Davis DANG on Vanguard Radio Talk About the Prospects for a New Grocer in West Davis

On Wednesday night, on KDRT 95.7 FM, Vanguard Radio had on three members from the group DANG–Davis Advocates for Neighborhood Grocers–Eric Nelson, Russ Snyder, and Katherine West.

Click here to listen to the entire interview: Radio Interview

One of the points they made is that there is a perception that this is a bad location for a grocery store. What they believe has been shown over time is that poorly run stores will not do well in this location. They argue for instance that Farmtown Market did exceedingly well in this location and that the only reason that it left was that the owner, the original owner of the plaza, wanted to get out of the grocer business. He had only gotten into the business to begin with due to the requirements for a grocery store. But it was well run and profitable.

Next came Ray’s Market. Ray’s Market also did well there but there were logistical problems due to the fact it was Oregon-based and the southern-most Ray’s Market location. Toward the end, the Ray’s Market did poorly but that in part because of lack of upkeep of the store.

Even Food Fair initially turned a profit but quickly lost money when they never put money or resources into the store. Food shelves were rarely re-stocked and people had no good reason to go there.

Because of the smaller size, what is needed is a store that can cater to people purchasing a meal or two at the store. Which suggests some specialty items but also just as importantly a wide-berth of items so that people can do all of their shopping for that meal at one store.

It is an interesting discussion and worth listening to.

They could not divulge the grocers, but apparently there are several that have expressed a realistic interest in the spot in the last month or two. They seem very optimistic that this spot will be filled and that if it is a well-run store it will succeed.

DANG maintains an active website with a load of information. I have already put the link on the side bar, but click here for more information about DANG, their activities, and how you can get involved.

About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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60 Comments

  1. David J. Thompson

    David J. Thompson said…
    DANG board members Eric Nelson, Russ Snyder and Katherine West did an excellent job of covering the past and present efforts to get a neighborhood store in West Davis. Thanks to David Greenwald for his excellent questions and informed background on the store. Please listen to the show it makes you proud of the activist citizens of Davis. In January DANG will kick off a capital campaign so that the community can be a partner in bringing a neighborhood store to West Davis. Contact us through our web site if you are able to make a pledge.

    Building Community from the Ground Up
    Grocery Stores are the Vibrant
    Anchors of Neighborhood Shopping Centers

    Attracting an appropriately sized and merchandised neighborhood grocery store (not another convenience store) to the Westlake Plaza Shopping Center will take effort from the community. Our group, Davis Advocates for Neighborhood Groceries (DANG) agrees that the trading area (13,000 people) does not presently support a 23,000 square foot store the size of the former Ray’s or Food Fair. However, we do strongly believe that a moderate sized grocery store will be a great contributor to the health of the shopping center.

    We also believe that a grocery store operator will feel much more confident about locating in West Davis if the community can demonstrate that it is ready, willing, and able to support a store. We can demonstrate our support a number of different ways. To attract a grocery store to locate in West Davis will require evidence in a number of categories, including:

    1. A sense of neighborhood support for the grocery store;
    DANG is doing this with our petitions from 1,000 plus people to the City to maintain the grocery zoning requirement of 15,000 square feet.
    2. Publicity and outreach. DANG is doing this by holding regular meetings, sponsoring public forums, issuing press releases and email alerts and at our website davisdang.org.
    3. DANG now proposes demonstrating that West Davis and the Davis supporters of neighborhood grocer stores will economically support a neighborhood grocery store.
    DANG believes we can best do this through a capital pledge drive.

    DANG will support all forms of ownership scenarios as long as it meets the community’s merchandising criteria. If it does meet this criteria, whether it is a branch of the Davis Food Co-op, a new food co-op, a branch of an existing chain of neighborhood stores, or an existing independent food store operation, it will be fully supported. However, DANG will not support any form of convenience store.

    We understand that a grocery store operator may not have all the capital needed to fund an additional store. At this point we think it valuable to show our economic support for a West Davis neighborhood grocery store by pledging to invest in a viable project. A number of communities in the US that had no grocery store have raised their own capital to attract a store. These efforts could be called Community Supported Markets (CSM), just like Community Supported Agriculture (CSA’s) where city families support family farmers through investment and patronage. For example, the Davis Food Co-op will likely look more at doing a store in West Davis if the community shows capital support. Help us show support for a West Davis Neighborhood Grocery Store by making a non-binding pledge of monetary support.

    Capital Pledge Campaign
    towards a
    West Davis Neighborhood Grocery Store

    I/We support the efforts to bring a neighborhood grocery store to West Davis. I/We pledge to provide share or loan capital to support a neighborhood grocery store which is either; a branch of the Davis Food Co-op; a new Co-op or a Community Supported Market.

    One of the DANG board members has put it so well:
    “We need to really demonstrate our resolve to the City, the landlord, and any prospective grocer that we are willing to put our money where our mouth lives.”

    DANG has adopted a goal of a minimum of $100,000 up to $250,000 in pledges towards supporting a neighborhood grocery store in West Davis.

    12/13/08 9:53 AM

  2. David J. Thompson

    David J. Thompson said…
    DANG board members Eric Nelson, Russ Snyder and Katherine West did an excellent job of covering the past and present efforts to get a neighborhood store in West Davis. Thanks to David Greenwald for his excellent questions and informed background on the store. Please listen to the show it makes you proud of the activist citizens of Davis. In January DANG will kick off a capital campaign so that the community can be a partner in bringing a neighborhood store to West Davis. Contact us through our web site if you are able to make a pledge.

    Building Community from the Ground Up
    Grocery Stores are the Vibrant
    Anchors of Neighborhood Shopping Centers

    Attracting an appropriately sized and merchandised neighborhood grocery store (not another convenience store) to the Westlake Plaza Shopping Center will take effort from the community. Our group, Davis Advocates for Neighborhood Groceries (DANG) agrees that the trading area (13,000 people) does not presently support a 23,000 square foot store the size of the former Ray’s or Food Fair. However, we do strongly believe that a moderate sized grocery store will be a great contributor to the health of the shopping center.

    We also believe that a grocery store operator will feel much more confident about locating in West Davis if the community can demonstrate that it is ready, willing, and able to support a store. We can demonstrate our support a number of different ways. To attract a grocery store to locate in West Davis will require evidence in a number of categories, including:

    1. A sense of neighborhood support for the grocery store;
    DANG is doing this with our petitions from 1,000 plus people to the City to maintain the grocery zoning requirement of 15,000 square feet.
    2. Publicity and outreach. DANG is doing this by holding regular meetings, sponsoring public forums, issuing press releases and email alerts and at our website davisdang.org.
    3. DANG now proposes demonstrating that West Davis and the Davis supporters of neighborhood grocer stores will economically support a neighborhood grocery store.
    DANG believes we can best do this through a capital pledge drive.

    DANG will support all forms of ownership scenarios as long as it meets the community’s merchandising criteria. If it does meet this criteria, whether it is a branch of the Davis Food Co-op, a new food co-op, a branch of an existing chain of neighborhood stores, or an existing independent food store operation, it will be fully supported. However, DANG will not support any form of convenience store.

    We understand that a grocery store operator may not have all the capital needed to fund an additional store. At this point we think it valuable to show our economic support for a West Davis neighborhood grocery store by pledging to invest in a viable project. A number of communities in the US that had no grocery store have raised their own capital to attract a store. These efforts could be called Community Supported Markets (CSM), just like Community Supported Agriculture (CSA’s) where city families support family farmers through investment and patronage. For example, the Davis Food Co-op will likely look more at doing a store in West Davis if the community shows capital support. Help us show support for a West Davis Neighborhood Grocery Store by making a non-binding pledge of monetary support.

    Capital Pledge Campaign
    towards a
    West Davis Neighborhood Grocery Store

    I/We support the efforts to bring a neighborhood grocery store to West Davis. I/We pledge to provide share or loan capital to support a neighborhood grocery store which is either; a branch of the Davis Food Co-op; a new Co-op or a Community Supported Market.

    One of the DANG board members has put it so well:
    “We need to really demonstrate our resolve to the City, the landlord, and any prospective grocer that we are willing to put our money where our mouth lives.”

    DANG has adopted a goal of a minimum of $100,000 up to $250,000 in pledges towards supporting a neighborhood grocery store in West Davis.

    12/13/08 9:53 AM

  3. David J. Thompson

    David J. Thompson said…
    DANG board members Eric Nelson, Russ Snyder and Katherine West did an excellent job of covering the past and present efforts to get a neighborhood store in West Davis. Thanks to David Greenwald for his excellent questions and informed background on the store. Please listen to the show it makes you proud of the activist citizens of Davis. In January DANG will kick off a capital campaign so that the community can be a partner in bringing a neighborhood store to West Davis. Contact us through our web site if you are able to make a pledge.

    Building Community from the Ground Up
    Grocery Stores are the Vibrant
    Anchors of Neighborhood Shopping Centers

    Attracting an appropriately sized and merchandised neighborhood grocery store (not another convenience store) to the Westlake Plaza Shopping Center will take effort from the community. Our group, Davis Advocates for Neighborhood Groceries (DANG) agrees that the trading area (13,000 people) does not presently support a 23,000 square foot store the size of the former Ray’s or Food Fair. However, we do strongly believe that a moderate sized grocery store will be a great contributor to the health of the shopping center.

    We also believe that a grocery store operator will feel much more confident about locating in West Davis if the community can demonstrate that it is ready, willing, and able to support a store. We can demonstrate our support a number of different ways. To attract a grocery store to locate in West Davis will require evidence in a number of categories, including:

    1. A sense of neighborhood support for the grocery store;
    DANG is doing this with our petitions from 1,000 plus people to the City to maintain the grocery zoning requirement of 15,000 square feet.
    2. Publicity and outreach. DANG is doing this by holding regular meetings, sponsoring public forums, issuing press releases and email alerts and at our website davisdang.org.
    3. DANG now proposes demonstrating that West Davis and the Davis supporters of neighborhood grocer stores will economically support a neighborhood grocery store.
    DANG believes we can best do this through a capital pledge drive.

    DANG will support all forms of ownership scenarios as long as it meets the community’s merchandising criteria. If it does meet this criteria, whether it is a branch of the Davis Food Co-op, a new food co-op, a branch of an existing chain of neighborhood stores, or an existing independent food store operation, it will be fully supported. However, DANG will not support any form of convenience store.

    We understand that a grocery store operator may not have all the capital needed to fund an additional store. At this point we think it valuable to show our economic support for a West Davis neighborhood grocery store by pledging to invest in a viable project. A number of communities in the US that had no grocery store have raised their own capital to attract a store. These efforts could be called Community Supported Markets (CSM), just like Community Supported Agriculture (CSA’s) where city families support family farmers through investment and patronage. For example, the Davis Food Co-op will likely look more at doing a store in West Davis if the community shows capital support. Help us show support for a West Davis Neighborhood Grocery Store by making a non-binding pledge of monetary support.

    Capital Pledge Campaign
    towards a
    West Davis Neighborhood Grocery Store

    I/We support the efforts to bring a neighborhood grocery store to West Davis. I/We pledge to provide share or loan capital to support a neighborhood grocery store which is either; a branch of the Davis Food Co-op; a new Co-op or a Community Supported Market.

    One of the DANG board members has put it so well:
    “We need to really demonstrate our resolve to the City, the landlord, and any prospective grocer that we are willing to put our money where our mouth lives.”

    DANG has adopted a goal of a minimum of $100,000 up to $250,000 in pledges towards supporting a neighborhood grocery store in West Davis.

    12/13/08 9:53 AM

  4. David J. Thompson

    David J. Thompson said…
    DANG board members Eric Nelson, Russ Snyder and Katherine West did an excellent job of covering the past and present efforts to get a neighborhood store in West Davis. Thanks to David Greenwald for his excellent questions and informed background on the store. Please listen to the show it makes you proud of the activist citizens of Davis. In January DANG will kick off a capital campaign so that the community can be a partner in bringing a neighborhood store to West Davis. Contact us through our web site if you are able to make a pledge.

    Building Community from the Ground Up
    Grocery Stores are the Vibrant
    Anchors of Neighborhood Shopping Centers

    Attracting an appropriately sized and merchandised neighborhood grocery store (not another convenience store) to the Westlake Plaza Shopping Center will take effort from the community. Our group, Davis Advocates for Neighborhood Groceries (DANG) agrees that the trading area (13,000 people) does not presently support a 23,000 square foot store the size of the former Ray’s or Food Fair. However, we do strongly believe that a moderate sized grocery store will be a great contributor to the health of the shopping center.

    We also believe that a grocery store operator will feel much more confident about locating in West Davis if the community can demonstrate that it is ready, willing, and able to support a store. We can demonstrate our support a number of different ways. To attract a grocery store to locate in West Davis will require evidence in a number of categories, including:

    1. A sense of neighborhood support for the grocery store;
    DANG is doing this with our petitions from 1,000 plus people to the City to maintain the grocery zoning requirement of 15,000 square feet.
    2. Publicity and outreach. DANG is doing this by holding regular meetings, sponsoring public forums, issuing press releases and email alerts and at our website davisdang.org.
    3. DANG now proposes demonstrating that West Davis and the Davis supporters of neighborhood grocer stores will economically support a neighborhood grocery store.
    DANG believes we can best do this through a capital pledge drive.

    DANG will support all forms of ownership scenarios as long as it meets the community’s merchandising criteria. If it does meet this criteria, whether it is a branch of the Davis Food Co-op, a new food co-op, a branch of an existing chain of neighborhood stores, or an existing independent food store operation, it will be fully supported. However, DANG will not support any form of convenience store.

    We understand that a grocery store operator may not have all the capital needed to fund an additional store. At this point we think it valuable to show our economic support for a West Davis neighborhood grocery store by pledging to invest in a viable project. A number of communities in the US that had no grocery store have raised their own capital to attract a store. These efforts could be called Community Supported Markets (CSM), just like Community Supported Agriculture (CSA’s) where city families support family farmers through investment and patronage. For example, the Davis Food Co-op will likely look more at doing a store in West Davis if the community shows capital support. Help us show support for a West Davis Neighborhood Grocery Store by making a non-binding pledge of monetary support.

    Capital Pledge Campaign
    towards a
    West Davis Neighborhood Grocery Store

    I/We support the efforts to bring a neighborhood grocery store to West Davis. I/We pledge to provide share or loan capital to support a neighborhood grocery store which is either; a branch of the Davis Food Co-op; a new Co-op or a Community Supported Market.

    One of the DANG board members has put it so well:
    “We need to really demonstrate our resolve to the City, the landlord, and any prospective grocer that we are willing to put our money where our mouth lives.”

    DANG has adopted a goal of a minimum of $100,000 up to $250,000 in pledges towards supporting a neighborhood grocery store in West Davis.

    12/13/08 9:53 AM

  5. Carolyn Hinshaw

    I will pledge $100 dollars towards the effort to bring a grocery store to West Davis. Maybe more if my ship comes in – although it seems to be foundering on the shoals as I write this.

    I challenge everyone in West Davis to match – or exceed – my pledge.

  6. Carolyn Hinshaw

    I will pledge $100 dollars towards the effort to bring a grocery store to West Davis. Maybe more if my ship comes in – although it seems to be foundering on the shoals as I write this.

    I challenge everyone in West Davis to match – or exceed – my pledge.

  7. Carolyn Hinshaw

    I will pledge $100 dollars towards the effort to bring a grocery store to West Davis. Maybe more if my ship comes in – although it seems to be foundering on the shoals as I write this.

    I challenge everyone in West Davis to match – or exceed – my pledge.

  8. Carolyn Hinshaw

    I will pledge $100 dollars towards the effort to bring a grocery store to West Davis. Maybe more if my ship comes in – although it seems to be foundering on the shoals as I write this.

    I challenge everyone in West Davis to match – or exceed – my pledge.

  9. East Davis Activist

    Local stores, especially those selling groceries and meeting the needs of surrounding neighborhoods, benefit all of Davis in a number of important ways.

    1. They reduces driving and associated traffic as people do less driving to stores further away. This will be especially important in West Davis where there aren’t any grocery stores.

    2. Less driving and traffic means less pollution and gas use. That will be more and more important as Peak Oil inevitably catches up with us and as global warming becomes more serious.

    3. Local groceries anchor shopping centers which then remain viable and bring in tax revenue to the city, which we certainly need.

    4. Local groceries, like local schools help property values which help residents and the city.

    5. Local groceries support neighborliness and people getting to know each other better as they see each other much more often in their local groceries and shopping centers than those in other parts of town.

    All of Davis should support a grocery at the Lake Blvd shopping center. It’s in all our interests.

  10. East Davis Activist

    Local stores, especially those selling groceries and meeting the needs of surrounding neighborhoods, benefit all of Davis in a number of important ways.

    1. They reduces driving and associated traffic as people do less driving to stores further away. This will be especially important in West Davis where there aren’t any grocery stores.

    2. Less driving and traffic means less pollution and gas use. That will be more and more important as Peak Oil inevitably catches up with us and as global warming becomes more serious.

    3. Local groceries anchor shopping centers which then remain viable and bring in tax revenue to the city, which we certainly need.

    4. Local groceries, like local schools help property values which help residents and the city.

    5. Local groceries support neighborliness and people getting to know each other better as they see each other much more often in their local groceries and shopping centers than those in other parts of town.

    All of Davis should support a grocery at the Lake Blvd shopping center. It’s in all our interests.

  11. East Davis Activist

    Local stores, especially those selling groceries and meeting the needs of surrounding neighborhoods, benefit all of Davis in a number of important ways.

    1. They reduces driving and associated traffic as people do less driving to stores further away. This will be especially important in West Davis where there aren’t any grocery stores.

    2. Less driving and traffic means less pollution and gas use. That will be more and more important as Peak Oil inevitably catches up with us and as global warming becomes more serious.

    3. Local groceries anchor shopping centers which then remain viable and bring in tax revenue to the city, which we certainly need.

    4. Local groceries, like local schools help property values which help residents and the city.

    5. Local groceries support neighborliness and people getting to know each other better as they see each other much more often in their local groceries and shopping centers than those in other parts of town.

    All of Davis should support a grocery at the Lake Blvd shopping center. It’s in all our interests.

  12. East Davis Activist

    Local stores, especially those selling groceries and meeting the needs of surrounding neighborhoods, benefit all of Davis in a number of important ways.

    1. They reduces driving and associated traffic as people do less driving to stores further away. This will be especially important in West Davis where there aren’t any grocery stores.

    2. Less driving and traffic means less pollution and gas use. That will be more and more important as Peak Oil inevitably catches up with us and as global warming becomes more serious.

    3. Local groceries anchor shopping centers which then remain viable and bring in tax revenue to the city, which we certainly need.

    4. Local groceries, like local schools help property values which help residents and the city.

    5. Local groceries support neighborliness and people getting to know each other better as they see each other much more often in their local groceries and shopping centers than those in other parts of town.

    All of Davis should support a grocery at the Lake Blvd shopping center. It’s in all our interests.

  13. Rich Rifkin

    May 15, 2009 will mark the third anniversary of the closing of Food Fair. I would be surprised if a new supermarket opens in Westlake before that date.

    Anyone want to wager a $2 cup of coffee: you say DANG (or the owner) will succeed and bring in a supermarket or grocer to WSC, I say they will not.

    I’m not rooting against a store opening there. I realize how vital it is to a neighborhood to have a healthy shopping center and to have the convenience of a supermarket. I simply believe what the owner (former now?) of the shopping center told me: no supermarket operators like that site; and because of the tough economy, it will be even harder to get one interested in 2009.

  14. Rich Rifkin

    May 15, 2009 will mark the third anniversary of the closing of Food Fair. I would be surprised if a new supermarket opens in Westlake before that date.

    Anyone want to wager a $2 cup of coffee: you say DANG (or the owner) will succeed and bring in a supermarket or grocer to WSC, I say they will not.

    I’m not rooting against a store opening there. I realize how vital it is to a neighborhood to have a healthy shopping center and to have the convenience of a supermarket. I simply believe what the owner (former now?) of the shopping center told me: no supermarket operators like that site; and because of the tough economy, it will be even harder to get one interested in 2009.

  15. Rich Rifkin

    May 15, 2009 will mark the third anniversary of the closing of Food Fair. I would be surprised if a new supermarket opens in Westlake before that date.

    Anyone want to wager a $2 cup of coffee: you say DANG (or the owner) will succeed and bring in a supermarket or grocer to WSC, I say they will not.

    I’m not rooting against a store opening there. I realize how vital it is to a neighborhood to have a healthy shopping center and to have the convenience of a supermarket. I simply believe what the owner (former now?) of the shopping center told me: no supermarket operators like that site; and because of the tough economy, it will be even harder to get one interested in 2009.

  16. Rich Rifkin

    May 15, 2009 will mark the third anniversary of the closing of Food Fair. I would be surprised if a new supermarket opens in Westlake before that date.

    Anyone want to wager a $2 cup of coffee: you say DANG (or the owner) will succeed and bring in a supermarket or grocer to WSC, I say they will not.

    I’m not rooting against a store opening there. I realize how vital it is to a neighborhood to have a healthy shopping center and to have the convenience of a supermarket. I simply believe what the owner (former now?) of the shopping center told me: no supermarket operators like that site; and because of the tough economy, it will be even harder to get one interested in 2009.

  17. Anonymous

    Rich:

    Don’t buy into the ancient misinformation from the former Westlake Plaza frontman (a minority partner) who has since been moved out of the picture. His penchant for giving inaccurate or contradictory information at public meetings created nothing but animosity and probably delayed a market solution at Westlake by more than a year. The original agenda of the ownership group was fairly obvious: to let the center deteriorate, drive off any potential markets with unreasonabily high lease terms and convert the grocery space to more profitable office space. That is no doubt why the loading dock was quickly filled in and all the coolers and other grocery infrastructure hauled away. Now the ownership group has come around and appears to be more serious about recruting a grocery tenant. The partnership between the shopping center’s representatives and members of DANG is productive, and it appears to be gathering momentum.

    Make mine an extra-large coffee.

  18. Anonymous

    Rich:

    Don’t buy into the ancient misinformation from the former Westlake Plaza frontman (a minority partner) who has since been moved out of the picture. His penchant for giving inaccurate or contradictory information at public meetings created nothing but animosity and probably delayed a market solution at Westlake by more than a year. The original agenda of the ownership group was fairly obvious: to let the center deteriorate, drive off any potential markets with unreasonabily high lease terms and convert the grocery space to more profitable office space. That is no doubt why the loading dock was quickly filled in and all the coolers and other grocery infrastructure hauled away. Now the ownership group has come around and appears to be more serious about recruting a grocery tenant. The partnership between the shopping center’s representatives and members of DANG is productive, and it appears to be gathering momentum.

    Make mine an extra-large coffee.

  19. Anonymous

    Rich:

    Don’t buy into the ancient misinformation from the former Westlake Plaza frontman (a minority partner) who has since been moved out of the picture. His penchant for giving inaccurate or contradictory information at public meetings created nothing but animosity and probably delayed a market solution at Westlake by more than a year. The original agenda of the ownership group was fairly obvious: to let the center deteriorate, drive off any potential markets with unreasonabily high lease terms and convert the grocery space to more profitable office space. That is no doubt why the loading dock was quickly filled in and all the coolers and other grocery infrastructure hauled away. Now the ownership group has come around and appears to be more serious about recruting a grocery tenant. The partnership between the shopping center’s representatives and members of DANG is productive, and it appears to be gathering momentum.

    Make mine an extra-large coffee.

  20. Anonymous

    Rich:

    Don’t buy into the ancient misinformation from the former Westlake Plaza frontman (a minority partner) who has since been moved out of the picture. His penchant for giving inaccurate or contradictory information at public meetings created nothing but animosity and probably delayed a market solution at Westlake by more than a year. The original agenda of the ownership group was fairly obvious: to let the center deteriorate, drive off any potential markets with unreasonabily high lease terms and convert the grocery space to more profitable office space. That is no doubt why the loading dock was quickly filled in and all the coolers and other grocery infrastructure hauled away. Now the ownership group has come around and appears to be more serious about recruting a grocery tenant. The partnership between the shopping center’s representatives and members of DANG is productive, and it appears to be gathering momentum.

    Make mine an extra-large coffee.

  21. Farwester

    Rich . . . how Rich . . . never a positive note from your pen . . . how dull! I’ll put my money where my mouth LIVES . . . sign me up for a $500 pledge. And make mine a tall skinny latte!!

  22. Farwester

    Rich . . . how Rich . . . never a positive note from your pen . . . how dull! I’ll put my money where my mouth LIVES . . . sign me up for a $500 pledge. And make mine a tall skinny latte!!

  23. Farwester

    Rich . . . how Rich . . . never a positive note from your pen . . . how dull! I’ll put my money where my mouth LIVES . . . sign me up for a $500 pledge. And make mine a tall skinny latte!!

  24. Farwester

    Rich . . . how Rich . . . never a positive note from your pen . . . how dull! I’ll put my money where my mouth LIVES . . . sign me up for a $500 pledge. And make mine a tall skinny latte!!

  25. Anonymous

    Rich-

    The “bad location” issue is OLD propaganda, you and St.John must read your own puff . . . and believe it!

    Rumor has it that there is a qualified (50 years in the grocery business) and current operator of a number of high quality independent groceries in the Bay Area has already negotiated acceptable terms with the Westlake property owner and says he can be profitable on day 2. So check your sources and your facts, and maybe get the soles of your shoes off your carpet and out on the street.

  26. Anonymous

    Rich-

    The “bad location” issue is OLD propaganda, you and St.John must read your own puff . . . and believe it!

    Rumor has it that there is a qualified (50 years in the grocery business) and current operator of a number of high quality independent groceries in the Bay Area has already negotiated acceptable terms with the Westlake property owner and says he can be profitable on day 2. So check your sources and your facts, and maybe get the soles of your shoes off your carpet and out on the street.

  27. Anonymous

    Rich-

    The “bad location” issue is OLD propaganda, you and St.John must read your own puff . . . and believe it!

    Rumor has it that there is a qualified (50 years in the grocery business) and current operator of a number of high quality independent groceries in the Bay Area has already negotiated acceptable terms with the Westlake property owner and says he can be profitable on day 2. So check your sources and your facts, and maybe get the soles of your shoes off your carpet and out on the street.

  28. Anonymous

    Rich-

    The “bad location” issue is OLD propaganda, you and St.John must read your own puff . . . and believe it!

    Rumor has it that there is a qualified (50 years in the grocery business) and current operator of a number of high quality independent groceries in the Bay Area has already negotiated acceptable terms with the Westlake property owner and says he can be profitable on day 2. So check your sources and your facts, and maybe get the soles of your shoes off your carpet and out on the street.

  29. Anonymous

    “Why pledge drive”
    I would presume that DANG is operating independently of the other parties involved and wants to ensure a positive outcome by lowering the capital commitment threshold, plus demonstrate community support of the project . . . nothing beats customers who have “ownership”, just ask the Davis Co-op.

  30. Anonymous

    “Why pledge drive”
    I would presume that DANG is operating independently of the other parties involved and wants to ensure a positive outcome by lowering the capital commitment threshold, plus demonstrate community support of the project . . . nothing beats customers who have “ownership”, just ask the Davis Co-op.

  31. Anonymous

    “Why pledge drive”
    I would presume that DANG is operating independently of the other parties involved and wants to ensure a positive outcome by lowering the capital commitment threshold, plus demonstrate community support of the project . . . nothing beats customers who have “ownership”, just ask the Davis Co-op.

  32. Anonymous

    “Why pledge drive”
    I would presume that DANG is operating independently of the other parties involved and wants to ensure a positive outcome by lowering the capital commitment threshold, plus demonstrate community support of the project . . . nothing beats customers who have “ownership”, just ask the Davis Co-op.

  33. David J. Thompson

    Dear Anonymous:
    DANG wants to be pro-active in getting a neighborhood store in West Davis. We see three options; a private operator moves in, the DFC decides to move in, or a new co-op is started. In all three cases capital coming from the community can play a role in attracting and facilitating the opening of a neighborhood store. A number of community supported stores are being opened around the country where the community puts up some of the capital in partnership with a private store owner (just like the CSA’s locally support a number of local farmers).
    Go to the DANG web site and you can see stories about community capital helping open up stores. DANG has pledges of $4,700 even before launching the capital pledge campaign. Anonymous you are welcome to contact us to make your pledge through our website.

    Here’s a list of recent community capital fund raisers for neighborhood stores:

    $1,043,000 Weaver Street Market, Carrboro, NC (for existing co-op’s third store in Hillsborough)

    $1,101,400 River Valley Market, Northampton, MA (new co-op opening its first co-op store)

    $750,000 Wheatsville, Austin, TX (remodel of existing co-op store)

    $500,000 Garnett Mercantile, Ely, NV (bringing back a store to the community)
    $400,000 Powell Mercantile, WY (bringing back a store to the community)

  34. David J. Thompson

    Dear Anonymous:
    DANG wants to be pro-active in getting a neighborhood store in West Davis. We see three options; a private operator moves in, the DFC decides to move in, or a new co-op is started. In all three cases capital coming from the community can play a role in attracting and facilitating the opening of a neighborhood store. A number of community supported stores are being opened around the country where the community puts up some of the capital in partnership with a private store owner (just like the CSA’s locally support a number of local farmers).
    Go to the DANG web site and you can see stories about community capital helping open up stores. DANG has pledges of $4,700 even before launching the capital pledge campaign. Anonymous you are welcome to contact us to make your pledge through our website.

    Here’s a list of recent community capital fund raisers for neighborhood stores:

    $1,043,000 Weaver Street Market, Carrboro, NC (for existing co-op’s third store in Hillsborough)

    $1,101,400 River Valley Market, Northampton, MA (new co-op opening its first co-op store)

    $750,000 Wheatsville, Austin, TX (remodel of existing co-op store)

    $500,000 Garnett Mercantile, Ely, NV (bringing back a store to the community)
    $400,000 Powell Mercantile, WY (bringing back a store to the community)

  35. David J. Thompson

    Dear Anonymous:
    DANG wants to be pro-active in getting a neighborhood store in West Davis. We see three options; a private operator moves in, the DFC decides to move in, or a new co-op is started. In all three cases capital coming from the community can play a role in attracting and facilitating the opening of a neighborhood store. A number of community supported stores are being opened around the country where the community puts up some of the capital in partnership with a private store owner (just like the CSA’s locally support a number of local farmers).
    Go to the DANG web site and you can see stories about community capital helping open up stores. DANG has pledges of $4,700 even before launching the capital pledge campaign. Anonymous you are welcome to contact us to make your pledge through our website.

    Here’s a list of recent community capital fund raisers for neighborhood stores:

    $1,043,000 Weaver Street Market, Carrboro, NC (for existing co-op’s third store in Hillsborough)

    $1,101,400 River Valley Market, Northampton, MA (new co-op opening its first co-op store)

    $750,000 Wheatsville, Austin, TX (remodel of existing co-op store)

    $500,000 Garnett Mercantile, Ely, NV (bringing back a store to the community)
    $400,000 Powell Mercantile, WY (bringing back a store to the community)

  36. David J. Thompson

    Dear Anonymous:
    DANG wants to be pro-active in getting a neighborhood store in West Davis. We see three options; a private operator moves in, the DFC decides to move in, or a new co-op is started. In all three cases capital coming from the community can play a role in attracting and facilitating the opening of a neighborhood store. A number of community supported stores are being opened around the country where the community puts up some of the capital in partnership with a private store owner (just like the CSA’s locally support a number of local farmers).
    Go to the DANG web site and you can see stories about community capital helping open up stores. DANG has pledges of $4,700 even before launching the capital pledge campaign. Anonymous you are welcome to contact us to make your pledge through our website.

    Here’s a list of recent community capital fund raisers for neighborhood stores:

    $1,043,000 Weaver Street Market, Carrboro, NC (for existing co-op’s third store in Hillsborough)

    $1,101,400 River Valley Market, Northampton, MA (new co-op opening its first co-op store)

    $750,000 Wheatsville, Austin, TX (remodel of existing co-op store)

    $500,000 Garnett Mercantile, Ely, NV (bringing back a store to the community)
    $400,000 Powell Mercantile, WY (bringing back a store to the community)

  37. David J. Thompson

    Thank you to Carolyn Hinshaw, David and Cecilia for their pledges to our Capital Pledge Campaign. Thanks to Farwester, please be in touch we know where you live but not exactly. And thanks to everyone who has already committed to the campaign.

    Pledges most welcome.

  38. David J. Thompson

    Thank you to Carolyn Hinshaw, David and Cecilia for their pledges to our Capital Pledge Campaign. Thanks to Farwester, please be in touch we know where you live but not exactly. And thanks to everyone who has already committed to the campaign.

    Pledges most welcome.

  39. David J. Thompson

    Thank you to Carolyn Hinshaw, David and Cecilia for their pledges to our Capital Pledge Campaign. Thanks to Farwester, please be in touch we know where you live but not exactly. And thanks to everyone who has already committed to the campaign.

    Pledges most welcome.

  40. David J. Thompson

    Thank you to Carolyn Hinshaw, David and Cecilia for their pledges to our Capital Pledge Campaign. Thanks to Farwester, please be in touch we know where you live but not exactly. And thanks to everyone who has already committed to the campaign.

    Pledges most welcome.

  41. Rich Rifkin

    “The original agenda of the ownership group was fairly obvious: to let the center deteriorate, drive off any potential markets with unreasonabily high lease terms and convert the grocery space to more profitable office space.”

    This argument makes no sense, because office space leases for 50% as much per s.f. as grocery space in Davis. Further, by having a profitable grocer, that supports higher rents for the other retailers and restaurateurs in a shopping center.’ On top of all that, you ignore the cash flow implications. By not having any rental income from the supermarket space for likely 3 years, never in a hundred years could all that lost cash income be replaced.

  42. Rich Rifkin

    “The original agenda of the ownership group was fairly obvious: to let the center deteriorate, drive off any potential markets with unreasonabily high lease terms and convert the grocery space to more profitable office space.”

    This argument makes no sense, because office space leases for 50% as much per s.f. as grocery space in Davis. Further, by having a profitable grocer, that supports higher rents for the other retailers and restaurateurs in a shopping center.’ On top of all that, you ignore the cash flow implications. By not having any rental income from the supermarket space for likely 3 years, never in a hundred years could all that lost cash income be replaced.

  43. Rich Rifkin

    “The original agenda of the ownership group was fairly obvious: to let the center deteriorate, drive off any potential markets with unreasonabily high lease terms and convert the grocery space to more profitable office space.”

    This argument makes no sense, because office space leases for 50% as much per s.f. as grocery space in Davis. Further, by having a profitable grocer, that supports higher rents for the other retailers and restaurateurs in a shopping center.’ On top of all that, you ignore the cash flow implications. By not having any rental income from the supermarket space for likely 3 years, never in a hundred years could all that lost cash income be replaced.

  44. Rich Rifkin

    “The original agenda of the ownership group was fairly obvious: to let the center deteriorate, drive off any potential markets with unreasonabily high lease terms and convert the grocery space to more profitable office space.”

    This argument makes no sense, because office space leases for 50% as much per s.f. as grocery space in Davis. Further, by having a profitable grocer, that supports higher rents for the other retailers and restaurateurs in a shopping center.’ On top of all that, you ignore the cash flow implications. By not having any rental income from the supermarket space for likely 3 years, never in a hundred years could all that lost cash income be replaced.

  45. Rich Rifkin

    “Rumor has it that there is a qualified (50 years in the grocery business) and current operator of a number of high quality independent groceries in the Bay Area has already negotiated acceptable terms with the Westlake property owner and says he can be profitable on day 2.”

    I’ve been hearing these rumors for 2.5 years. I guess you don’t believe them either, because you don’t have the courage to wager a $2 cup of coffee with me.

    “So check your sources and your facts, and maybe get the soles of your shoes off your carpet and out on the street.”

    What sources would you like me to check that I have not already. Importantly I spoke to the man who hired two full time commercial real estate agents whose job was to scour all of California and the West Coast looking for a supermarket for that site. He told me in no uncertain terms last January that there was no one interested at that time. It’s possible something has changed. I’ll believe that when I see it.

    If you have faith in your assertions, make the bet with me.

  46. Rich Rifkin

    “Rumor has it that there is a qualified (50 years in the grocery business) and current operator of a number of high quality independent groceries in the Bay Area has already negotiated acceptable terms with the Westlake property owner and says he can be profitable on day 2.”

    I’ve been hearing these rumors for 2.5 years. I guess you don’t believe them either, because you don’t have the courage to wager a $2 cup of coffee with me.

    “So check your sources and your facts, and maybe get the soles of your shoes off your carpet and out on the street.”

    What sources would you like me to check that I have not already. Importantly I spoke to the man who hired two full time commercial real estate agents whose job was to scour all of California and the West Coast looking for a supermarket for that site. He told me in no uncertain terms last January that there was no one interested at that time. It’s possible something has changed. I’ll believe that when I see it.

    If you have faith in your assertions, make the bet with me.

  47. Rich Rifkin

    “Rumor has it that there is a qualified (50 years in the grocery business) and current operator of a number of high quality independent groceries in the Bay Area has already negotiated acceptable terms with the Westlake property owner and says he can be profitable on day 2.”

    I’ve been hearing these rumors for 2.5 years. I guess you don’t believe them either, because you don’t have the courage to wager a $2 cup of coffee with me.

    “So check your sources and your facts, and maybe get the soles of your shoes off your carpet and out on the street.”

    What sources would you like me to check that I have not already. Importantly I spoke to the man who hired two full time commercial real estate agents whose job was to scour all of California and the West Coast looking for a supermarket for that site. He told me in no uncertain terms last January that there was no one interested at that time. It’s possible something has changed. I’ll believe that when I see it.

    If you have faith in your assertions, make the bet with me.

  48. Rich Rifkin

    “Rumor has it that there is a qualified (50 years in the grocery business) and current operator of a number of high quality independent groceries in the Bay Area has already negotiated acceptable terms with the Westlake property owner and says he can be profitable on day 2.”

    I’ve been hearing these rumors for 2.5 years. I guess you don’t believe them either, because you don’t have the courage to wager a $2 cup of coffee with me.

    “So check your sources and your facts, and maybe get the soles of your shoes off your carpet and out on the street.”

    What sources would you like me to check that I have not already. Importantly I spoke to the man who hired two full time commercial real estate agents whose job was to scour all of California and the West Coast looking for a supermarket for that site. He told me in no uncertain terms last January that there was no one interested at that time. It’s possible something has changed. I’ll believe that when I see it.

    If you have faith in your assertions, make the bet with me.

  49. Anonymous

    Rich Rifkin said, “This argument makes no sense, because office space leases for 50% as much per s.f. as grocery space in Davis.”

    Just to clarify. Do you mean that rental income from office space is twice as high as grocery space or half as much? It is believed that 22,500 sq ft rented as offices will bring in far more income than rented as grocery space!

  50. Anonymous

    Rich Rifkin said, “This argument makes no sense, because office space leases for 50% as much per s.f. as grocery space in Davis.”

    Just to clarify. Do you mean that rental income from office space is twice as high as grocery space or half as much? It is believed that 22,500 sq ft rented as offices will bring in far more income than rented as grocery space!

  51. Anonymous

    Rich Rifkin said, “This argument makes no sense, because office space leases for 50% as much per s.f. as grocery space in Davis.”

    Just to clarify. Do you mean that rental income from office space is twice as high as grocery space or half as much? It is believed that 22,500 sq ft rented as offices will bring in far more income than rented as grocery space!

  52. Anonymous

    Rich Rifkin said, “This argument makes no sense, because office space leases for 50% as much per s.f. as grocery space in Davis.”

    Just to clarify. Do you mean that rental income from office space is twice as high as grocery space or half as much? It is believed that 22,500 sq ft rented as offices will bring in far more income than rented as grocery space!

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