!

    It’s not worth my hard earned $10 a month to give kids extra help with reading.

  29. I want better

    “I think we’re in for another “salad rant” from someone who thinks schools should be run like they were 40+ years ago.”

    Or we are in for another rant about how anyone who disagrees with Measure W is a ranter! Or who disagrees with Measure W doesn’t care about children. Or is only interested in money, not the community. Or doesn’t want to save valuable programs. In other words, if you don’t support Measure W, you are selfish and uncaring, and probably don’t have children currently enrolled in Davis schools, such as senior citizens.

    Sounds a lot like the current nationwide bailout mess. The argument goes if you don’t vote for the bailout of the lending institutions, you will only be hurting the economy. But the much wiser and infuriated electorate held out, and it looks like the bill that will come out of Congress will be better for it. Maybe the same applies to Measure W?

  30. I want better

    “I think we’re in for another “salad rant” from someone who thinks schools should be run like they were 40+ years ago.”

    Or we are in for another rant about how anyone who disagrees with Measure W is a ranter! Or who disagrees with Measure W doesn’t care about children. Or is only interested in money, not the community. Or doesn’t want to save valuable programs. In other words, if you don’t support Measure W, you are selfish and uncaring, and probably don’t have children currently enrolled in Davis schools, such as senior citizens.

    Sounds a lot like the current nationwide bailout mess. The argument goes if you don’t vote for the bailout of the lending institutions, you will only be hurting the economy. But the much wiser and infuriated electorate held out, and it looks like the bill that will come out of Congress will be better for it. Maybe the same applies to Measure W?

  31. I want better

    “I think we’re in for another “salad rant” from someone who thinks schools should be run like they were 40+ years ago.”

    Or we are in for another rant about how anyone who disagrees with Measure W is a ranter! Or who disagrees with Measure W doesn’t care about children. Or is only interested in money, not the community. Or doesn’t want to save valuable programs. In other words, if you don’t support Measure W, you are selfish and uncaring, and probably don’t have children currently enrolled in Davis schools, such as senior citizens.

    Sounds a lot like the current nationwide bailout mess. The argument goes if you don’t vote for the bailout of the lending institutions, you will only be hurting the economy. But the much wiser and infuriated electorate held out, and it looks like the bill that will come out of Congress will be better for it. Maybe the same applies to Measure W?

  32. I want better

    “I think we’re in for another “salad rant” from someone who thinks schools should be run like they were 40+ years ago.”

    Or we are in for another rant about how anyone who disagrees with Measure W is a ranter! Or who disagrees with Measure W doesn’t care about children. Or is only interested in money, not the community. Or doesn’t want to save valuable programs. In other words, if you don’t support Measure W, you are selfish and uncaring, and probably don’t have children currently enrolled in Davis schools, such as senior citizens.

    Sounds a lot like the current nationwide bailout mess. The argument goes if you don’t vote for the bailout of the lending institutions, you will only be hurting the economy. But the much wiser and infuriated electorate held out, and it looks like the bill that will come out of Congress will be better for it. Maybe the same applies to Measure W?

  33. Anonymous

    Please ignore the salad rant comment.

    What really piques my interest is how the school board allegedly spends our money for their benefit.

    I don’t know the exact amount, but school board members receive a stipend of ~$200, and some have turned it over to charity.

    So you make a pretty serious allegation. Please explain…

  34. Anonymous

    Please ignore the salad rant comment.

    What really piques my interest is how the school board allegedly spends our money for their benefit.

    I don’t know the exact amount, but school board members receive a stipend of ~$200, and some have turned it over to charity.

    So you make a pretty serious allegation. Please explain…

  35. Anonymous

    Please ignore the salad rant comment.

    What really piques my interest is how the school board allegedly spends our money for their benefit.

    I don’t know the exact amount, but school board members receive a stipend of ~$200, and some have turned it over to charity.

    So you make a pretty serious allegation. Please explain…

  36. Anonymous

    Please ignore the salad rant comment.

    What really piques my interest is how the school board allegedly spends our money for their benefit.

    I don’t know the exact amount, but school board members receive a stipend of ~$200, and some have turned it over to charity.

    So you make a pretty serious allegation. Please explain…

  37. Anonymous

    I just got my paper and read Rifkin’s editorial. He nailed it. And like he said, it bothers me that the school district is using its government website to promote this tax increase, which would not be needed if the district had not kept increasing the salaries of their employees. When government has a spending problem, they never cut back, they just ask for more money.

  38. Anonymous

    I just got my paper and read Rifkin’s editorial. He nailed it. And like he said, it bothers me that the school district is using its government website to promote this tax increase, which would not be needed if the district had not kept increasing the salaries of their employees. When government has a spending problem, they never cut back, they just ask for more money.

  39. Anonymous

    I just got my paper and read Rifkin’s editorial. He nailed it. And like he said, it bothers me that the school district is using its government website to promote this tax increase, which would not be needed if the district had not kept increasing the salaries of their employees. When government has a spending problem, they never cut back, they just ask for more money.

  40. Anonymous

    I just got my paper and read Rifkin’s editorial. He nailed it. And like he said, it bothers me that the school district is using its government website to promote this tax increase, which would not be needed if the district had not kept increasing the salaries of their employees. When government has a spending problem, they never cut back, they just ask for more money.

  41. Anonymous

    Is your wallet as waterproof as a frogs butt people ? $2.50 a week , or do you buy into the hype of Rich Rifkins lame article today in the Enterprise .

  42. Anonymous

    Is your wallet as waterproof as a frogs butt people ? $2.50 a week , or do you buy into the hype of Rich Rifkins lame article today in the Enterprise .

  43. Anonymous

    Is your wallet as waterproof as a frogs butt people ? $2.50 a week , or do you buy into the hype of Rich Rifkins lame article today in the Enterprise .

  44. Anonymous

    Is your wallet as waterproof as a frogs butt people ? $2.50 a week , or do you buy into the hype of Rich Rifkins lame article today in the Enterprise .

  45. Rifkin skeptic

    “And like he said, it bothers me that the school district is using its government website to promote this tax increase, which would not be needed if the district had not kept increasing the salaries of their employees.”

    Even with the current salaries that teachers make, I wouldn’t characterize teachers as being overpaid, certainly not compared to firefighters

    The problem with Rich’s assumptions is that it doesn’t appropriately factor in the cost of housing over the the ten years that he follows the increase.

    A hallmark of a middle class income is the ability to purchase a house. Senior teachers have already purchased homes at cheaper prices long ago. Newer teachers are generally paying much higher prices for a home.

    I think Rifkin makes a good case for capping salaries for a while, especially if housing prices remain stable or even drop. I think teachers are under contract, so I don’t think the district could take back anything.

  46. Rifkin skeptic

    “And like he said, it bothers me that the school district is using its government website to promote this tax increase, which would not be needed if the district had not kept increasing the salaries of their employees.”

    Even with the current salaries that teachers make, I wouldn’t characterize teachers as being overpaid, certainly not compared to firefighters

    The problem with Rich’s assumptions is that it doesn’t appropriately factor in the cost of housing over the the ten years that he follows the increase.

    A hallmark of a middle class income is the ability to purchase a house. Senior teachers have already purchased homes at cheaper prices long ago. Newer teachers are generally paying much higher prices for a home.

    I think Rifkin makes a good case for capping salaries for a while, especially if housing prices remain stable or even drop. I think teachers are under contract, so I don’t think the district could take back anything.

  47. Rifkin skeptic

    “And like he said, it bothers me that the school district is using its government website to promote this tax increase, which would not be needed if the district had not kept increasing the salaries of their employees.”

    Even with the current salaries that teachers make, I wouldn’t characterize teachers as being overpaid, certainly not compared to firefighters

    The problem with Rich’s assumptions is that it doesn’t appropriately factor in the cost of housing over the the ten years that he follows the increase.

    A hallmark of a middle class income is the ability to purchase a house. Senior teachers have already purchased homes at cheaper prices long ago. Newer teachers are generally paying much higher prices for a home.

    I think Rifkin makes a good case for capping salaries for a while, especially if housing prices remain stable or even drop. I think teachers are under contract, so I don’t think the district could take back anything.

  48. Rifkin skeptic

    “And like he said, it bothers me that the school district is using its government website to promote this tax increase, which would not be needed if the district had not kept increasing the salaries of their employees.”

    Even with the current salaries that teachers make, I wouldn’t characterize teachers as being overpaid, certainly not compared to firefighters

    The problem with Rich’s assumptions is that it doesn’t appropriately factor in the cost of housing over the the ten years that he follows the increase.

    A hallmark of a middle class income is the ability to purchase a house. Senior teachers have already purchased homes at cheaper prices long ago. Newer teachers are generally paying much higher prices for a home.

    I think Rifkin makes a good case for capping salaries for a while, especially if housing prices remain stable or even drop. I think teachers are under contract, so I don’t think the district could take back anything.

  49. Anonymous

    Teachers are way underpaid, need better benefits to take care of there families, so that they can take care of your children, don’t fall for the Rifkin hype !!!!

  50. Anonymous

    Teachers are way underpaid, need better benefits to take care of there families, so that they can take care of your children, don’t fall for the Rifkin hype !!!!

  51. Anonymous

    Teachers are way underpaid, need better benefits to take care of there families, so that they can take care of your children, don’t fall for the Rifkin hype !!!!

  52. Anonymous

    Teachers are way underpaid, need better benefits to take care of there families, so that they can take care of your children, don’t fall for the Rifkin hype !!!!

  53. Anonymous

    By the way, is your money better spent on CEO’s, COO’s, and companies who are cheating you out of your $$$$$, compared to the stability ,safety, and self sacrifice of a teacher ,nurse,cop,or firefighter..

    Don’t be brainwashed by this blog or Rifkin …

  54. Anonymous

    By the way, is your money better spent on CEO’s, COO’s, and companies who are cheating you out of your $$$$$, compared to the stability ,safety, and self sacrifice of a teacher ,nurse,cop,or firefighter..

    Don’t be brainwashed by this blog or Rifkin …

  55. Anonymous

    By the way, is your money better spent on CEO’s, COO’s, and companies who are cheating you out of your $$$$$, compared to the stability ,safety, and self sacrifice of a teacher ,nurse,cop,or firefighter..

    Don’t be brainwashed by this blog or Rifkin …

  56. Anonymous

    By the way, is your money better spent on CEO’s, COO’s, and companies who are cheating you out of your $$$$$, compared to the stability ,safety, and self sacrifice of a teacher ,nurse,cop,or firefighter..

    Don’t be brainwashed by this blog or Rifkin …

  57. different view

    I’ve said it before, and will again. $120 per year is a small price to pay, not only for educating the children, but for helping to maintain premium housing prices in Davis. The excess demand for housing in Davis is driven by the quality of the public schools and by the quality of life in Davis. Any rational property owner in Davis should support Measure W just based on protecting their investment. The educational benefits are just another bonus.

  58. different view

    I’ve said it before, and will again. $120 per year is a small price to pay, not only for educating the children, but for helping to maintain premium housing prices in Davis. The excess demand for housing in Davis is driven by the quality of the public schools and by the quality of life in Davis. Any rational property owner in Davis should support Measure W just based on protecting their investment. The educational benefits are just another bonus.

  59. different view

    I’ve said it before, and will again. $120 per year is a small price to pay, not only for educating the children, but for helping to maintain premium housing prices in Davis. The excess demand for housing in Davis is driven by the quality of the public schools and by the quality of life in Davis. Any rational property owner in Davis should support Measure W just based on protecting their investment. The educational benefits are just another bonus.

  60. different view

    I’ve said it before, and will again. $120 per year is a small price to pay, not only for educating the children, but for helping to maintain premium housing prices in Davis. The excess demand for housing in Davis is driven by the quality of the public schools and by the quality of life in Davis. Any rational property owner in Davis should support Measure W just based on protecting their investment. The educational benefits are just another bonus.

  61. Anonymous

    I’m sure that Rifkin, a regular on this blog, will be happy to weigh in to clarify. But I don’t take the conclusion of his article to be an outright rejection of Measure W. Some of other statements are certainly provocative — cut teacher salaries — but to act on that would be ludicrous.

    Don Shor and John Munn both indicate that Measure W is needed to fill a gap. But that going forward, more vigilence is needed.
    Rifkin uses some similar language about future vigilence without taking a clear position on W.

    Don Shor, in his recent blog, said, “Davis teachers are paid, on average, slightly more than the statewide average. Their benefits package is comparable to other districts.”

    I would be willing to say that teachers in Davis probably deserve the extra over-average owing to the housing. After all, even the average definitely isn’t lucrative.

    To take the position to oppose W because teachers should take a cut instead is a real cheap shot.

  62. Anonymous

    I’m sure that Rifkin, a regular on this blog, will be happy to weigh in to clarify. But I don’t take the conclusion of his article to be an outright rejection of Measure W. Some of other statements are certainly provocative — cut teacher salaries — but to act on that would be ludicrous.

    Don Shor and John Munn both indicate that Measure W is needed to fill a gap. But that going forward, more vigilence is needed.
    Rifkin uses some similar language about future vigilence without taking a clear position on W.

    Don Shor, in his recent blog, said, “Davis teachers are paid, on average, slightly more than the statewide average. Their benefits package is comparable to other districts.”

    I would be willing to say that teachers in Davis probably deserve the extra over-average owing to the housing. After all, even the average definitely isn’t lucrative.

    To take the position to oppose W because teachers should take a cut instead is a real cheap shot.

  63. Anonymous

    I’m sure that Rifkin, a regular on this blog, will be happy to weigh in to clarify. But I don’t take the conclusion of his article to be an outright rejection of Measure W. Some of other statements are certainly provocative — cut teacher salaries — but to act on that would be ludicrous.

    Don Shor and John Munn both indicate that Measure W is needed to fill a gap. But that going forward, more vigilence is needed.
    Rifkin uses some similar language about future vigilence without taking a clear position on W.

    Don Shor, in his recent blog, said, “Davis teachers are paid, on average, slightly more than the statewide average. Their benefits package is comparable to other districts.”

    I would be willing to say that teachers in Davis probably deserve the extra over-average owing to the housing. After all, even the average definitely isn’t lucrative.

    To take the position to oppose W because teachers should take a cut instead is a real cheap shot.

  64. Anonymous

    I’m sure that Rifkin, a regular on this blog, will be happy to weigh in to clarify. But I don’t take the conclusion of his article to be an outright rejection of Measure W. Some of other statements are certainly provocative — cut teacher salaries — but to act on that would be ludicrous.

    Don Shor and John Munn both indicate that Measure W is needed to fill a gap. But that going forward, more vigilence is needed.
    Rifkin uses some similar language about future vigilence without taking a clear position on W.

    Don Shor, in his recent blog, said, “Davis teachers are paid, on average, slightly more than the statewide average. Their benefits package is comparable to other districts.”

    I would be willing to say that teachers in Davis probably deserve the extra over-average owing to the housing. After all, even the average definitely isn’t lucrative.

    To take the position to oppose W because teachers should take a cut instead is a real cheap shot.

  65. Rich Rifkin

    “But I don’t take the conclusion of his article to be an outright rejection of Measure W.”

    That is a fair read regarding my view. I am still not certain how I will vote on W. Yet I cannot accept what the pro-W campaign is saying, that we are in this mess now because the state has “for years” been cutting funding for education. That simply is not true. The DJUSD created this problem, not the state.

    “Even with the current salaries that teachers make, I wouldn’t characterize teachers as being overpaid, certainly not compared to firefighters.”

    I don’t think teachers are necessarily overpaid (or over-benefitted) in some sort of societal comparison with other jobs. I would we prefer we valued good teachers twice as much as we value prison guards, but in pay the reverse is true.

    However, the Davis school board is not charged with answering that kind of philosophical question. It is charged with making contracts which conform with its budgetary constraints. And unfortunately, because they have failed to properly control their spending, despite much higher income over the past decade, our district is in a terrible bind right now, and the DTA has refused to budge to help them out of this mess.

    “The problem with Rich’s assumptions is that it doesn’t appropriately factor in the cost of housing over the the ten years that he follows the increase.”

    If you look up how the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ All-Urban CPI for the Bay Area is calculated — this is the figure used in Davis for inflation — it in fact includes the cost of housing. I am fairly certain that inflation factor is not specific to Davis, though I would guess our housing inflation (1998-2007) is in line with the Bay Area’s…. It is fair to note, though, that since 2006, inflation has been much higher than it was the 8 years prior, housing included. Food and transportation costs are way up, and these are included in the BLS numbers.

  66. Rich Rifkin

    “But I don’t take the conclusion of his article to be an outright rejection of Measure W.”

    That is a fair read regarding my view. I am still not certain how I will vote on W. Yet I cannot accept what the pro-W campaign is saying, that we are in this mess now because the state has “for years” been cutting funding for education. That simply is not true. The DJUSD created this problem, not the state.

    “Even with the current salaries that teachers make, I wouldn’t characterize teachers as being overpaid, certainly not compared to firefighters.”

    I don’t think teachers are necessarily overpaid (or over-benefitted) in some sort of societal comparison with other jobs. I would we prefer we valued good teachers twice as much as we value prison guards, but in pay the reverse is true.

    However, the Davis school board is not charged with answering that kind of philosophical question. It is charged with making contracts which conform with its budgetary constraints. And unfortunately, because they have failed to properly control their spending, despite much higher income over the past decade, our district is in a terrible bind right now, and the DTA has refused to budge to help them out of this mess.

    “The problem with Rich’s assumptions is that it doesn’t appropriately factor in the cost of housing over the the ten years that he follows the increase.”

    If you look up how the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ All-Urban CPI for the Bay Area is calculated — this is the figure used in Davis for inflation — it in fact includes the cost of housing. I am fairly certain that inflation factor is not specific to Davis, though I would guess our housing inflation (1998-2007) is in line with the Bay Area’s…. It is fair to note, though, that since 2006, inflation has been much higher than it was the 8 years prior, housing included. Food and transportation costs are way up, and these are included in the BLS numbers.

  67. Rich Rifkin

    “But I don’t take the conclusion of his article to be an outright rejection of Measure W.”

    That is a fair read regarding my view. I am still not certain how I will vote on W. Yet I cannot accept what the pro-W campaign is saying, that we are in this mess now because the state has “for years” been cutting funding for education. That simply is not true. The DJUSD created this problem, not the state.

    “Even with the current salaries that teachers make, I wouldn’t characterize teachers as being overpaid, certainly not compared to firefighters.”

    I don’t think teachers are necessarily overpaid (or over-benefitted) in some sort of societal comparison with other jobs. I would we prefer we valued good teachers twice as much as we value prison guards, but in pay the reverse is true.

    However, the Davis school board is not charged with answering that kind of philosophical question. It is charged with making contracts which conform with its budgetary constraints. And unfortunately, because they have failed to properly control their spending, despite much higher income over the past decade, our district is in a terrible bind right now, and the DTA has refused to budge to help them out of this mess.

    “The problem with Rich’s assumptions is that it doesn’t appropriately factor in the cost of housing over the the ten years that he follows the increase.”

    If you look up how the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ All-Urban CPI for the Bay Area is calculated — this is the figure used in Davis for inflation — it in fact includes the cost of housing. I am fairly certain that inflation factor is not specific to Davis, though I would guess our housing inflation (1998-2007) is in line with the Bay Area’s…. It is fair to note, though, that since 2006, inflation has been much higher than it was the 8 years prior, housing included. Food and transportation costs are way up, and these are included in the BLS numbers.

  68. Rich Rifkin

    “But I don’t take the conclusion of his article to be an outright rejection of Measure W.”

    That is a fair read regarding my view. I am still not certain how I will vote on W. Yet I cannot accept what the pro-W campaign is saying, that we are in this mess now because the state has “for years” been cutting funding for education. That simply is not true. The DJUSD created this problem, not the state.

    “Even with the current salaries that teachers make, I wouldn’t characterize teachers as being overpaid, certainly not compared to firefighters.”

    I don’t think teachers are necessarily overpaid (or over-benefitted) in some sort of societal comparison with other jobs. I would we prefer we valued good teachers twice as much as we value prison guards, but in pay the reverse is true.

    However, the Davis school board is not charged with answering that kind of philosophical question. It is charged with making contracts which conform with its budgetary constraints. And unfortunately, because they have failed to properly control their spending, despite much higher income over the past decade, our district is in a terrible bind right now, and the DTA has refused to budge to help them out of this mess.

    “The problem with Rich’s assumptions is that it doesn’t appropriately factor in the cost of housing over the the ten years that he follows the increase.”

    If you look up how the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ All-Urban CPI for the Bay Area is calculated — this is the figure used in Davis for inflation — it in fact includes the cost of housing. I am fairly certain that inflation factor is not specific to Davis, though I would guess our housing inflation (1998-2007) is in line with the Bay Area’s…. It is fair to note, though, that since 2006, inflation has been much higher than it was the 8 years prior, housing included. Food and transportation costs are way up, and these are included in the BLS numbers.

  69. Anonymous

    As usual, dpd is wrong again. More taxes? No Way. Having been here for 41+ years, I know the request for more funding is a continual issue. It stops here.

  70. Anonymous

    As usual, dpd is wrong again. More taxes? No Way. Having been here for 41+ years, I know the request for more funding is a continual issue. It stops here.

  71. Anonymous

    As usual, dpd is wrong again. More taxes? No Way. Having been here for 41+ years, I know the request for more funding is a continual issue. It stops here.

  72. Anonymous

    As usual, dpd is wrong again. More taxes? No Way. Having been here for 41+ years, I know the request for more funding is a continual issue. It stops here.

  73. Anonymous

    “As usual, dpd is wrong again. More taxes? No Way. Having been here for 41+ years, I know the request for more funding is a continual issue. It stops here.”

    If you want to use length of residency as a credential, I’ve got you beat.

    Investing in the education of the next generation is the most worthwhile use of taxes. It brings the highest return on the dollar to society.

    Increase the earning power of the next generation, and they will be able to pay more into medicare and social security for your generation.

    It reduces future expenditures on the corrections system, unemployment aid and unemployment.

    Overall it creates a stronger society.

    At present the funding structure for K-12 education is FUBAR. This is the best we can do to make it all work.

  74. Anonymous

    “As usual, dpd is wrong again. More taxes? No Way. Having been here for 41+ years, I know the request for more funding is a continual issue. It stops here.”

    If you want to use length of residency as a credential, I’ve got you beat.

    Investing in the education of the next generation is the most worthwhile use of taxes. It brings the highest return on the dollar to society.

    Increase the earning power of the next generation, and they will be able to pay more into medicare and social security for your generation.

    It reduces future expenditures on the corrections system, unemployment aid and unemployment.

    Overall it creates a stronger society.

    At present the funding structure for K-12 education is FUBAR. This is the best we can do to make it all work.

  75. Anonymous

    “As usual, dpd is wrong again. More taxes? No Way. Having been here for 41+ years, I know the request for more funding is a continual issue. It stops here.”

    If you want to use length of residency as a credential, I’ve got you beat.

    Investing in the education of the next generation is the most worthwhile use of taxes. It brings the highest return on the dollar to society.

    Increase the earning power of the next generation, and they will be able to pay more into medicare and social security for your generation.

    It reduces future expenditures on the corrections system, unemployment aid and unemployment.

    Overall it creates a stronger society.

    At present the funding structure for K-12 education is FUBAR. This is the best we can do to make it all work.

  76. Anonymous

    “As usual, dpd is wrong again. More taxes? No Way. Having been here for 41+ years, I know the request for more funding is a continual issue. It stops here.”

    If you want to use length of residency as a credential, I’ve got you beat.

    Investing in the education of the next generation is the most worthwhile use of taxes. It brings the highest return on the dollar to society.

    Increase the earning power of the next generation, and they will be able to pay more into medicare and social security for your generation.

    It reduces future expenditures on the corrections system, unemployment aid and unemployment.

    Overall it creates a stronger society.

    At present the funding structure for K-12 education is FUBAR. This is the best we can do to make it all work.

  77. Thomas Randall, Jr

    In response to the previous articles of this website you will find that I am now posting some commets regarding them. I am the author of the sample ballot statement against Measure W and the author of last Sunday’s article in the Davis Enterprise titled “Measure W is Wrong for Davis”

  78. Thomas Randall, Jr

    In response to the previous articles of this website you will find that I am now posting some commets regarding them. I am the author of the sample ballot statement against Measure W and the author of last Sunday’s article in the Davis Enterprise titled “Measure W is Wrong for Davis”

  79. Thomas Randall, Jr

    In response to the previous articles of this website you will find that I am now posting some commets regarding them. I am the author of the sample ballot statement against Measure W and the author of last Sunday’s article in the Davis Enterprise titled “Measure W is Wrong for Davis”

  80. Thomas Randall, Jr

    In response to the previous articles of this website you will find that I am now posting some commets regarding them. I am the author of the sample ballot statement against Measure W and the author of last Sunday’s article in the Davis Enterprise titled “Measure W is Wrong for Davis”

  81. voting for Measure W

    Hi, Thomas,

    One of your arguments last Sunday was that Measure W was unfair in that it did not differentiate between high value parcels and lower value parcels. All homeowners/parcel owners pay the same regardless.

    There’s a problem with that. Prop. 13 limits do not allow that kind of ad valorem assessment. You can propose a special tax based on the kind of property (hence the distinction between homeowner and apartment dweller), but you can’t propose a special tax to assess based on the value of the property.

    If you want to overturn Prop. 13, then you might be able to have your way with that kind of assessment.

  82. voting for Measure W

    Hi, Thomas,

    One of your arguments last Sunday was that Measure W was unfair in that it did not differentiate between high value parcels and lower value parcels. All homeowners/parcel owners pay the same regardless.

    There’s a problem with that. Prop. 13 limits do not allow that kind of ad valorem assessment. You can propose a special tax based on the kind of property (hence the distinction between homeowner and apartment dweller), but you can’t propose a special tax to assess based on the value of the property.

    If you want to overturn Prop. 13, then you might be able to have your way with that kind of assessment.

  83. voting for Measure W

    Hi, Thomas,

    One of your arguments last Sunday was that Measure W was unfair in that it did not differentiate between high value parcels and lower value parcels. All homeowners/parcel owners pay the same regardless.

    There’s a problem with that. Prop. 13 limits do not allow that kind of ad valorem assessment. You can propose a special tax based on the kind of property (hence the distinction between homeowner and apartment dweller), but you can’t propose a special tax to assess based on the value of the property.

    If you want to overturn Prop. 13, then you might be able to have your way with that kind of assessment.

  84. voting for Measure W

    Hi, Thomas,

    One of your arguments last Sunday was that Measure W was unfair in that it did not differentiate between high value parcels and lower value parcels. All homeowners/parcel owners pay the same regardless.

    There’s a problem with that. Prop. 13 limits do not allow that kind of ad valorem assessment. You can propose a special tax based on the kind of property (hence the distinction between homeowner and apartment dweller), but you can’t propose a special tax to assess based on the value of the property.

    If you want to overturn Prop. 13, then you might be able to have your way with that kind of assessment.

  85. steve-o

    I am trying to find out more about measure W. Can anyone give me CONCRETE evidence for not supporting the measure? I am particularly interested in comments such as “the district should be more responsible with current budget,” etc. Can anyone help me out here?

  86. steve-o

    I am trying to find out more about measure W. Can anyone give me CONCRETE evidence for not supporting the measure? I am particularly interested in comments such as “the district should be more responsible with current budget,” etc. Can anyone help me out here?

  87. steve-o

    I am trying to find out more about measure W. Can anyone give me CONCRETE evidence for not supporting the measure? I am particularly interested in comments such as “the district should be more responsible with current budget,” etc. Can anyone help me out here?

  88. steve-o

    I am trying to find out more about measure W. Can anyone give me CONCRETE evidence for not supporting the measure? I am particularly interested in comments such as “the district should be more responsible with current budget,” etc. Can anyone help me out here?

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