Aguiar-Curry Votes to Fund Crumbling State and Local Transportation Infrastructure

Pothole-Sky

(From Press Release) – Assemblymember Cecilia Aguiar-Curry (D – Winters) voted in support of SB 1 (Jim Beall), to fund the decades-long backlog of fixes to state and local roads, bridges, and transit systems.

“When our leaders asked for my support for this effort, I told them I needed several things to be on board:  protecting transportation funds from budget raids; a fix-it first plan; fair share for small and rural communities; and, an even funding split between state highways and local streets and roads,” said Aguiar-Curry.  “I take very seriously asking our people to pay more in taxes, but this plan meets those goals and starts the process of restoring the transportation system that is so critical to our people and economy.”

The bill will provide $5.2 billion in new funds per year, with $2.6 billion committed to state programs ($1.9 billion for maintenance to the state highway system, $300 million to trade corridors, and almost $400 million to congestion relief programs), and $2.6 billion to local programs ($1.5 billion distributed directly to cities and counties for local street and road maintenance, $850 million for transit, bike, and pedestrian access programs, and $200 million in incentive grants to counties with local transportation sales taxes like Napa and Sonoma Counties).

Part of the package also includes a constitutional amendment that will prevent the state budget from raiding transportation funding for non-transportation purposes – a common practice in the state budgets of the Great Recession.

“Our broken roads cost drivers over $750 a year in repairs, farmers have a hard time getting their produce to market, and transit service cuts and increased fares hurt working families,” Assemblymember Aguiar-Curry declared.

She added,  “We’ve ignored our maintenance responsibilities for too long.  I may not have been here to create the problem, but I am among our state’s leaders who are willing to step up and begin fixing it, while also creating thousands of jobs that will go with this critical investment.”

A breakdown of anticipated funding for the cities and counties of the 4th Assembly District is below:


From the Governor’s Office:

Cities, counties, local and statewide businesses and labor groups, transportation leaders and newspaper editorial boards from across California are supporting the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017 – SB 1, co-authored by Senator Jim Beall (D-San Jose) and Assemblymember Jim L. Frazier Jr. (D-Discovery Bay) – which invests $52.4 billion over the next decade to fix roads, freeways and bridges in communities across California and put more dollars toward transit and safety. Here’s what they’re saying:

Business and Labor Leaders

California Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Allan Zaremberg: “This is a responsible investment. The public and our economy will be the beneficiaries”
“Asking Californians to pay more is not something the Chamber of Commerce does lightly, or frequently. But in this case, it is the most prudent course of action…The basic principle that those who use the roads should help maintain them is one that was embraced by Ronald Reagan and George Deukmejian. President Reagan pushed for a hike in the federal gas tax and Gov. Deukmejian took similar action on the state level in 1990. Investing in transportation improvements will save taxpayers money in the long run…Fixing our roads and transportation systems is an investment in our future that will help our economy grow, and improve the quality of life for California residents and businesses. This is a responsible investment. The public and our economy will be the beneficiaries of a comprehensive funding solution. (3/31/17)

Orange County Business Council President and CEO Lucy Dunn: “We thank Governor Brown and legislative leaders for hearing our concerns.”
“This is a critical moment for Californians. No one disputes that the state’s transportation system is in disrepair. The Council has long advocated that any new funding measures must come hand in hand with strong accountability measures and reforms. We thank Governor Brown and legislative leaders for hearing our concerns.” (3/29/17)

Orange County Business Council Senior Vice President for Government Affairs Bryan Starr: “Moderate increases will reduce costs for motorists in California”
“Our coalition supports legislation which would enact strong accountability measures to ensure that our dollars are spent efficiently, while also providing long-term funding for transportation through a combination of moderate fees and gas taxes of a few dollars a month. In the end, moderate increases will reduce costs for motorists in California who pay almost $800 annually in repairs to their vehicles from driving on bad roads, which pencils out to over $60 per month…situation is too dire for the problem to be fixed with accountability reforms alone…the time has come for the Legislature to step up and urgently pass a transportation funding package (3/26/17)

Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce Chair Steve Nissen: “raising revenue to support our transportation infrastructure is a very worthwhile investment”
“Transportation infrastructure is important to a healthy economy from commuting to and from work, to providing access to business establishments, to the essential business of moving goods which benefits everyone. This is why California’s business community believes raising revenue to support our transportation infrastructure is a very worthwhile investment. You know the business community keeps an eye on ROI, return on investment. This is a great return on investment because for every one dollar spent on roads, highway and bridge improvements, the result is a $5.20 benefit to Californians in lower car repairs, lower road maintenance costs, better fuel consumption and improved road safety. We are California. We can do this, we should do this, we really must do this.” (3/20/17)

Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Donna Duperron: “Torrance Chamber supports SB 1 so that area businesses can continue to excel at providing the goods, people, and the services that our economy requires”
“California’s crumbling transportation network has been faced with physical and financial challenges for too long. Torrance businesses require – and deserve – an efficient transportation system to succeed and prosper in today’s economy. The Torrance Chamber supports SB 1 so that area businesses can continue to excel at providing the goods, people, and the services that our economy requires.” (4/3/17)

Bay Area Council President and CEO Jim Wunderman: “We need this bill. It doesn’t just fix potholes, it has essential funds for traffic relief”
“In the Bay Area, we are either jammed in traffic or having our teeth rattled by pothole-infested roads and highways. We need this bill. It doesn’t just fix potholes, it has essential funds for traffic relief in our region on places like Highway 101 and 680. Our elected leaders should vote yes.” (3/29/17)

Bay Area Council Senior Vice President for Transportation Policy Michael Cunningham: “The longer we wait to fix the small problems, the bigger and more expensive they become.”
“Legislature urgently needs to pass a transportation funding package in 2017 to address the billions in backlogged maintenance needs that have led to potholes, deteriorating roads, bridges and transit systems across our region and the state. The longer we wait to fix the small problems, the bigger and more expensive they become. In fact, it costs eight times more to fix a road than to maintain it.” (2/12/17)

Silicon Valley Leadership Group CEO Carl Guardino: Legislators need to “move this legislation to the Governor’s desk.”
“It’s time for a Butch Cassidy and Sundance Kid moment – I’ll jump if you jump,” “When it comes to transportation improvements, Democrats often call for additional revenue. Republicans often call for additional reforms. The fact is, we need both, and we need both sides of the aisle to recognize that reality and move this legislation to the Governor’s desk.” (3/29/17)

Silicon Valley Leadership Group Chair and Silicon Valley Bank President and CEO Greg Becker and Stellar Solutions Founder and CEO Celeste Ford: “SB 1 is a balanced combination of necessary revenue and needed reforms”
“SB 1 is a balanced combination of necessary revenue and needed reforms to ensure we have more money for traffic relief, while also using our existing dollars as cost effectively as possible…SB 1 focuses $2.5 billion for improvements in California’s key corridors…Transportation funding hasn’t increased in California in 23 years, since Republican Gov. George Deukmejian championed our last gas tax increase in 1994. Since it wasn’t adjusted for inflation, and with the improved fuel efficiency our cars now enjoy, our gas tax has lost well over half its purchasing power during a time when our state’s population has increased by nearly 8 million people…For better roads, more transit and traffic relief, call your legislator today.” (4/4/17)

State Building and Construction Trades Council, AFL-CIO President Robbie Hunter: “This forward thinking investment will create tens of thousands of good paying jobs”
“SB 1 will help all Californians, especially working families that have to navigate our dilapidated and congested roads and mass transit systems daily. This forward thinking investment will create tens of thousands of good paying jobs, make our roads more accessible and safer while protecting the General Fund from having to cover the high costs of emergency replacement and repairs of bridges and roads.” (4/3/17)

Associated General Contractors of California CEO Tom Holsman: “plan strategically aligns with our industry’s efforts to address the backlog of projects and secures future revenue that will be used for its stated purpose”
“The plan strategically aligns with our industry’s efforts to address the backlog of projects and secures future revenue that will be used for its stated purpose. Let’s not further delay; Urge Legislators to pass this package.” (4/3/17)

California Alliance for Jobs Executive Director Michael Quigley: “This is a smart and responsible investment legislators should support.”
“We are fully committed to supporting the road repair plan and intend to get it and the companion constitutional protection through the Legislature by April 6. We need new revenue coupled with accountably provisions to begin to make a dent in the multi-billion dollar backlog of needed repairs to state highways and local roads. With strong protections that dedicate this revenue toward fixing the roads, this is a smart and responsible investment legislators should support.” (3/29/17)

United Contractors Executive Vice President Emily Cohen: “This is the right thing for California’s economy, for our safety, and for the quality of life of every California family”
“Legislative inaction is hamstringing our economy and harming our quality of life. It’s time to invest. The transportation funding and reform proposal introduced today is a balanced package of needed revenue and smart reforms to more efficiently invest in California’s roads, bridges, neighborhood streets, and public transit systems. ..Although a tax increase is never an easy thing, it is absolutely necessary to repair and rebuild our state’s crumbling infrastructure. In addition to being a user-based fee system, the bill ensures that the funds are dedicated to transportation purposes and creates essential accountability, oversight and regulatory reforms that are important to our industry. This is the right thing for California’s economy, for our safety, and for the quality of life of every California family. Now it’s time for members of the legislature to step up, face the challenge, and show true leadership by supporting this investment package.” (3/29/17)

CA Labor Federation, State Building and Construction Trades Council, Amalgamated Transit Union CA Conference Board, American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, CA Alliance of Retired Americans, CA Conference of Machinists, CA Conference of Plasterers and Cement Masons, CA District Council of Ironworkers, CA/NV Conference of Operating Engineers, CA Professional Firefighters, CA State Council of Laborers, CA Teamsters Public Affairs Council, International Federation of Professional and Technical Engineers, Local 21, Service Employees International Union California, Service Employees International Union, Local 1000: “proposal will strengthen the economy, expand trade, and create good paying jobs for California workers”
“California’s Labor Movement stands united in strong support of this transportation funding proposal…Legislature should not wait for more bridges to collapse or only respond to emergency situations…The proposal will strengthen the economy, expand trade, and create good paying jobs for California workers.” (4/3/17)

Transportation Leaders
Transportation California Director Roger Dickinson: Legislation “provides funding for road improvement projects in every community in California”
“Lawmakers need to pass this bill immediately. The Legislature has not raised revenue to address transportation needs in more than two decades – since George Deukmejian was governor…This deal provides funding for road improvement projects in every community in California. It also includes $7.5 billion for public transportation, which can help communities reduce air pollution and meet our state’s ambitious clean-air goals…This new public investment will improve the safety and quality of life for our residents, and allow California to continue to lead the way toward a better future.” (3/31/17)

California Transit Association Executive Committee Chair Michael Wiley: Legislation “demonstrates California’s commitment to clean, sustainable transportation”
“This proposal clearly demonstrates California’s commitment to clean, sustainable transportation, and the role that public transit plays in that vision…this proposal acknowledges the importance of public transit in achieving the 21st century transportation network that Californians need and deserve.” (3/29/17)

Metropolitan Transportation Commission Chair and Mayor of Rohnert Park Jake Mackenzie: “This is what real leadership looks like”
“This is what real leadership looks like. The state has kicked the can down the proverbial road for a full generation, during which time some of our rural roads have started returning to gravel. The governor, Senate and Assembly leaders and State Transportation Agency secretary Brian Kelly all had a lot of heavy lifting to do, and they’ve done it. Now we’ll see if our crumbling pavement, crawling traffic and corroding transit infrastructure will spur the rest of our legislators to do some heavy lifting of their own.” (3/29/17)

National Electrical Contractors Association San Diego Chapter Executive Director Andy Berg: “The time to act is now”
“The poor state of our roads is why we’ve joined with other businesses, local governments, labor leaders and many others in urging the California Legislature to urgently pass a transportation funding package…It has been 23 years since California has increased funding for transportation. As a result, road repairs now receive only 50 percent of the funding they did back in1994…Just ask any contractor, or any motorist how urgent this problem has become. It’s past time for our legislators to do something to fix our roads. The time to act is now” (2/17/17)

Newspaper Editorial Boards and Opinion
LA Times: Skelton: Legislation “deserves passage. Our cars need help”
“This measure isn’t perfect, but it deserves passage. Our cars need help. And it’s a pay-as-you-go plan. No borrowing. No bonds that double the sticker price with interest payments.” (4/3/17)

LA Times: Skelton: “The last time the Legislature raised the gas tax was when a Republican governor, George Deukmejian, pushed for it. That was in 1989.”
“The chief argument against raising taxes on motorists to pay for road repairs is that Sacramento Democrats can’t be trusted. They have a rotten history, Republicans contend, of stealing the drivers’ tax money and spending it on nontransportation goodies. And that argument is basically bunkum. It’s a convenient excuse to vote against unpopular tax hikes. It plays well with the public’s perpetual-but-rising mistrust of government. And more than that, it feeds the natural desire of people to make someone else pay for things they want.” (4/6/17)

LA Daily News: “If we let our roads and highways keep deteriorating, our economy eventually will fall into a sinkhole”
“It’s been 23 years since gas taxes were raised, and if the tax had been indexed to inflation, it would be higher now than the governor’s proposal will make it…The package includes a constitutional amendment to be passed by voters to require that all the money is spent as promised…These tax hikes are essentially user fees, and that’s better than the typical approach to taxes in the state. And paying as we go is better than borrowing…If we let our roads and highways keep deteriorating, our economy eventually will fall into a sinkhole…this is a case where we have to swallow hard and pay” (4/1/17)

SF Chronicle: “state can’t somehow meet its massive transportation needs with money hiding in the corners of the state budget”
“A plan to raise $52 billion over a decade for roads, bridges, and mass transit reflects a big, ugly bill that Californians have little choice but to pay…Given that the state can’t somehow meet its massive transportation needs with money hiding in the corners of the state budget, as Brown noted, the most responsible way to do so is by charging the motorists who use the infrastructure.” (3/30/17)

Modesto Bee: “Gas tax makes sense, if state sees our needs”
“Those who argue we can redirect part of state’s annual $113 billion budget are severely underestimating both need and resources…Our roads are as deplorable as any in the state. We shouldn’t have to wait until someone swerves to avoid a pothole and runs head-on into another vehicle to fix them.” (4/3/17)

Sac Bee: “The cost of repair won’t fall if lawmakers fail to act now”
“By this Friday, the Legislature is expected to vote on – and we hope approve – a bill to raise taxes and fees that will generate $52 billion during the coming decade for road repairs and construction and public transit…California’s roads are rutted, clogged and in need of help. The cost of repair won’t fall if lawmakers fail to act now.” (4/3/17)

Sac Bee: Editorial: “Gridlock and potholes vex regardless of party”
“Gov. Jerry Brown and Democratic legislators on Wednesday announced a 10-year, $52.4 billion freeway repair and construction deal, and business and labor leaders have been quick to applaud, rightly…includes safeguards, and voters would get a chance to approve a measure that locks in money for transportation…No Republican legislator is backing the deal openly, which is unfortunate. Gridlock and potholes vex regardless of party…we already pay dearly in wasted traffic time and damage from bumps in the roads. (3/29/17)

Sac Bee: Walters: Legislation “maintains the fundamental user-pays principle of transportation financing, which Republicans have, for some reason, been willing to abandon”
“Capping years of effort, Brown, Democratic legislators, and business, labor and civic groups unveiled this week a package…the plan would, if enacted, finally do something about the state’s pavement conditions, considered some of the nation’s second worst, which Brown correctly likens to fixing a home’s leaky roof…The package also maintains the fundamental user-pays principle of transportation financing, which Republicans have, for some reason, been willing to abandon.” (3/30/17)

Bakersfield Californian: “We need our roads fixed yesterday, and these proposed taxes would undoubtedly do it, quickly”
“We need our roads fixed yesterday, and these proposed taxes would undoubtedly do it, quickly. Even the tax-averse California Chamber of Commerce agrees: ‘Raising additional revenues for transportation will not be an easy vote when the time comes,’ Chamber CEO Allan Zaremberg said in a statement, ‘but doing nothing will only ensure deterioration in the system necessary to move people and goods.'” (3/30/17)

San Diego Union-Tribune: “providing decent roads is government’s ‘most core function'”
“As Brown said, providing decent roads is government’s “most core function.” Their case appears strong…Most importantly, Brown has included a constitutional amendment in the proposal to ensure new revenue would go only to transportation projects.” (3/30/17)

Cities and Counties
League of California Cities President and Lodi City Council Member JoAnne Mounce: “Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017 will have a lasting impact on Californians for generations.”
“After years of discussion, debate and negotiation on transportation, our Governor and legislative leaders have made monumental progress with the crafting of this agreement. Their commitment in making transportation a priority and coming together on the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017 will have a lasting impact on Californians for generations. The League and the cities of California are ready to get to work on our streets and begin fixing many years of deferred maintenance.” (3/29/17)

California State Association of Counties Second Vice President and Humboldt County Supervisor Virginia Bass: “This will allow counties to make much-needed repairs to improve the safety and efficiency of our local transportation systems”
“Transportation funding has been a county priority for more than three years, so we are gratified to see this legislation gaining traction. We understand the next few days will be critical and legislators should rest assured that members of the Fix Our Roads coalition support this package, and we will stand behind legislators who vote for it. This will allow counties to make much-needed repairs to improve the safety and efficiency of our local transportation systems.” (3/29/17)

San Luis Obispo Mayor Heidi Harmon: “package would provide Caltrans with funds for highway improvements on the Central Coast”
“SB 1 would generate more than $1 million per year for street and road maintenance in the city of San Luis Obispo alone, and enable the city to meet critical transportation needs…In addition, San Luis Obispo County would receive a significant increase in road funding. The transportation package would provide Caltrans with funds for highway improvements on the Central Coast, increase funding for local transit agencies such as SLO Transit and our local Regional Transit Agency, and increase money in the state’s Active Transportation Program…San Luis Obispo City Council believes these benefits can enhance public health, build community and reduce congestion.” (4/4/17)

South Bay Cities Council of Governments Executive Director Jacki Bacharach: “maintaining a healthy transportation network is critical to our regional economy and will help us meet our future sustainability goals”
“The South Bay is strategically located between the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, and the Los Angeles International Airport. These facilities benefit our region by providing an influx of goods and tourism, but they strain our local transportation infrastructure and show the limits of our current transportation funding. The South Bay Cities Council of Governments supports SB 1, because maintaining a healthy transportation network is critical to our regional economy and will help us meet our future sustainability goals.” (4/3/17)

Santa Barbara County Association of Governments Chair and Goleta City Council Member Michael T. Bennett: “Restoration of STIP funds will allow the Santa Barbara Association of Governments and the member agencies to leverage regional Measure A transportation sales tax dollars”
“Restoration of STIP funds will allow the Santa Barbara Association of Governments and the member agencies to leverage regional Measure A transportation sales tax dollars to construct high-occupancy vehicle lanes on the frequently gridlocked U.S. I01 in south Santa Barbara County. U.S. 101 is our highest regional transportation priority. U.S. 101 is one of only two highways connecting Southern California to the Bay area and is a critical economic link for goods movement from our region to the rest of the country.” (3/31/17)

Santa Barbara Mayor Helene Schneider: “Santa Barbara is in dire need of additional funding to maintain its streets, sidewalks and related infrastructure.”
“The City of Santa Barbara is in dire need of additional funding to maintain its streets, sidewalks and related infrastructure. The pavement condition index in Santa Barbara is 61 and declining rapidly. The City estimates the funding gap for street infrastructure to be approximately $17 million per year. Any additional funding received from new revenue sources will go directly to improving the pavement condition, repairing sidewalks, and maintaining traffic safety infrastructure such as traffic lights and street lights.” (4/3/17)

Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg: “Roads, jobs, transit – why not say yes?”
“California in 2017 has the opportunity to raise money to do something necessary and positive. Roads, jobs, transit – why not say yes? Throughout our state’s history, every generation has reached their own crossroads and made a deliberate decision to do what it takes to build up, not wear down our state structures because we know that the prosperity of our state and future generations depends on it. This is such a moment.” (4/5/17)

Sacramento County Supervisor and California Air Resources Board Member Phil Serna: “SB 1 provides an effective new tool to ensure 300,000 dirty diesel trucks clean up their act in the state of California”
“I’m on the California Air Resources Board, home to some of the brightest air quality analysts in the business. They are telling all of us that SB 1 provides an effective new tool to ensure 300,000 dirty diesel trucks clean up their act in the state of California…that will slash up to 90 tons of smog-forming NOx and three tons of toxic diesel soot per day. That’s equal to taking every single passenger car in California off the road, all 26 million of them. So remember, the same air quality experts who helped bring Volkswagen to justice for falsifying diesel emissions have concluded this is a good deal for California air quality. That’s why I’m supporting SB 1 wholeheartedly.” (4/5/17)

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti: “Our safety, economy, and quality of life depend on it.”
“We have a very simple message for Sacramento: It’s time to fix our streets. Los Angeles and cities throughout California are counting on the Legislature to act by April 6 and pass legislation that would allow the state to begin investing the billions of dollars we need to fix crumbling roads, bridges, and infrastructure that millions of Californians use every day. Our safety, economy, and quality of life depend on it.” (4/3/17)

Burbank Mayor Jess A. Talamantes: “There may be no better way to put Californians back to work and stimulate our economy”
“a comprehensive transportation proposal inclusive of sensible reforms, modest increases to revenue sources, robust infrastructure investment, and important protections for the revenues…a historic and necessary agreement between the Governor and legislature…There may be no better way to put Californians back to work and stimulate our economy than making the roads we and our children rely on everyday safe again.” (4/4/17)

San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo: “We need the state legislature to approve this critical investment in our transportation infrastructure”
“Every dollar we invest in basic road maintenance today will save us $4 in the future to repair a failed road. We need the state legislature to approve this critical investment in our transportation infrastructure, and I’d like to thank Gov. Brown, Sen. Beall and Assemblymember Frazier for their continued commitment to fixing our aging and deteriorating roads.” (4/3/17)

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee: “bill reflects a landmark commitment to make responsible investments in our infrastructure”
“I fully endorse the comprehensive transportation funding proposal announced today by Governor Brown and leaders in the California State Legislature…When Californians are able to travel efficiently and safely, it benefits our economy, our environment, and the overall quality of life standards of our state. This bill reflects a landmark commitment to make responsible investments in our infrastructure…I appreciate the determination of our Governor and legislators in Sacramento to come up with a transportation funding package that proves California is ready to invest in a brighter future.” (3/29/17)

Contra Costa County Board of Supervisors Chair Federal D. Glover: “Contra Costa County is depending on a solution at the state level in order to close a $7.9 million budget gap.”
“Contra Costa County is depending on a solution at the state level in order to close a $7.9 million budget gap. The County has struggled to maintain safe, well-maintained roads during a time when revenues are declining due to the increase in fuel-efficient and electric vehicles and the purchasing power of the unit based gas tax is half of what is was when it was established in 1994. Our Public Works Department has a short term list of 11 major projects that will have to be deferred, on top of a reduction in maintenance activities, unless a solution is identified. The more long term scenario is substantially bleak.” (4/3/17)

Alameda County Supervisor Scott Haggerty: “Without an immediate investment of new revenue, the County’s local streets and roads infrastructure will continue to decline, which only increases the cost burden on future tax payers”
“In Alameda County, we have $170 million in deferred maintenance needs for 2018. This figure is expected to increase significantly in future years under the current budget assumptions. Almost one third of Alameda County’s local streets and roads are in poor or very poor condition. This is the result of limited transportation funding resulting in continued deferred maintenance of needed roadway treatments. Without an immediate investment of new revenue, the County’s local streets and roads infrastructure will continue to decline, which only increases the cost burden on future tax payers.” (3/31/17)

Alpine County Board of Supervisors Chair Terry Woodrow: “current trend of reduced revenues for transportation…will result in significant adverse impacts to public safety, convenience of the travelling public and our local economy”
“Reductions in funding available to local agencies has resulted in our county reducing its road maintenance crew to only four full time positions. There is no funding for pavement treatments. Consequently our road maintenance effort can best be described as triage – responding to emergencies that need immediate attention and using our limited resources to try and keep the pavement from completely failing. If the current trend of reduced revenues for transportation continues our pavements will eventually fail and we will have to cut back maintenance efforts even further. This will result in significant adverse impacts to public safety, convenience of the travelling public and our local economy.” (3/31/17)

Mendocino County Board of Supervisors Chair John McCowen: “SB 1 would allow us to reinvest in our existing infrastructure.”
“The County of Mendocino’s local streets and roads are in poor condition and are facing an unmet need of $625 million according to the statewide needs assessment. Without an immediate investment of new revenue into the system, our infrastructure will continue to decline, which will only increases the cost burden on future tax payers. SB 1 would allow us to reinvest in our existing infrastructure. Mendocino County would be able to bring our infrastructure into good condition, by applying pavement preservation treatments to 300 miles of road, paving 150 miles of road, and repairing 21 bridges and other much-needed maintenance and improvements.” (3/31/17)

Monterey County Board of Supervisors Chair Mary L. Adams: “Without adequate maintenance and rehabilitation funds, repair costs will continue to increase exponentially”
“Monterey County maintains more than 1,200 miles of roadway and 173 bridges – a significant majority of which were rated as in “poor” condition in the recent Statewide Local Streets and Road Assessment report. As of December 2016, Monterey County’s maintenance backlog was more than $750 million. Damage due to the 2016 Soberanes Fire and 2016-17 Winter Storms added an additional $50 million in damages to County roadways. Without adequate maintenance and rehabilitation funds, repair costs will continue to increase exponentially.” (3/31/17)

Santa Clara Board of Supervisors President Dave Cortese: “SB 1 would assist our County in addressing both a maintenance backlog and the ongoing operating and maintenance needs of our roadways”
“The County has exhausted its Road Fund reserves, which were used over the last five years to cover the shortfall between the gas tax revenue and operating/maintenance costs. Consequently, the County no longer has sufficient resources to perform pavement, traffic signal, and other infrastructure maintenance, and, in general, to ensure the safe and efficient operations of the expressway and unincorporated road systems. The receipt of funds through SB 1 would assist our County in addressing both a maintenance backlog and the ongoing operating and maintenance needs of our roadways.” (3/31/17)

Yolo County Supervisor Oscar Villegas: “Well maintained and modern road infrastructure ensures the continued viability and sustainability of our agricultural economy”
“Within Yolo County there are hundreds of road miles that need major repairs and improvements in order to keep up with increased usage, in addition to new infrastructure needs. Well maintained and modern road infrastructure ensures the continued viability and sustainability of our agricultural economy. Road infrastructure between rural and urban areas supports agribusiness’ ability to quickly and safely move agricultural products to value-adding processing facilities and ultimately to local, domestic, and international markets.” (3/31/17)

Arroyo Grande Mayor Jim Hill: “Arroyo Grande, like most municipal agencies has a backlog of road maintenance and improvement projects including roads requiring substantial rehabilitation as well as ongoing pavement resurfacing needs”
“The City of Arroyo Grande, like most municipal agencies has a backlog of road maintenance and improvement projects including roads requiring substantial rehabilitation as well as ongoing pavement resurfacing needs. Additionally, this transportation funding is needed for the Brisco Road at Highway 101 Interchange project which our local Council of Governments has identified as a high priority improvement in our region.” (3/31/17)

Belvedere Mayor James Campbell: “We are in critical need of funding to maintain streets”
“In Belvedere, we are in critical need of funding to maintain streets that, being a predominantly island city, provide the only daily and emergency vehicle access and egress for our residents. We would use funding to stabilize, shore up and repave our lagoon and hillside roadways that are suffering from deteriorating sub-grade conditions. Additional work will be necessary to protect our public roadways from rising sea level.” (3/31/17)

Ceres Mayor Chris Vierra: “The current street network has a Pavement Condition Index (PCI) of 64 and is forecast to drop to 52 over the next ten years without significant investment.”
“The City of Ceres has a substantial investment in the critical infrastructure of local streets and roads valued in excess of $169 million. The current street network has a Pavement Condition Index (PCI) of 64 and is forecast to drop to 52 over the next ten years without significant investment. The unfunded maintenance backlog is currently over $10 million and would grow to over $63 million in ten years.” (3/31/17)

Chino Mayor Eunice M. Ulloa: “This bill will greatly assist the City of Chino by affording us the opportunity to receive funding that will enhance the ability to maintain our critical infrastructure.”
“Located along the 60 Interstate Freeway, the City serves as a corridor from The Greater Los Angeles area and Ports. This includes the mass distribution of goods from our warehouses that serve the Western States. Though the city is tenacious in maintaining our streets, the consistent use of trucks has led to a continuous pattern of scheduling improvements of our roads to ensure they retain the highest standard. Moreover, our region has experience tremendous population growth. This has led to an increased traffic flow through our City. Undoubtedly, this will have significant impacts to the quality of our streets. This bill will greatly assist the City of Chino by affording us the opportunity to receive funding that will enhance the ability to maintain our critical infrastructure.” (3/31/17)

Concord Mayor Laura Hoffmeister: “SB 1 would significantly increase the City’s budget to repair and maintain our roadways, improving the local roadways that our residents and visitors use every day.”
“The funding available to help maintain the roadways in the City of Concord has been limited and roadway conditions continue to decline. As noted in the California Statewide Local Streets and Roads Needs Assessment prepared by NCE, the roadways in the City of Concord are considered “At Risk”. Approximately $90 million is needed to bring our roads to “Good” condition. Additional funding would also be needed to maintain the rating, once achieved. The funds made available through SB 1 would significantly increase the City’s budget to repair and maintain our roadways, improving the local roadways that our residents and visitors use every day. Additionally, SB 1 will help fund the implementation of needed bikeway and other Complete Street improvements in the City.” (3/31/17)

Walnut Creek Mayor Richard G. Carlston: “we still need further assistance to bridge funding shortfalls to maintain our roads at their current levels”
“Here in Walnut Creek, 125,000 vehicles drive through our City per day on just two of our arterial roads: Ygnacio Valley Road and Treat Blvd, more than Highway 4. We place a high priority on the maintenance of our 218 miles of roads and transportation infrastructure, spending $2.3 million per year. Nevertheless, we still need further assistance to bridge funding shortfalls to maintain our roads at their current levels.” (3/31/17)

Walnut Creek City Councilmember Cindy Silva: “Potholes are not partisan”
“Potholes are not partisan. When it comes to roads, our community members do not care that I am a Republican, nor do they care that one of my colleagues is a Democrat -they just want their roads fixed. Our communities want good roads, they want safe bridges and now is the time for all of us to come together to support SB 1 and to deliver on our promise to our communities.” (4/5/17)

Crescent City Mayor Blake Inscore: “We, in Crescent City, are in urgent need of funding to support our deteriorating transportation infrastructure”
“We, in Crescent City, are in urgent need of funding to support our deteriorating transportation infrastructure. A 2011 inventory of our city streets revealed that 44% were in need of capital preventative maintenance and an additional 13% were in dire need of structural improvements. This data has been supported with multiple failed roadways during this year’s winter storms including the passage of two Declared Emergencies. Estimates to provide the required improvements exceed $30 million; a difficult feat for a small town with General Fund expenditures of $5.2 million.” (3/31/17)

Davis Mayor Robb Davis: “Addressing the current condition of certain roads and bike lanes now will save millions of dollars in the long run”
“Although the City of Davis has allocated millions of General Fund dollars in the annual budget to address transportation infrastructure improvements, this area remains one of the City’s largest unfunded priorities. The community’s average pavement condition index currently sits at a 63; without adequate investment, that percentage will decline to unacceptable and unsafe levels. Addressing the current condition of certain roads and bike lanes now will save millions of dollars in the long run.” (3/31/17)

Gonzales Mayor Maria Orozco: “The proposed legislation will improve the ability to address some of these needs”
“Gonzales recently completed a pavement management plan that shows a need for $15.7 million dollars to bring the approximately 20 miles of roadways in our community to good condition if spent in the current year. The plan shows the average Pavement Condition Index (as determined by the federal guidelines from the Army Corps of Engineers) is 60 out of 100 with main arteries much lower. Furthermore, Gonzales has three primary entrances from the freeway. Two of which need over $20 million apiece to improve. These projects will take years to improve. The proposed legislation will improve the ability to address some of these needs.” (3/31/17)

Grass Valley Mayor Howard Levine: “As the economic hub center of Western Nevada County, updated and well-maintained road systems are necessary vital resources for the City of Grass Valley”
“SB 1 would provide much needed funding and transportation reform towards the local streets and roads infrastructure used every day in the City of Grass Valley. As the economic center of Western Nevada County, updated and well-maintained road systems are necessary vital resources for the City of Grass Valley’s residents, business owners and tourists alike.” (3/31/17)

Gustine Mayor Melvin Oliveira: “without adequate funding deterioration is rapidly occurring on our local streets and roads”
“SB 1 funding would help the City of Gustine meet the maintenance needs of our aging local streets and roads. The current condition of streets and roads in the City of Gustine is poor to fair condition, and without adequate funding deterioration is rapidly occurring on our local streets and roads. Funds to maintain roadways would preserve roadways and eliminate the expensive need to repave in the future. Funds will be used to repave local streets in very poor condition and maintain roadways in fair or good condition.” (3/31/17)

Indio Mayor Elaine Holmes: “Delaying improvements will only make road repairs more expensive in the future”
“In the City of Indio, approximately $6 million per year is needed to properly maintain our city’s 172 miles of streets. We need to fix pot holes and make road improvements for the safety of motorists, bicyclists, and pedestrians. Delaying improvements will only make road repairs more expensive in the future. It is also vital that state Highway 111 and Interstate 10 be improved for safety and traffic flow since nearly 1.4 million visitors come to the City of Indio every year for our world-renown festivals and events. This will also help accommodate the City of Indio’s current and future economic development and population growth, which is expected to increase from 100,000 in 2020 to 170,000 in 2035.” (3/31/17)

King City Mayor Mike LeBarre: Legislation “could be instrumental in achieving the City’s goal of addressing serious deficiencies of the City’s street system”
“This bill would provide important revenue to King City to assist in funding ongoing paving projects, a proposed roundabout project necessary to address a substantial circulation problem, and other transportation and street infrastructure needs. It could be instrumental in achieving the City’s goal of addressing serious deficiencies of the City’s street system.” (3/31/17)

Modesto Mayor Ted Brandvold: “City of Modesto has more than $300 Million in deferred maintenance costs and that figure continues to rise”
“The City of Modesto currently maintains 615 centerline miles of pavement. Our average pavement condition index is 59. With current funding levels, this number is projected to drop to 45 within the next 10 years. More than 10% of our streets are failed and require complete reconstruction. The City of Modesto has more than $300 Million in deferred maintenance costs and that figure continues to rise. Within 20 years the deferred maintenance cost is project to exceed $1 Billion if additional funding is not secured.” (3/31/17)

Moraga Mayor Teresa Onoda: “In addition to pavement needs, more funding is needed for other transportation and infrastructure projects.”
“In order to maintain our Pavement Condition Index over the remaining life of our sales tax, an annual amount of $2.1 million is needed, far greater than what our tax will generate. In addition to pavement needs, more funding is needed for other transportation and infrastructure projects.” (3/31/17)

Ontario Mayor Paul S. Leon: “Senate Bill 1 is a carefully crafted attempt to raise new funding while ensuring that existing funding be better utilized for transportation purposes”
“Our state’s economy, and the prosperity of cities like Ontario, depends heavily on upon a reliable road system. But, by all accounts, California’s transportation infrastructure system is crumbling, and in desperate need of repair. Senate Bill 1 is a carefully crafted attempt to raise new funding while ensuring that existing funding be better utilized for transportation purposes.” (3/31/17)

San Gabriel City Manager Steven A. Preston: “With stagnant and declining gas tax revenues in the future, this situation will only become worse.”
“The inconsistency of revenue streams, the loss of redevelopment, and reductions in federal Block Grant funding have affected our ability to deliver timely rehabilitation and repair. With stagnant and declining gas tax revenues in the future, this situation will only become worse.” (3/31/17)

Santa Cruz Mayor Cynthia Chase: “we certainly appreciate whatever additional funds the State could funnel to the local agencies for maintenance of arterial and collector streets.”
“The current backlog of deferred maintenance for the transportation network within the City is approximately $40 million. While we understand that there is no magic formula to alleviate this, we certainly appreciate whatever additional funds the State could funnel to the local agencies for maintenance of arterial and collector streets.” (3/31/17)

Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs: “Stockton currently has $224 million in unfunded transportation infrastructure projects that are fundamental to safety, commerce and development in our community.”
“In addition to maintenance and repair needs, Stockton currently has $224 million in unfunded transportation infrastructure projects that are fundamental to safety, commerce and development in our community. Without additional funding sources, these critical projects will be delayed long into the future.” (3/31/17)

Tracy City Manager Troy Brown: “Additional transportation dollars could be used for freeway interchanges, highway improvements, creation of railroad grade separations and to support local streets and roads which are grossly underfunded.”
“The City of Tracy boasts a strategic position in the region, with easy access to the Ports of Stockton and Oakland, as well as having quick access to San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose airports. Over 70,000 vehicle trips per day traverse the City as goods and people move to points west {across the Altamont Pass) and east to Interstate 5 where access to all points across the West Coast are possible. Additional transportation dollars could be used for freeway interchanges, highway improvements, creation of railroad grade separations and to support local streets and roads which are grossly underfunded. The City of Tracy would allocate any additional monies toward three freeway interchange improvement, maintenance of our existing 545 roadway network which currently has a Pavement Condition Index rating of 72.” (3/31/17)

Tulare Mayor Carlton Jones: “As the condition of these roads continues to decrease, the future cost of repairs necessary to return them to good condition increases exponentially.”
“The City of Tulare currently receives approximately $1.3 million of funding annually through the Highway Users Tax Account, which falls well short of the approximately $5 million needed to maintain our street network in an overall “good” condition. The Pavement Condition Index (PCI) of our network is currently 57 which falls within the lower end of the range used to define the “good” condition category. Due to the shortage of funding available for pavement management activities, the City of Tulare has focused its maintenance efforts on our arterial and collector roadway network, as these are of the greatest importance to regional mobility and economic development. As a result, the condition of our local (residential) street network has steadily declined from a PCI 61 in 2010 to a PCI of 53 in 2016. As the condition of these roads continues to decrease, the future cost of repairs necessary to return them to good condition increases exponentially.” (3/31/17)

Riverside Mayor Rusty Bailey: “maintaining transportation is a core function of our local government”
“I’m here because our constituents deserve streets and roads they can use to get to work and to school without dodging potholes and risking damage to their vehicles. Maintaining transportation infrastructure is a core function of our local government. Yet in my city and cities across California, that investment has declined in recent years due to a lack of action in Sacramento. That’s why it’s critical that the legislature act to inject funding into our network of roads by passing a funding bill by April 6 this year.” (3/20/17)

Perris City Council Member Tonya Burke: “plan includes smart, targeted investments that will produce results for the people of Riverside County and will save local taxpayers millions of dollars into the future”

“This much-needed investment will help our economy stay on track, and give Riverside residents the transportation support we so desperately need for our growing region…No matter what anyone says, there’s simply not enough money in the state general fund to make a dent in the backlog…This compromise plan includes smart, targeted investments that will produce results for the people of Riverside County and will save local taxpayers millions of dollars into the future… I invite Sen. Roth and Assembly Members Cervantes and Medina to stand boldly with myself and other local leaders in the Inland region, to help bring California’s crumbling roadways into the 21st Century. (3/31/17)

Riverside County Board of Supervisors Chair John F. Tavaglione and Vice Chair Chuck Washington: “We all pay, the more they delay.”
“In Riverside County, we have dozens of road projects that have been backlogged because of lack of immediate funding such as the Market Street Bridge reconstruction, Mission Boulevard Bridge reconstruction, Hamner Avenue Bridge reconstruction and the Limonite/15 Freeway Interchange reconstruction. Completion of these projects and many others on the list will improve commute times and residents’ quality of life. That’s why we strongly support…long-term transportation reform and funding packages that contain new revenues to make road safety improvements, fill potholes and repair local streets, highways, bridges and overpasses…We all pay, the more they delay.” (2/10/17)

Stanislaus County Supervisor Vito Chiesa: “$10 more per month…a smart investment because driving on bad roads means I pay far more”
“The plan announced earlier this week would mean that drivers in California pay about $10 more per month. That small amount every month makes sense to me as a smart investment because driving on bad roads means I pay far more than that to fix and maintain my personal vehicle and the trucks I use in my farming business…If we fix our roads, I won’t have to fix my vehicles as often, and neither will you. The deal just announced this week by Gov. Jerry Brown and several key lawmakers achieves that goal…The plan will generate tens of millions of dollars of new revenue each year so Stanislaus County and our city governments can make road safety improvements, fill potholes and repair local streets, highways, bridges and overpasses. All for about $10 a month. I think it’s worth it (3/30/17)

Waterford Mayor Michael Van Winkle: “SB 1 will help lo improve Waterford’s existing infrastructure and improve neighborhoods”
“Funding from SB 1 will help lo improve Waterford’s existing infrastructure and improve neighborhoods, provide transit system preservation and improvements, reduce traffic congestion, help to provide funding for point-to-point services for seniors, veterans and people with disabilities, improve safety for motorists, bicyclists and pedestrians and will help to promote economic development.” (3/31/17)

Yreka Mayor Joan Freeman Smith: “funding for state highway projects is also of critical concern to the community.”
“Recent financial events have pushed off funding repair projects such as those already in the pipeline, much less the streets that desperately need repair beyond that. Without funding for repair the average Yreka Street will have a PCI of 39 by 2020. A PCI of 39 is the breakpoint for full reconstruction, the most costly method of repair. The financial lifeblood of our community is dependent on Interstate 5 as well as Highway 3, which is also our Main Street, so funding for state highway projects is also of critical concern to the community.” (3/31/17)



Enter the maximum amount you want to pay each month
$
USD
Sign up for

About The Author

Disclaimer: the views expressed by guest writers are strictly those of the author and may not reflect the views of the Vanguard, its editor, or its editorial board.

Related posts

One thought on “Aguiar-Curry Votes to Fund Crumbling State and Local Transportation Infrastructure”

  1. Mark Kropp

    Mark Kropp, Candidate for AD4:

    Curry voted to increase the cost of your commute; when, and if, the road is repaired, the time it takes you to commute will be more.

    My humble opinion is this could have been vetted better. Unfortunately it’s “Curry time…”

Leave a Reply

X Close

Newsletter Sign-Up

X Close

Monthly Subscriber Sign-Up

Enter the maximum amount you want to pay each month
$ USD
Sign up for