Why is the Enterprise Printing Anti-Asian Letters to the Editor?

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It came to my attention this morning that a letter in the Davis Enterprise appearing this weekend and published in the August 13 paper reads as follows:

“How do you like living in a Central Valley railroad crossing that has more than 20 Asian restaurants — Thai, Korean, Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese. You can count them yourself on Pages 203 and 204 of the current (May, 2017) YP business yellow pages Yolo County; try a new one every day for three weeks! — in a town now completely dominated by a monstrous, obsessively expending international diploma mill known as “UCD”: the University of China, Davis.”

The letter writer is Glenn Rice.

Most of the commenters pushed back.

One wrote: “Glenn Rice’s claim that UCD is the ‘University of China, Davis’ is quaint racism, at best. The comment reflects an ignorance of basic geography, California history, Asian diaspora, and restaurateuring in a college town where half the population is students. Just because UCD has a 35% Asian / Pacific Islander student population doesn’t mean that Thailand, Japan, and the Phillipines serve the same food. If you want more macaroni and cheese, learn how to cook.”

Another: “This is a shockingly racist comment… Mr. Rice, not sure why you came out from under a rock to spew this slime, but please get back. Your rhetoric has no place in our society.”

As a third person noted: “Why was this racist drivel published at all? I fail to see what the Enterprise’s editor thought was worthwhile in wasting ink on this ignorant screed. Were you that desperate for hits that you decided to chum the waters? Davis deserves better than this.”



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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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6 thoughts on “Why is the Enterprise Printing Anti-Asian Letters to the Editor?”

  1. Alan Miller

    Why is the Enterprise Printing Anti-Asian Letters to the Editor?

    Because it exposes the self-exposing idiots in our midst.  Free speech is very useful.  Kudos to the Enterprise.

    Similarly, the Imam exposed his feelings that emerge when angered.  Also similarly useful to know.  No crafted apologies, no Kumbaya, no need for unity or photo ops or a smattering from faith organizations reaching out, speaking for their own unity among those who like to une.

    Awareness and information, that’s paramount.  Thanks to those who expose themselves, thanks to those that translate it, thanks to those that print it.

     

    1. John Hobbs

      “Because it exposes the self-exposing idiots in our midst.  Free speech is very useful.”

      Just so. I am gratified by the many photos of the white nationalists in VA (NAZIs, KKK and unaffiliated cretins), clear enough that some of the thugs have already been given pink slips by their bosses and many more are being disavowed on social media by family and former friends.

      Shunning, it’s an American tradition.

      1. Keith O

        . I am gratified by the many photos of the white nationalists in VA (NAZIs, KKK and unaffiliated cretins), clear enough that some of the thugs have already been given pink slips by their bosses and many more are being disavowed on social media by family and former friends.
        Shunning, it’s an American tradition.

        Is that why the Antifa cover their faces with masks and scarfs?

        1. Alan Miller

          Getting off topic here fellows

          Uh huh . . . happens all the time in the V comments, but only called when it gets “uncomfortable”.

          In answer to BP:  YES, cowards cover their faces.

  2. PhilColeman

    A person has the legal right to be racist. Racists enjoy the same rights as a citizen of this country as everybody else.

    Media editors have a quandary. They may oppose the racist rant as a matter of personal and editorial policy, but these same editors subscribe to the First Amendment right of Free Speech. Editors don’t want to be called censors.

    As long as the message does not promote violence towards the target race–and as long as the messenger does not fall into the narrow libel venue–racists can say what they want.

    Audiences such as we have rights, too. If somebody dislikes the message, do and say nothing. The racist rant dies on opening night, just like a bad Broadway Play.

     

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