Commentary: With COVID Out of Control, Us Blind As a Bat, State and County Roll Back Openings

Remember May?  In Yolo County there were just 40 reported cases.  The Board of Supervisors pushed for attestation to re-open the county.  The state, under pressure, expedited re-opening—even as experts warned it was too soon.  And now, COVID is worse than ever.  And the state is rolling back their re-openings.

Yolo County will pass 1000 cases, after having just a few hundred as recently as June 8.  The state is at 329,000 cases and rising.

Yolo County, which as late as early June was one of the lesser impacted counties, is now on the list of counties affected by the new order from the governor.  “These closures will impact 29 counties that are currently on the State’s List and represent more than 80% of the total population in California. In addition, all alcohol-only bars and breweries must close operations, both indoor and outdoor, statewide,” the county reported.

Impacted businesses include:

  • Gyms and fitness centers
  • Personal care services, including nail salons, skin care and cosmetology, electrolysis, body waxing, and body art, tattoo and piercing shops
  • Hair salons and barber shops
  • Places of worship
  • Offices for non-essential sectors
  • Indoor malls

Not mentioned are schools.  But the pace of the explosion of cases is probably going to render moot the question of whether to re-open schools.

According to the county release: “Yolo County will soon exceed 1,000 confirmed cases this week when four weeks ago on June 15th the County only had 255 cases. Residents and businesses are all required to wear face coverings, social distance by at least six feet, and stay home as much as possible to help lower the spread of COVID-19.”

“Our local community continues to bear the brunt of the COVID-19 crises. As the virus spreads locally through a failure to observe health protocols, the impact widens,” said Chair to the Yolo County Board of Supervisors Gar Sandy.

Supervisor Sandy added, “The numbers of those infected continues to climb, our healthcare systems are jeopardized, and our business community is decimated. It is in everyone’s interest to wear face coverings and maintain social distancing. Avoid large gatherings at all costs.  We must remain vigilant and re-dedicate ourselves to driving the cases numbers down.”

What went wrong?  A lot of blame to go around.

June 8 was really the shift, that was the third highest single day at the time—after that, there were only a handful of days with fewer cases

The comments made by Tia Will, a retired physician, on the Vanguard yesterday rang true: “We made a huge mistake in reopening the county too soon. We did that on an attestation, which was basically a way of skirting some very real numbers which were not breaking the way the business community wanted them to. Our county officials succumbed to intense pressure from these private interests and we are now seeing the results in actual numbers of cases which will as the county health officer predicted result in more deaths, some preventable.”

But in my view this goes further.  And it impacts every level of government.

President Trump: We can probably write a book on all of the failures of his administration.  And someone no doubt will at some point.  I will make two brief remarks.  First, he pressed for the economy to re-open before the pandemic was under control.  That was a huge mistake.  Second, he refused to wear a mask.  I still believe that, with no other changes, had he simply from the start said to wear a mask and we can open the economy, a lot of his supporters would have followed suit and we would be in much better shape.

Governor Newsom: He got high marks for his handling from March to May.  But he succumbed to pressure from businesses and some of the rogue counties.  One of the big problems is that when a bunch of rural counties threatened to re-open, he could have fought them or he could have acceded to their demands.  In the face of protests and a threat to undermine his authority, he allowed the state to reopen.  I also think he has been too slow to respond to the humanitarian crisis in San Quentin and other prisons, and we will see how many people die as a result of that.

County Board of Supervisors: Again, they were early on proactive.  But Tia Will is right.  The county also succumbed to pressure and fought to re-open at a time when the pandemic was contained but not over.  They allowed businesses to re-open too soon and people got complacent and now we have gone from 255 cases on June 15 to nearly 1000.  In a month’s time, the number of cases have nearly quadrupled.

The Public: The leaders didn’t lead.  The public didn’t follow.  We might have been able to re-open had the public been willing to follow the guidelines.  Too many gathered in large groups without masks or distancing, and to devastating effect.  Had the public simply followed protocols we might have been able to do this.

It’s not all the public.  About two-thirds of the public in California believes the state re-opened too soon.  That’s actually about the polling nationwide.  There is a heavy partisan split to those numbers.  There is a heavy red-blue state divide—although with the rise of COVID in Florida, Texas, and Arizona, all nominally redder states, we are seeing a shift, and the handling of COVID could turn Texas into a swing state this year.

But what we are now seeing is that it doesn’t take a lot to give COVID a new foothold.  A small percentage of people can cause hospitals to fill up and COVID to shut down large sectors of the economy.  Those who wanted to save the economy by re-opening have in effect probably made the economic crisis ten times worse.

I will never forget the commenters who in late May pointed out that we were letting one death in two weeks in Yolo County shut down the economy.  The truth was, that was a false statement at the time.  The reality was we were allowing the threat of COVID expansion shut down the economy and everything that has happened since that point bears it out—we needed to keep things shut much longer in order to contain this.

Maybe we’ll learn our lesson, but it doesn’t appear that some people are likely to admit mistake.  Already, I have received releases about shutdown protests scheduled for the state capital, as hospitals and ICUs are being overwhelmed and our system teeters out of control.

—David M. Greenwald reporting


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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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71 Comments

    1. Alan Miller

      I’ll say this again, paraphrasing an opinion piece in the New York Times.  Once we opened it up for one activity, we de-facto opened it up for everything.  The idea that the protests didn’t contribute to spread is a fantasy, though outdoor is better than indoor.  It’s the attitude of allowing large groups to gather that is the true mistake.

  1. John Hobbs

    Here’s a novel idea: How about we take medical advise from CDC doctors and scientists and ignore anti-intellectual populist politicians and greedy capitalists?

    1. Bill Marshall

      I second that emotion… if you accept a friendly amendment… will you except  non-greedy, trying-to make a living capitalists?

      100% agreement with,

      How about we take medical advise from CDC doctors and scientists and ignore anti-intellectual populist politicians

      If you accept my friendly amendment, could get to 100% across the board… anyone working for a living, investing, saving, owning a house, are ‘capitalists’… trying to gain capital to live, and ultimately retire by…

      1. Tia Will

        Here is another thought. How about we each own our own errors and take responsibility for them?

        I’ll start. As an individual with an interest in public health, I had read extensively about the 1918 influenza. I knew how various strategies resulted in better or worse outcomes. As an MD, I had been on the front lines of 4 epidemics, I knew how this could play out. So what did I do?

        1. I wrote a series of very polite, very respectful articles about how to protect one’s self and others during this pandemic, with changing advice as more information became available.

        2. I spoke out, again very politely about the dangers of moving forward prematurely at BOS meetings and made suggestions at Health Council Zoom meetings.

        3. I spoke with friends, family, acquaintances by phone, zoom, in appropriately distanced outdoor settings and on social media about the danger and our best defensive practices.

        It didn’t work. It was too little, too late and too misguided. I honestly believed that a calm, reasoned, evidence-based approach would be most effective. It was not. It did not win over those whose emotions, denial, and or ideology would not allow them to see what was right in all our faces.

        So what I should have done:

        1. I should have dropped the “I think”, “in my view” and “from my perspective and gone with “this I know”, “this will happen”, and “please, please don’t do this”.

        2. I should have put forth the message on all public media, at every city council meeting, in calls and letters and emails to every elected’s office.

        3. I should have gone out personally to the local places of business and made a case for how continued closure in May would prevent longer shut down in the future. I knew, and except for one brief, polite comment  at BOS, I said nothing.

        Who’s next?

         

         

         

    1. Bill Marshall

      Don… I suspect Woodland’s numbers are skewed… for various reasons, that’s where the majority of convalescent, assisted living, and incarceration facilities are located… and where employees of those live…

      That said, thank you for the data…

      Also, # of hospitalizations, morbidity, mortality would be useful in seeing the whole picture… the Yolo Co dashboard is helpful in those area, but not by location… they also don’t show 7-day trends… not your responsibility…

      Also, it would be great if YC could ‘normalize’ the data… if you took assisted living (and those employees), and ‘results of family/social gatherings’ out of the data set, a much different picture would emerge… as would the removal from the data set of those flaunting the guidelines…

      ‘Rules’ are of no use, if not enforced, even if enforcement is a frozen fish, by a citizen… or ‘shaming’.  What is happening now, is that those who abided by the rules, are lumped in with those that did not… a form of “profiling”?

  2. Alan Miller

    I have long said I’m going to have my headstone engraved with:

    “I Told You So”

    I may get the chance to do so sooner than expected, thanks to all you stupid, selfish people that I share this society with.  You know who you are . . . or maybe you are so stupid you don’t.

    Everybody sing:

    We’re on our way to herd immunity!

    We’re on our way to herd immunity!

    We’re on our way to herd immunity!

    And only some of us will die long, torturous, suffocating deaths!

    So it’s OK!

    Because My God, will protect Me!

    Because I’m on the correct side of politics!

    Be I Evangelical or an Atheist!

    We’re on our way to herd immunity!

    Sorry Grandma, Sorry Grandpa!

    The New Normal is on it’s WAAAAAAAAAAY!

  3. Tia Will

    Here is another thought. How about we each own our own errors and take responsibility for them?

    I’ll start. As an individual with an interest in public health, I had read extensively about the 1918 influenza. I knew how various strategies resulted in better or worse outcomes. As an MD, I had been on the front lines of 4 epidemics, I knew how this could play out. So what did I do?

    1. I wrote a series of very polite, very respectful articles about how to protect one’s self and others during this pandemic, with changing advice as more information became available.

    2. I spoke out, again very politely about the dangers of moving forward prematurely at BOS meetings and made suggestions at Health Council Zoom meetings.

    3. I spoke with friends, family, acquaintances by phone, zoom, in appropriately distanced outdoor settings and on social media about the danger and our best defensive practices.

    It didn’t work. It was too little, too late and too misguided. I honestly believed that a calm, reasoned, evidence-based approach would be most effective. It was not. It did not win over those whose emotions, denial, and or ideology would not allow them to see what was right in all our faces.

    So what I should have done:

    1. I should have dropped the “I think”, “in my view” and “from my perspective and gone with “this I know”, “this will happen”, and “please, please don’t do this”.

    2. I should have put forth the message on all public media, at every city council meeting, in calls and letters and emails to every elected’s office.

    3. I should have gone out personally to the local places of business and made a case for how continued closure in May would prevent longer shut down in the future. I knew, and except for one brief, polite comment  at BOS, I said nothing.

    Who’s next?

     

     

     

    1. Bill Marshall

      Here is another thought. How about we each own our own errors and take responsibility for them?

      If you add, “our reasonable, prudent, responsibility to others”, 100% agree… that’s what we’ve (our household) been doing, but things we are involved with, as of yesterday, have been shut down…

      1. Tia Will

        Bill

        That would be a reasonable approach if we all shared a common belief in the definition of “reasonable, prudent, and responsibility’. Some countries obviously do and have succeeded based on widely shared community values and a belief in science and expertise even when they are rapidly evolving. Unfortunately, too many in the US feel no community responsibility at all and make all decisions based only on what they decide is best for them seeing only through the narrow prism of “my rights” and never through the prism of “my responsibilities”.

    2. David Greenwald

      I’ll go next:

      1. I underestimated and downplayed the threat of COVID at the start.
      2. I should have fought back harder against re-opening when I thought it was too soon
      3. I thought we could manage a re-opening if people distanced and wore masks
      4. I underestimated the extent to which masks would become a political issue

  4. Alan Miller

    TW,

    Sounds like a Covid-19 take on “First they came for me . . . ”

    First the virus came for the elderly, and I did not speak out—
         Because I was not elderly.

    Then the virus came for those with compromised health, and I did not speak out—
         Because I was not of compromised health.

    Then the virus came for the inner city poor, and I did not speak out—
         Because I was not of the inner city poor.

    Then the virus came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.

  5. John Hobbs

    Apologists and deflectors are already diluting the lock down that might save us. And in allegedly the smartest town in California.

    Here is the problem. If your money is more important than someone’s life, if you are willing to sacrifice the old and the sick and teachers , we are lost.

    1. Bill Marshall

      Which lock down?  The current version (July 13), the one adopted in May?  The one adopted in March?

      If folk had actually followed the “May revise”, across the board, I’m doubting there would have been the ‘June swoon’… but, we’ll never know, one way or the other…

      The March version (looking at the graphic provided) looked effective, despite some not following the guidelines… The May version had probably many more folk taking it a ‘license’, instead of ‘permission, if you follow the rubrics’… we’ll never be able to get data, to prove one way or the other… that would have only been possible under a completely totalitarian state…

      Some have hinted at, even back in March, we did not go far enough… I disagree, and believe that had there been universal adherence to the May revise, we wouldn’t have had the June swoon…

      1. Tia Will

        OK Bill, since you yourself said we will never really know, on what basis are you choosing against those, such as myself, who feel we did not go far enough soon enough?

        1. Alan Miller

          TW,

          As you went out to spread the word in your polite way, and I went out to spread the word in my arsehole way, we both did way more than 99% of the folks out there, and a large % actually went out and did harm, either by total lack of making themselves aware, or actually choosing to go against the most current beliefs about best practices.  No need to beat oneself up for not doing this perfectly.  I am happy with what I did early on, but I burned out after a few weeks, then became disillusioned with humanity as a species.

      2. Bill Marshall

        Tia… I made no choice to go against you, or anyone in particular… you read things in that are not there…

        The fact is some would have had no grocery stores, no CVSs open… complete and total lockdown… and good luck if you didn’t have provisions already store in the ‘safety’ of your home… yes, even some in my extended family… they believe “stay at home” means “stay at home”… literally, no exceptions… maybe get food via curb delivery…

  6. Ron Oertel

     But he succumbed to pressure from businesses . . .

    Tesla among them, as I recall.  Perhaps the straw that broke the governor’s back?

    But, at least they’re doing good for their workers and the planet, right? 😉

      1. Ron Oertel

        But it’s very localized in its effects. 

        Is it?  Over time?

        Seems like “whack a mole”, in various, changing locales.

        Perhaps relying upon localized government is not the best way to deal with a global pandemic.

        1. David Greenwald

          I do agree we need a national policy which is part of why I faulted Trump.

          But when you look at it – first NY had a severe problem and that triggered a local response, then LA, then Miami. There have been some lesser hot spots as well.

          Part of the problem is look at the map of California, you see areas where cases are exploding and areas where there are no cases. So do you shut everyone down? Or do you shut down the counties that are impacted. Both approaches have drawbacks.

        2. Ron Oertel

          The problem is that you’ll end up having a guy (or gal) in charge of decisions who is similar to the mayor in the movie “Jaws”. (Or, at least susceptible to pressure.)

          Of course, that also happens at the national level.

          And once it’s in one spot, that inevitably leads to the next spot having an outbreak.

          Seems to me that at least masks should be required in every public space, indoors.

          But it truly seems out of control at this point. Fortunately, it doesn’t have a very high mortality rate, except for the elderly and those with health conditions. I guess we’ll see if there’s long-term impacts, for others.

        3. John Hobbs

          ” Fortunately, it doesn’t have a very high mortality rate, except for the elderly and those with health conditions. I guess we’ll see if there’s long-term impacts, for others.”

          Fortunate for who? Right now the US mortality rate is running over 4%. Interesting tht so many of you are willing to sacrifice the aged and infirm, apparently including your own aged loved ones.(I’m generously assuming you have some.) However as the virus has mutated more and more younger healthier people have died or are suffering sci-fi like symptoms. Will it take you getting morbidly ill before you are willing to think of others?

        4. Keith Olsen

          Fortunate for who? Right now the US mortality rate is running over 4%.

          That’s false info.  The mortality rate is much lower than that.  John is basing the numbers on confirmed cases, but as we know from several studies that many more cases go unconfirmed because they are mild or don’t show any symptoms as in children.

        5. Ron Oertel

          135,235/3,355,457 = 4%.

          “Honest” question.

          Has there been some official acknowledgement of a change in the death rate?  Or, does this disproportionately represent some at-risk population?

          I recall a much lower estimate of the death rate, a few weeks ago.

          Also – what are the worldwide figures?

           

        6. Ron Oertel

          Tried to add:  Is there any reliable estimate regarding the percentage/number of people actually infected (e.g., on a national level)?

          Do they even know when this all actually started, in the U.S.? How many have recovered, and wouldn’t necessarily test positive – assuming they’ve even been tested?

          How many mofos are walking around without symptoms? And, never will have them?

          I’m guessing that a lot of this is unknown.

        7. Ron Oertel

          I just assume that everyone has it, and that it might create a serious problem for some (including me, and/or – those close to me).

          However, I suspect that it wouldn’t that it wouldn’t impact Keith Richards.

        8. Ron Oertel

          I would say, however, that some may not view 135,000 deaths (out of whatever population this country has) as “serious” – especially when it disproportionately impacts an at-risk population (some of whom would have died by now, regardless of Covid).

          Note that this isn’t MY view – but it is my interpretation of some OTHER’s views.

          Perhaps a reason that we’re seeing reports of a “party”, where young people are “attempting” to spread the disease.  And similar reports, at a jail.

          By the way, does anyone actually believe that the young person who died as a result actually said that he realized that he made a mistake (or words to that effect) – right before his death?  How was he able to speak, if he (for example) had a ventilator tube in his throat?  (Something I recall seeing on the national news, recently.)

        9. Keith Olsen

          Data from CDC as of 7/14/20.
          135,235/3,355,457 = 4%.

          I’ll repeat my post Don so you can read it again, the actual death rate is far below 4%.

          Fortunate for who? Right now the US mortality rate is running over 4%.

          That’s false info.  The mortality rate is much lower than that.  John is basing the numbers on confirmed cases, but as we know from several studies that many more cases go unconfirmed because they are mild or don’t show any symptoms as in children.

           

          1. Don Shor

            Hey, Keith, I read your post. I posted confirmed deaths divided by confirmed cases. If you have other data, by all means post it.

        10. Robb Davis

          I have posted here at least 3 times the estimated IFR—infections mortality rate—estimates from a variety of studies.  They are remarkably stable.  IFR is estimated to be between 0.6% and 1.2%.

          Just do the math (as I have asked you to do several times) assuming some theoretical herd immunity is reached without vaccines but simply via wild spread of the virus in the population.  Go ahead 350 million X .6 X .006.

          That is 1.26 million (with an M) deaths.

          If you think that is acceptable (no matter which age groups are most affected), go ahead and say so.

          I will say that it is both unacceptable and wholly unnecessary.

        11. Ron Oertel

          Now that’s a number that would grab people’s attention. The news media doesn’t focus on that number.

          From the number of deaths so far (along with the information you’ve provided), I believe that you could also calculate an estimate of the number/percentage of people who haven’t been infected (yet).

          However, I’ve forgotten the formula to do so, and am not motivated enough to look it up.

        12. Ron Oertel

          (Well that – plus someone will give me a hard time if I get it wrong.) Regardless, 135,000 is pretty far off from 1.2 million, so it seems that a lot of people haven’t been infected so far.

          Pretty sure it’s an easy calculation, though. If no one takes a crack at it, maybe I will – later.

          Or, there’s probably estimates of it, already. (Again, if I was only motivated enough to look for that.)

          In the meantime, I’m just being careful, using masks, etc., regardless.

        13. Ron Oertel

          I became curious, so here’s what I came up with.

          Per the info Robb provided, the death rate is calculated (conservatively) at .0036%.  (Equal to .6 X .006.)

          An infected population of 37,500,000 X .0036 = 135,000 total deaths.

          350,000,000 (total population) – 37,500,000 (infected) = 312,500,000 (who aren’t yet infected).

          Less than 11% of the population infected so far – if reflected in total deaths to date. (However, that last phrase is likely not reflective of the situation.)

          Just felt like doing this exercise as a challenge.  (I wouldn’t rely on it.)  😉

           

           

        14. Ron Oertel

          And – I already see a percentage sign that I shouldn’t have used, in regard to .0036.  Damn.

          But, I think the numbers are calculated correctly, based upon the assumptions.

        15. Keith Olsen

          Just do the math (as I have asked you to do several times) assuming some theoretical herd immunity is reached without vaccines but simply via wild spread of the virus in the population.  Go ahead 350 million X .6 X .006.
          That is 1.26 million (with an M) deaths.
          If you think that is acceptable (no matter which age groups are most affected), go ahead and say so.

          If the “you” you’re referring to is me I don’t know why you had to inject much of what you wrote here into it, I was simply saying to a couple of other commenters that the COVID IFR was well below the 4% that they had said it was.  Thank you for backing my point.

           

      2. Robb Davis

        ”You“ was referring to anyone who claims that this virus is not such a bad thing.  Not you.

        Second, those using 4% are citing a (known) case fatality rate (CFR).  That is useful as far as it goes but because we know that there are many asymptomatic cases the IFR is preferred.

    1. Tia Will

      Ron

      It is a global pandemic. However different locations are achieving very different results based on the decisions of their leaders and the compliance of the population with evidence-based recommendations.

      One comment from a BOS meeting haunts me. A well-known business owner stated ” we trusted the Health Department’s recommendation to shut down. We did and we flattened the curve. Now it is time for you to trust in our ability to reopen safely”. Factually, as our numbers show, he was incorrect.

      In a time of pandemic, everyone is entitled to their own opinion. But as we can plainly see, not everyone’s opinion is equally reliable.

      1. Bill Marshall

        Why do you think the uptick is based on businesses?   Data?  Most published data to date shows social/family gatherings are the primary underlying reasons…

        The fact is, that reliable data is limited… and we will never have any reliable data that will show that if we had adopted 2X more stringent guidelines (than in March) in January, what the outcome would have been…  speculation, only.  And, even that doesn’t matter… we are where we are, and need to affect the future… that’s it, plain and simple…

  7. David Greenwald

    On the mortality rate…

    So the cases went up since early to mid June.  The deaths fell over that time and then in the last seven days it has started to increase.  So will the deaths, mirror the case increase?  That’s a quesiton I guess, but those arguing that deaths are the metric, may start to regret that in the next few weeks.

    1. Alan Miller

      There is no doubt the death metric will climb – it follows the infection curve by 4-6 weeks or more.  What is expected is that the rate will be lower relative to the infection rate than the last rise, due to the greater percentage of young people infected, who are less likely to die.  That is until they spread it to older people as the spread continues..

      1. David Greenwald

        They also believe they are better at treating it than they were in March and April. Unfortunately for my brother in law.

        BUT – and this is a point a lot people are missing – the hospitalization and ICU rates are going way way up and that means if they get over capacity, people will not get the treatment for htis and other things and that could cause the death rate to go way way way up.

  8. Ron Glick

    I’ve taken up walking for my health. I walk the shady streets of my neighborhood’s mature canopy. I wear a mask whenever anyone is near and try to stay more than 6 feet away.

    What gets me is how many people are ignoring wearing a mask, walkers, bike riders, joggers some huffing more than others. Some wearing masks that are nothing more than thin fabric that doesn’t protect anyone. Masks are supposed to be three layers. I read that wearing a mask reduces your risk by 75%. If both are wearing a mask risk reduction is 94%.

    I get young people think they are unlikely to die if they get infected but how would they feel if they knew they gave it to someone who gave it to someone who died?

    Still its not only young people. Today two middle aged women were walking in my path neither had a mask on. I walked out into the street to the edge of the bike lane. One of the women walked out too because trash cans were out on the street today. So rude!

    I think its starts at the top. Without leadership from Trump’s bully pulpit the country hasn’t taken it seriously. Trump chose the economy over public health. He ended up with neither. How many could have been saved if only people had taken this seriously? How many more could be saved if people would start taking it seriously today?

    1. Bill Marshall

      It’s not just Trump (but he has the bully pulpit [double entendre FULLY meant]) … Newsom needs to own parts of it… he has been knee-jerk… clap off, clap on, clap off… no sense of monitoring the valve for re-opening…

      Trump needs to own big parts of it… he has been knee-jerk… clap on, clap off, clap on… no sense of monitoring the valve for re-opening…

      Newsom and Trump are different flavors of the same beastie… they wet their finger, stick it in the air, figure where the winds they care about are blowing, then posture/act…

      Trump and Newsom BOTH own this… only question is, in what measure…

      Both “leaders” have failed, IMNSHO…

      But, we need to focus on what we can do NOW, what is reasonable, and prudent… finger-pointing at what HAS happened, is not all that constructive as to the future… although some might say, we have no future… all human existence will end in two years anyway… yeah, right…

       

      1. Don Shor

        Newsom and Trump are different flavors of the same beastie… they wet their finger, stick it in the air, figure where the winds they care about are blowing, then posture/act…

        Trump and Newsom BOTH own this… only question is, in what measure…

        Both “leaders” have failed, IMNSHO…

        Newsom’s messaging has been consistent and evidence-based. Trump’s has been a disastrous mess. There is no comparison whatsoever.

        1. David Greenwald

          I have to disagree a little with that. Newsom has been a lot better than Trump, but he did open the state way to soon and he bowed to pressure doing so.

  9. Alan Miller

    I read that wearing a mask reduces your risk by 75%.

    Close: your wearing a mask greatly decreases the OTHER person’s risk of catching it from you.

    I’m a huge masktivist, but I don’t share your concern of people being outside around without masks, as long as the distance is great and the contact is brief.  Your going out into the bike lane is how I handle it too.  Fine.  It’s the people inside without masks that gain my ire.

    Trump has finally donned a mask.  How many, oh great one, did you kill by waiting four months?

     

    1. Bill Marshall

      It’s the people inside without masks that gain my ire.

      I really hope you mean  “inside in public places”… no way am I going to mask in my own home, only immediate family present, nor sleep more than 6 feet away from my spouse of 40+ years… if you demand that, fergettit… ain’t happening…

      But even those who do temp checks, masks, hand sanitizing, AND social distancing are being denied activities if they are ‘inside’, “public space”… since yesterday…

      As David classified them, a certain set of “businesses”, despite all those measures, are now closed… some will not care… others care, deeply.

      If they are closed, we should close ALL grocery stores, EVEN IF they do temp checks, masks, hand sanitizing, AND social distancing.  Consistency is fair/good.

      1. Todd Edelman

        close ALL grocery stores

        The main risk is between infected employees, or if an employee sneezes etc on their hand and touches something which you touch to your eyes or mouth immediately.

        More evidence shows that it’s only longer exposure which causes a transmisssion.

        As far as stuff that’s still allowed to open, I am somewhat concerned about outside dining with no air movement – or inside partial tents that are being erected in Sacramento, etc – between people from different households. Most outside situations are not like this, but the tents shows that people are perhaps mistakenly building a new normal.

        I am most concerned with the many people moving into new households on September 1st from out of town, out of county and out of state. None are getting quarantined – only isolated if they show symptoms – and my personal experience is that many younger people are defining the grey area in the Orders however they see fit.

      2. Alan Miller

        I really hope you mean  “inside in public places”…

        Of course.  What do I care what someone does inside their house ?  Unless they have careless guests from outside their pod . . . see Berkeley frat houses, for example.

        And yes, we SHOULD close grocery stores.  The Davis Food COOP does a *wonderful* curbside pickup program.  Why go inside and expose our mighty grocery workers to the virus cooties from the whole d@mn population?  WHY?

      3. Ron Oertel

        I am most concerned with the many people moving into new households on September 1st from out of town, out of county and out of state. 

        Me too!

        (Oh, wait – I thought we were suddenly talking about a “different” subject.)  😉

        Never mind. I must be in a jocular mood.

  10. Tia Will

    In Yolo County?

    Yes, according to Brian Vaughn during a virtual Q&A session at the Chamber of Commerce today. But Yolo County should not be considered as a stand-alone entity. Along with some of the surrounding counties, we have a sharing of facility arrangements. Also, the Sleep Train arena remains available if needed.

    I am however going to share concerns I have not yet expressed. Because of the perceived need to get people to comply with highly undesirable shelter in place orders, an easy to understand, but incomplete message was put out. The idea of flattening the curve. While this concept was true, straight forward, and simple, it was not the whole story. I have heard many people state that because we flattened the curve, we were done and could go back to normal. This was not accurate. Flattening the curve served the immediate goal of preserving bed availability, adequate staffing & PPE. It was the first skirmish, not the end of the war. We won that skirmish only to lose our advantage when we ceded its’ only goal to the virus, the opportunity to spread. A second point many do not seem to appreciate is that while death is a clear and obvious marker that can be quantified, we are just beginning to grapple with the chronic and disabling medical problems that many survivors will face. I am very concerned about the long term health challenges faced by many, including those who have lost their employer-based health insurance.

  11. Bill Marshall

    K…

    One member of the household has a friend, who has a friend who might have been exposed to Covid… he want to be tested in W Sac tomorrow… no symptoms… will oblige… I have to go thru it for a medical procedure… two weeks from now… will report out… on both…

    I hope when I do, my account is respected… I suspect, NOT.

    Folk seem to be @ 2nd or 3rd deviations on this (either end of the curve)… but, I’ll report out truthfully, and anyone can take it or leave it… but it will be honest data…

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