Weekly Questions – Davis City Council – Week 1

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This is our first of eight questions.  The candidates get exactly 250 words.  We did have some technical problems, so not all the answers have come in.  Normally we do have a hard cut off at 9 pm on Thursday.

Question number one: What is your vision for Davis if elected to the council?


Will Arnold, Davis VanguardWill Arnold

Our community faces significant uncertainty, but I believe we are equal to the task. We’ve faced adversity before, with perseverance, resilience and innovation, and used challenges to learn, adapt and become national leaders. Now is no different.

I’m reminded that this historic moment is another opportunity for us to re-examine our own personal actions and reaffirm our conviction that a person is not defined by gender, color, economics or disability—but by their compassion and integrity.

We cannot take our special community for granted. It’s the legacy of hard work and thoughtful planning. Now it is our turn!

Our City Council has become a cohesive, knowledgeable and effective team. That stability is paying dividends.

  •         Our city budget is more secure, even in the face of current economic challenges
  •         We have invested in roads, bike paths, and other critical infrastructure
  •         We have increased housing inventory, and improved access to services
  •         We are working to examine both policies and assumptions in order to become ever-more equitable and just

But that’s not enough. There is more to do!

Even before COVID-19 changed our world, there was a lot to do in planning for the impacts of Climate Change. Now we must simultaneously address the immediate needs of our community, while planning for an uncertain future.

More than ever, our Councilmembers need to possess experience, competence, creativity and resolve. As a united Council, we remain dedicated to the health of every resident, maintaining a strong economic foundation and preserving the community we love.


Larry Guenther

My vision for Davis is one where community engagement is not seen as a barrier to accomplishing plans, but as a path to better outcomes. Where stakeholders are truly engaged in a process that doesn’t create division, but brings us closer together. Where unvetted plans are not created at midnight during City Council meetings in unsuccessful attempts at compromise. In my world view, the tension and division we see is a result of bad process.

When everyone in Davis sees transparency and accountability as tools for improvement, that will lead to the City I envision.

I want to help this City realize the full potential of our community because innovation always comes from the community. Everything Davis is so justly famous for has come from the community. In my view, the biggest job of City leadership is to actualize the goals of the community.

The Davis that I envision is a city where everyone has a share and a voice, regardless of race, economic background, gender identity, or abilities. I believe everyone has skills to improve this City and that leadership’s job is to use those skills where they will do the most good.

I want to see Davis honor its commitments to the environment, to fiscal responsibility, and to resiliency. A City that keeps its promises to the community and where we hold others to their promises.

In short, my vision for Davis is to be the progressive, inclusive, and equitable city that we say we are.


Josh Chapman

My vision for Davis is the same whether I am fortunate enough to be elected to City Council or not. I want Davis to be an inclusive, enlightened, equitable, and resilient community that meets the social, environmental, and economic needs of ALL its residents.

I want a community that shelters the unsheltered and provides mental healthcare for all residents in need, including students and our homeless population. I want a community that prioritizes meeting the basic needs of our most vulnerable residents, including safety for all minority and disenfranchised populations.

I envision a stronger, more sustainable, and vibrant downtown that serves as an arts and entertainment hub and provides a space for ALL residents. I have and will continue to advocate for and support our downtown businesses and to think innovatively about ways to spur continued economic development and investment in our local community.

My vision for Davis requires strong local leadership to develop and execute creative and actionable solutions to deal with the pandemic-induced social and financial crises and to navigate the challenges of these unprecedented times. Transparent policy making and direct engagement with community members to identify and address the needs of Davis residents is essential to creating the opportunity for positive change.

I want a community that is engaged in the planning and decision-making process and where all voices are heard and respected. If elected, I am committed to engaging not only with the District 5 community but with the entire community to realize our shared vision.


Davis California Councilmember Lucas Frerichs, Davis VanguardLucas Frerichs

Davis is a phenomenal community, and yet, like any community, there are issues to work on to continually make it better.

Due to the COVID pandemic, we will need to work over the next few years to weather the economic, fiscal and societal storm together. Yet, now is the time to begin laying the groundwork for the type of resilient community we want to see in the future.

Thankfully, some of this work has already been completed, with the Woodland Davis Clean Water Project bringing us a sustainable source of water. Both the Downtown Plan, and the pending update to the Climate Action & Adaptation Plan, are underway. We have strong collaborative partners in UC Davis & Yolo County.

I believe we need to continue collaborations with Yolo County, interfaith & non-profit community & UC Davis to address homelessness, and providing more mental health and other wrap around services.

We’ll work on increasing affordable housing, both subsidized Affordable Housing, and also housing which is affordable.

We need to continue investing in citywide & neighborhood infrastructure, including repaving bike paths, roads & park improvements.

I’m committed to working on the reimagining of public safety, and the types of investments in social services that are needed to bring about change.

Perhaps most important, we need to continue our efforts to address the pending adverse impacts of climate change. The future will focus on resilience, and we’ll need to work to reimagine our energy, transportation and food systems, as well.


Connor Gorman

Stable Housing, Caring Communities.  This is my vision for Davis.  Every person should have their needs met, including having comfortable living conditions.

Making sure people have what they need to survive, and even thrive, benefits not only those whose needs aren’t currently being met, but also those who are already in stable living situations.  Stability for all creates healthy communities and true public safety that lowers the rate of crime, which is often due to desperation.

Additionally, we should strive to achieve a vibrant and democratic community.  We need more neighborhood associations, tenants unions, and other organizations that build connections between community members.

We need public safety services rather than policing.  We need decision making processes that empower people, especially the most marginalized and historically disenfranchised.

We need a Davis, and a South Davis, for all — which will require actively addressing the underlying systems of oppression that have, and continue to, shape our society.


Rochelle Swanson

The City of Davis is at a crossroads and I am running after two years off the City Council because I have hope and optimism that we can meet the substantial challenges that face our community.

I come back to running for office with a new perspective. I want to improve how we engage and include the entire community. As we reimagine public safety and economic resiliency, I want to inspire the voices who haven’t been heard to come to the table.

We must begin by reviewing our budget from top to bottom, including employees and contractors benchmarked by what is necessary to run a healthy city while supporting essential services.

It’s time to create a clear and transparent framework for City decision-making that encompasses community, commissions, staff and Council. Our commitment to affordable housing must include a robust array of jobs for every income level.

We can’t ignore Davis’ role in the regional recovery and the assets our community has with UCD and numerous innovative thinkers who call this home. The reality is emissions, traffic, social needs and economic vitality are not bound by the borders of our city. Davis has transportation, renewable energy and agricultural industry giants that we can leverage to reap the benefits of the Green Economy.

I believe we can determine the course we want to set Davis on not only in the next two to four years but well beyond. Trying to solve our issues alone is short-sighted. We must move forward together.


Kelsey Fortune

My vision for Davis builds on the work we have already done. Our community is passionate about

  1.       increasing inclusion, diversity, and equity,
  2.       rethinking public safety,
  3.       keeping downtown a destination,
  4.       fighting to limit climate change,
  5.       creating communication, transparency, and accountability in local government,
  6.       and planning how to get to the future we want and need.

This looks like denser housing and sustainable infill development, so all people who work, play, and want to be here can live here. Creating a healthy housing market is an important step toward the diverse and welcoming town Davis wants to be. This vision includes an increase in the types of response to 911 calls, so police officers can handle crime, and public safety can put a focus on people and prevention. This vision means less cars, more bikes, and includes improvements to infrastructure that build on our strengths. Picture downtown with more space allocated to businesses, pedestrians, and bikers. Now we are surrounded by smoke, and it is clear that every one of us needs to do more when it comes to climate change. Davis is poised to be an example of a net zero emission economy. We all have blind spots and different perspectives. Local government should be a place where all voices are heard, and decisions are made and explained with this knowledge in hand. My vision for Davis relies on community-based planning to create concrete steps to reach lofty goals because that’s what Davis deserves.


Colin Walsh

More importantly than what is my vision for Davis, the question is, what is the community’s vision for itself. That is what the general plan is all about. Our current general plan came from an engaging citizen driven planning process and deserves to be treated with respect. There are however aspects of it that are out of date and need updating, for example to better consider climate change. I support initiating a transparent, community driven planning process to update the general plan as soon as possible.

My vision for Davis is a community where people with diverse perspectives work together to set a long-term vision for the City.  In the shorter term, I envision a council that represents diverse viewpoints, respects community involvement, and commission input, and makes decisions based in intellectual honesty and integrity.

You can learn more about me on my website – Walsh4davis.com. Please feel free to contact me there for more information or please email me at walsh4davis@gmail.com.


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Disclaimer: the views expressed by guest writers are strictly those of the author and may not reflect the views of the Vanguard, its editor, or its editorial board.

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63 thoughts on “Weekly Questions – Davis City Council – Week 1”

        1. Kelsey Fortune

          Hi Keith and Ron,

          I’ve noticed metered parking is an important issue to you. When I talk about reallocating space downtown to businesses, bikes, and pedestrians, I mean creating pedestrian/bike malls where private vehicles are not allowed. This would create areas with limited sound and local pollutants and encourage people to spend time downtown rather than driving to one specific shop or restaurant. Creating these spaces would eliminate some street parking, but there would still be parking within a block or two of any specific destination.

          As for creating increased incentives for people to utilize alternatives to private vehicles and alleviate parking constraints in high traffic areas, metered parking in downtown would do the trick, but would not be my first choice.

          One alternative I propose is a parking space fee for multi-unit residential (and perhaps commercial) which is assessed on the property owner annually. This has a few benefits over parking meters.

          First, it is low cost to implement. We need only to count the number of parking spaces on the premise once. There is no need for purchasing meters, creating a voucher system for businesses, monitoring, and maintenance.

          Second, it creates a more reliable revenue stream for the city. Metered parking revenue is pro-cyclical which can lead to issues in recessionary periods; we can see budget issues from this type of revenue now. Annual parking space fees would provide consistent, predictable revenue.

          Third, it is simpler for community members. While this may mean that multi-unit complexes begin charging a fee to those who wish to have a car, it is much less work to pay a one time fee rather than pay every time one chooses to drive to their downtown destination.

          Fourth, it has been noted that over the past decades the number of bicyclers in Davis has remained constant and those with cars has increased. This is primarily due to students bringing vehicles to school at an increased rate as the university grows, and they are forced to live further from campus. Uncoupling parking from housing (which I believe would happen if this fee is implemented) would encourage students to leave their vehicles at home, so it would not only benefit parking downtown, but traffic congestion across the city.

          I would love to know what you think about (1) creating ped/bike only streets in the downtown core and (2) implementing a multi-unit parking space fee. My email is fortunefordavis@gmail.com. I also make myself available regularly outside local businesses and on Zoom. You can find out where I’ll be at fortunefordavis.com/meetme.

          Kelsey

      1. Alan Miller

        I’m going to repeat RG’s comment here without the unfortunate play on words, so the original comment can be omitted:

        Ron Glick response: I’d like to know.  I think we can surmise that [Kelsey] Fortune would want to make driving downtown less accessible.

        1. Richard McCann

          I don’t see Kelsey’s proposal as necessarily making driving downtown less accessible. Instead, the proposal changes the emphasis on who would drive downtown by giving incentives for those who work or reside downtown to be less likely to drive, and thereby opening up parking for customers which could lead to increased accessibility for those who bring business downtown. Totally free parking just leads to congesting parking by those who don’t add to the commercial revenues of downtown.

    1. Dave Hart

      Considering a move to south Davis so I can vote for Kelsey.  Better yet, Kelsey, move to Slide Hill Park so I can vote for you two years from now without moving. That would give you more time to build your base.

  1. Bill Marshall

    David…

    If this is to be a series, suggest you make clear, perhaps by grouping of responses, what districts apply… Dave H might ‘get it’, but first time out, I can see where folk think they can have a choice of any candidate, wherever they reside.

    I can assure you, the failure to reinforce the district nature, will generate a lot of calls to Co Elections, and/or complaints to the poll-workers for those who don’t do the VBM…

    Just a suggestion… same, if you choose to do similar for DJUSD Board candidates…

    Just not sure folk “get” the ‘district’ thing…

    1. Alan Miller

      Much agree with WM here.  Grouping into districts would be helpful.  Those of us unfortunate wonks who actually pay attention to what’s going on are few.  I wouldn’t be surprised if a lot of people haven’t heard of districts, are confused by the difference between school and council districts, or think they can vote for a council-member this Nov, when in fact 2/5 of Davis can’t!

      1. Bill Marshall

        BTW, haven’t done the math yet, but since the CC boundaries, and DJUSD boundaries aren’t the same, and neither correspond to Co Supervisor districts, the # of ballot types is a large # (and that’s in a “general” election!)… [I do not envy Jesse Salinas or his Elections Office crew!]

        So there’s a pretty good chance if you live in Davis, and move a mile away, still in Davis, you’d better re-register, or you’ll be issued the wrong ballot type…

        And if you live in District “X” for CC, you may well NOT be in District “X” for DJUSD.

        All the more reason for ‘education’…

        And thanks, Alan M, for the affirmations… on this topic…

         

  2. Bill Marshall

    Am (after reading the first installment) glad that I have no vote of CC in November (thanks, Rex, et al. … may the bird of paradise…)

    I see only one candidate I could comfortably vote FOR… I’d be tempted to vote for the worst candidate, in my district (except the one), just to show the problems with district elections… but rest assured, I can’t vote in November for any CC candidate.

  3. Keith Olsen

    Another good question to ask:

    What do the candidates think about the painting of BLM “art” or any other political “art” done without much (if any) community input on Davis city streets?

    1. Keith Olsen

      I’m asking that question here because we all know the candidates are reading this thread.

      Maybe they can answer the question here just as Kelsey Fortune so graciously answered another  question above.

    2. Kelsey Fortune

      I understand some people’s frustration with BLM art popping up in public spaces without notice. However, the phrase black lives matter is not political. This phrase exists to support a marginalized group of people who are discriminated against to the point that their murderers walk free. In the same way we have black history month to acknowledge the whitewashing of history, this phrase is an acknowledgement that historically the lives of people of color did not matter.

      As for the inclusion of the community in decisions on art in public spaces, the community elects their representatives. I agree that there is insufficient communication between Council and the public currently. However, when it comes to something like chalk art on the road, the public should be able to trust the city to make a decision without putting it on the Council agenda.

      I love the solidarity space and was very glad I got to enjoy the chalk on second street before it was removed. There are members of our community who deserve our support right now. Davis says it is a welcoming and inclusive community. There should be no controversy here. Black lives matter.

      1. Ron Glick

        “In the same way we have black history month to acknowledge the whitewashing of history, this phrase is an acknowledgement that historically the lives of people of color did not matter.”

        I’m uncomfortable with the word whitewashing as the driving impetus of Black History Month because of its negative connotation. That may be a fair interpretation on your part but it isn’t how I have thought about it and I don’t think it is how it has been portrayed historically. In my mind words like enlightening or enriching seem more appropriate. I found these two examples that I believe reflect a more positive tone about the origin of Black History Month.

        Wikipedia states “…when President Gerald Ford first recognized Black History Month… He urged Americans to ‘seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of Black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history'”.

        Wikipedia also claims “the original inspiration for Black History Month, which was a desire to redress the manner in which American schools failed to represent Black historical figures as anything other than slaves or colonial subjects.”

        These statements don’t necessarily refute your claim but they do have a more nuanced explanation of the inspiration for the program.

         

         

         

        1. David Greenwald

          Ron: I think she’s right. We have told history from the standpoint of Anglo-Saxon Christian America. Black History Month has attempted to highlight the contributions of Blacks to American history. There are so many absolutely mindboggling horrific attrocities in American history that have been whitewashed, including just how badly slaves were treated.

        2. Ron Glick

          I don’t disagree that there is much important history that has been avoided. My problem is saying that Black History was a response to whitewashing American History. Shouldn’t Black History be seen as valuable in its own right? I looked up the origin of Black History Month and posted what I found. It had a more positive tone. If you have information that backs up the view that it was a response to “whitewashing” please share it.

          1. David Greenwald

            This is much more interesting than the Wikipedia article you posted: https://asalh.org/about-us/origins-of-black-history-month/

            “The story of Black History Month begins in Chicago during the summer of 1915. An alumnus of the University of Chicago with many friends in the city, Carter G. Woodson traveled from Washington, D.C. to participate in a national celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of emancipation sponsored by the state of Illinois. Thousands of African Americans travelled from across the country to see exhibits highlighting the progress their people had made since the destruction of slavery.”

            My point though is that history has been whitewashed – the history of Black History Month goes back more than 100 years and thus would be framed as a celebration of Black achievement rather than an indictment of history books.

        3. Ron Glick

          “What Carter G. Woodson would say about the continued celebrations is unknown, but he would smile on all honest efforts to make black history a field of serious study and provide the public with thoughtful celebrations.”
          That is the concluding sentence of the article you linked. Nowhere does the article talk about anything akin to a whitewash but does talk about celebration of  black contributions.

          Interestingly the time frame of Woodson’s efforts corresponds to the same period that monuments to Southern Generals are being put up throughout the South. Now that was whitewashing.

           

        4. Kelsey Fortune

          “These statements don’t necessarily refute your claim but they do have a more nuanced explanation of the inspiration for the program.”

          I disagree. They do not add nuance so much as they add flowery language. Both of the quotes that you pulled are just gentler ways of saying what I said. They allow us to avoid admitting our failings and sitting with our discomfort.

        5. Matt Williams

          One of the things that I like about Kelsey a lot is the fact that she talks straight and doesn’t mince words.  She sounds a whole lot more like a public servant than a politician.

      2. Ron Glick

        I guess we will have to disagree. I think both you and David are projecting your understanding in today’s context onto a historical question. Its not like we are talking about blaming the Civil War on the Morill Tariff.

        My view is shaped from taking African American History in High School during the 70’s. The class focused more on contributions of African Americans than on a whitewashed American History in the traditional curriculum.

        If you are talking about a more Howard Zinn view of the world I would point out that Black History Month predates “A Peoples History of the United States.”

  4. Don Shor

    City Council:

    District 2:
    Will Arnold
    Colin Walsh
    Dillan Horton

    District 3:
    Lucas Frerichs
    Larry D. Guenther

    District 5:
    Rochelle Swanson
    Josh Chapman
    Connor Gorman
    Kelsey Fortune

    Searchable map for council districts:
    https://www.cityofdavis.org/city-hall/city-clerk/elections/district-elections

    Davis Joint Unified School District:
    Trustee Area 2:          
    Lea Darrah

    Trustee Area 5:
    Cecilia Escamilla-Greenwald
    Betsy Hyder

    At-Large:
    Vigdis Asmundson
    Andrew Cullen

    Note: There are NOT going to be polling places as in the past.
    Per Yolo County Elections:

    Yolo County has replaced its traditional polling places with 12 Voter Assistance Centers (VACs) and has placed 12 Ballot Drop Boxes (BDBs) throughout the county. The Yolo County Elections Office has worked in partnership with local jurisdictions and school districts to ensure that all voting locations allow for secure, socially distant in-person voting. The VACs and BDBs are spread throughout each community for ease of access.

    .
    Voter Assistance Centers,
    Open Saturday Oct 21 thru Monday Nov 2, 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
    Open Tuesday Nov 3, 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
    — UC Davis ARC Ballroom
    — Veterans Memorial Center Multipurpose Room
    — Montgomery Elementary School Multipurpose Room
    — Patwin Elementary School Multipurpose Room

    Ballot Drop Boxes
    Available Monday, Oct 5, thru Tuesday, Nov 3.
    — City Hall, available 24/7.
    — Nugget Markets in South and North Davis, available daily 6:00 a.m.- 10:00 p.m.
    — Westlake Market in West Davis, available daily 7:00 a.m. – 11:00 p.m.
    https://www.yoloelections.org/voting/locations
    ” rel=”nofollow”>https://www.yoloelections.org/voting/locations

    1. Bill Marshall

      And, to add to Richard’s comments on Don’s post, just yesterday got a card from the Postal Service… they recommend mailing your ballot @ least 7 days before Nov 3… given some of the questions about the recent appointment of Postmaster General, and his links to political powerhouses in a certain party…

      Hence, I recommend:

      1.  When you get your VBM ballot, check to make sure it’s for the districts you’re in… if not, contact county elections immediately

      2.  If you don’t get a VBM ballot, particularly if you have moved within Davis, done your registration via DMV (!), name change, new to Davis, etc., by OCT 5,  contact county elections immediately

      3.  Strongly consider using the ‘drop off’ or ‘VAC’s to turn in your voted ballot… particularly within the 7 day ‘recommended’ window…

      4.  If you get two ballots in your name (happens, rarely), do step 1 to find the right one, destroy the other… voting twice is a felony… and the likelihood of getting caught, given YCE protocols, is high.

      5. Am thinking that on the VBM envelope (NOT the ballot) there is a code # (there are on Provisional/Conditional ballot envelopes)… write it down… call Elections around 4-5 weeks later (I usually advise voters, 3-4 weeks, but this is not a usual year!) if you want to verify whether your ballot was received (first test), and accepted for counting (second test)… and to cut the legs out of those from a certain party, once accepted, the ballot is removed from the envelope, un-read, and then processed by different folk for counting… there is no link between the ballot cast, and voter ID, at that point.

  5. Matt Williams

    In the South Davis Candidates Forum organized by Tracy DeWit, each candidate was asked 31 questions and their answers are being videoed.  The questions were submitted to Tracy by members of the Davis community.

    PUBLIC SAFETY
    CRIME
    POLICE RE-ORGANIZATION

    Crime is on the rise in Davis, including the sexual assault in S. Davis on Aug 3. What are your thoughts on increasing the Police budget and presence in our community?

    __________________________________________________________________

    Would you put that decision to a ballot style vote/decision for the residents? __________________________________________________________________

    What is your opinion on, and what further action would you take on the Davis Police Department “reorganization” and reallocation of funding?

    ____________________________________________________________________

    How will you make sure biking to school is safe in South. Davis and ensure South Davis parks and Putah Creek bike trail are safe day and night?

    _____________________________________________________________________

    Any thoughts on the increase in crime in South Davis as it’s an ongoing concern that just seems to be getting worse and more wide spread?

    ____________________________________________________________________

    What is your plan to address the individuals who are being released from jails into our communities? These individuals were most likely not provided skills or training on how to be successful in society. Furthermore, they often struggle with addictions and mental illness. How will you ensure that they have the opportunity to experience sustainable independence and success, instead of sustainable dependence on government?

    ____________________________________________________________________

    HOUSING
    PACIFICO
    HOMELESSNESS 

    What is your vision for the decrepit housing bordering the Putah Creek bike trail at the end of Drew? Otherwise known as Pacifico?

    _______________________________________________________________

    What are your thoughts on the Pacifico project in South Davis and it being relocated out of South Davis?

    __________________________________________________________________

    Do you think the Respite Center is working? why or why not? In your answer, please explain for whom is it benefiting and for whom is it not benefiting?

    ___________________________________________________________________

    Shall we have “Respite Centers” all over Davis that don’t discriminate based on location so that the impacts of such ideas are more evenly distributed?

    ______________________________________________________________________

    Homelessness is a ‘catch-all ” phrase and can be very misleading. The lack of a clear and agreed upon definition of the group we are trying to help, could contribute to why we don’t have a clear direction or plan by City leaders.

    Please, define the terms homelessness and chronic-homelessness?

    ______________________________________________________________________

    The ever increasing number of those with mental disabilities and uncontrollable drug and alcohol addictions are serious issues that seem to usually involve chronic homelessness.

    The city moved the chronic homeless out of the Downtown to save business and moved the uncontrollable situation directly into our neighborhoods and communities and for some, onto our front lawns and into our backyards.

    The enormous and profound situation should not be the responsibility of the city’s residents.

    What are your plans to address this issue?

    ____________________________________________________________________

    Centuries of racially discriminatory policies have created an enormous wealth gap between whites and most minorities of color. Like many affluent white communities, Davis has perpetuated its lack of racial diversity by simply pricing out the typical minority home owner

    Do you agree that our city plan should include a goal of racial diversity in all of our neighborhoods?

    If so, then what policies might you support/promote with respect to zoning, lot size, and taxes that would support affordable housing scattered throughout our community?

    ____________________________________________________________________

    TRAFFIC
    MACE-MESS
    DISC
    INFASTRUCTURE

    Due to the large apartments in South Davis and those in the pipeline, the road traffic on Poleline Rd, Richards Blvd underpass, and Mace Blvd overpass, is awful and an ongoing concern. What solutions can you offer?

    ______________________________________________________________________

    What should Mace Boulevard look like in terms of bike and vehicle traffic design?

    ____________________________________________________________________

    Are you in favor of the DISC project? Why or why not?

    ______________________________________________________________________

    How will South Davis Mace Blvd plan for the impacts of DISC, if approved?

    ______________________________________________________________________

    Do you think our roads, bike paths, road medians are in good condition? How would you prioritize fixing our infrastructure?

    _____________________________________________________________________

    Many Davis citizens have pointed to the Mace Mess as an example of a failure by the City in transparency, public disclosure and public engagement, as well as an example of how City processes are reactive rather than proactive. What have you learned from the Mace Mess situation that causes you to agree or disagree with those assessments?

    _____________________________________________________________________

    SOUTH DAVIS IMPROVEMENTS
    DISABLED
    MOBILITY
    REDISTRICTING

    South Davis has been a dumping ground for Davis since the city was built it seems. If there is a need for fast food, car dealerships, large business complexes, large apartment complexes, etc. it’s been easy to build it in South Davis. If you are elected to City Council what will you do to improve the image of South Davis and what specific things will you do to make South Davis a more desirable location to live?
    ______________________________________________________________________

    Pedestrian and bike improvements are needed in South Davis. Specifically the south side entrance/exit, at the Safeway shopping center. Road changes, including road striping and the relocation of the cross walk button are in need of correction and improvement. For example, currently, and for over 20 + years the crosswalk button is inaccessible for those in wheelchairs. and due to the insufficient design, the situation is unsafe for all pedestrians, bikes, and even cars.

    Do you have plans on improving these unsafe conditions in South Davis?
    ____________________________________________________________________

    What are your thoughts on making more decisions that positively impact actual Davis residents (those that promote positive behavior) versus the transient population and those that steal from our residents, our businesses, and not act/behave as good citizen… ie spending Davis tax dollars towards improving Davis as a Whole.

    ______________________________________________________________________

    One of the responsibilities of the post-election City Council will be Redistricting for the 2022 Election. Do you favor creation of a Citizens Redistricting Commission? Please explain your answer. If a Citizens Redistricting Commission is created, when should they first convene, and what should their powers be?

    ____________________________________________________________________

    How will you make sure biking to school is safe in South. Davis and ensure South Davis parks and Putah Creek bike trail are safe day and night?

    _____________________________________________________________________

    Any thoughts on the increase in crime in South Davis as it’s an ongoing concern that just seems to be getting worse and more wide spread?

    ____________________________________________________________________

    What is your plan to address the individuals who are being released from jails into our communities? These individuals were most likely not provided skills or training on how to be successful in society. Furthermore, they often struggle with addictions and mental illness. How will you ensure that they have the opportunity to experience sustainable independence and success, instead of sustainable dependence on government?

    ____________________________________________________________________

    HOUSING
    PACIFICO
    HOMELESSNESS 

    What is your vision for the decrepit housing bordering the Putah Creek bike trail at the end of Drew? Otherwise known as Pacifico?

    _______________________________________________________________

    What are your thoughts on the Pacifico project in South Davis and it being relocated out of South Davis?

    __________________________________________________________________

    Do you think the Respite Center is working? why or why not? In your answer, please explain for whom is it benefiting and for whom is it not benefiting?

    ___________________________________________________________________

    Shall we have “Respite Centers” all over Davis that don’t discriminate based on location so that the impacts of such ideas are more evenly distributed?

    ______________________________________________________________________

    Homelessness is a ‘catch-all ” phrase and can be very misleading. The lack of a clear and agreed upon definition of the group we are trying to help, could contribute to why we don’t have a clear direction or plan by City leaders.

    Please, define the terms homelessness and chronic-homelessness?

    ______________________________________________________________________

    The ever increasing number of those with mental disabilities and uncontrollable drug and alcohol addictions are serious issues that seem to usually involve chronic homelessness.

    The city moved the chronic homeless out of the Downtown to save business and moved the uncontrollable situation directly into our neighborhoods and communities and for some, onto our front lawns and into our backyards.

    The enormous and profound situation should not be the responsibility of the city’s residents.

    What are your plans to address this issue?

    ____________________________________________________________________

    Centuries of racially discriminatory policies have created an enormous wealth gap between whites and most minorities of color. Like many affluent white communities, Davis has perpetuated its lack of racial diversity by simply pricing out the typical minority home owner

    Do you agree that our city plan should include a goal of racial diversity in all of our neighborhoods?

    If so, then what policies might you support/promote with respect to zoning, lot size, and taxes that would support affordable housing scattered throughout our community?

    ____________________________________________________________________

    TRAFFIC
    MACE-MESS
    DISC
    INFASTRUCTURE

    Due to the large apartments in South Davis and those in the pipeline, the road traffic on Poleline Rd, Richards Blvd underpass, and Mace Blvd overpass, is awful and an ongoing concern. What solutions can you offer?

    ______________________________________________________________________

    What should Mace Boulevard look like in terms of bike and vehicle traffic design?

    ____________________________________________________________________

    Are you in favor of the DISC project? Why or why not?

    ______________________________________________________________________

    How will South Davis Mace Blvd plan for the impacts of DISC, if approved?

    ______________________________________________________________________

    Do you think our roads, bike paths, road medians are in good condition? How would you prioritize fixing our infrastructure?

    _____________________________________________________________________

    Many Davis citizens have pointed to the Mace Mess as an example of a failure by the City in transparency, public disclosure and public engagement, as well as an example of how City processes are reactive rather than proactive. What have you learned from the Mace Mess situation that causes you to agree or disagree with those assessments?

    _____________________________________________________________________

    SOUTH DAVIS-DAVIS IMPROVEMENTS
    DISABLED
    MOBILITY
    REDISTRICTING

    South Davis has been a dumping ground for Davis since the city was built it seems. If there is a need for fast food, car dealerships, large business complexes, large apartment complexes, etc. it’s been easy to build it in South Davis. If you are elected to City Council what will you do to improve the image of South Davis and what specific things will you do to make South Davis a more desirable location to live?

    ______________________________________________________________________

    Pedestrian and bike improvements are needed in South Davis. Specifically the south side entrance/exit, at the Safeway shopping center. Road changes, including road striping and the relocation of the cross walk button are in need of correction and improvement. For example, currently, and for over 20 + years the crosswalk button is inaccessible for those in wheelchairs. and due to the insufficient design, the situation is unsafe for all pedestrians, bikes, and even cars.

    Do you have plans on improving these unsafe conditions in South Davis? ____________________________________________________________________

    What are your thoughts on making more decisions that positively impact actual Davis residents (those that promote positive behavior) versus the transient population and those that steal from our residents, our businesses, and not act/behave as good citizen… ie spending Davis tax dollars towards improving Davis as a Whole.
    ______________________________________________________________________

    As the divide between political parties becomes a chasm, what solutions do you see to bring our city’s residents together? What is one common goal you propose that will bring unity?

    ______________________________________________________________________

    COVID-19
    SCHOOLS
    BUSINESSES
    COMMUNICATION

    Our community is experiencing several crises, one of which is the effects of Covid-19. The pandemic has caused the closure of all our public schools, including the UCD campus, created a loss of jobs and businesses, and impacts our country’s, states, counties, and city’s economic and mental health. As a city council member, what is your first priority as we try not to lose any more people, business, and jobs?

    ______________________________________________________________________

    Do you think the city of Davis should have more cannabis retail?

    _____________________________________________________________________

    When do you think the schools should open?

    ______________________________________________________________________

    How will you communicate with your constituents to hear and be heard?

    _____________________________________________________________________

    What knowledge, skill, and/or ability will you bring to the city council that your competitor may not possess?

    _____________________________________________________________________

    What specific items have you accomplished, introduced, and/or guided through the approval process that has made Davis a better, more desirable place to live?

    1. Matt Williams

      Tracy has done an excellent job organizing and executing these forums.  She cares a lot about the community and was even considering running for City Council herself until COVID struck.  With three small children coping with COVID impacts left little time for much else, so she decided not to run.  Kudos to her for staying involved even when she couldn’t be a candidate herself.

      Links to the two forums conducted thus far, as well as a Zoom invitation to tomorrow’s forum with Connor Gorman, are as follows:

      =======================

      Forum #1 Topic: South Davis Candidate Group Forum – all four candidates
      Date: Aug 30, 2020 01:44 PM Pacific Time (US and Canada)

      Meeting Recording:https://us02web.zoom.us/rec/share/5Y9zEYjZzF5Jb6_E6GHjQvd6MoDgeaa81SBL_aIMnUuIXNdmLwgNPqp6zpKKSC7OAccess Passcode: KrJj7.#j

      =======================

      Forum #2 Topic: South Davis City Council Candidate – Kelsey Fortune
      Date: Sep 6, 2020 01:52 PM Pacific Time (US and Canada)

      Meeting Recording:
      https://us02web.zoom.us/rec/share/STI_RBLmtn4_gdqx5rmvuVKyOjIlHOMFqdnArKaTQ0KjF1znTvcyfcRKd3ETKkPP.JKNi__OpN6bbzl-h

      =======================

      Forum #3 Topic: South Davis City Council Candidate – Connor Gorman
      Date: Sep 13, 2020 02:00 PM Pacific Time (US and Canada)

      Join Zoom Meeting
      https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84808935103

      =======================

  6. Matt Williams

    The video of the YCDIE Candidates Forum held this afternoon from 2:00 to 4:00 can be accessed at https://www.facebook.com/YCDIEdavis/videos/2743623855956385

    Yolo Committee for Diverse and Inclusive Elections Introduction — 0:00 through 5:30

    Question #1 — 5:30 through 29:20 — posed to all candidates — “What have you done personally or professionally to address racism and inequity in our community?”

    — Linda Deos
    — Jim Provenza
    — Will Arnold
    — Dillan Horton
    — Colin Walsh
    — Lucas Frerichs
    — Larry Guenther
    — Josh Chapman
    — Kelsey Fortune
    — Connor Gorman
    — Rochelle Swanson

    Question #2 — 29:200 through 54:05 — posed to all candidates — “What do you see as the core challenges of people of color  ine the city of Davis or Yolo County, and what would you prioritize to help overcome them?”

    — Larry Guenther
    — Lucas Frerichs
    — Dillan Horton
    — Colin Walsh
    — Will Arnold
    — Rochelle Swanson
    — Connor Gorman
    — Kelsey Fortune
    — Josh Chapman
    — Jim Provenza
    — Linda Deos

    Question #3 — 54:10 through 1:01:35 — posed to District 2 City Council candidates — “The City of Davis Social Services Commission, Police Accountability Commission and Human Relations Commission are discussing ways to reprioritize police funding.  If you were a Council member, what ways would you like to see functions currently performed by the police be performed by other departments?”

    — Colin Walsh
    — Dillan Horton
    — Will Arnold

    Question #4 — 1:03:10 through 1:08:00 — posed to District 3 City Council candidates — “In your view what are the structural issues that lead to  the disproportionate number of people of color unhoused?  And what can we do locally to address this?”

    — Lucas Frerichs
    — Larry Guenther

    Question #5 — 1:08:10 through 1:16:40 — posed to District 5 City Council candidates — “As a Council member what role do you see yourself playing in reducing racism and economic disparities in our community?”

    — Kelsey Fortune
    — Rochelle Swanson
    — Josh Chapman
    — Connor Gorman

    Question #6 — 1:16:50 through 1:22:40 — posed to Yolo County Supervisor candidates — “What changes do you propose to better support the Public Defenders Office to address structural racism within the criminal justice system?”

    — Linda Deos
    — Jim Provenza

    Question #7 — 1:22:50 through 1:32:40 — posed by Alan Miller — “Bretton Woods Buyers Program” question

    — Colin Walsh
    — Kelsey Fortune
    — Lucas Frerichs
    — Rochelle Swanson
    — Dillan Horton
    — Larry Guenther

    Question #8 — 1:32:50 through 1:42:50  — posed by Jim Frame — “Access to Internet/Community Broadband, Digital Divide and Distance Learning” question

    — Jim Provenza
    — Dillan Horton
    — Will Arnold
    — Linda Deos
    — Josh Chapman
    — Colin Walsh
    — Connor Gorman

    Question #9 — 1:42:50 through 1:50:30  — posed by multiple people in the audience — “What problems do you see presently in how the City of Davis Police Department and County agencies relate to people of color?  And what specific changes would you make to address this problem?

    — Rochelle Swanson
    — Larry Guenther
    — Kelsey Fortune
    — Lucas Frerichs

    Candidate Closing Statements — 1:50:30 through 2:03:30

    — Josh Chapman
    — Connor Gorman
    — Colin Walsh
    — Linda Deos
    — Dillan Horton
    — Rochelle Swanson
    — Larry Guenther
    — Kelsey Fortune
    — Lucas Frerichs
    — Will Arnold
    — Jim Provenza

    Yolo Committee for Diverse and Inclusive Elections Closing Statement — 2:03:30 through 2:05:15

  7. Tia Will

    As anticipated, such a general question drew a lot of value/aspirational statements, which is good, but for the most part does not offer much substance. One comment did particularly catch my eye. It was from Rochelle Swanson.

    Our commitment to affordable housing must include a robust array of jobs for every income level.”

    In my opinion, in our current situation, this statement does not address the reality of our economic situation. I believe we must focus, at least in the short to mid-range on adapting such that all of our residents have enough money to ensure the necessities of life. This is unlikely to be met by assuring jobs for “every income level”, some of which did not provide enough to live on even before the pandemic, and certainly do not provide enough to live on now with necessary restrictions on many businesses.

     

    1. Don Shor

      The city council doesn’t create jobs or provide money to residents. The council can just provide space for economic opportunities, and services that alleviate hardships such as respite centers. I find these kinds of questions exasperating because they don’t really get at the actual job description these folks are applying for.
      What does the city council do? What would you do as a councilmember to help address inequities and hardships?
      At the county level, of course, they control funding for many social welfare programs, so the answers would get more into the details of budget priorities.

    2. Ron Glick

      Even before the pandemic Yolo County suffered from a shortage of livable wage jobs and high levels of chronic poverty. It is one of the reasons I have long supported economic growth and job creation to lift people and families from poverty. Tia, whether she knows it or not has made the case for Measure B.

      The City Council creates plenty of livable wage jobs forts staff and consultants.

  8. Matt Williams

    It is one of the reasons I have long supported economic growth and job creation to lift people and families from poverty.  Tia, whether she knows it or not has made the case for Measure B.

    .
    Ron G., I too have long supported economic growth and job creation, but with a few exceptions our support has not been rewarded with actual job creation and associated economic growth.  Tia is absolutely correct when she says we got, “a lot of value/aspirational statements, which is good, but for the most part does not offer much substance.”  And that is my fundamental problem with the Measure B DISC proposal … it is all aspirational statements and very little substance, especially if substance equals actual jobs.

    In his September 6th article entitled Sunday Commentary: These Are Troubled Times and We Need to Get Real about Our Community’s Challenges David published the graphic below.  My immediate reaction to the graphic was “That’s a really good depiction of the DISC project.  (1) The seats in two rows are blocked off by tape.  They are no longer part of the seating capacity.  Those two rows are like Phase 3 and Phase 4 of the DISC project … because of the reduction in market demand for office space due to COVID, those two Phases of the proposed project probably will never happen. (2) The seats in the other two rows are not blocked off, but there are no “jobs” actually sitting in the seats kin those “rows.”

    I have asked the DISC development team over and over and over again to show me anything “real” about the market demand for the space they are proposing to build.  To date they have not provided any answer to my request.  That leaves me with little choice other than to conclude that there isn’t anything “real” about their project.  I haven’t stopped waiting for DISC to show me evidence about any jobs that are “real” and I will wait right up until November 3rd.

    https://www.davisvanguard.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Council-Emergency-8.jpg

    1. Ron Glick

      Matt, I don’t expect to be rewarded personally but I do expect that the community will be rewarded with many jobs.

      Think about how many jobs have already come to fruition. First there were the staff people like Robb White who put out the RFP. Then there were all the groups who responded with the products of planners writing EIR’s, architects, lobbyists and consultants. Now we have the pollsters, professional election groups and the locals they will employ to try to get Measure B passed.

      If they get it passed there will be work for the banks and financiers. Also the lawyers. Then the earth mover suppliers and the people who drive the bulldozers. The the trades people; the stone masons, carpenters, plumbers, electricians, glazers, roofers, all of whom likely have young apprentice laborers. Then there are the material suppliers and truck drivers. Of course throughout there are the inspectors. All these jobs before even one company opens shop there and all those jobs have multiplier effects at grocery stores and other service providers.

      If they ever get it built and occupied there will be the workers and the support staff. Remember for every R&D or manufacturing job there are likely 3-5 jobs in accounting, custodial, IT or other support services.

      It all adds up to a whole lot of jobs Matt.

      1. Matt Williams

        Jobs that are essentially one-time.  Jobs to be sure, but not ones that continue to contribute to the Davis economy once their limited duration is over = planners writing EIR’s, architects, lobbyists and consultants. Now we have the pollsters, professional election groups and the locals they will employ to try to get Measure B passed … banks and financiers. Also the lawyers. earth mover suppliers and the people who drive the bulldozers.

        Jobs that are permanent recurring additions to the community = workers and the support staff.for the hoped-for R&D and manufacturing companies

        The challenge with the vast majority of the one-time jobs is that they will be filled by people who live outside Davis, so the multiplier effects at grocery stores and other service providers that all those jobs have will happen (for the most part) in the communities where those employees live.

        Regarding the recurring jobs, I have asked the DISC team many times over the past two years for evidence of the market demand they promise is there.  They have promised to get me together with their marketing partner Reynolds & Brown, but never delivered on that promise.  Then they renewed the promise (both times at the marvelous Chinese restaurant in Westlake Plaza … Shanghai Town), and once again never delivered.

        I want the addition of jobs in our community just as much as you do, but so far every time the DISC team has promised evidence of any long-term jobs they have come up with nothing.

        1. Ron Glick

          One time jobs can be lengthy or recurring depending on market conditions for their services.

          Maybe workers will pick up groceries where they live or maybe get them here on their way home from work.

          Anyway, Agstart just announced a lab incubator in Woodland. Maybe if it took less time to get anything done in Davis they might have come here instead.

        2. Matt Williams

          Anyway, Agstart just announced a lab incubator in Woodland. Maybe if it took less time to get anything done in Davis they might have come here instead.

          .
          If you look at AgStart’s address online you will find that it is in the middle of Woodland’s downtown in refurbished retail space.  The southern building of Davis Ace Hardware would have more than met their needs in terms of square feet of space.

          Here’s a LINK to a Google Maps view of their new address in Woodland.

        3. Ron Glick

          Makes me wonder if any jobs qualify as worthy for you Matt. Either they are not permanent enough or could fit elsewhere or who knows why but it seems you will always have a reason. You claim there is no need for Ramosland that there are no jobs. I list a lot of jobs. They aren’t the type you think are worthy. Then I give another example but they are not worthy either. I guess jobs are like me, they are not worthy.

        4. Matt Williams

          Ron, we live in a free country, so feel free to wonder all you want to.  No one is stopping you.

          With that said, let me help you out of your misconceptions.

          One-time jobs can be lengthy, but they can’t be recurring.  They last the duration of either the contract, which in this case is a project construction contract, or the actual task that is part of the construction.

          To draw a parallel from your own life, you are a recurring customer of Mishka’s, and Sinisa Novakovic values you accordingly.  My son, visiting from Baltimore is a one-time customer of Mishka’s and Sinsia assigns a very different value to my son.

          Very few of the people completing the one-time construction-related jobs associated with DISC, if it goes forward, add any students to the local Davis schools.  Their children go to the schools in the communities where they live.

          The people who would/could fill the recurring R&D and Advanced Manufacturing jobs that DISC (ideally) wants to attract will add lots of student to the local Davis schools if they choose to live here in Davis rather than commute to their DISC jobs from other non-Davis communities.  That is a huge difference.  Bottom-line, your sarcasm not withstanding, recurring jobs are incredibly worthy.

          You are correct, on occasion workers will pick up groceries where they live and on occasion they will get them here on their way home from work.  There is no one size fits all answer.

          Either they are not permanent enough or could fit elsewhere or who knows why but it seems you will always have a reason. You claim there is no need for Ramosland that there are no jobs. I list a lot of jobs. They aren’t the type you think are worthy.

          .
          All jobs have the ability to “fit elsewhere.” That is the nature of competition in our capitalistic economy.  My comments about AgStart had nothing to do with the quality of the jobs at AgStart, but rather had to do with the fact that the space AgStart has just moved into is readily available here in Davis right now at multiple locations.  Either Davis property owners were unwilling to work with AgStart, or AgStart actually wanted to be in Woodland. That is a question you will have to ask the AgStart principals … one of which (according to their website) is the City Manager of Woodland.

          Right now the only actual recurring jobs DISC has shown evidence of is the clothing factory making new clothes for the Emperor.

      2. Don Shor

        Ron G makes a very good point about the high value jobs that are created during the construction of a new development, and those jobs would continue for many years at the pace of buildout expected for MRIC. There are many local contractors, many of them residents of Davis, who would certainly benefit from contracts with the developers of the site. There would be construction jobs for residents of Davis and nearby communities. This is not a short-term development proposal.
        The multiplier effect of their spending and the taxes increased by the presence of those jobs and workers would continue for quite awhile. Even short-term parts of the project would have fiscal benefits.

        I am reminded of when cable TV came to Davis in the 1980’s. The owners of the company that got the contract, Johnson Enterprises, moved here. They bought a house in El Macero and enrolled their kids in Davis schools. The company was startled to find that people in Davis got very upset when their crews trenched through their lawns and landscapes to install the cable; apparently the number of calls was unique to Davis. So they contracted with us to go out and fix their work, generating many small jobs and lots of income for us. The house they bought was unlandscaped, so they contracted with us to plant it (first time I’ve ever planted a 10,000 square foot lawn from seed). They shopped locally, spending a lot of money with us and other retailers in town. When the contract was done after about two years, they sold the house at considerable increase in value and moved on.

        People who work on local projects often become members of the community, regardless of their duration. People who live here would have job opportunities. Those job opportunities employ an especially diverse range of demographics. And a project of this nature would create those types of jobs for a long time.

        1. Matt Williams

          That is all correct Don, but as you clearly point out in your Johnson example, when the contract was done they sold their house and moved on to the next project.

          Compare that to the jobs that Marrone Bio Inovations or Mori Seki created when they were established in Davis.  We don’t find ourselves saying “sold their house and moved away” about those jobs.

          The two problems I have with the DISC project are (1) that there is a near total absence of employers with new jobs coming to Davis standing up with the development team saying “build it and we will come join your community,” and (2) UC Davis has publicly in writing said that they don’t oppose the project rather than that they support the project.  That is hardly a ringing endorsement … and Chancellor May wasn’t even willing to deliver that message about DISC himself.

          DISC should be about permanent additions to our economy, not about temporary patches to our economy.

        2. Ron Glick

          Matt your objection is a perfect Catch-22. For those too young to know Catch-22 was a novel about WWII. The premise of Catch-22 is that anybody who is crazy enough to want out of the army isn’t crazy.

          In this case Ramos can’t talk about who the tenants will be because he doesn’t have signed rental contracts. The reason he doesn’t have signed rental contracts is because he can’t guarantee the project won’t be turned down at the polls. So you are voting no because of another unintended consequence of Measure J/R. Your argument is not to support the project at the ballot box because the proponent can’t tell you who the tenants will be before it passes at the ballot box.

        3. Ron Oertel

          Ron G:  There’s no demonstrated commercial demand for this proposal (or anything like it).  One only has to look at all the proposals that have failed so far (including MRIC itself) to see that.

          The proposal that failed in Davis, and subsequently moved to Woodland (maybe 3 years ago or so) is another example.  Which (also) still doesn’t have any announced commercial tenants.

          The only reason that DISC is being presented to voters is due to the dense, market-rate housing on a peripheral site, far from the city center.

          The finance and budget commissioners understood this, as well – which is the reason that the proposal’s viability was questioned (beyond the phases which include the housing).

        4. Ron Oertel

          Also, there are “for lease” signs on commercial properties all over Davis – including on a property that (ironically) has a “Yes on B” sign on it, I think.

          I can post lots of articles regarding the commercial crash that’s occurring, as a result of Covid and a permanent shift towards telecommuting. Including a technology company that paid almost $90 million to cancel a lease in San Francisco.

          Take away the dense housing at DISC (which is totally inappropriate at that site) and you’ll see how quickly the proposal would be withdrawn (again).

        5. Matt Williams

          In this case Ramos can’t talk about who the tenants will be because he doesn’t have signed rental contracts. The reason he doesn’t have signed rental contracts is because he can’t guarantee the project won’t be turned down at the polls.

          Ron  G, you have chosen the wrong verb when you say “Ramos can’t talk about” in your first sentence.  Your statement would be correct if it read “Ramos chooses not to talk about”

          Ramos doesn’t need signed contracts to talk about the marketing and sales plan for DISC.  In fact I doubt many lenders would consider lending DISC mmoney if they don’t have a marketing and sales plan.  They simply have chosen to try and finesse the “is it real” issue with the Davis voters.

          So Ron, your Catch 22 reference was a good try, but given the choices that the Ramos team have made, they are in a bind of their own making.

          1. David Greenwald

            “Ron G, you have chosen the wrong verb when you say “Ramos can’t talk about” in your first sentence. Your statement would be correct if it read “Ramos chooses not to talk about””

            How do you know?

        6. Ron Glick

          I guess we disagree on how these things happen. I spoke with a neighbor with around 30 years as staff in city governments throughout California. He told me what I posted. I replied it was a Catch -22. An observation he confirmed.

        7. Matt Williams

          Ron G., ask your neighborwhat section of California (or Federal) Law prevents a private business from discussing their sales and marketing plans/activities?

          Then ask your neighbor if if what he is/was telling you pertains to what a municipal jurisdiction can talk about.

        8. Matt Williams

          David asks, “How do you know?”

          The answer is a simple process of elimination.

          Nothing has been provided in any of the discussions that prevents disclosure under the provisions of California or Federal Law.  That means the developer CAN disclose.   By process of elimination, if the developer can disclose, but has not disclosed, then the only alternative that remains is that they choose/chose not to disclose.

        9. Ron Glick

          My guess is that at this point Ramos is doing what his campaign consultants tell him to do and nothing more.

          This does however demonstrate the ad infinitum stupidity of Measure J/R. The question I have for you Matt is there any request by any voter or by any citizen that is too much? The reason I say voter or citizen is because if you live outside the city you don’t get to vote on Measure B. I’m not saying this as a you should be quiet because you don’t live in the city remark. I’m saying it as a why should Ramos respond to every question even those posed by those not voting in the election question. Where does it end Matt? You want to see his company’s books?

        10. Matt Williams

          My guess is that at this point Ramos is doing what his campaign consultants tell him to do and nothing more.

          I agree with that assessment Ron.

          The question I have for you Matt is there any request by any voter or by any citizen that is too much? The reason I say voter or citizen is because if you live outside the city you don’t get to vote on Measure B. I’m not saying this as a you should be quiet because you don’t live in the city remark. I’m saying it as a why should Ramos respond to every question even those posed by those not voting in the election question. Where does it end Matt? You want to see his company’s books?

          .
          I didn’t feel you were trying to silence me Ron … and I do live outside the city, so the question is very relevant.  The answer to your question, “why should Ramos respond to every question even those posed by those not voting in the election question” is actually quite simple.  I did not initiate the conversation with the Ramos team.  They reached out to me in 2019 and invited me to lunch in order to get my input on both the project and the eventual election campaign.  I gave the feedback freely … and indicated that nothing would please me more than a 100% full project producing lots of jobs.  They offered to arrange a follow-up meeting with their partner Reynolds & Brown who they said was most directly involved with how the project’s marketing and sales program would address my expressed concerns about how “real” the promised jobs were.

          Despite the promise, no follow-up meeting with Reynolds & Brown ever happened.

          Then in January 2020 the Ramos team reached out to me again and we again met for lunch at Shanghai Town in Westlake Plaza.  That January meeting was a carbon copy of the 2019 meeting, with the same promises to have a follow-up meeting with Reynolds & Brown.  Again the promises came to nothing.

          I have no desire to see the company’s books.  I simply want to see evidence that the market demand the project needs to thrive is actually “real.”

  9. Ron Glick

    I think this is a good example of an additional problem of Measure J/R. It gives people with no skin in the game a deciding role in whether a project would go forward.

    In places without Measure J/R. Investors take risk with their own money and if no jobs are produced and the project fails they lose their money. But not in Davis. Here, everyone with a vote gets to weigh in on whether you can risk capital on a project no matter how arcane their vision for appropriate jobs or uses.

    1. Bill Marshall

      It gives people with no skin in the game a deciding role in whether a project would go forward.

      Another way of wording that, is J/R/D feel/believe they own all the land around Davis, and therefore, after all the chances for input @ commissions and CC, want to exert “control” if the decisions don’t go the way they want.   Quite simple, really… the desire to ‘control’ others… lest they be inconvenienced in the slightest, and/or it doesn’t fit with their view of Nirvana…  aka, “two-year-olds”… but highly educated, and spout why everyone else who disagree are stupid, ignorant, and should be thwarted…  I’m thinking many of them if a measure J/R/D measure is approved, they’ll want a “”do-over” via litigation… yeah, right, that would never happen…

      One or two of the CC candidates would seem to support such a measure, if proposed…

      Am just surprised the Measure J/R/D folk have not proposed requiring a vote for any land use change, or even any approval for development, within the existing City… a ‘coming attraction’?

  10. Jim Frame

    I think this is a good example of an additional problem of Measure J/R. It gives people with no skin in the game a deciding role in whether a project would go forward.

    Every Davis voter has skin in the game:  they either pay the taxes that pay for the city services that are delivered to development projects, or they pay rent to people who pay those taxes (thus indirectly paying those taxes themselves).

    1. Ron Glick

      Its a interesting twist Jim. We all have skin in the game because we pay taxes. The argument is based on the idea that projects don’t pay for the services they so aren’t we all in some sort of services deficit then? So if we are all in a services deficit are we really paying anything into the project?

      1. Mark West

        “Every Davis voter has skin in the game:  they either pay the taxes that pay for the city services that are delivered to development projects, or they pay rent to people who pay those taxes…”

        Considering the level of unfunded obligations in the City’s budget it would be more accurate to suggest that none of us have skin in the game since we are not currently paying enough (directly or indirectly) to cover the City’s service costs. It will be those who are living here 10-40 years in the future who actually have ‘skin in the game’ as they will be paying for our poor fiscal management and equally poor land-use decisions.

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