Robb Davis Officially Announces City Council Candidacy

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Robb Davis formally announced his candidacy in front of about 70 supporters early on Saturday at the southeast corner of 5th and D, at the location of the the Davis Community Meals Cold Weather Shelter and the STEAC Resource Center where he has been a longtime volunteer.

“I am running because I want Davis to be a socially, environmentally, and economically healthy city. Davis faces challenges and opportunities in protecting and sustaining community health,” he said.

“We need elected officials who can weigh alternatives, analyze tradeoffs and make informed and transparent decisions,” he continued.

Mr. Davis, a public health professional with over 25 years of experience working in the field of food security, child nutrition and maternal and child health, primarily in French-speaking West Africa, has focused in recent years on bringing the principles and practices of restorative justice to Yolo County and dealing with the challenges of homelessness and addiction in Davis.

He continues to work in child health as a consultant in curriculum design, program design, and program monitoring and evaluation.

“I will bring my experience working in many communities around the world and the following strengths to the process,” he said.  “I am a good listener, able to ask relevant questions and probe to go deeper.”

“I am a tireless worker who prepares for the task before me.  I am able to take complex topics and articulate them in ways that citizens can understand,” he continued.  “I am respectful of others and value team work to solve problems. Most importantly I am willing to learn and go on learning to improve my ability to make informed decisions.”

He would add, “I am a forward-looking person. As I learn about the city, its problems and its potential, I will work with citizens to identify our values, assure that our policies are consistent with them, and seek creative ways to implement these policies. I will listen, learn and respectfully walk with my neighbors to chart our collective future.”

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Robb Davis laid out some of his issue positions as well.

He said one of his chief goals is to “assure prime agriculture land is safeguarded, and development on it is non-residential and community-determined.”

“We live in one of the most productive agricultural zones on the planet. We must nurture and sustain this resource for our benefit and that of future generations,” he explained. “I support Measure J/R as a tool for assuring that any ag land conversion is community-approved.”

“I believe that economic development on the periphery of the City is possible on non-prime land or on land for which agricultural uses are severely constrained, as is the case with the Nishi property,” he added. “Peripheral development on such land should foster economic development and job creation. It should not be used for housing.”

He also believes in growing “a diversified revenue base to face our fiscal challenges and to protect vital community amenities.”

“We must produce balanced budgets that account for all future liabilities and infrastructure maintenance,” he said. “We must squarely face our need for new revenue by re-examining our current tax structure and fee schedule. I believe that we must immediately deal with our fiscal imbalances.”

He added: “This means we must find a combination of short-term revenue enhancements and longer-term solutions that generate revenue from new business development.”

He also pushed for fiscal responsibility.

“We must also keep City expenditures in check by negotiating fair but realistic agreements with all employee groups,” he said. “Agreements must assure the City’s ability to pay for growing retiree health benefit costs and pensions in a sustainable way.”

Robb Davis talked about the need for denser housing options, in particular rental housing as a means to “accommodate the housing needs of students, young professionals and retirees who desire to live in our community.”

“Our housing needs will grow as the University grows and there is evidence that we currently lack sufficient rental housing to meet demand,” he said. “If we are to preserve farmland and meet the needs of all members of our community we must have more and denser rental housing on existing city land-including the downtown.”

He added, “Denser housing within walking distance of transit and shopping encourages the use of alternatives to automobile use. This is a critical means of absorbing population growth without creating traffic congestion and without increasing carbon emissions.”

Another goal of Robb Davis is to increase walking, biking, and transit use.  He argued, “We must create safe streets, use education on safe cycling and encourage the use of transit as a normal means of transportation for all residents. Doing so will reduce congestion, create healthier citizens and reduce carbon emissions.”

Mr. Davis argued that we must develop and promote the downtown “as a premier shopping, entertainment, art and restaurant center of the region.”

“Our downtown is a thriving public space that exudes energy and offers a real sense of ‘place’ for citizens in Davis and beyond. I believe we must maintain it as a welcoming space and encourage further development and redevelopment that will make it a place where people come, relax, walk, eat and enjoy entertainment and one another’s company,” he said.

Finally, as one of the innovators of the neighborhood court program, he pushed for the promotion of restorative and reconciling practice in order to productively transform community conflict.

He said, “We must reinforce the social fabric of our community by enabling constructive dialogue and problem solving that honors differences and restores relationships when disagreements arise.”

“The practice of restorative justice offers an alternative to the traditional retributive justice system that enables those committing crimes to acknowledge harms to victims and the community and to make things as right as possible,” he said.

“I believe we are on the cusp of developing restorative practices to deal with school discipline and for juvenile and adult non-violent offenders. This will require the development of public/private/school district partnerships-some of which are already underway,” he continued.

He would add, “Beyond restorative justice, we must evolve more robust community-based programs that enable citizens with disputes to deal with them in carefully facilitated ‘conferences’ that offer safety and the possibility of resolving conflicts outside the formal court system.”

Robb Davis is the first officially announced candidate, although Councilmember Rochelle Swanson has indicated her intention to seek reelection.  There is a vacated seat as Joe Krovoza, the Mayor of Davis, is running for state assembly.  School Board Member Sheila Allen is widely believed to be entering the race, as well.

The election will take place in June 2014.

—David M. Greenwald reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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56 thoughts on “Robb Davis Officially Announces City Council Candidacy”

  1. B. Nice

    “Mr. Davis, a public health professional with over 25 years of experience working in the field of food security, child nutrition and maternal and child health, primarily in French-speaking West Africa, has focused in recent years on bringing the principles and practices of restorative justice to Yolo County and dealing with the challenges of homelessness and addiction in Davis.”

    Wow. I’m feeling like a slacker who has done nothing productive with their life….

  2. Frankly

    [i]Wow. I’m feeling like a slacker who has done nothing productive with their life[/i]

    LOL! Yeah, I know the feeling. I keep thinking I will get back to school and learn something and then go do some work to help save the world… and then guys like Rob Davis put out their CV and I just give up.

    At this point I am undecided about Robb Davis. He is obviously educated and intelligent and has relevant experience in public policy and social justice. He is also inquisitive. And he is one of the nicest guys in the neighborhood. I can see him mediating conflict and mending relationships throughout the city. I am always impressed with people having those abilities.

    But in his initial launch, Rob appears to be echoing all the typical Davis activist feel good notes in the order that they would want to hear them. For example, when he is quoted as saying he values farmland prior to mentioning economic sustainability, I think that clearly indicates where his priorities lay. Also, I know Robb has been in clear support of a sales tax increase. I don’t think I can ever vote for another political candidate that turns to tax increases as a way to fix the fiscal problems politicians before them caused… especially when it is clear there are long-term rational alternatives available.

    I will continue to keep an open mind and I will certainly be interested in talking to Robb over the coming months. He is a good man and deserves consideration despite the things we might disagree on.

  3. Davis Progressive

    robb is a good guy. he was also rightly appalled by the conduct of the firefighters. on the other hand you have sheila allen who works for provenza who fired off the pro-firefighter letter to the city and then you have her colleague on the board of education and co-worker in provenza’s office, gina daleiden who is an item with a former interim chief who has been outspoken against fire reform. anyone else think there is too much, shall we say, in-breeding, in davis?

  4. medwoman

    [quote]“I am respectful of others and value team work to solve problems. Most importantly I am willing to learn and go on learning to improve my ability to make informed decisions.”[/quote]

    While virtually every politician has made similar statements, I can personally vouch for the fact that Robb embodies this statement. I first met Robb as a fellow member of the editorial board of the Vanguard. While we do not always agree on issues, I never leave feeling that Robb has not demonstrated interest in and respect for my ideas and values. He is respectful, caring and genuinely open minded. While we share many values, we also have differences of opinion. This is no way will deter me from whole heartedly endorsing and supporting him since I know that he will derive his decisions thoughtfully with respect for all points of view.

  5. medwoman

    DP

    [quote]he was also rightly appalled by the conduct of the firefighters[/quote]

    [quote]anyone else think there is too much, shall we say, in-breeding, in davis?[/quote]

    I think you make an important distinction in your first statement. What Robb, and many of us are appalled by
    is a specific bit of “[u]conduct[/u] of the firefighters” and not by the firefighters as individuals or even as a group. What I do not believe is the Robb is “anti fire fighter”.

    I also think that it is important not to pre judge Sheila Allen based on her employer or the affiliations of any
    of her co-workers or colleagues. If she has made statements herself in favor or opposing any particular group, I think that is fair game. Otherwise, it would be a good idea to wait and hear from her directly.

    What I do see in our community is a far too facile willingness to see things in “black and white” almost as graphically as portrayed in the picture of the police dressed in white and the firefighters dressed predominantly in black. Nice pictorial, but ignores the nuances. I think one thing that we can count on with Robb is that he has the ability to see past our local “tribalism” and tendency to frame issues in terms of the
    “good guys” vs the “bad guys” and consider where the areas for cooperation exist.

  6. Growth Izzue

    Toad:
    [quote]This guy sounds like a Davis Vanguard wet dream. [/quote]

    LOL Toad, one of your more profound posts.
    Do you think he’s also one of those “conservatives”?

  7. Growth Izzue

    [quote]dealing with the challenges of homelessness and addiction in Davis[/quote]

    Speaking of homelessness and addiction, is everybody noticing the huge number of homeless panhandlers now making our downtown their home. It’s a lovely sight.

  8. Growth Izzue

    [quote]what do you want to do, kick them out? [/quote]

    No, not at all. Let’s just keep welcoming the homeless and addicts by providing free lockers, food and any other support they need and make Davis to go to destination in the region. I know it’s the liberal feel good way to do things, after all that’s what Davis is about, isn’t it? We have room for many more so when you walk by them downtown with your children and grandchildren you can act proud. But be careful, never let them walk around downtown without you, it’s unsafe.

  9. B. Nice

    “Speaking of homelessness and addiction, is everybody noticing the huge number of homeless panhandlers now making our downtown their home. It’s a lovely sight.”

    Yeah, looking at homeless people is such a downer. Maybe Robb could work on a plan to camouflage them. Or we could turn them into hotspots that way their visual blight would serve some purpose?

  10. Growth Izzue

    [quote]so again, you’re proposing what, gi? [/quote]

    I propose more lockers, more halfway houses, more free food kitchens, more homeless and addicts.

  11. B. Nice

    [quote]I propose more lockers, more halfway houses, more free food kitchens, more homeless and addicts.[/quote]

    I wonder WWJD? Probably something similar to Robb. Don’t think he would refer to homeless people as visual unappealing.

  12. Growth Izzue

    Davis Progressive:
    [quote]you have sheila allen who works for provenza who fired off the pro-firefighter letter to the city and then you have her colleague on the board of education and co-worker in provenza’s office, gina daleiden who is an item with a former interim chief who has been outspoken against fire reform. anyone else think there is too much, shall we say, in-breeding, in davis? [/quote]

    D.P., are you being a troll?

  13. Robb Davis

    Some thoughts:

    GI: I actually wear the badge “conservative” with some pride. Like a good conservative (not the Neo-Con kind) I believe in the importance of “place” and “limits”–of caring for my nearby and helping keep it healthy. I believe in subsidiarity and believe power should be devolved to the lowest level (I would be happy to discuss this with you or others in more detail because a blog comment is too limiting). I believe in nurturing strong local institutions starting with families. Google Patrick Deneen, Wendell Berry or Jacques Ellul to learn more about some thinkers (current and past) who have influenced my thinking.

    Frankly – I would invite you to check out my website [url]www.davis4davis.org[/url] to get a fuller picture of my views on revenue generation. Yesterday I acknowledged that the things I care about are often in tension and land use/economic development is the most apparent example.

    I disagree with you that my views on preserving land use are a “feel good” issue. I am not a feel good person (ask my wife). This is about a hard economic reality related to comparative advantage. Quite simply, there are some places that are uniquely endowed to grow food and we live right in the middle of one of them. Our Class I and II soils are the envy of the planet and that is no hyperbole. Food is not merely an economic commodity but a source of life. Therefore, my basic question is “Why the hell would we not work to conserve this unique resource?”

    On revenue, I look forward to talking to you about this more but the bottom line is this: even if we put a shovel in the ground tomorrow to develop a new tech or innovation park the full stream of revenue economic activity (via jobs, fees and taxes) at the site would generate is not going to flow immediately. You and I have both (in various places) talked about needing to address our fiscal challenges now. We can do through holding the line on spending and compensation (as I think the current CC is doing) but we need more. There are no “revenue magic bullets.” Any tax increases (sales tax rate) would need to be temporary but it may be necessary. If I were on CC now (and I assume this is happening but don’t know), I would be asking staff to produce a set of several scenarios that could take us in the direction-short-, medium- and long-term to face our unfunded liabilities and infrastructure backlog. I would expect any solutions that involve economic development to be based on fiscal models the parameters and assumptions of which are clear so that we as a community could debate them.

    The point is that we need to act in the short term and I am not sure what options we have in the short run. I would be interested in hearing your views. So, let’s talk. You have my contact info. I would invite any others to contact me as well at robbbike@me.com. I would be happy to talk to anyone and will guard anonymity related to postings here.

    I am not running on the “nice guy next door” platform. Conflict resolution and employing restorative processes are not “soft skill” but we need to build our capacity to engage in them and it is hard work.

    I am not running on the kumbaya platform. I reject black and white solutions not because I just wish everyone would get along or because I think compromise is an “end”. No, I have been around long enough to know that complex systems (a medium sized city being one such system) do not yield simple or simplistic solutions to most problems. If anyone here is looking for a candidate who will frame solutions in unambiguous, black and white terms then I am most certainly not your candidate.

    Toad: I will take your tagline idea under advisement but something tells me that my “messaging team” is not going to go for it. I wanted to go for the slogan “Davis for Toads” (to lock up the substantial toad vote) but that was rejected too (sorry, I tried).

  14. Robb Davis

    GI–my advice on panhandlers is that if you have the time and inclination, ask them if they are hungry and buy them a sandwich if they say they are and if you would like to do that (or carry some fruit or an energy bar around and offer that). Don’t give money. If folks are in town for any length of time they find their way to a variety of services where they can get help with bus tickets, food, clothing and–especially in the months November to March–housing. Still, the biggest challenges (mental health services and drug and alcohol abuse programs) are woefully lacking in our county.

    One thing I have learned about homeless individuals is that their stories are diverse and saying “homeless” hides more than it reveals. I have the privilege of working in a shelter where a good number of people have found a path beyond addiction and other challenges but it is a long walk and there are lots of failures along the way (and the failures are often spectacular in their devastating effects). At this point I don’t see an easy solution (especially for meth addiction–the closest thing to a true “demon” I have ever experienced) but I think community services that build relationships with people in need are key. As Bill Pride of Davis Community Meals said to me one time: (paraphrase): “What we need are people who are committed to being in relationship with those facing addiction and mental health problems over the long term because every once in a while a person at the bottom will have a moment of lucidity, will be ready to make a change, will be willing to make the hard decision. In those times, someone needs to be there to make sure they get the help they need.” I have seen this work but it is a long walk in one direction.

  15. Growth Izzue

    Robb, I fully believe in taking care of our town’s homeless and addicted. I don’t believe in making Davis the go to destnation for the region’s homeless which is what it is now as told by the homeless people’s own words. I don’t believe in giving money either and many times I’ve given food. There’s a guy that camps out in front of Woodstock’s that has received many of my family’s take home boxes. Once while driving to Subway I saw a lady sleeping on her suitcases in the middle of the sidewalk on Covell. I felt sorry for her so I bought her a BLT footlong and a water and on my way home I stopped and offered her the sandwich. Her first words were “does it have meat on it?” I laughed and said yes, bacon, to which she replied she was a vegetarian. That was fine but who knew? I must have found the only homeless vegetarian in the U.S. I gave her the water and this troll was on his way.

  16. medwoman

    [quote]What we need are people who are committed to being in relationship with those facing addiction and mental health problems over the long term because every once in a while a person at the bottom will have a moment of lucidity, will be ready to make a change, will be willing to make the hard decision. In those times, someone needs to be there to make sure they get the help they need[/quote]

    I think occasionally just the extension of the willingness to help may make a difference. It is rare as an office practitioner that one sees one’s advice alone save a life or a family, but it can happen. About 5 years ago as I was standing in line at the grocery store, a well groomed, healthy appearing woman with two young children in tow came up to me and said “you don’t recognize me, do you ? You saved my life “. She was right, I would never have known that she was the same woman that I had treated in my clinic for a minor gyn problem, and recognizing that she was destroying her own life and that of her family through her addictions, told her as much, and gave her the number for the appropriate referral within our system to help her when she was ready to accept it.

    On a previous thread, I believe that Alan Miller misunderstood my post and thought I was advocating for enabling people with addictions. I do not believe in enabling any one to continue with their self destructive behavior. I do however, believe that there are tipping points where each individual will have an opportunity to make a difference in the life of another. We usually do not recognize those points when they occur and rarely see the consequences. It is an act of faith to believe that our individual small acts can make a difference.
    I see Robb as someone who has much more experience than most with small, local acts.

  17. Mr.Toad

    It was an observation not a suggestion.

    Having worked in Africa I would think that you would recognize the value added by research done here on the wheat genome that found resistance to wheat rust that is decimating wheat crops in Africa and Asia. of course the value of that one research effort will produce so much additional food that it makes our local production efforts seem small. You must also be aware that the problem with hunger is a distribution of resources problem not an inability to produce food commodities. Yet you persist in the standard local dogma about protecting our farmland as though it is sacred. I find that troubling because farm land is valuable but so are the education and research missions of the community. We must balance all these competing priorities yet over the years we have favored preservation over other priorities such as housing and economic development much to the detriment of the local community and economy.

  18. medwoman

    Mr. Toad

    [quote]Yet you persist in the standard local dogma about protecting our farmland as though it is sacred. I find that troubling because farm land is valuable but so are the education and research missions of the community. We must balance all these competing priorities yet over the years we have favored preservation over other priorities such as housing and economic development much to the detriment of the local community and economy.[/quote]

    To some, the land is sacred. To others, not so much so. This is an argument that goes back to the arrival of Europeans. It is not new, and it is not unique to Davis.
    You also phrase this as though the preservation of farm land and education and research are incompatible. I do not believe this to be true.
    I agree with the need for balance but appreciate that while it is always possible to build and develop further,
    once the land is used for other purposes, it will never revert to its natural state. Thus my preference for very slow, very thoughtful development.

  19. Becky

    It seems pretty hypocritical that Robb Davis claims to want to preserve ag land, yet he does not seem to not care about re-introducing the Covell Village issue (386 acres of ag land) with his demands for excessive bike underpasses and over passes through the Covell Village land to the Cannery site. For instance, his persistence for an unneeded bike underpass to L St. from the Covell Village site and the problems that it introduces has been brought up to him a number of times, yet he rebuffs the concerns.

    Robb also claims to want to resolve conflict, yet he is the proponent of creating the conflict on this issue. He goes so far that he threatens with an ultimatum if he does not get his way on this issue. That is anything BUT the way to practice conflict resolution. It seems that Robb talks the talk, but does not walk the walk.

    On another interesting note he seems to be in support of developing the Nishi property which the progressive community has been strongly against since the whole Measure E vote years ago which opposed widening the Richards underpass. This which would have basically ruined the downtown. It would have led to tons of cars piling into downtown Davis with nowhere to go, given the limited street capacity. That would have made downtown completely bike. Yet, he has taken a position on the Nishi land use issue apparently, without understanding the consequences as well.

    Robb may have good intentions, but he does not know, nor understand land use issues in Davis which makes him a poor candidate for City Council.

  20. SouthofDavis

    Mr. Toad wrote:

    > I find that troubling because farm land is valuable
    > but so are the education and research missions of
    > the community.

    The people that “really” want more farmland in Davis will donate the land their home is on to a community garden and move to an area that can not grow crops. The people that don’t do this just want to keep Davis the way it is and stop the building of new homes (and keep the type of people that want (and can afford) $500-$900K homes and condos out of the city)…

  21. medwoman

    [quote]Robb may have good intentions, but he does not know, nor understand land use issues in Davis which makes him a poor candidate for City Council. [/quote]

    I am sure that virtually every council member that we have ever considered or elected has had gaps in their understanding of major issues.
    What Robb does have is the capability to learn quickly. This combined with an open mind would stand him in good stead and I trust his willingness to do the necessary research and adapt.

  22. Matt Williams

    Mr.Toad said . . .

    [i]”This guy sounds like a Davis Vanguard wet dream.”[/i]

    Toad, that must make you a Davis Vanguard wet dream as well, because based on what he said yesterday at STEAC he is really not that far from you on the issue of needing both land and research. He clearly is in favor of most of what you talk about here on the V.

  23. Becky

    medwoman: So far I have seen no willingness for Robb to do “the necessary research” before he takes a position on land use issues which are critical.

    I will be most interested in seeing if, and how, he handles this from here.

  24. Matt Williams

    Becky said . . .

    [i]”It seems pretty hypocritical that Robb Davis claims to want to preserve ag land, [b]yet he does not seem to not care about re-introducing the Covell Village issue[/b] (386 acres of ag land) with his demands for excessive bike underpasses and over passes through the Covell Village land to the Cannery site. For instance, his persistence for an unneeded bike underpass to L St. from the Covell Village site and the problems that it introduces has been brought up to him a number of times, yet he rebuffs the concerns.”[/i]

    Becky, setting your typo aside, I have two questions for you.

    1) How does having a bicycle underpass that serves the residents of the Cannery going to and from the Nugget Shopping Center at L Street “re-introduce the Covell Village issue”?

    2) Is the L Street grade separated crossing even the first choice of the Davis Bicycling community, which Robb is speaking for?

    Regarding that second question if you think Robb is “carrying the water for Covell Village” the evidence to the contrary is plain to hear half way through the recording of the October 7, 2013 Bicycle Advisory Committee meeting. He very clearly says, [i]”We need to stare these guys down and take the land if we need it…”[/i] The “these guys” he is referring to are the owners of Cranbrook Apartments. He calls their actions reprehensible. You may want to transcribe this and send it out to anyone who claims (in full throat or in whispers) that Rob is supporting “these guys” especially since the owners of Cranbrook Apartments and Covell Village are essentially the same.

    Becky said . . .

    [i]”Robb also claims to want to resolve conflict, yet he is the proponent of creating the conflict on this issue. He goes so far that he threatens with an ultimatum if he does not get his way on this issue. That is anything BUT the way to practice conflict resolution. It seems that Robb talks the talk, but does not walk the walk.”[/i]

    Again, I encourage you to listen to the October 7, 2013 Bicycle Advisory Commission audio recording. The conflict is being created by others. Robb, representing the bicycle community is calling them on the conflict they are creating.

    Becky said . . .

    [i]”On another interesting note he seems to be in support of developing the Nishi property which the progressive community has been strongly against since the whole Measure E vote years ago which opposed widening the Richards underpass. This which would have basically ruined the downtown. It would have led to tons of cars piling into downtown Davis with nowhere to go, given the limited street capacity. That would have made downtown completely bike. Yet, he has taken a position on the Nishi land use issue apparently, without understanding the consequences as well.”[/i]

    You and I attended at least 20 Housing Element Steering Committee (HESC) meetings together in 2008, and both you and I and Robb know that there were two different “views” of Nishi presented/evaluated by the HESC Site XX looked at Nishi with only the current access from Olive Drive, and indeed that site was ranked very low (#25 out of 37) because of the very issues you raise. However, the same Nishi site was also evaluated by the HESC as Site #17 with its primary access under the Union Pacific rail line somewhere between the Mondavi Wine Center and the Hyatt Place #17 was in the HESC grouping called [i]Secondary Sites – Additional Sites Recommended For Housing (otherwise known as “Green Light” sites)[/i] #25 was in the HESC grouping called [i]Alternate Sites – Only To Be Considered If Needed Prior to 2013 (otherwise known as “Yellow Light” sites)[/i]

    The HESC Report has the following Recommended Actions and Responsibilities for Site #17.
    Action 17.1 Develop a cooperative plan with UC Davis for land use and circulation.
    Action 17.2 Discuss the development with the railroad company and mitigate safety concerns.
    Action 17.3 General Plan amendment (to a new highedensity category), rezoning, and Measure J vote.

    Based on the update given to City Council on October 1, 2013 as Item 5 City-University Mixed-Use Innovation District, Actions 17.1 and 17.2 have both been actively undertaken and completed.

    So it is fair to say that the Site #25 concerns you have raised in your comments in this thread are not active in the current Nishi trajectory. Robb was/is aware of that when making comments about Nishi.

    Becky said . . .

    [i]”Robb may have good intentions, but he does not know, nor understand land use issues in Davis which makes him a poor candidate for City Council.”[/i]

    I respect your right to have that opinion, but I respectfully disagree with the opinion itself. We can agree to disagree reasonably, because you and I are both reasonable people.

  25. Matt Williams

    medwoman said . . .

    [i]”I am sure that virtually every council member that we have ever considered or elected has had gaps in their understanding of major issues.

    What Robb does have is the capability to learn quickly. This combined with an open mind would stand him in good stead and I trust his willingness to do the necessary research and adapt.”[/i]

    medwoman, I wholeheartedly agree with your second paragraph, and while I agree with your first paragraph, I don’t see land use issues as being one of the gaps (or even soft spots) in Robb’s knowledge. Based on the two years I have known him, I have found Robb to be amongst the top 10% of the people I have talked to about land use issues. Of the current Council, only Lucas with his tenure on the Planning Commission had more land use knowledge than Robb leading up to the first Council Campaign for each respective candidate. Becky clearly has concerns about Robb;s positions on land use, and I respect her right to have those concerns, but a difference on positions does not translate to a gap in knowledge.

  26. JimmysDaughter

    “…homeless panhandlers…”
    I have no problem with the homeless in Davis. Compared to the more aggressive panhandling experienced in San Francisco, it really is nothing. Maybe you feel a little guilty that you are comfortable, and they live on the street? If you don’t like them, cross the street. It makes me sad & wonder if they are homeless by choice, or because they are mentally ill with nowhere to go. In America, they have a right to panhandle. Freedom of speech, freedom of expression.

  27. medwoman

    Becky

    Have you specifically spoken to Robb about his views on land use or are you just going by the positions of the bicycle groups and assuming that these reflect Robb’s positions? I have found that Robb listens really well even if he doesn’t agree with me. Perhaps you might want to take him up on his offer to all for a conversation so that you could share your perspective directly with him.

  28. JimmysDaughter

    “I disagree with you that my views on preserving land use are a “feel good” issue. I am not a feel good person (ask my wife). This is about a hard economic reality related to comparative advantage. Quite simply, there are some places that are uniquely endowed to grow food and we live right in the middle of one of them. Our Class I and II soils are the envy of the planet and that is no hyperbole. Food is not merely an economic commodity but a source of life. Therefore, my basic question is “Why the hell would we not work to conserve this unique resource?””

    If I still lived in Davis, this statement alone would be enough to convince me to vote for you. Why the hell, indeed. Well said.

  29. Growth Izzue

    [quote]. In America, they have a right to panhandle. Freedom of speech, freedom of expression. [/quote]

    And I have the right and freedom to say and express my feelings too. You say you no longer live in Davis so you probably have no idea how many are now lining our downtown streets.

  30. Growth Izzue

    If we keep making our town more attractable and comfortable to more outside homeless, drug addicts and derelicts we won’t have to worry about a downtown parking problem because who’s going to want to visit? I’ve got to believe that the DDBA and merchants are starting to get alarmed by the growing problem.

  31. medwoman

    GI

    I frequent downtown during both day and night sometimes by myself, sometimes with my partner and have noticed some increase in number of folks who are panhandling, but have never felt intimidated or threatened.
    I am mostly of foot since I live within easy walking distance of downtown.
    Is your concern about the appearance, the reality or both ?

  32. Growth Izzue

    I had breakfast yesterday morning at Bernardos with my family and in our short walk to our car around the corner on D St. we were panhandled twice and walked past eight people squating on the streets in a very short distance. I guess that’s why this is fresh on my mind.

    Medwoman, it would be easier for me to be understandable to this if it were truly our own Davis homeless, addicts and derelicts. But as I have said Davis has become a magnet for this and it’s only going to get worse. For me it’s the appearance for the city, the safety, the reality and the crime.

  33. Frankly

    I heard that Pete’s downtown was losing business from customers going elsewhere due to the growing homeless population camping out and panhandling outside their location. They finally had to ask the police to intervene.

    It is a difficult problem. I don’t mind too much as long as they are respectful, don’t take up too much space on the sidewalks, don’t stink, are not too loud and disruptive, etc… but then again I feel the same way about college students.

  34. DT Businessman

    Becky, it’s hard to make sense of your downtown comments. Part of the mission of Davis Downtown is to foster a vibrant downtown for the benefit of our community. Development of the Nishi property as part of a mixed-use innovation district is one of the top, top priorities of Davis Downtown. Yet you denigrate Robb for sharing this priority. What to make of your comments?

    -Michael Bisch

  35. DT Businessman

    I’ve re-read your post, Becky. I’ve come to the realization that my previous comment was too limiting. It’s hard to make sense of ANY of your comments related to Robb. You turn everything upside down. You did the same thing a week or 2 ago. A willingness to compromise is deemed inflexibility. Supporting a Davis Downtown priority is deemed anti-downtown. It’s really weird. You seem to have some undisclosed vendetta against Robb. What exactly is your beef? Spit it out so that we know what we’re tangling with.

    -Michael Bisch

  36. medwoman

    GI

    [quote]But as I have said Davis has become a magnet for this and it’s only going to get worse[/quote]

    Apart from your recent encounter, do you have any evidence that this is the case ? For example are you aware of any major police action currently occurring in one of our nearby communities to expel their homeless thus making Davis a better alternative for them ? I have heard that this does happen from time to time, but am unaware of any current action.

  37. Matt Williams

    JimmysDaughter said . . .

    [i]”Therefore, my basic question is ‘Why the hell would we not work to conserve this unique resource?”

    If I still lived in Davis, this statement alone would be enough to convince me to vote for you. Why the hell, indeed. Well said.”[/i]

    We have a motion and a second. Let’s call the question. All those who say aye? All those opposed?

  38. B. Nice

    Aye!

    Robb gave a link to his Website, but here is one to his official Facebook Page:

    [url]https://www.facebook.com/pages/Davis-for-Davis-City-Council-2014/674343419256958[/url]

  39. SouthofDavis

    Frankly wrote:

    > I heard that Pete’s downtown was losing business from
    > customers going elsewhere due to the growing homeless
    > population camping out and panhandling outside their
    > location. They finally had to ask the police to intervene.

    I have not used the Peet’s front door in years and go in and out through the side door then use the alley in back to get out to 3rd and avoid the homeless that almost always seem to be on D Street in front hitting me up for money…

  40. JimmysDaughter

    “And I have the right and freedom to say and express my feelings too. You say you no longer live in Davis so you probably have no idea how many are now lining our downtown streets.”

    Lining your downtown streets? Really?

    I visited Davis on the 4th of July this year. Wonderful experience. I didn’t trip over any panhandlers lining the downtown streets. I walked quite comfortably all over Davis with friends & family members. Had a wonderful time.

  41. Mr.Toad

    Its well and good the this candidate wants to help people in need but what would he do differently than what is being done now? Its easy to say we should do more, but how?

  42. Matt Williams

    Ernesto said . . .

    [i]Robb, Given the contentious water fluoridation debate that we just went through, I’d like to know where you stand on water fluoridation for Davis. [/i]

    Ernesto, that is an interesting question to ask. You asked it for a reason. Can you help me understand what that reason is?

    Two related questions I have are, 1) if all of the candidates come from the public health profession are you going to sit this election out? and 2) Have you talked to any of the other fluoridation opponents to see how they feel about Robb?

    I look forward to hearing your thoughts.

  43. Ernesto

    Matt,

    I’m upset enough about the underhanded way they attempted to sneak fluoridation into the water project that I’m wary. It would be a stupid fight to put the city through, eating a lot of people’s time, wasting city funds, for something that, historically speaking, would be a losing battle for the pro-fluoridation side. Just a waste.

    As a policy Phd myself I am aghast at how American public health professionals push water fluoridation. When you have a controversial policy objective you need to work with your potential adversaries to see if you can get to your objective without picking a fight with them, i.e. if people don’t want water fluoridation see if you can find an alternative so you don’t have to fight a capable adversary.

    If only public health people were running we’d put together our own slate. 🙂

    As for Robb, I actually like a lot about him , from the little I know so far. I think the community justice work, fo example, is great. He has some good endorsers. But I could not vote for him if I knew he might support a water fluoridation for Davis. It is a move that would indicate to me a lack of good sense, plunging the community into a lengthy, contentious , and expensive battle when much better things could be done with that time, energy, and resources.

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