New York Times Covers Former Davis Police Chief

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Even if the article in Sunday’s New York Times were not about our old friend, former Davis Police Chief Jim Hyde it would be pretty fascinating.

That is because in a lot of ways there is tremendous change going on in American society, equivalent perhaps to the changes that occurred in the 20th century when large numbers of African-Americans fled from the south to northern cities which in turn spawned a flight of white city dwellars to the suburbs. Now the rising cost of urban housing is causing almost a reverse migration with many whites moving back to the cities and many African-Americans fleeing to the more affordable suburbs aided at times by programs like the Section 8 federal housing program.

Writes the New York Times:

“Under the Section 8 federal housing voucher program, thousands of poor, urban and often African-American residents have left hardscrabble neighborhoods in the nation’s largest cities and resettled in the suburbs.

Law enforcement experts and housing researchers argue that rising crime rates follow Section 8 recipients to their new homes, while other experts discount any direct link. But there is little doubt that cultural shock waves have followed the migration. Social and racial tensions between newcomers and their neighbors have increased, forcing suburban communities like Antioch to re-evaluate their civic identities along with their methods of dealing with the new residents.”

In addition to these forces, the foreclosure crisis plays a role as well:

“The foreclosure crisis gnawing away at overbuilt suburbs has accelerated that migration, and the problems. Antioch is one of many suburbs in the midst of a full-blown mortgage meltdown that has seen property owners seeking out low-income renters to fill vacant homes.”

Like I said, this would be an interesting story even without the presence of the formerly polarizing police chief of Davis in the story. The issue of “overbuilt suburbs” could probably keep us going for a week with talks about new waves in smart development and questions about what will happen to suburbs as towns struggle to redevelop their cores in hopes of cutting down on the need to consume gasoline in commutes.

For all the talk about racial reconciliation, it appears that the presence of African-Americans in a town like Antioch is just as explosive today as the notion of forced busing and integration was in the 1970s. The more things change, the more they stay the same.

On the front lines of these kinds of cultural struggles is often the face of law enforcement and it is here where our old friend rears his head once again and plants himself firmly in the conscience this time not just of Davis but apparently the entire nation.

The action filed as Antioch last month claims discrimination, intimidation, and illegal property searches. Police allegedly routinely questioned and harassed Section 8 residents about their housing status, writing letters to the county’s housing authority recommending termination of subsidies.

According to the Times article:

“A December 2007 study of Antioch police records by Public Advocates, a law firm in San Francisco, counted 67 investigations of black households, compared with 59 of white families; black households, it found, are four times as likely to be searched based on noncriminal complaints and to be contacted by the police in the first place.”

Like any profiling claim, the contentions are difficult to sustain even with such statistics–for all statistics can be a matter of coincidence as well as intent.

For their part, Chief Jim Hyde of the Antioch Police Department denies these claims.

But here is a very telling statement in the New York Times article:

“Chief Hyde also said that the local housing authority was not meeting its obligation to screen tenants properly, and that as his department focused on nuisance issues, the police had become a de facto enforcement arm of the federal government.”

The question that immediately jumps to my mind is whether this an appropriate role for the police department to play. I understand the frustration that the police may have if the federal government is being negligent in its duties to enforce its own laws, but at the same time, if the police have gone beyond their own charge, they invite these sorts of complaints and law suits.

The Times article tells a number of stories about white residents complaining about the problems that the Section 8 housing has brought.

There is clear conflict within these stories on the one hand fear and on the other hand a recognition that there is a racial component to that fear and wondering if that is an appropriate response.

Laura Reynolds, 36, an emergency room nurse, said that she often came home to her Country Hills development tract after working a late-shift to find young black teenagers strolling through her neighborhood.

“I know it sounds horrible, but they’re scary. I’m sorry,” said Ms. Reynolds, who like her two friends said she was conflicted about her newfound fear of black youths. “Sometimes I question myself, and I think, Would I feel this way if they were Mexican or white?”

Is this is a legitimate fear and concern or is it being overblown by cultural and racial stereotypes? The problem that I fear is that some are playing on the legitimate fears of residents to their own political advantage. This is far from a new phenomena.

Brad Seligman is a lawyer with a nonprofit civil rights advocacy group based in San Francisco, the Impact Fund. They are one of the groups along with the ACLU, Public Advocates, and the NAACP that have accused the city’s police department of racial profiling.

Mr. Seligman is quoted in the New York Times saying:

“Instead of driving while black, it’s renting while black.”

The New York Times talks about an African-American couple, Thomas and Karen Coleman, two of the plaintiffs.

In June 2007, a neighbor told the police that Mr. Coleman had threatened him. Officers from the police community action team visited the house and demanded to be allowed in.

“I cracked the door open, but they pushed me out of the way,” Ms. Coleman said.

The officers searched the house even though they did not have a warrant, said the Colemans, who are now part of the class-action suit against the department. The police questioned Mr. Coleman, a parolee at the time, about his living arrangement. He explained that he and his wife were separated but in the process of reconciling. The police accused the family of violating a Section 8 rule that only listed tenants can live in a subsidized home.

After the raid, officers made repeated visits to the Coleman home and to Mr. Coleman’s job at a movie theater. They also sent a letter to the county housing department recommending that the Colemans be removed from federal housing assistance, a recommendation the authority rejected.

“They kept harassing me until I was off parole,” Mr. Coleman said.

If the account of the Colemans is accurate, we see a number of problems with not only the police’s conduct, but their role in this process.

First, even as a parolee, police cannot enter a person’s residence without a warrant and without permission to enter.

Second, the police accused the family of violating a Section 8 rule but the family’s situation was obviously more complicated than that. Frankly it is not the police’s authority to enforce Section 8 rules which are federal. Moreover, by inserting themselves into the process they probably overstepped their boundaries.

Unexplained in this story is the fact that obviously there was no evidence that Mr. Coleman threatened anyone, otherwise they could have simply arrested him and revoked his parole.

Even if the authorities in Antioch technically acted appropriate here, a questionable contention at best, their insertion into this process is part of the problem. Instead of calming the situation down, they seem to be throwing fuel on the fire.

This is part of the problem I had with the Police Chief while he was in Davis. Two years ago, I obtained public records that show that Chief Hyde in response to citizen complaints about police conduct and in response to the HRC pressing the issue, instead of diffusing the situation, launched a PR campaign against the HRC from the police station. Emails show efforts by the police chief to drum up opposition to the HRC. Emails show derogatory statements made by the police chief to the HRC, its chair, and others in this community. While the Chief perhaps had every right to mobilize a counter response to the HRC’s complaints, the method in which it was undertaken was polarizing and increased the heat and the tensions.

Moreover the police chief chose to finally take a new position in Antioch, a move he had been looking to make for some time, long before disagreements with the HRC arose. He chose that opportunity to throw the final fuel to the fire, further inciting tensions as he left the scene and forced those who stayed in Davis to clean up his mess including a number of lawsuits that the city currently faces from actions, which took place under his command.

These patterns seem to be reemerging in Antioch. Thus far, it seems that the police chief has the backing of the Antioch Mayor and City Council who also gave him a raise this month. The next question will be how much teeth this lawsuit has and whether the findings by the court, which figures to be a long and drawn out process, will vindicate or indict his current practices.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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112 thoughts on “New York Times Covers Former Davis Police Chief”

  1. tansey thomas

    DPD, Chief Hyde honed his skills in Davis. He targeted residents of affordable housing, especially vunlnerable persons such as single parents and their children using the old conservative and racial belief that being poor is a character flaw and symptom of criminality. They have renamed “profiling” to “proactive policing.” However, much of the change in policing has been going on for years but generally popularized by former Mayor Rudolph Giuliani’s “Broken Windows” policy of policing that essentially says that the poor causes crime, etc. I totally expect that at some point this scene will blow up again as occurred in the sixties when the middleclass and student left gets involved.

  2. tansey thomas

    DPD, Chief Hyde honed his skills in Davis. He targeted residents of affordable housing, especially vunlnerable persons such as single parents and their children using the old conservative and racial belief that being poor is a character flaw and symptom of criminality. They have renamed “profiling” to “proactive policing.” However, much of the change in policing has been going on for years but generally popularized by former Mayor Rudolph Giuliani’s “Broken Windows” policy of policing that essentially says that the poor causes crime, etc. I totally expect that at some point this scene will blow up again as occurred in the sixties when the middleclass and student left gets involved.

  3. tansey thomas

    DPD, Chief Hyde honed his skills in Davis. He targeted residents of affordable housing, especially vunlnerable persons such as single parents and their children using the old conservative and racial belief that being poor is a character flaw and symptom of criminality. They have renamed “profiling” to “proactive policing.” However, much of the change in policing has been going on for years but generally popularized by former Mayor Rudolph Giuliani’s “Broken Windows” policy of policing that essentially says that the poor causes crime, etc. I totally expect that at some point this scene will blow up again as occurred in the sixties when the middleclass and student left gets involved.

  4. tansey thomas

    DPD, Chief Hyde honed his skills in Davis. He targeted residents of affordable housing, especially vunlnerable persons such as single parents and their children using the old conservative and racial belief that being poor is a character flaw and symptom of criminality. They have renamed “profiling” to “proactive policing.” However, much of the change in policing has been going on for years but generally popularized by former Mayor Rudolph Giuliani’s “Broken Windows” policy of policing that essentially says that the poor causes crime, etc. I totally expect that at some point this scene will blow up again as occurred in the sixties when the middleclass and student left gets involved.

  5. longtime Davis resident

    This doesn’t surprise me at all. Many officers in Davis were not happy with Hyde when he was the Chief of Police. He was so busy focusing on his PhD and only reporting or checking in 1/2 the time. He was essentially a part-time Chief receiving a full-time pay and benefits.

    One can only hide their biases for so long. This cloud seems to follow him wherever he goes.

    Chief Landy Black is a professional and our city is better served with Black as Chief.

  6. longtime Davis resident

    This doesn’t surprise me at all. Many officers in Davis were not happy with Hyde when he was the Chief of Police. He was so busy focusing on his PhD and only reporting or checking in 1/2 the time. He was essentially a part-time Chief receiving a full-time pay and benefits.

    One can only hide their biases for so long. This cloud seems to follow him wherever he goes.

    Chief Landy Black is a professional and our city is better served with Black as Chief.

  7. longtime Davis resident

    This doesn’t surprise me at all. Many officers in Davis were not happy with Hyde when he was the Chief of Police. He was so busy focusing on his PhD and only reporting or checking in 1/2 the time. He was essentially a part-time Chief receiving a full-time pay and benefits.

    One can only hide their biases for so long. This cloud seems to follow him wherever he goes.

    Chief Landy Black is a professional and our city is better served with Black as Chief.

  8. longtime Davis resident

    This doesn’t surprise me at all. Many officers in Davis were not happy with Hyde when he was the Chief of Police. He was so busy focusing on his PhD and only reporting or checking in 1/2 the time. He was essentially a part-time Chief receiving a full-time pay and benefits.

    One can only hide their biases for so long. This cloud seems to follow him wherever he goes.

    Chief Landy Black is a professional and our city is better served with Black as Chief.

  9. Anonymous

    This blog entry doesn’t discuss the reasons that people moved to the suburbs to buy homes. The suburbs are miles further from employment, yet people moved there to escape the problems of the cities where they worked. Now, the government is paying for the problems to move to the suburbs.

    The tone of the article is that white people are racist and hate black people. The reverse is true though. Why didn’t the article explain the racist attitudes of the section 8 recipients?

    The Davis police aren’t racists who hate black people. The Davis police are enforcing the laws equitably and not favoring non-white people by allowing them to ignore laws that long-time Davis residents follow.

    This topic could use some objective reporting; the civil rights issues in the 1960s are not representative of the City of Davis today. The Davis police and Davis residents aren’t racists and don’t hate people of color because of the color of their skin.

  10. Anonymous

    This blog entry doesn’t discuss the reasons that people moved to the suburbs to buy homes. The suburbs are miles further from employment, yet people moved there to escape the problems of the cities where they worked. Now, the government is paying for the problems to move to the suburbs.

    The tone of the article is that white people are racist and hate black people. The reverse is true though. Why didn’t the article explain the racist attitudes of the section 8 recipients?

    The Davis police aren’t racists who hate black people. The Davis police are enforcing the laws equitably and not favoring non-white people by allowing them to ignore laws that long-time Davis residents follow.

    This topic could use some objective reporting; the civil rights issues in the 1960s are not representative of the City of Davis today. The Davis police and Davis residents aren’t racists and don’t hate people of color because of the color of their skin.

  11. Anonymous

    This blog entry doesn’t discuss the reasons that people moved to the suburbs to buy homes. The suburbs are miles further from employment, yet people moved there to escape the problems of the cities where they worked. Now, the government is paying for the problems to move to the suburbs.

    The tone of the article is that white people are racist and hate black people. The reverse is true though. Why didn’t the article explain the racist attitudes of the section 8 recipients?

    The Davis police aren’t racists who hate black people. The Davis police are enforcing the laws equitably and not favoring non-white people by allowing them to ignore laws that long-time Davis residents follow.

    This topic could use some objective reporting; the civil rights issues in the 1960s are not representative of the City of Davis today. The Davis police and Davis residents aren’t racists and don’t hate people of color because of the color of their skin.

  12. Anonymous

    This blog entry doesn’t discuss the reasons that people moved to the suburbs to buy homes. The suburbs are miles further from employment, yet people moved there to escape the problems of the cities where they worked. Now, the government is paying for the problems to move to the suburbs.

    The tone of the article is that white people are racist and hate black people. The reverse is true though. Why didn’t the article explain the racist attitudes of the section 8 recipients?

    The Davis police aren’t racists who hate black people. The Davis police are enforcing the laws equitably and not favoring non-white people by allowing them to ignore laws that long-time Davis residents follow.

    This topic could use some objective reporting; the civil rights issues in the 1960s are not representative of the City of Davis today. The Davis police and Davis residents aren’t racists and don’t hate people of color because of the color of their skin.

  13. Anonymous

    “First, even as a parolee, police cannot enter a person’s residence without a warrant and without permission to enter.”

    This is probably incorrect. A person on probation or parole more than likely does not have this protection. Police are allowed to search at will. It really depends on the conditions of their parole.

    If the man moved into the house, the Section 8 certificate holder must report the additional tenant and also his income so that their contribution is adjusted or risk losing the benefit. If they don’t do that, the tax payer is subsidizing the rent at a level that the program does not intend.

    There is only one pot of money for this program. If people reported their income and the number of tenants accurately, there would probably be more money to spread around. There is a huge waiting list for this program. Also, do we really want to be subsidizing the rent of a parolee that is the result of his wife not reporting that she has another person who is earning income in the household?

  14. Anonymous

    “First, even as a parolee, police cannot enter a person’s residence without a warrant and without permission to enter.”

    This is probably incorrect. A person on probation or parole more than likely does not have this protection. Police are allowed to search at will. It really depends on the conditions of their parole.

    If the man moved into the house, the Section 8 certificate holder must report the additional tenant and also his income so that their contribution is adjusted or risk losing the benefit. If they don’t do that, the tax payer is subsidizing the rent at a level that the program does not intend.

    There is only one pot of money for this program. If people reported their income and the number of tenants accurately, there would probably be more money to spread around. There is a huge waiting list for this program. Also, do we really want to be subsidizing the rent of a parolee that is the result of his wife not reporting that she has another person who is earning income in the household?

  15. Anonymous

    “First, even as a parolee, police cannot enter a person’s residence without a warrant and without permission to enter.”

    This is probably incorrect. A person on probation or parole more than likely does not have this protection. Police are allowed to search at will. It really depends on the conditions of their parole.

    If the man moved into the house, the Section 8 certificate holder must report the additional tenant and also his income so that their contribution is adjusted or risk losing the benefit. If they don’t do that, the tax payer is subsidizing the rent at a level that the program does not intend.

    There is only one pot of money for this program. If people reported their income and the number of tenants accurately, there would probably be more money to spread around. There is a huge waiting list for this program. Also, do we really want to be subsidizing the rent of a parolee that is the result of his wife not reporting that she has another person who is earning income in the household?

  16. Anonymous

    “First, even as a parolee, police cannot enter a person’s residence without a warrant and without permission to enter.”

    This is probably incorrect. A person on probation or parole more than likely does not have this protection. Police are allowed to search at will. It really depends on the conditions of their parole.

    If the man moved into the house, the Section 8 certificate holder must report the additional tenant and also his income so that their contribution is adjusted or risk losing the benefit. If they don’t do that, the tax payer is subsidizing the rent at a level that the program does not intend.

    There is only one pot of money for this program. If people reported their income and the number of tenants accurately, there would probably be more money to spread around. There is a huge waiting list for this program. Also, do we really want to be subsidizing the rent of a parolee that is the result of his wife not reporting that she has another person who is earning income in the household?

  17. Anonymous

    Surprise, surprise, surprise….now the New York Times is reporting on our former Police Chief. Thank goodness for our Federal laws and unbiased media publicity.

    Davis Enterprise take note and clean up your skewed reporting (favoring local Public Officials and agencies).

    Former Davis Police Chief Hyde did not count on ANY Davis residents (residing in affordable housing) defying racial stereotype and standing up against him as a Public Official and/or his brand of policing.
    Some affordable housing residents are ( or have been): students at UC Davis; working on graduate, law and medical degrees; and/or just struggling to provide a better life for their families.
    It was readily apparent to many of us in the Davis community, specifically the African-American and Hispanic residents (regardless of socioeconomic status) that Chief Hyde was divisive. It took several racist, high profile, incidents and OUTSIDE support to expose Yolo County, not just Davis Police Department for its discriminatory practices.

    Now lets see if the New York Times can investigate Jeff Reisig’s (and any other Public Officials) “leadership”.

  18. Anonymous

    Surprise, surprise, surprise….now the New York Times is reporting on our former Police Chief. Thank goodness for our Federal laws and unbiased media publicity.

    Davis Enterprise take note and clean up your skewed reporting (favoring local Public Officials and agencies).

    Former Davis Police Chief Hyde did not count on ANY Davis residents (residing in affordable housing) defying racial stereotype and standing up against him as a Public Official and/or his brand of policing.
    Some affordable housing residents are ( or have been): students at UC Davis; working on graduate, law and medical degrees; and/or just struggling to provide a better life for their families.
    It was readily apparent to many of us in the Davis community, specifically the African-American and Hispanic residents (regardless of socioeconomic status) that Chief Hyde was divisive. It took several racist, high profile, incidents and OUTSIDE support to expose Yolo County, not just Davis Police Department for its discriminatory practices.

    Now lets see if the New York Times can investigate Jeff Reisig’s (and any other Public Officials) “leadership”.

  19. Anonymous

    Surprise, surprise, surprise….now the New York Times is reporting on our former Police Chief. Thank goodness for our Federal laws and unbiased media publicity.

    Davis Enterprise take note and clean up your skewed reporting (favoring local Public Officials and agencies).

    Former Davis Police Chief Hyde did not count on ANY Davis residents (residing in affordable housing) defying racial stereotype and standing up against him as a Public Official and/or his brand of policing.
    Some affordable housing residents are ( or have been): students at UC Davis; working on graduate, law and medical degrees; and/or just struggling to provide a better life for their families.
    It was readily apparent to many of us in the Davis community, specifically the African-American and Hispanic residents (regardless of socioeconomic status) that Chief Hyde was divisive. It took several racist, high profile, incidents and OUTSIDE support to expose Yolo County, not just Davis Police Department for its discriminatory practices.

    Now lets see if the New York Times can investigate Jeff Reisig’s (and any other Public Officials) “leadership”.

  20. Anonymous

    Surprise, surprise, surprise….now the New York Times is reporting on our former Police Chief. Thank goodness for our Federal laws and unbiased media publicity.

    Davis Enterprise take note and clean up your skewed reporting (favoring local Public Officials and agencies).

    Former Davis Police Chief Hyde did not count on ANY Davis residents (residing in affordable housing) defying racial stereotype and standing up against him as a Public Official and/or his brand of policing.
    Some affordable housing residents are ( or have been): students at UC Davis; working on graduate, law and medical degrees; and/or just struggling to provide a better life for their families.
    It was readily apparent to many of us in the Davis community, specifically the African-American and Hispanic residents (regardless of socioeconomic status) that Chief Hyde was divisive. It took several racist, high profile, incidents and OUTSIDE support to expose Yolo County, not just Davis Police Department for its discriminatory practices.

    Now lets see if the New York Times can investigate Jeff Reisig’s (and any other Public Officials) “leadership”.

  21. Doug Paul Davis

    “This is probably incorrect. A person on probation or parole more than likely does not have this protection. Police are allowed to search at will. It really depends on the conditions of their parole.”

    I actually checked with a lawyer before writing that. I was told that they retain the right not allow the police to search their home, now searching their person without probable cause is a different story, but there is still greater protection for the actual physical home.

  22. Doug Paul Davis

    “This is probably incorrect. A person on probation or parole more than likely does not have this protection. Police are allowed to search at will. It really depends on the conditions of their parole.”

    I actually checked with a lawyer before writing that. I was told that they retain the right not allow the police to search their home, now searching their person without probable cause is a different story, but there is still greater protection for the actual physical home.

  23. Doug Paul Davis

    “This is probably incorrect. A person on probation or parole more than likely does not have this protection. Police are allowed to search at will. It really depends on the conditions of their parole.”

    I actually checked with a lawyer before writing that. I was told that they retain the right not allow the police to search their home, now searching their person without probable cause is a different story, but there is still greater protection for the actual physical home.

  24. Doug Paul Davis

    “This is probably incorrect. A person on probation or parole more than likely does not have this protection. Police are allowed to search at will. It really depends on the conditions of their parole.”

    I actually checked with a lawyer before writing that. I was told that they retain the right not allow the police to search their home, now searching their person without probable cause is a different story, but there is still greater protection for the actual physical home.

  25. Anonymous

    When a person is on parole or probation there is a reduced right to a constitutionally protected "reasonable expectation of privacy".
    This is the exception to the Fourth Amendment rule.
    Maybe I am missing something but the Antioch case in question involved a non parolee/probationer living in affordable housing. Her "significant other" is said to be the parolee & he was not even on the lease. If he was on the lease and the police performed even a suspicionless search (legal in California) of the shared home, the police search is limited to: a search of the parolee, his belongings; and any shared areas with the non parolee. If I have missed something, can someone legal clarify?

    As for why the city employees reside in the suburbs? Your comments sound like "White flight" to me. To practice racism or discrimination one must be in a position of power. That is why we have Federal laws to protect against discrimination. So the playing field is not yet equal). Blacks can be as prejudice as Whites. That is very true. However, as a group Blacks do not have the same external "power" to negatively impact Whites as a group (e.g., education, employment, housing, government; law enforcement and/or judicial). This fact is a significant oversight on your part.

  26. Anonymous

    When a person is on parole or probation there is a reduced right to a constitutionally protected "reasonable expectation of privacy".
    This is the exception to the Fourth Amendment rule.
    Maybe I am missing something but the Antioch case in question involved a non parolee/probationer living in affordable housing. Her "significant other" is said to be the parolee & he was not even on the lease. If he was on the lease and the police performed even a suspicionless search (legal in California) of the shared home, the police search is limited to: a search of the parolee, his belongings; and any shared areas with the non parolee. If I have missed something, can someone legal clarify?

    As for why the city employees reside in the suburbs? Your comments sound like "White flight" to me. To practice racism or discrimination one must be in a position of power. That is why we have Federal laws to protect against discrimination. So the playing field is not yet equal). Blacks can be as prejudice as Whites. That is very true. However, as a group Blacks do not have the same external "power" to negatively impact Whites as a group (e.g., education, employment, housing, government; law enforcement and/or judicial). This fact is a significant oversight on your part.

  27. Anonymous

    When a person is on parole or probation there is a reduced right to a constitutionally protected "reasonable expectation of privacy".
    This is the exception to the Fourth Amendment rule.
    Maybe I am missing something but the Antioch case in question involved a non parolee/probationer living in affordable housing. Her "significant other" is said to be the parolee & he was not even on the lease. If he was on the lease and the police performed even a suspicionless search (legal in California) of the shared home, the police search is limited to: a search of the parolee, his belongings; and any shared areas with the non parolee. If I have missed something, can someone legal clarify?

    As for why the city employees reside in the suburbs? Your comments sound like "White flight" to me. To practice racism or discrimination one must be in a position of power. That is why we have Federal laws to protect against discrimination. So the playing field is not yet equal). Blacks can be as prejudice as Whites. That is very true. However, as a group Blacks do not have the same external "power" to negatively impact Whites as a group (e.g., education, employment, housing, government; law enforcement and/or judicial). This fact is a significant oversight on your part.

  28. Anonymous

    When a person is on parole or probation there is a reduced right to a constitutionally protected "reasonable expectation of privacy".
    This is the exception to the Fourth Amendment rule.
    Maybe I am missing something but the Antioch case in question involved a non parolee/probationer living in affordable housing. Her "significant other" is said to be the parolee & he was not even on the lease. If he was on the lease and the police performed even a suspicionless search (legal in California) of the shared home, the police search is limited to: a search of the parolee, his belongings; and any shared areas with the non parolee. If I have missed something, can someone legal clarify?

    As for why the city employees reside in the suburbs? Your comments sound like "White flight" to me. To practice racism or discrimination one must be in a position of power. That is why we have Federal laws to protect against discrimination. So the playing field is not yet equal). Blacks can be as prejudice as Whites. That is very true. However, as a group Blacks do not have the same external "power" to negatively impact Whites as a group (e.g., education, employment, housing, government; law enforcement and/or judicial). This fact is a significant oversight on your part.

  29. Anonymous

    Yes, it is true that the home has greater protection. Often it is written into the conditions of the persons parole that police can search without a warrant the space in a home that is under the control of the parolee. That means police can enter and search a bedroom that the person keeps his personal stuff in, but maybe not the bathrooms, kitchen, living room, or other common areas. But it does allow the police to enter the home without a warrant.

  30. Anonymous

    Yes, it is true that the home has greater protection. Often it is written into the conditions of the persons parole that police can search without a warrant the space in a home that is under the control of the parolee. That means police can enter and search a bedroom that the person keeps his personal stuff in, but maybe not the bathrooms, kitchen, living room, or other common areas. But it does allow the police to enter the home without a warrant.

  31. Anonymous

    Yes, it is true that the home has greater protection. Often it is written into the conditions of the persons parole that police can search without a warrant the space in a home that is under the control of the parolee. That means police can enter and search a bedroom that the person keeps his personal stuff in, but maybe not the bathrooms, kitchen, living room, or other common areas. But it does allow the police to enter the home without a warrant.

  32. Anonymous

    Yes, it is true that the home has greater protection. Often it is written into the conditions of the persons parole that police can search without a warrant the space in a home that is under the control of the parolee. That means police can enter and search a bedroom that the person keeps his personal stuff in, but maybe not the bathrooms, kitchen, living room, or other common areas. But it does allow the police to enter the home without a warrant.

  33. Richard

    Jim Hyde must be a very happy man these days. He’s a police chief in a town with a city leadership that has given him carte blanche to harass African Americans.

    By the way, Tansey nailed the situation in her comment here. Hyde confirms it in his remark about the police having been forced to take over a federal responsibility by policing Section 8 residents. In fact, there are numerous “federal” situations in Antioch, people there get federal subsidy of all kinds there, as they do anywhere, but it’s only a federal issue for Hyde when it involves poor people and black people.

    –Richard Estes

  34. Richard

    Jim Hyde must be a very happy man these days. He’s a police chief in a town with a city leadership that has given him carte blanche to harass African Americans.

    By the way, Tansey nailed the situation in her comment here. Hyde confirms it in his remark about the police having been forced to take over a federal responsibility by policing Section 8 residents. In fact, there are numerous “federal” situations in Antioch, people there get federal subsidy of all kinds there, as they do anywhere, but it’s only a federal issue for Hyde when it involves poor people and black people.

    –Richard Estes

  35. Richard

    Jim Hyde must be a very happy man these days. He’s a police chief in a town with a city leadership that has given him carte blanche to harass African Americans.

    By the way, Tansey nailed the situation in her comment here. Hyde confirms it in his remark about the police having been forced to take over a federal responsibility by policing Section 8 residents. In fact, there are numerous “federal” situations in Antioch, people there get federal subsidy of all kinds there, as they do anywhere, but it’s only a federal issue for Hyde when it involves poor people and black people.

    –Richard Estes

  36. Richard

    Jim Hyde must be a very happy man these days. He’s a police chief in a town with a city leadership that has given him carte blanche to harass African Americans.

    By the way, Tansey nailed the situation in her comment here. Hyde confirms it in his remark about the police having been forced to take over a federal responsibility by policing Section 8 residents. In fact, there are numerous “federal” situations in Antioch, people there get federal subsidy of all kinds there, as they do anywhere, but it’s only a federal issue for Hyde when it involves poor people and black people.

    –Richard Estes

  37. suburbanite

    It sounds like the police are overreaching in their enforcement. However, they should be expected to respond to reports from neighbors.

    It is not clear if Mr. Coleman indeed threatened his neighbor. He wasn’t on the lease, so the police could have merely arrested him for violating the conditions of his parole, couldn’t they? The neighbor could have asked for a restraining order to keep Mr. Coleman away. Instead, the police determined that he was living at the home, entered it and searched it and then worked to get the entire family evicted. It is clear that Antioch is using this strategy to “clean up” its neighborhoods.

    Jim Hyde thinks differently than most. I believe he does have a problem with racism which makes him choose strange solutions to community problems.

    As an aside – I can see how the wife could be a plaintiff, but the husband, who was inappropriately living there, on parole at the time and accused of causing problems with neighbors doesn’t really have a legal leg to stand on. I suspect that the husband also being a plaintiff will complicate the wife’s case.

  38. suburbanite

    It sounds like the police are overreaching in their enforcement. However, they should be expected to respond to reports from neighbors.

    It is not clear if Mr. Coleman indeed threatened his neighbor. He wasn’t on the lease, so the police could have merely arrested him for violating the conditions of his parole, couldn’t they? The neighbor could have asked for a restraining order to keep Mr. Coleman away. Instead, the police determined that he was living at the home, entered it and searched it and then worked to get the entire family evicted. It is clear that Antioch is using this strategy to “clean up” its neighborhoods.

    Jim Hyde thinks differently than most. I believe he does have a problem with racism which makes him choose strange solutions to community problems.

    As an aside – I can see how the wife could be a plaintiff, but the husband, who was inappropriately living there, on parole at the time and accused of causing problems with neighbors doesn’t really have a legal leg to stand on. I suspect that the husband also being a plaintiff will complicate the wife’s case.

  39. suburbanite

    It sounds like the police are overreaching in their enforcement. However, they should be expected to respond to reports from neighbors.

    It is not clear if Mr. Coleman indeed threatened his neighbor. He wasn’t on the lease, so the police could have merely arrested him for violating the conditions of his parole, couldn’t they? The neighbor could have asked for a restraining order to keep Mr. Coleman away. Instead, the police determined that he was living at the home, entered it and searched it and then worked to get the entire family evicted. It is clear that Antioch is using this strategy to “clean up” its neighborhoods.

    Jim Hyde thinks differently than most. I believe he does have a problem with racism which makes him choose strange solutions to community problems.

    As an aside – I can see how the wife could be a plaintiff, but the husband, who was inappropriately living there, on parole at the time and accused of causing problems with neighbors doesn’t really have a legal leg to stand on. I suspect that the husband also being a plaintiff will complicate the wife’s case.

  40. suburbanite

    It sounds like the police are overreaching in their enforcement. However, they should be expected to respond to reports from neighbors.

    It is not clear if Mr. Coleman indeed threatened his neighbor. He wasn’t on the lease, so the police could have merely arrested him for violating the conditions of his parole, couldn’t they? The neighbor could have asked for a restraining order to keep Mr. Coleman away. Instead, the police determined that he was living at the home, entered it and searched it and then worked to get the entire family evicted. It is clear that Antioch is using this strategy to “clean up” its neighborhoods.

    Jim Hyde thinks differently than most. I believe he does have a problem with racism which makes him choose strange solutions to community problems.

    As an aside – I can see how the wife could be a plaintiff, but the husband, who was inappropriately living there, on parole at the time and accused of causing problems with neighbors doesn’t really have a legal leg to stand on. I suspect that the husband also being a plaintiff will complicate the wife’s case.

  41. Waiting

    I’m not willing to draw any conclusions just yet. Depends on outcome of lawsuit. But given Chief Hyde’s reputation while he was in Davis, I wouldn’t be surprised if Antioch regrets hiring him. Trouble seems to follow him wherever he goes.

  42. Waiting

    I’m not willing to draw any conclusions just yet. Depends on outcome of lawsuit. But given Chief Hyde’s reputation while he was in Davis, I wouldn’t be surprised if Antioch regrets hiring him. Trouble seems to follow him wherever he goes.

  43. Waiting

    I’m not willing to draw any conclusions just yet. Depends on outcome of lawsuit. But given Chief Hyde’s reputation while he was in Davis, I wouldn’t be surprised if Antioch regrets hiring him. Trouble seems to follow him wherever he goes.

  44. Waiting

    I’m not willing to draw any conclusions just yet. Depends on outcome of lawsuit. But given Chief Hyde’s reputation while he was in Davis, I wouldn’t be surprised if Antioch regrets hiring him. Trouble seems to follow him wherever he goes.

  45. Anonymous

    “I actually checked with a lawyer before writing that. I was told that they retain the right not allow the police to search their home, now searching their person without probable cause is a different story, but there is still greater protection for the actual physical home.”

    DPD, you need to better qualify your sources. A registered sex offender on parole has no such rights. Also, you are quite liberal with your assumption that probable cause did not exist. It is interesting that you base your opinion on the parole’s statement rather than the statements from the police. I think this indicative of your lack of objectivity for this topic.

    Speaking of objectivity… why would anybody trust the NYT for this?

  46. Anonymous

    “I actually checked with a lawyer before writing that. I was told that they retain the right not allow the police to search their home, now searching their person without probable cause is a different story, but there is still greater protection for the actual physical home.”

    DPD, you need to better qualify your sources. A registered sex offender on parole has no such rights. Also, you are quite liberal with your assumption that probable cause did not exist. It is interesting that you base your opinion on the parole’s statement rather than the statements from the police. I think this indicative of your lack of objectivity for this topic.

    Speaking of objectivity… why would anybody trust the NYT for this?

  47. Anonymous

    “I actually checked with a lawyer before writing that. I was told that they retain the right not allow the police to search their home, now searching their person without probable cause is a different story, but there is still greater protection for the actual physical home.”

    DPD, you need to better qualify your sources. A registered sex offender on parole has no such rights. Also, you are quite liberal with your assumption that probable cause did not exist. It is interesting that you base your opinion on the parole’s statement rather than the statements from the police. I think this indicative of your lack of objectivity for this topic.

    Speaking of objectivity… why would anybody trust the NYT for this?

  48. Anonymous

    “I actually checked with a lawyer before writing that. I was told that they retain the right not allow the police to search their home, now searching their person without probable cause is a different story, but there is still greater protection for the actual physical home.”

    DPD, you need to better qualify your sources. A registered sex offender on parole has no such rights. Also, you are quite liberal with your assumption that probable cause did not exist. It is interesting that you base your opinion on the parole’s statement rather than the statements from the police. I think this indicative of your lack of objectivity for this topic.

    Speaking of objectivity… why would anybody trust the NYT for this?

  49. Anonymous

    Maybe I am missing something but in the state of California it is my understanding that suspicionless seaches of parolees/probationers or their homes are legal. There are sound public policy reasons for that. Parolees/Probationers have a reduced (constitutionally protected) expectation of privacy in lieu of incarceration.
    The parolee’s or probationer’s legal safeguard is that the searches cannot be ” arbitrary, capricious, or harassing.”
    Apparently, the legal claim filed against Hyde’s Antioch Police Department contends that its actions against the resident exceeded the scope of her husband’s parole search and/or the police are accused of “harassing” the parolee husband as well.

    I wonder just how often this happened in Davis affordable housing?

  50. Anonymous

    Maybe I am missing something but in the state of California it is my understanding that suspicionless seaches of parolees/probationers or their homes are legal. There are sound public policy reasons for that. Parolees/Probationers have a reduced (constitutionally protected) expectation of privacy in lieu of incarceration.
    The parolee’s or probationer’s legal safeguard is that the searches cannot be ” arbitrary, capricious, or harassing.”
    Apparently, the legal claim filed against Hyde’s Antioch Police Department contends that its actions against the resident exceeded the scope of her husband’s parole search and/or the police are accused of “harassing” the parolee husband as well.

    I wonder just how often this happened in Davis affordable housing?

  51. Anonymous

    Maybe I am missing something but in the state of California it is my understanding that suspicionless seaches of parolees/probationers or their homes are legal. There are sound public policy reasons for that. Parolees/Probationers have a reduced (constitutionally protected) expectation of privacy in lieu of incarceration.
    The parolee’s or probationer’s legal safeguard is that the searches cannot be ” arbitrary, capricious, or harassing.”
    Apparently, the legal claim filed against Hyde’s Antioch Police Department contends that its actions against the resident exceeded the scope of her husband’s parole search and/or the police are accused of “harassing” the parolee husband as well.

    I wonder just how often this happened in Davis affordable housing?

  52. Anonymous

    Maybe I am missing something but in the state of California it is my understanding that suspicionless seaches of parolees/probationers or their homes are legal. There are sound public policy reasons for that. Parolees/Probationers have a reduced (constitutionally protected) expectation of privacy in lieu of incarceration.
    The parolee’s or probationer’s legal safeguard is that the searches cannot be ” arbitrary, capricious, or harassing.”
    Apparently, the legal claim filed against Hyde’s Antioch Police Department contends that its actions against the resident exceeded the scope of her husband’s parole search and/or the police are accused of “harassing” the parolee husband as well.

    I wonder just how often this happened in Davis affordable housing?

  53. John

    “He targeted residents of affordable housing, especially vunlnerable persons such as single parents and their children using the old conservative and racial belief that being poor is a character flaw and symptom of criminality.”

    When you intentionally and knowingly lie about someone in print, that is libel.

  54. John

    “He targeted residents of affordable housing, especially vunlnerable persons such as single parents and their children using the old conservative and racial belief that being poor is a character flaw and symptom of criminality.”

    When you intentionally and knowingly lie about someone in print, that is libel.

  55. John

    “He targeted residents of affordable housing, especially vunlnerable persons such as single parents and their children using the old conservative and racial belief that being poor is a character flaw and symptom of criminality.”

    When you intentionally and knowingly lie about someone in print, that is libel.

  56. John

    “He targeted residents of affordable housing, especially vunlnerable persons such as single parents and their children using the old conservative and racial belief that being poor is a character flaw and symptom of criminality.”

    When you intentionally and knowingly lie about someone in print, that is libel.

  57. Anonymous

    Maybe I am missing something but….If you are referring to Tansey Thomas’ comments, she has not libeled the police chief. First, this is her opinion protected by the first amendment of our Constitution. Secondly, former Police Chief Hyde is a Public Official who has voluntarily assumed the risk of public scrutiny and review. Thirdly, her comments must be knowingly false or made with reckless disregard of falsity. (This is an actual malice standard.) Are they?

    Thank Goodness that the Constitution protects our citizens so that they can freely speak. Read the NY Times v. Sullivan to understand why. Its applicable here in more ways than one.

  58. Anonymous

    Maybe I am missing something but….If you are referring to Tansey Thomas’ comments, she has not libeled the police chief. First, this is her opinion protected by the first amendment of our Constitution. Secondly, former Police Chief Hyde is a Public Official who has voluntarily assumed the risk of public scrutiny and review. Thirdly, her comments must be knowingly false or made with reckless disregard of falsity. (This is an actual malice standard.) Are they?

    Thank Goodness that the Constitution protects our citizens so that they can freely speak. Read the NY Times v. Sullivan to understand why. Its applicable here in more ways than one.

  59. Anonymous

    Maybe I am missing something but….If you are referring to Tansey Thomas’ comments, she has not libeled the police chief. First, this is her opinion protected by the first amendment of our Constitution. Secondly, former Police Chief Hyde is a Public Official who has voluntarily assumed the risk of public scrutiny and review. Thirdly, her comments must be knowingly false or made with reckless disregard of falsity. (This is an actual malice standard.) Are they?

    Thank Goodness that the Constitution protects our citizens so that they can freely speak. Read the NY Times v. Sullivan to understand why. Its applicable here in more ways than one.

  60. Anonymous

    Maybe I am missing something but….If you are referring to Tansey Thomas’ comments, she has not libeled the police chief. First, this is her opinion protected by the first amendment of our Constitution. Secondly, former Police Chief Hyde is a Public Official who has voluntarily assumed the risk of public scrutiny and review. Thirdly, her comments must be knowingly false or made with reckless disregard of falsity. (This is an actual malice standard.) Are they?

    Thank Goodness that the Constitution protects our citizens so that they can freely speak. Read the NY Times v. Sullivan to understand why. Its applicable here in more ways than one.

  61. Anonymous

    There are several Section 8 rentals in my neighborhood and mostly these are rented to single women with children, young families, or couples who are going to school full time. However, we have experienced problems when the “boyfriend” or adult male family member “comes to visit” (aka moves in). The whole street changes. These men have apparently no jobs and have a steady stream of visitors day and night with the children in the household relegated to staying outside unsupervised. Nuisance crimes occur – speeding, loud, booming music from arriving and departing cars, late night gatherings in and out of the house, drinking – followed by crime – stolen bikes, vandalism, domestic violence, threats to neighbors who try to talk to them about their behavior. Then come the visits from the police and probation/parole officers and YONET.

    All we can do is report to the police what we see and experience and lean on the landlord to not renew the lease for the following year and hope for the best with the next tenant.

  62. Anonymous

    There are several Section 8 rentals in my neighborhood and mostly these are rented to single women with children, young families, or couples who are going to school full time. However, we have experienced problems when the “boyfriend” or adult male family member “comes to visit” (aka moves in). The whole street changes. These men have apparently no jobs and have a steady stream of visitors day and night with the children in the household relegated to staying outside unsupervised. Nuisance crimes occur – speeding, loud, booming music from arriving and departing cars, late night gatherings in and out of the house, drinking – followed by crime – stolen bikes, vandalism, domestic violence, threats to neighbors who try to talk to them about their behavior. Then come the visits from the police and probation/parole officers and YONET.

    All we can do is report to the police what we see and experience and lean on the landlord to not renew the lease for the following year and hope for the best with the next tenant.

  63. Anonymous

    There are several Section 8 rentals in my neighborhood and mostly these are rented to single women with children, young families, or couples who are going to school full time. However, we have experienced problems when the “boyfriend” or adult male family member “comes to visit” (aka moves in). The whole street changes. These men have apparently no jobs and have a steady stream of visitors day and night with the children in the household relegated to staying outside unsupervised. Nuisance crimes occur – speeding, loud, booming music from arriving and departing cars, late night gatherings in and out of the house, drinking – followed by crime – stolen bikes, vandalism, domestic violence, threats to neighbors who try to talk to them about their behavior. Then come the visits from the police and probation/parole officers and YONET.

    All we can do is report to the police what we see and experience and lean on the landlord to not renew the lease for the following year and hope for the best with the next tenant.

  64. Anonymous

    There are several Section 8 rentals in my neighborhood and mostly these are rented to single women with children, young families, or couples who are going to school full time. However, we have experienced problems when the “boyfriend” or adult male family member “comes to visit” (aka moves in). The whole street changes. These men have apparently no jobs and have a steady stream of visitors day and night with the children in the household relegated to staying outside unsupervised. Nuisance crimes occur – speeding, loud, booming music from arriving and departing cars, late night gatherings in and out of the house, drinking – followed by crime – stolen bikes, vandalism, domestic violence, threats to neighbors who try to talk to them about their behavior. Then come the visits from the police and probation/parole officers and YONET.

    All we can do is report to the police what we see and experience and lean on the landlord to not renew the lease for the following year and hope for the best with the next tenant.

  65. Anonymous

    Maybe I am missing something but…I was a long time resident of Davis.
    My life was far more negatively impacted by UC Davis students and the college party life style or unsupervised HS students with wealthy parents who partied at home when Mom and Dad were away. That, too, brought (welcomed) police intervention because of: speeding; loud music; heavy traffic; drugs and alcohol use(underaged drinking, too); and overall disrespect for families residing in the neighborhood.
    These ” violators” of the public peace were oftentimes dealt with very leniently because they are not receipients of or children of section 8 parents. While I agree that there are social problems exasberated by poverty,
    Section 8 families do not have exclusive rights to being the cause of public nuisance claims, especially in Davis.

  66. Anonymous

    Maybe I am missing something but…I was a long time resident of Davis.
    My life was far more negatively impacted by UC Davis students and the college party life style or unsupervised HS students with wealthy parents who partied at home when Mom and Dad were away. That, too, brought (welcomed) police intervention because of: speeding; loud music; heavy traffic; drugs and alcohol use(underaged drinking, too); and overall disrespect for families residing in the neighborhood.
    These ” violators” of the public peace were oftentimes dealt with very leniently because they are not receipients of or children of section 8 parents. While I agree that there are social problems exasberated by poverty,
    Section 8 families do not have exclusive rights to being the cause of public nuisance claims, especially in Davis.

  67. Anonymous

    Maybe I am missing something but…I was a long time resident of Davis.
    My life was far more negatively impacted by UC Davis students and the college party life style or unsupervised HS students with wealthy parents who partied at home when Mom and Dad were away. That, too, brought (welcomed) police intervention because of: speeding; loud music; heavy traffic; drugs and alcohol use(underaged drinking, too); and overall disrespect for families residing in the neighborhood.
    These ” violators” of the public peace were oftentimes dealt with very leniently because they are not receipients of or children of section 8 parents. While I agree that there are social problems exasberated by poverty,
    Section 8 families do not have exclusive rights to being the cause of public nuisance claims, especially in Davis.

  68. Anonymous

    Maybe I am missing something but…I was a long time resident of Davis.
    My life was far more negatively impacted by UC Davis students and the college party life style or unsupervised HS students with wealthy parents who partied at home when Mom and Dad were away. That, too, brought (welcomed) police intervention because of: speeding; loud music; heavy traffic; drugs and alcohol use(underaged drinking, too); and overall disrespect for families residing in the neighborhood.
    These ” violators” of the public peace were oftentimes dealt with very leniently because they are not receipients of or children of section 8 parents. While I agree that there are social problems exasberated by poverty,
    Section 8 families do not have exclusive rights to being the cause of public nuisance claims, especially in Davis.

  69. Annonymous 4:32 pm

    Good point.

    I agree, the problems with student rentals are dealt with in exactly the same way – calls to the police and leaning on the landlord not to renew the lease.

    So where is the racism?

    (Problems with children having parties when their parents are away tend to be dealt with by talking to the parents – the difference here being that there tends to be an established connection with the family and the neighborhood and the problems are infrequent.)

  70. Annonymous 4:32 pm

    Good point.

    I agree, the problems with student rentals are dealt with in exactly the same way – calls to the police and leaning on the landlord not to renew the lease.

    So where is the racism?

    (Problems with children having parties when their parents are away tend to be dealt with by talking to the parents – the difference here being that there tends to be an established connection with the family and the neighborhood and the problems are infrequent.)

  71. Annonymous 4:32 pm

    Good point.

    I agree, the problems with student rentals are dealt with in exactly the same way – calls to the police and leaning on the landlord not to renew the lease.

    So where is the racism?

    (Problems with children having parties when their parents are away tend to be dealt with by talking to the parents – the difference here being that there tends to be an established connection with the family and the neighborhood and the problems are infrequent.)

  72. Annonymous 4:32 pm

    Good point.

    I agree, the problems with student rentals are dealt with in exactly the same way – calls to the police and leaning on the landlord not to renew the lease.

    So where is the racism?

    (Problems with children having parties when their parents are away tend to be dealt with by talking to the parents – the difference here being that there tends to be an established connection with the family and the neighborhood and the problems are infrequent.)

  73. Anonymous

    Then its a matter of socioeconomics, correct? Maybe. Maybe not. Where one resides is based on opportunities in life. Opportunities are oftentimes impacted by race. This goes back to education; housing; employment; and intergenerational history of all of the above. Children of all socioeconomic backgrounds role model what they see or are exposed to.

    You are definitely correct, however, when there are established relationships with neighbors it is ALOT easier to deal with partying youth. But this is oftentimes not applicable to the many student rentals in Davis where the occupants are young adults.

  74. Anonymous

    Then its a matter of socioeconomics, correct? Maybe. Maybe not. Where one resides is based on opportunities in life. Opportunities are oftentimes impacted by race. This goes back to education; housing; employment; and intergenerational history of all of the above. Children of all socioeconomic backgrounds role model what they see or are exposed to.

    You are definitely correct, however, when there are established relationships with neighbors it is ALOT easier to deal with partying youth. But this is oftentimes not applicable to the many student rentals in Davis where the occupants are young adults.

  75. Anonymous

    Then its a matter of socioeconomics, correct? Maybe. Maybe not. Where one resides is based on opportunities in life. Opportunities are oftentimes impacted by race. This goes back to education; housing; employment; and intergenerational history of all of the above. Children of all socioeconomic backgrounds role model what they see or are exposed to.

    You are definitely correct, however, when there are established relationships with neighbors it is ALOT easier to deal with partying youth. But this is oftentimes not applicable to the many student rentals in Davis where the occupants are young adults.

  76. Anonymous

    Then its a matter of socioeconomics, correct? Maybe. Maybe not. Where one resides is based on opportunities in life. Opportunities are oftentimes impacted by race. This goes back to education; housing; employment; and intergenerational history of all of the above. Children of all socioeconomic backgrounds role model what they see or are exposed to.

    You are definitely correct, however, when there are established relationships with neighbors it is ALOT easier to deal with partying youth. But this is oftentimes not applicable to the many student rentals in Davis where the occupants are young adults.

  77. Anonymous

    The law does not require a search warrant to search the home of someone on PAROLE. That is the agreement a person makes with the Parole Board when he or she is released. This one should have been easy to research as there is quite a bit or recent case law.

    THE BROKEN WINDOWS THEORY is not about picking on the poor. Nor does it say the poor cause crime. It has to do with the neglect of a neighborhood by residents because they are frustrated or no longer care. The apathy subsequently contributes to the acceptance of criminal behavior.

  78. Anonymous

    The law does not require a search warrant to search the home of someone on PAROLE. That is the agreement a person makes with the Parole Board when he or she is released. This one should have been easy to research as there is quite a bit or recent case law.

    THE BROKEN WINDOWS THEORY is not about picking on the poor. Nor does it say the poor cause crime. It has to do with the neglect of a neighborhood by residents because they are frustrated or no longer care. The apathy subsequently contributes to the acceptance of criminal behavior.

  79. Anonymous

    The law does not require a search warrant to search the home of someone on PAROLE. That is the agreement a person makes with the Parole Board when he or she is released. This one should have been easy to research as there is quite a bit or recent case law.

    THE BROKEN WINDOWS THEORY is not about picking on the poor. Nor does it say the poor cause crime. It has to do with the neglect of a neighborhood by residents because they are frustrated or no longer care. The apathy subsequently contributes to the acceptance of criminal behavior.

  80. Anonymous

    The law does not require a search warrant to search the home of someone on PAROLE. That is the agreement a person makes with the Parole Board when he or she is released. This one should have been easy to research as there is quite a bit or recent case law.

    THE BROKEN WINDOWS THEORY is not about picking on the poor. Nor does it say the poor cause crime. It has to do with the neglect of a neighborhood by residents because they are frustrated or no longer care. The apathy subsequently contributes to the acceptance of criminal behavior.

  81. Anonymous

    I agree with your first paragragh (8/11/08 2:11).

    A primary issue I intuitively have with “The Broken Window” theory is that apathy should be replaced with resignation. The former connotes a ” do not care” attitude or blame where the latter infers that even concerned residents ” cannot do anything about it”.

  82. Anonymous

    I agree with your first paragragh (8/11/08 2:11).

    A primary issue I intuitively have with “The Broken Window” theory is that apathy should be replaced with resignation. The former connotes a ” do not care” attitude or blame where the latter infers that even concerned residents ” cannot do anything about it”.

  83. Anonymous

    I agree with your first paragragh (8/11/08 2:11).

    A primary issue I intuitively have with “The Broken Window” theory is that apathy should be replaced with resignation. The former connotes a ” do not care” attitude or blame where the latter infers that even concerned residents ” cannot do anything about it”.

  84. Anonymous

    I agree with your first paragragh (8/11/08 2:11).

    A primary issue I intuitively have with “The Broken Window” theory is that apathy should be replaced with resignation. The former connotes a ” do not care” attitude or blame where the latter infers that even concerned residents ” cannot do anything about it”.

  85. tansey thomas

    The Broken Windows theory as used by then New York mayor Giuliani effectively cleared notorious slumlords of responsibility for the condition of their properties or the city for failing to hold slumlords accountable. Also, another aspect of the theory is that harshly punishing slum residents for minor infractions discourages them from going on to major crimes. Therefore, there can be no equal protection under the law.

  86. tansey thomas

    The Broken Windows theory as used by then New York mayor Giuliani effectively cleared notorious slumlords of responsibility for the condition of their properties or the city for failing to hold slumlords accountable. Also, another aspect of the theory is that harshly punishing slum residents for minor infractions discourages them from going on to major crimes. Therefore, there can be no equal protection under the law.

  87. tansey thomas

    The Broken Windows theory as used by then New York mayor Giuliani effectively cleared notorious slumlords of responsibility for the condition of their properties or the city for failing to hold slumlords accountable. Also, another aspect of the theory is that harshly punishing slum residents for minor infractions discourages them from going on to major crimes. Therefore, there can be no equal protection under the law.

  88. tansey thomas

    The Broken Windows theory as used by then New York mayor Giuliani effectively cleared notorious slumlords of responsibility for the condition of their properties or the city for failing to hold slumlords accountable. Also, another aspect of the theory is that harshly punishing slum residents for minor infractions discourages them from going on to major crimes. Therefore, there can be no equal protection under the law.

  89. Anonymous

    Good point. I completely agree with that analysis, “resignation” would have been a better word to use. But hey, that is why more minds are always better than one right?

    “The Broken Windows theory as used by then New York mayor Giuliani effectively cleared notorious slumlords of responsibility for the condition of their properties or the city for failing to hold slumlords accountable. Also, another aspect of the theory is that harshly punishing slum residents for minor infractions discourages them from going on to major crimes. Therefore, there can be no equal protection under the law.”

    I must say that I would have to do more reading on NY’s efforts to agree or disagree. Did most residents feel this way? I do know that New York’s crime rate did significantly drop over that period of time.

    I think it is important to keep in mind that most crime victims in low income areas, are the impoverished people who live there and cannot afford to move.

    Even if NY failed to manage their efforts in a fair and just manner, does not really mean the theory itself is somehow racist or discriminatory.

  90. Anonymous

    Good point. I completely agree with that analysis, “resignation” would have been a better word to use. But hey, that is why more minds are always better than one right?

    “The Broken Windows theory as used by then New York mayor Giuliani effectively cleared notorious slumlords of responsibility for the condition of their properties or the city for failing to hold slumlords accountable. Also, another aspect of the theory is that harshly punishing slum residents for minor infractions discourages them from going on to major crimes. Therefore, there can be no equal protection under the law.”

    I must say that I would have to do more reading on NY’s efforts to agree or disagree. Did most residents feel this way? I do know that New York’s crime rate did significantly drop over that period of time.

    I think it is important to keep in mind that most crime victims in low income areas, are the impoverished people who live there and cannot afford to move.

    Even if NY failed to manage their efforts in a fair and just manner, does not really mean the theory itself is somehow racist or discriminatory.

  91. Anonymous

    Good point. I completely agree with that analysis, “resignation” would have been a better word to use. But hey, that is why more minds are always better than one right?

    “The Broken Windows theory as used by then New York mayor Giuliani effectively cleared notorious slumlords of responsibility for the condition of their properties or the city for failing to hold slumlords accountable. Also, another aspect of the theory is that harshly punishing slum residents for minor infractions discourages them from going on to major crimes. Therefore, there can be no equal protection under the law.”

    I must say that I would have to do more reading on NY’s efforts to agree or disagree. Did most residents feel this way? I do know that New York’s crime rate did significantly drop over that period of time.

    I think it is important to keep in mind that most crime victims in low income areas, are the impoverished people who live there and cannot afford to move.

    Even if NY failed to manage their efforts in a fair and just manner, does not really mean the theory itself is somehow racist or discriminatory.

  92. Anonymous

    Good point. I completely agree with that analysis, “resignation” would have been a better word to use. But hey, that is why more minds are always better than one right?

    “The Broken Windows theory as used by then New York mayor Giuliani effectively cleared notorious slumlords of responsibility for the condition of their properties or the city for failing to hold slumlords accountable. Also, another aspect of the theory is that harshly punishing slum residents for minor infractions discourages them from going on to major crimes. Therefore, there can be no equal protection under the law.”

    I must say that I would have to do more reading on NY’s efforts to agree or disagree. Did most residents feel this way? I do know that New York’s crime rate did significantly drop over that period of time.

    I think it is important to keep in mind that most crime victims in low income areas, are the impoverished people who live there and cannot afford to move.

    Even if NY failed to manage their efforts in a fair and just manner, does not really mean the theory itself is somehow racist or discriminatory.

  93. Anonymous

    Keeping an open mind is imperative to effective discourse (written or verbal).
    I, too, must read more about “The Broken Windows” to make an informed decision.

    I can say – without question-that IF the ” slum lords” are not being (punitively) held accountable for their blatant neglect of rental property, that is egregiously unfair.
    The tenants, on the other hand, are to be deterred from committing crime through harsh punishment?

    One must only look at statistics to see the sentencing disparity in our criminal justice system when race is factored.
    Now that is a problem and would imply that injustice was occurring (socioeconomic injustice and its underlying race issues).

    Does it theoretically mean that ” The Broken Windows” policy is inherently racist or discriminatory? Maybe not, but NY has seemingly failed with ensuring that it was not discriminatory in its application.

  94. Anonymous

    Keeping an open mind is imperative to effective discourse (written or verbal).
    I, too, must read more about “The Broken Windows” to make an informed decision.

    I can say – without question-that IF the ” slum lords” are not being (punitively) held accountable for their blatant neglect of rental property, that is egregiously unfair.
    The tenants, on the other hand, are to be deterred from committing crime through harsh punishment?

    One must only look at statistics to see the sentencing disparity in our criminal justice system when race is factored.
    Now that is a problem and would imply that injustice was occurring (socioeconomic injustice and its underlying race issues).

    Does it theoretically mean that ” The Broken Windows” policy is inherently racist or discriminatory? Maybe not, but NY has seemingly failed with ensuring that it was not discriminatory in its application.

  95. Anonymous

    Keeping an open mind is imperative to effective discourse (written or verbal).
    I, too, must read more about “The Broken Windows” to make an informed decision.

    I can say – without question-that IF the ” slum lords” are not being (punitively) held accountable for their blatant neglect of rental property, that is egregiously unfair.
    The tenants, on the other hand, are to be deterred from committing crime through harsh punishment?

    One must only look at statistics to see the sentencing disparity in our criminal justice system when race is factored.
    Now that is a problem and would imply that injustice was occurring (socioeconomic injustice and its underlying race issues).

    Does it theoretically mean that ” The Broken Windows” policy is inherently racist or discriminatory? Maybe not, but NY has seemingly failed with ensuring that it was not discriminatory in its application.

  96. Anonymous

    Keeping an open mind is imperative to effective discourse (written or verbal).
    I, too, must read more about “The Broken Windows” to make an informed decision.

    I can say – without question-that IF the ” slum lords” are not being (punitively) held accountable for their blatant neglect of rental property, that is egregiously unfair.
    The tenants, on the other hand, are to be deterred from committing crime through harsh punishment?

    One must only look at statistics to see the sentencing disparity in our criminal justice system when race is factored.
    Now that is a problem and would imply that injustice was occurring (socioeconomic injustice and its underlying race issues).

    Does it theoretically mean that ” The Broken Windows” policy is inherently racist or discriminatory? Maybe not, but NY has seemingly failed with ensuring that it was not discriminatory in its application.

  97. Anonymous

    “Keeping an open mind is imperative to effective discourse (written or verbal).
    I, too, must read more about “The Broken Windows” to make an informed decision.

    I can say – without question-that IF the ” slum lords” are not being (punitively) held accountable for their blatant neglect of rental property, that is egregiously unfair.
    The tenants, on the other hand, are to be deterred from committing crime through harsh punishment?

    One must only look at statistics to see the sentencing disparity in our criminal justice system when race is factored.
    Now that is a problem and would imply that injustice was occurring (socioeconomic injustice and its underlying race issues).

    Does it theoretically mean that ” The Broken Windows” policy is inherently racist or discriminatory? Maybe not, but NY has seemingly failed with ensuring that it was not discriminatory in its application.”

    Like I said, I would have to research the NY situation more before passing any judgment.

    I completely agree with you on the rest. I would say the approach has to be comprehensive. One must deal with tenants, landlords, and the neighborhood as a whole. But perhaps Antioch is doing this, I don’t think we know what the overall plan is.

    As far as the racial aspect. Well you have my agreement there too. I think the issue is much bigger than the criminal justice system and primarily centered around the socioeconomic divide in our society. But that would be another lengthy discussion.

  98. Anonymous

    “Keeping an open mind is imperative to effective discourse (written or verbal).
    I, too, must read more about “The Broken Windows” to make an informed decision.

    I can say – without question-that IF the ” slum lords” are not being (punitively) held accountable for their blatant neglect of rental property, that is egregiously unfair.
    The tenants, on the other hand, are to be deterred from committing crime through harsh punishment?

    One must only look at statistics to see the sentencing disparity in our criminal justice system when race is factored.
    Now that is a problem and would imply that injustice was occurring (socioeconomic injustice and its underlying race issues).

    Does it theoretically mean that ” The Broken Windows” policy is inherently racist or discriminatory? Maybe not, but NY has seemingly failed with ensuring that it was not discriminatory in its application.”

    Like I said, I would have to research the NY situation more before passing any judgment.

    I completely agree with you on the rest. I would say the approach has to be comprehensive. One must deal with tenants, landlords, and the neighborhood as a whole. But perhaps Antioch is doing this, I don’t think we know what the overall plan is.

    As far as the racial aspect. Well you have my agreement there too. I think the issue is much bigger than the criminal justice system and primarily centered around the socioeconomic divide in our society. But that would be another lengthy discussion.

  99. Anonymous

    “Keeping an open mind is imperative to effective discourse (written or verbal).
    I, too, must read more about “The Broken Windows” to make an informed decision.

    I can say – without question-that IF the ” slum lords” are not being (punitively) held accountable for their blatant neglect of rental property, that is egregiously unfair.
    The tenants, on the other hand, are to be deterred from committing crime through harsh punishment?

    One must only look at statistics to see the sentencing disparity in our criminal justice system when race is factored.
    Now that is a problem and would imply that injustice was occurring (socioeconomic injustice and its underlying race issues).

    Does it theoretically mean that ” The Broken Windows” policy is inherently racist or discriminatory? Maybe not, but NY has seemingly failed with ensuring that it was not discriminatory in its application.”

    Like I said, I would have to research the NY situation more before passing any judgment.

    I completely agree with you on the rest. I would say the approach has to be comprehensive. One must deal with tenants, landlords, and the neighborhood as a whole. But perhaps Antioch is doing this, I don’t think we know what the overall plan is.

    As far as the racial aspect. Well you have my agreement there too. I think the issue is much bigger than the criminal justice system and primarily centered around the socioeconomic divide in our society. But that would be another lengthy discussion.

  100. Anonymous

    “Keeping an open mind is imperative to effective discourse (written or verbal).
    I, too, must read more about “The Broken Windows” to make an informed decision.

    I can say – without question-that IF the ” slum lords” are not being (punitively) held accountable for their blatant neglect of rental property, that is egregiously unfair.
    The tenants, on the other hand, are to be deterred from committing crime through harsh punishment?

    One must only look at statistics to see the sentencing disparity in our criminal justice system when race is factored.
    Now that is a problem and would imply that injustice was occurring (socioeconomic injustice and its underlying race issues).

    Does it theoretically mean that ” The Broken Windows” policy is inherently racist or discriminatory? Maybe not, but NY has seemingly failed with ensuring that it was not discriminatory in its application.”

    Like I said, I would have to research the NY situation more before passing any judgment.

    I completely agree with you on the rest. I would say the approach has to be comprehensive. One must deal with tenants, landlords, and the neighborhood as a whole. But perhaps Antioch is doing this, I don’t think we know what the overall plan is.

    As far as the racial aspect. Well you have my agreement there too. I think the issue is much bigger than the criminal justice system and primarily centered around the socioeconomic divide in our society. But that would be another lengthy discussion.

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