Disturbing Incident involving Davis High School

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A few weeks ago, a Davis High School student, a 4.0 honors student heavily involved in student government and community causes, turned in a poster for one of his classes on Malcom X. On the poster appeared the phrase, “by any means necessary” along with other phrases from one of Malcom X’s most famous speeches.

This is a phrase comes from this context:

“We declare our right on this earth…to be a human being, to be respected as a human being, to be given the rights of a human being in this society, on this earth, in this day, which we intend to bring into existence by any means necessary.”

The next day, the student came back and found that the poster had been taken down and in front of the class was told that this was a “terrorist” message.

A few weeks later, this same student was asked to give a speech in front of the school during Human Relations Week about a civil rights incident that he had experienced. He was given a choice and decided to do it on this specific incident. He then gave them an advanced copy of the speech which they approved. He was told that he could not specifically mention the teacher and he agreed to this.

He then delivered the speech, he did not mention the teacher’s name. Apparently the teacher however walked out during the speech, he and his parents were called in by the Vice-Principal.

There were several different meetings between the father and the school, but suddenly unbeknownst to the family, the student was informed that he was suspended for three days. The father went to complain and was told to leave the campus and he ended up calling his lawyer.

These are the preliminaries on this story, more is likely to emerge in the coming days. But this appears to be a big story in the making. To me on the surface this seems to have been handled very poorly. The Malcom X quote was clearly not intended to be a “terrorist” message. The teacher clearly overreacted there. I mention this since the terrorist issue arose, that this student is an American-born Muslim. Apparently the ACLU has been contacted, CAIR is involved, and many of the student’s peers are outraged.

The three day suspension is a very harsh penalty given the facts involved. Now did he break his word? I do not know. But that seems an extreme punishment for a student involved in an academic exercise who is not dealing drugs or starting fights.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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112 thoughts on “Disturbing Incident involving Davis High School”

  1. Rich Rifkin

    “A few weeks ago, a Davis High School student, a 4.0 honors student heavily involved in student government and community causes, turned in a poster for one of his classes on Malcom X. On the poster appeared the phrase, “by any means necessary” along with other phrases from one of Malcom X’s most famous speeches.”

    If this student is “a 4.0 honors student,” I hope he at least knows how to spell Malcolm X’s name.

    One other thing to consider: with the 5.0 scale for an A in an AP class, 4.0 is not what it used to be. I did some research on grade inflation for a column and found that most students in every AP course get an A. This grtade inflation phenomenon is not unique to Davis High School, though it is more prevalent at wealthier suburban schools than it is at poorer inner-city and rural high school campuses.

    Since the early 1990s, when the “self-esteem movement,” giving honest grades became impossible. Since that time, schools in towns like Davis do not reward children with an A for an excellent performance. Rather, every kid who gives an ordinary effort gets an A. B’s and lower are reserved largely for the kids who didn’t try. (Some teachers don’t play this game, but they are punished for their sincerity.)

    “Meanwhile now the student’s academic career is in jeopardy because of this suspension. The UC’s apparently have a provision that any student suspended for three days or more is ineligible for enrollment.”

    What is your source for this?

    “To me on the surface this seems to have been handled very poorly. The Malcom X quote was clearly not intended to be a “terrorist” message. The teacher clearly overreacted there.”

    Malcolm X is a difficult subject to teach at the high school level. If you grab one or two quotes from him, positive or negative, you can slant how he should be seen. But any mention of him, by a student or by a teacher, should be mindful of the fact that for the vast majority of his public life Malcolm X was a very controversial figure, intimately tied to a deeply racist and anti-Jewish group, The Nation of Islam (which is not mainstream Islam). It was only at the very end of his life, when he turned against The Nation and they (very likely) set out to have him killed that he renounced the hatemongering of men like Farakhan and Elijah Muhammed.

    As such, when a student wants to give a talk about Malcolm X, and his talk does not incorporate Malcolm X into a fuller context of his controversial public role, it is not surprising that a teacher may have problems with that.

    “The three day suspension is a very harsh penalty given the facts involved.”

    Do you know all of the facts involved? Or are you really just hearing from one side?

  2. Rich Rifkin

    “A few weeks ago, a Davis High School student, a 4.0 honors student heavily involved in student government and community causes, turned in a poster for one of his classes on Malcom X. On the poster appeared the phrase, “by any means necessary” along with other phrases from one of Malcom X’s most famous speeches.”

    If this student is “a 4.0 honors student,” I hope he at least knows how to spell Malcolm X’s name.

    One other thing to consider: with the 5.0 scale for an A in an AP class, 4.0 is not what it used to be. I did some research on grade inflation for a column and found that most students in every AP course get an A. This grtade inflation phenomenon is not unique to Davis High School, though it is more prevalent at wealthier suburban schools than it is at poorer inner-city and rural high school campuses.

    Since the early 1990s, when the “self-esteem movement,” giving honest grades became impossible. Since that time, schools in towns like Davis do not reward children with an A for an excellent performance. Rather, every kid who gives an ordinary effort gets an A. B’s and lower are reserved largely for the kids who didn’t try. (Some teachers don’t play this game, but they are punished for their sincerity.)

    “Meanwhile now the student’s academic career is in jeopardy because of this suspension. The UC’s apparently have a provision that any student suspended for three days or more is ineligible for enrollment.”

    What is your source for this?

    “To me on the surface this seems to have been handled very poorly. The Malcom X quote was clearly not intended to be a “terrorist” message. The teacher clearly overreacted there.”

    Malcolm X is a difficult subject to teach at the high school level. If you grab one or two quotes from him, positive or negative, you can slant how he should be seen. But any mention of him, by a student or by a teacher, should be mindful of the fact that for the vast majority of his public life Malcolm X was a very controversial figure, intimately tied to a deeply racist and anti-Jewish group, The Nation of Islam (which is not mainstream Islam). It was only at the very end of his life, when he turned against The Nation and they (very likely) set out to have him killed that he renounced the hatemongering of men like Farakhan and Elijah Muhammed.

    As such, when a student wants to give a talk about Malcolm X, and his talk does not incorporate Malcolm X into a fuller context of his controversial public role, it is not surprising that a teacher may have problems with that.

    “The three day suspension is a very harsh penalty given the facts involved.”

    Do you know all of the facts involved? Or are you really just hearing from one side?

  3. Rich Rifkin

    “A few weeks ago, a Davis High School student, a 4.0 honors student heavily involved in student government and community causes, turned in a poster for one of his classes on Malcom X. On the poster appeared the phrase, “by any means necessary” along with other phrases from one of Malcom X’s most famous speeches.”

    If this student is “a 4.0 honors student,” I hope he at least knows how to spell Malcolm X’s name.

    One other thing to consider: with the 5.0 scale for an A in an AP class, 4.0 is not what it used to be. I did some research on grade inflation for a column and found that most students in every AP course get an A. This grtade inflation phenomenon is not unique to Davis High School, though it is more prevalent at wealthier suburban schools than it is at poorer inner-city and rural high school campuses.

    Since the early 1990s, when the “self-esteem movement,” giving honest grades became impossible. Since that time, schools in towns like Davis do not reward children with an A for an excellent performance. Rather, every kid who gives an ordinary effort gets an A. B’s and lower are reserved largely for the kids who didn’t try. (Some teachers don’t play this game, but they are punished for their sincerity.)

    “Meanwhile now the student’s academic career is in jeopardy because of this suspension. The UC’s apparently have a provision that any student suspended for three days or more is ineligible for enrollment.”

    What is your source for this?

    “To me on the surface this seems to have been handled very poorly. The Malcom X quote was clearly not intended to be a “terrorist” message. The teacher clearly overreacted there.”

    Malcolm X is a difficult subject to teach at the high school level. If you grab one or two quotes from him, positive or negative, you can slant how he should be seen. But any mention of him, by a student or by a teacher, should be mindful of the fact that for the vast majority of his public life Malcolm X was a very controversial figure, intimately tied to a deeply racist and anti-Jewish group, The Nation of Islam (which is not mainstream Islam). It was only at the very end of his life, when he turned against The Nation and they (very likely) set out to have him killed that he renounced the hatemongering of men like Farakhan and Elijah Muhammed.

    As such, when a student wants to give a talk about Malcolm X, and his talk does not incorporate Malcolm X into a fuller context of his controversial public role, it is not surprising that a teacher may have problems with that.

    “The three day suspension is a very harsh penalty given the facts involved.”

    Do you know all of the facts involved? Or are you really just hearing from one side?

  4. Rich Rifkin

    “A few weeks ago, a Davis High School student, a 4.0 honors student heavily involved in student government and community causes, turned in a poster for one of his classes on Malcom X. On the poster appeared the phrase, “by any means necessary” along with other phrases from one of Malcom X’s most famous speeches.”

    If this student is “a 4.0 honors student,” I hope he at least knows how to spell Malcolm X’s name.

    One other thing to consider: with the 5.0 scale for an A in an AP class, 4.0 is not what it used to be. I did some research on grade inflation for a column and found that most students in every AP course get an A. This grtade inflation phenomenon is not unique to Davis High School, though it is more prevalent at wealthier suburban schools than it is at poorer inner-city and rural high school campuses.

    Since the early 1990s, when the “self-esteem movement,” giving honest grades became impossible. Since that time, schools in towns like Davis do not reward children with an A for an excellent performance. Rather, every kid who gives an ordinary effort gets an A. B’s and lower are reserved largely for the kids who didn’t try. (Some teachers don’t play this game, but they are punished for their sincerity.)

    “Meanwhile now the student’s academic career is in jeopardy because of this suspension. The UC’s apparently have a provision that any student suspended for three days or more is ineligible for enrollment.”

    What is your source for this?

    “To me on the surface this seems to have been handled very poorly. The Malcom X quote was clearly not intended to be a “terrorist” message. The teacher clearly overreacted there.”

    Malcolm X is a difficult subject to teach at the high school level. If you grab one or two quotes from him, positive or negative, you can slant how he should be seen. But any mention of him, by a student or by a teacher, should be mindful of the fact that for the vast majority of his public life Malcolm X was a very controversial figure, intimately tied to a deeply racist and anti-Jewish group, The Nation of Islam (which is not mainstream Islam). It was only at the very end of his life, when he turned against The Nation and they (very likely) set out to have him killed that he renounced the hatemongering of men like Farakhan and Elijah Muhammed.

    As such, when a student wants to give a talk about Malcolm X, and his talk does not incorporate Malcolm X into a fuller context of his controversial public role, it is not surprising that a teacher may have problems with that.

    “The three day suspension is a very harsh penalty given the facts involved.”

    Do you know all of the facts involved? Or are you really just hearing from one side?

  5. Vincente

    “If this student is “a 4.0 honors student,” I hope he at least knows how to spell Malcolm X’s name.”

    Becos thet is relevent, specially senz the ked is not the wun righting this blog

    “Do you know all of the facts involved? Or are you really just hearing from one side?”

    One thing that I can guarantee to you–he knows more about it than you. I’m betting this is the first that you have heard about this incident.

  6. Vincente

    “If this student is “a 4.0 honors student,” I hope he at least knows how to spell Malcolm X’s name.”

    Becos thet is relevent, specially senz the ked is not the wun righting this blog

    “Do you know all of the facts involved? Or are you really just hearing from one side?”

    One thing that I can guarantee to you–he knows more about it than you. I’m betting this is the first that you have heard about this incident.

  7. Vincente

    “If this student is “a 4.0 honors student,” I hope he at least knows how to spell Malcolm X’s name.”

    Becos thet is relevent, specially senz the ked is not the wun righting this blog

    “Do you know all of the facts involved? Or are you really just hearing from one side?”

    One thing that I can guarantee to you–he knows more about it than you. I’m betting this is the first that you have heard about this incident.

  8. Vincente

    “If this student is “a 4.0 honors student,” I hope he at least knows how to spell Malcolm X’s name.”

    Becos thet is relevent, specially senz the ked is not the wun righting this blog

    “Do you know all of the facts involved? Or are you really just hearing from one side?”

    One thing that I can guarantee to you–he knows more about it than you. I’m betting this is the first that you have heard about this incident.

  9. Rich Rifkin

    This *grade inflation phenomenon…

    Since the early 1990s, when the “self-esteem movement” took over, giving honest grades became impossible.

    It was only at the very end of his life, when he turned against The Nation and they (very likely) set out to have him killed that he renounced the hatemongering of men like Farrakhan and Elijah Muhammed.

    As such, when a student wants to give a talk or compose a poster about Malcolm X…

  10. Rich Rifkin

    This *grade inflation phenomenon…

    Since the early 1990s, when the “self-esteem movement” took over, giving honest grades became impossible.

    It was only at the very end of his life, when he turned against The Nation and they (very likely) set out to have him killed that he renounced the hatemongering of men like Farrakhan and Elijah Muhammed.

    As such, when a student wants to give a talk or compose a poster about Malcolm X…

  11. Rich Rifkin

    This *grade inflation phenomenon…

    Since the early 1990s, when the “self-esteem movement” took over, giving honest grades became impossible.

    It was only at the very end of his life, when he turned against The Nation and they (very likely) set out to have him killed that he renounced the hatemongering of men like Farrakhan and Elijah Muhammed.

    As such, when a student wants to give a talk or compose a poster about Malcolm X…

  12. Rich Rifkin

    This *grade inflation phenomenon…

    Since the early 1990s, when the “self-esteem movement” took over, giving honest grades became impossible.

    It was only at the very end of his life, when he turned against The Nation and they (very likely) set out to have him killed that he renounced the hatemongering of men like Farrakhan and Elijah Muhammed.

    As such, when a student wants to give a talk or compose a poster about Malcolm X…

  13. Rich Rifkin

    One thing that I can guarantee to you–he knows more about it than you. I’m betting this is the first that you have heard about this incident.

    Right on both counts.

  14. Rich Rifkin

    One thing that I can guarantee to you–he knows more about it than you. I’m betting this is the first that you have heard about this incident.

    Right on both counts.

  15. Rich Rifkin

    One thing that I can guarantee to you–he knows more about it than you. I’m betting this is the first that you have heard about this incident.

    Right on both counts.

  16. Rich Rifkin

    One thing that I can guarantee to you–he knows more about it than you. I’m betting this is the first that you have heard about this incident.

    Right on both counts.

  17. Anonymous

    Rich, Please…

    Suspension is only to be used after other forms of discipline are used and found to be ineffective. Three days suspension? What is this teacher’s name. I want to know.

    Sharla Harrington

  18. Anonymous

    Rich, Please…

    Suspension is only to be used after other forms of discipline are used and found to be ineffective. Three days suspension? What is this teacher’s name. I want to know.

    Sharla Harrington

  19. Anonymous

    Rich, Please…

    Suspension is only to be used after other forms of discipline are used and found to be ineffective. Three days suspension? What is this teacher’s name. I want to know.

    Sharla Harrington

  20. Anonymous

    Rich, Please…

    Suspension is only to be used after other forms of discipline are used and found to be ineffective. Three days suspension? What is this teacher’s name. I want to know.

    Sharla Harrington

  21. davisite

    I wonder if our Human Relation Commission will get involved…(fat chance!) When did resistance to persecution/oppression become “heresy”? Wasn’t that the idea that launched our nation?

  22. davisite

    I wonder if our Human Relation Commission will get involved…(fat chance!) When did resistance to persecution/oppression become “heresy”? Wasn’t that the idea that launched our nation?

  23. davisite

    I wonder if our Human Relation Commission will get involved…(fat chance!) When did resistance to persecution/oppression become “heresy”? Wasn’t that the idea that launched our nation?

  24. davisite

    I wonder if our Human Relation Commission will get involved…(fat chance!) When did resistance to persecution/oppression become “heresy”? Wasn’t that the idea that launched our nation?

  25. Anonymous

    Is there a more famous Malcolm X quote than the often used “By any means necessary.” It seems that a teacher who over reacts to this in a poster by trying to censor it instead of engaging in a discussion about the potential gravity of such a statement, its inflammatory nature and the desperation which might lead to such a statement seems to know less about Malcolm X than does the student who has had to suffer the teacher’s poor judgement. The foolishness of the teacher in seeing this as a disciplinary issue compounded by the administrative support for the teacher, as if a student who has been inspired by Malcolm X is going to be chastened by such discipline is truly laughable.

    I wonder if the teacher ever read The Autobiography of Malcolm X written with Alex Haley who also wrote Roots. Maybe the real message here is the historical and ongoing need for more diversity in the faculty in the schools in Davis. Imagine if a teacher had seized the moment instead of squelching it.

    I hope the Trustees will unwind this before it becomes even more of an embarrassment.

    Ron Glick

  26. Anonymous

    Is there a more famous Malcolm X quote than the often used “By any means necessary.” It seems that a teacher who over reacts to this in a poster by trying to censor it instead of engaging in a discussion about the potential gravity of such a statement, its inflammatory nature and the desperation which might lead to such a statement seems to know less about Malcolm X than does the student who has had to suffer the teacher’s poor judgement. The foolishness of the teacher in seeing this as a disciplinary issue compounded by the administrative support for the teacher, as if a student who has been inspired by Malcolm X is going to be chastened by such discipline is truly laughable.

    I wonder if the teacher ever read The Autobiography of Malcolm X written with Alex Haley who also wrote Roots. Maybe the real message here is the historical and ongoing need for more diversity in the faculty in the schools in Davis. Imagine if a teacher had seized the moment instead of squelching it.

    I hope the Trustees will unwind this before it becomes even more of an embarrassment.

    Ron Glick

  27. Anonymous

    Is there a more famous Malcolm X quote than the often used “By any means necessary.” It seems that a teacher who over reacts to this in a poster by trying to censor it instead of engaging in a discussion about the potential gravity of such a statement, its inflammatory nature and the desperation which might lead to such a statement seems to know less about Malcolm X than does the student who has had to suffer the teacher’s poor judgement. The foolishness of the teacher in seeing this as a disciplinary issue compounded by the administrative support for the teacher, as if a student who has been inspired by Malcolm X is going to be chastened by such discipline is truly laughable.

    I wonder if the teacher ever read The Autobiography of Malcolm X written with Alex Haley who also wrote Roots. Maybe the real message here is the historical and ongoing need for more diversity in the faculty in the schools in Davis. Imagine if a teacher had seized the moment instead of squelching it.

    I hope the Trustees will unwind this before it becomes even more of an embarrassment.

    Ron Glick

  28. Anonymous

    Is there a more famous Malcolm X quote than the often used “By any means necessary.” It seems that a teacher who over reacts to this in a poster by trying to censor it instead of engaging in a discussion about the potential gravity of such a statement, its inflammatory nature and the desperation which might lead to such a statement seems to know less about Malcolm X than does the student who has had to suffer the teacher’s poor judgement. The foolishness of the teacher in seeing this as a disciplinary issue compounded by the administrative support for the teacher, as if a student who has been inspired by Malcolm X is going to be chastened by such discipline is truly laughable.

    I wonder if the teacher ever read The Autobiography of Malcolm X written with Alex Haley who also wrote Roots. Maybe the real message here is the historical and ongoing need for more diversity in the faculty in the schools in Davis. Imagine if a teacher had seized the moment instead of squelching it.

    I hope the Trustees will unwind this before it becomes even more of an embarrassment.

    Ron Glick

  29. Eric Mar

    Thank you for posting this. very troubling but I am sure this is not the only case like it around the country. I hope a support committee is supporting the student and others like him/her in the Davis/Sacramento area.
    At some point I hope you can post something about how the civil rights groups in Davis are responding and the Davis board of education as well.

  30. Eric Mar

    Thank you for posting this. very troubling but I am sure this is not the only case like it around the country. I hope a support committee is supporting the student and others like him/her in the Davis/Sacramento area.
    At some point I hope you can post something about how the civil rights groups in Davis are responding and the Davis board of education as well.

  31. Eric Mar

    Thank you for posting this. very troubling but I am sure this is not the only case like it around the country. I hope a support committee is supporting the student and others like him/her in the Davis/Sacramento area.
    At some point I hope you can post something about how the civil rights groups in Davis are responding and the Davis board of education as well.

  32. Eric Mar

    Thank you for posting this. very troubling but I am sure this is not the only case like it around the country. I hope a support committee is supporting the student and others like him/her in the Davis/Sacramento area.
    At some point I hope you can post something about how the civil rights groups in Davis are responding and the Davis board of education as well.

  33. Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald

    The fact that they are punishing this student when they read the story in advance is disturbing.

    What is the interim sup. doing about this?

    Why are they taking such extreme steps to negatively impact this student’s future of attending a UC school or other colleges?

    The UC Application does have questions such as:

    “Have you ever been expelled, suspended, or disciplined by any school official?”

  34. Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald

    The fact that they are punishing this student when they read the story in advance is disturbing.

    What is the interim sup. doing about this?

    Why are they taking such extreme steps to negatively impact this student’s future of attending a UC school or other colleges?

    The UC Application does have questions such as:

    “Have you ever been expelled, suspended, or disciplined by any school official?”

  35. Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald

    The fact that they are punishing this student when they read the story in advance is disturbing.

    What is the interim sup. doing about this?

    Why are they taking such extreme steps to negatively impact this student’s future of attending a UC school or other colleges?

    The UC Application does have questions such as:

    “Have you ever been expelled, suspended, or disciplined by any school official?”

  36. Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald

    The fact that they are punishing this student when they read the story in advance is disturbing.

    What is the interim sup. doing about this?

    Why are they taking such extreme steps to negatively impact this student’s future of attending a UC school or other colleges?

    The UC Application does have questions such as:

    “Have you ever been expelled, suspended, or disciplined by any school official?”

  37. Richard

    a classic example of how Davis is a city with major racial issues

    for example, if someone had put up a poster of Thomas Jefferson, would it have been torn down by a teacher, with someone, like Rich here, offering the explanation that Jefferson is a controversial figure because he owned slaves?

    and that some context is required?

    of course not, but then Jefferson was white and Malcolm was . . . you get the idea.

    as to the subject in question, I think a good demand letter from an attorney is in order, a letter demanding that their child be placed back in school immediately, a public letter of apology from the District and the teacher, with immediate legal action to follow

    the more things change, the more they remain the same . . . Davis seems destined to be a place that will always have a major problem with black people, especially assertive black males

    –Richard Estes

    –Richard Estes

  38. Richard

    a classic example of how Davis is a city with major racial issues

    for example, if someone had put up a poster of Thomas Jefferson, would it have been torn down by a teacher, with someone, like Rich here, offering the explanation that Jefferson is a controversial figure because he owned slaves?

    and that some context is required?

    of course not, but then Jefferson was white and Malcolm was . . . you get the idea.

    as to the subject in question, I think a good demand letter from an attorney is in order, a letter demanding that their child be placed back in school immediately, a public letter of apology from the District and the teacher, with immediate legal action to follow

    the more things change, the more they remain the same . . . Davis seems destined to be a place that will always have a major problem with black people, especially assertive black males

    –Richard Estes

    –Richard Estes

  39. Richard

    a classic example of how Davis is a city with major racial issues

    for example, if someone had put up a poster of Thomas Jefferson, would it have been torn down by a teacher, with someone, like Rich here, offering the explanation that Jefferson is a controversial figure because he owned slaves?

    and that some context is required?

    of course not, but then Jefferson was white and Malcolm was . . . you get the idea.

    as to the subject in question, I think a good demand letter from an attorney is in order, a letter demanding that their child be placed back in school immediately, a public letter of apology from the District and the teacher, with immediate legal action to follow

    the more things change, the more they remain the same . . . Davis seems destined to be a place that will always have a major problem with black people, especially assertive black males

    –Richard Estes

    –Richard Estes

  40. Richard

    a classic example of how Davis is a city with major racial issues

    for example, if someone had put up a poster of Thomas Jefferson, would it have been torn down by a teacher, with someone, like Rich here, offering the explanation that Jefferson is a controversial figure because he owned slaves?

    and that some context is required?

    of course not, but then Jefferson was white and Malcolm was . . . you get the idea.

    as to the subject in question, I think a good demand letter from an attorney is in order, a letter demanding that their child be placed back in school immediately, a public letter of apology from the District and the teacher, with immediate legal action to follow

    the more things change, the more they remain the same . . . Davis seems destined to be a place that will always have a major problem with black people, especially assertive black males

    –Richard Estes

    –Richard Estes

  41. Anonymous

    .I am a teacher at Davis High and was at that assembly. Unless you were there and heard the remarks you are in no position to be passing judgment. You should get both sides of the story before publishing such an article. For example your article I noticed failed to mention that the student is a member of that family that sued the City of Davis for unlawful arrest of their daughter last year, I am sure you all know that story.

    I became a teacher because I love kids and strive to make a difference each day that I enter the classroom. I think we all become teachers because of our true caring and love for kids. I think that is appropriate to remind the readers of this blog to take this into consideration before jumping to uniformed decisions and judgments

  42. Anonymous

    .I am a teacher at Davis High and was at that assembly. Unless you were there and heard the remarks you are in no position to be passing judgment. You should get both sides of the story before publishing such an article. For example your article I noticed failed to mention that the student is a member of that family that sued the City of Davis for unlawful arrest of their daughter last year, I am sure you all know that story.

    I became a teacher because I love kids and strive to make a difference each day that I enter the classroom. I think we all become teachers because of our true caring and love for kids. I think that is appropriate to remind the readers of this blog to take this into consideration before jumping to uniformed decisions and judgments

  43. Anonymous

    .I am a teacher at Davis High and was at that assembly. Unless you were there and heard the remarks you are in no position to be passing judgment. You should get both sides of the story before publishing such an article. For example your article I noticed failed to mention that the student is a member of that family that sued the City of Davis for unlawful arrest of their daughter last year, I am sure you all know that story.

    I became a teacher because I love kids and strive to make a difference each day that I enter the classroom. I think we all become teachers because of our true caring and love for kids. I think that is appropriate to remind the readers of this blog to take this into consideration before jumping to uniformed decisions and judgments

  44. Anonymous

    .I am a teacher at Davis High and was at that assembly. Unless you were there and heard the remarks you are in no position to be passing judgment. You should get both sides of the story before publishing such an article. For example your article I noticed failed to mention that the student is a member of that family that sued the City of Davis for unlawful arrest of their daughter last year, I am sure you all know that story.

    I became a teacher because I love kids and strive to make a difference each day that I enter the classroom. I think we all become teachers because of our true caring and love for kids. I think that is appropriate to remind the readers of this blog to take this into consideration before jumping to uniformed decisions and judgments

  45. 無名 - wu ming

    if you look at a fair amount of jefferson’s quotes, i suspect that not a few people might accuse him of being an extremist or terrorist, if they didn’t know that he was a safely white founding father:

    “God forbid we should ever be twenty years without such a rebellion. The people cannot be all, and always, well informed. The part which is wrong will be discontented, in proportion to the importance of the facts they misconceive. If they remain quiet under such misconceptions, it is lethargy, the forerunner of death to the public liberty. …

    And what country can preserve its liberties, if it’s rulers are not warned from time to time, that this people preserve the spirit of resistance? Let them take arms. The remedy is to set them right as to the facts, pardon and pacify them. What signify a few lives lost in a century or two? The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time, with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is its natural manure.

    suspending a student for quoting malcolm x or standing up for their own intellectual freedom is 180 degrees from what a reasonable educational system ought to be doing. the learning process should not be about disciplining inmates, but challenging students to think for themselves, and express themselves coherently (and if possible, elegantly as well). any student showing initiative, even if it irritates a teacher, should be encouraged, for god’s sake, not punished. what i wouldn’t give for one such student in my own classes.

    and the fact that the student was in the same family as the earlier police harassment only makes this the more obnoxious, in my opinion. but if those who have different information want to correct me, please go right ahead. speech is not harmed by differences of opinion.

  46. 無名 - wu ming

    if you look at a fair amount of jefferson’s quotes, i suspect that not a few people might accuse him of being an extremist or terrorist, if they didn’t know that he was a safely white founding father:

    “God forbid we should ever be twenty years without such a rebellion. The people cannot be all, and always, well informed. The part which is wrong will be discontented, in proportion to the importance of the facts they misconceive. If they remain quiet under such misconceptions, it is lethargy, the forerunner of death to the public liberty. …

    And what country can preserve its liberties, if it’s rulers are not warned from time to time, that this people preserve the spirit of resistance? Let them take arms. The remedy is to set them right as to the facts, pardon and pacify them. What signify a few lives lost in a century or two? The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time, with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is its natural manure.

    suspending a student for quoting malcolm x or standing up for their own intellectual freedom is 180 degrees from what a reasonable educational system ought to be doing. the learning process should not be about disciplining inmates, but challenging students to think for themselves, and express themselves coherently (and if possible, elegantly as well). any student showing initiative, even if it irritates a teacher, should be encouraged, for god’s sake, not punished. what i wouldn’t give for one such student in my own classes.

    and the fact that the student was in the same family as the earlier police harassment only makes this the more obnoxious, in my opinion. but if those who have different information want to correct me, please go right ahead. speech is not harmed by differences of opinion.

  47. 無名 - wu ming

    if you look at a fair amount of jefferson’s quotes, i suspect that not a few people might accuse him of being an extremist or terrorist, if they didn’t know that he was a safely white founding father:

    “God forbid we should ever be twenty years without such a rebellion. The people cannot be all, and always, well informed. The part which is wrong will be discontented, in proportion to the importance of the facts they misconceive. If they remain quiet under such misconceptions, it is lethargy, the forerunner of death to the public liberty. …

    And what country can preserve its liberties, if it’s rulers are not warned from time to time, that this people preserve the spirit of resistance? Let them take arms. The remedy is to set them right as to the facts, pardon and pacify them. What signify a few lives lost in a century or two? The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time, with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is its natural manure.

    suspending a student for quoting malcolm x or standing up for their own intellectual freedom is 180 degrees from what a reasonable educational system ought to be doing. the learning process should not be about disciplining inmates, but challenging students to think for themselves, and express themselves coherently (and if possible, elegantly as well). any student showing initiative, even if it irritates a teacher, should be encouraged, for god’s sake, not punished. what i wouldn’t give for one such student in my own classes.

    and the fact that the student was in the same family as the earlier police harassment only makes this the more obnoxious, in my opinion. but if those who have different information want to correct me, please go right ahead. speech is not harmed by differences of opinion.

  48. 無名 - wu ming

    if you look at a fair amount of jefferson’s quotes, i suspect that not a few people might accuse him of being an extremist or terrorist, if they didn’t know that he was a safely white founding father:

    “God forbid we should ever be twenty years without such a rebellion. The people cannot be all, and always, well informed. The part which is wrong will be discontented, in proportion to the importance of the facts they misconceive. If they remain quiet under such misconceptions, it is lethargy, the forerunner of death to the public liberty. …

    And what country can preserve its liberties, if it’s rulers are not warned from time to time, that this people preserve the spirit of resistance? Let them take arms. The remedy is to set them right as to the facts, pardon and pacify them. What signify a few lives lost in a century or two? The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time, with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is its natural manure.

    suspending a student for quoting malcolm x or standing up for their own intellectual freedom is 180 degrees from what a reasonable educational system ought to be doing. the learning process should not be about disciplining inmates, but challenging students to think for themselves, and express themselves coherently (and if possible, elegantly as well). any student showing initiative, even if it irritates a teacher, should be encouraged, for god’s sake, not punished. what i wouldn’t give for one such student in my own classes.

    and the fact that the student was in the same family as the earlier police harassment only makes this the more obnoxious, in my opinion. but if those who have different information want to correct me, please go right ahead. speech is not harmed by differences of opinion.

  49. Anonymous

    Davis seems destined to be a place that will always have a major problem with black people, especially assertive black males…

    Hmmmm:
    your article I noticed failed to mention that the student is a member of that family that sued the City of Davis for unlawful arrest of their daughter

    …so much for that theory….

  50. Anonymous

    Davis seems destined to be a place that will always have a major problem with black people, especially assertive black males…

    Hmmmm:
    your article I noticed failed to mention that the student is a member of that family that sued the City of Davis for unlawful arrest of their daughter

    …so much for that theory….

  51. Anonymous

    Davis seems destined to be a place that will always have a major problem with black people, especially assertive black males…

    Hmmmm:
    your article I noticed failed to mention that the student is a member of that family that sued the City of Davis for unlawful arrest of their daughter

    …so much for that theory….

  52. Anonymous

    Davis seems destined to be a place that will always have a major problem with black people, especially assertive black males…

    Hmmmm:
    your article I noticed failed to mention that the student is a member of that family that sued the City of Davis for unlawful arrest of their daughter

    …so much for that theory….

  53. Doug Paul Davis

    “I am a teacher at Davis High and was at that assembly. Unless you were there and heard the remarks you are in no position to be passing judgment.”

    Let me just say–unless the kid is fighting or doing drugs in front of the assembly there is NO scenario in my opinion where there is a justification for suspending a student for three days. That does not mean that they did not act inappropriately. However I do find it interesting that absolutely no specifics were provided by this poster about the scenario that occurred that would allow us better understand of why this teacher thinks a student should be suspended three days for giving a speech.

    “For example your article I noticed failed to mention that the student is a member of that family that sued the City of Davis for unlawful arrest of their daughter last year, I am sure you all know that story.”

    *IF* that is true, what bearing does that have on this case?

    The student’s identity was not disclosed to protect them as a minor. This teacher who has posted this information, again IF accurate, would be putting the minor in jeopardy potentially. I am not surprised that they choose to post anonymously. You will notice that I also did not identify the name of the teacher involved in order to protect his or her identity as well.

    “I became a teacher because I love kids and strive to make a difference each day that I enter the classroom. I think we all become teachers because of our true caring and love for kids.”

    I’m sure all teachers do. I come a family of teachers. I do not believe any of my family would have taken down a Malcolm X poster with his most famous phrase “by any means necessary” calling it a terrorist statement. I also doubt that they would want any part of suspending a student for what occurred at an assembly putting his future academic career in jeopardy.

    I assume that you say this because you are in fact the teacher involved. I’m sorry to hear that, but nothing you have said changes my mind on the handling of this case and I again I make no claims as to whether the student was right or wrong only that the punishment seems heavy-handed at best.

  54. Doug Paul Davis

    “I am a teacher at Davis High and was at that assembly. Unless you were there and heard the remarks you are in no position to be passing judgment.”

    Let me just say–unless the kid is fighting or doing drugs in front of the assembly there is NO scenario in my opinion where there is a justification for suspending a student for three days. That does not mean that they did not act inappropriately. However I do find it interesting that absolutely no specifics were provided by this poster about the scenario that occurred that would allow us better understand of why this teacher thinks a student should be suspended three days for giving a speech.

    “For example your article I noticed failed to mention that the student is a member of that family that sued the City of Davis for unlawful arrest of their daughter last year, I am sure you all know that story.”

    *IF* that is true, what bearing does that have on this case?

    The student’s identity was not disclosed to protect them as a minor. This teacher who has posted this information, again IF accurate, would be putting the minor in jeopardy potentially. I am not surprised that they choose to post anonymously. You will notice that I also did not identify the name of the teacher involved in order to protect his or her identity as well.

    “I became a teacher because I love kids and strive to make a difference each day that I enter the classroom. I think we all become teachers because of our true caring and love for kids.”

    I’m sure all teachers do. I come a family of teachers. I do not believe any of my family would have taken down a Malcolm X poster with his most famous phrase “by any means necessary” calling it a terrorist statement. I also doubt that they would want any part of suspending a student for what occurred at an assembly putting his future academic career in jeopardy.

    I assume that you say this because you are in fact the teacher involved. I’m sorry to hear that, but nothing you have said changes my mind on the handling of this case and I again I make no claims as to whether the student was right or wrong only that the punishment seems heavy-handed at best.

  55. Doug Paul Davis

    “I am a teacher at Davis High and was at that assembly. Unless you were there and heard the remarks you are in no position to be passing judgment.”

    Let me just say–unless the kid is fighting or doing drugs in front of the assembly there is NO scenario in my opinion where there is a justification for suspending a student for three days. That does not mean that they did not act inappropriately. However I do find it interesting that absolutely no specifics were provided by this poster about the scenario that occurred that would allow us better understand of why this teacher thinks a student should be suspended three days for giving a speech.

    “For example your article I noticed failed to mention that the student is a member of that family that sued the City of Davis for unlawful arrest of their daughter last year, I am sure you all know that story.”

    *IF* that is true, what bearing does that have on this case?

    The student’s identity was not disclosed to protect them as a minor. This teacher who has posted this information, again IF accurate, would be putting the minor in jeopardy potentially. I am not surprised that they choose to post anonymously. You will notice that I also did not identify the name of the teacher involved in order to protect his or her identity as well.

    “I became a teacher because I love kids and strive to make a difference each day that I enter the classroom. I think we all become teachers because of our true caring and love for kids.”

    I’m sure all teachers do. I come a family of teachers. I do not believe any of my family would have taken down a Malcolm X poster with his most famous phrase “by any means necessary” calling it a terrorist statement. I also doubt that they would want any part of suspending a student for what occurred at an assembly putting his future academic career in jeopardy.

    I assume that you say this because you are in fact the teacher involved. I’m sorry to hear that, but nothing you have said changes my mind on the handling of this case and I again I make no claims as to whether the student was right or wrong only that the punishment seems heavy-handed at best.

  56. Doug Paul Davis

    “I am a teacher at Davis High and was at that assembly. Unless you were there and heard the remarks you are in no position to be passing judgment.”

    Let me just say–unless the kid is fighting or doing drugs in front of the assembly there is NO scenario in my opinion where there is a justification for suspending a student for three days. That does not mean that they did not act inappropriately. However I do find it interesting that absolutely no specifics were provided by this poster about the scenario that occurred that would allow us better understand of why this teacher thinks a student should be suspended three days for giving a speech.

    “For example your article I noticed failed to mention that the student is a member of that family that sued the City of Davis for unlawful arrest of their daughter last year, I am sure you all know that story.”

    *IF* that is true, what bearing does that have on this case?

    The student’s identity was not disclosed to protect them as a minor. This teacher who has posted this information, again IF accurate, would be putting the minor in jeopardy potentially. I am not surprised that they choose to post anonymously. You will notice that I also did not identify the name of the teacher involved in order to protect his or her identity as well.

    “I became a teacher because I love kids and strive to make a difference each day that I enter the classroom. I think we all become teachers because of our true caring and love for kids.”

    I’m sure all teachers do. I come a family of teachers. I do not believe any of my family would have taken down a Malcolm X poster with his most famous phrase “by any means necessary” calling it a terrorist statement. I also doubt that they would want any part of suspending a student for what occurred at an assembly putting his future academic career in jeopardy.

    I assume that you say this because you are in fact the teacher involved. I’m sorry to hear that, but nothing you have said changes my mind on the handling of this case and I again I make no claims as to whether the student was right or wrong only that the punishment seems heavy-handed at best.

  57. Anonymous

    “For example your article I noticed failed to mention that the student is a member of that family that sued the City of Davis for unlawful arrest of their daughter last year, I am sure you all know that story.”

    *IF* that is true, what bearing does that have on this case?

    Actually the comment does have bearing – it indicates that the writer had formed a negative opinion about the family and the student. It makes me wonder if the punishment was related to the earlier case.

    Since the speech seems to be the reason the student was suspended, I would like to hear what was said. I assume there were quite a few people at the speech and could relay the information. It would be educational to know what words led to the suspension – if for no other reason, just to prevent others from making the same mistake.

    One thing that troubles me about Davis is that people overract to people’s comments. In the politically correct world of Davis it is far to easy to hurt a person’s feelings by making an insensitive comment. Davis should be open to free speech, but it isn’t. SAH

  58. Anonymous

    “For example your article I noticed failed to mention that the student is a member of that family that sued the City of Davis for unlawful arrest of their daughter last year, I am sure you all know that story.”

    *IF* that is true, what bearing does that have on this case?

    Actually the comment does have bearing – it indicates that the writer had formed a negative opinion about the family and the student. It makes me wonder if the punishment was related to the earlier case.

    Since the speech seems to be the reason the student was suspended, I would like to hear what was said. I assume there were quite a few people at the speech and could relay the information. It would be educational to know what words led to the suspension – if for no other reason, just to prevent others from making the same mistake.

    One thing that troubles me about Davis is that people overract to people’s comments. In the politically correct world of Davis it is far to easy to hurt a person’s feelings by making an insensitive comment. Davis should be open to free speech, but it isn’t. SAH

  59. Anonymous

    “For example your article I noticed failed to mention that the student is a member of that family that sued the City of Davis for unlawful arrest of their daughter last year, I am sure you all know that story.”

    *IF* that is true, what bearing does that have on this case?

    Actually the comment does have bearing – it indicates that the writer had formed a negative opinion about the family and the student. It makes me wonder if the punishment was related to the earlier case.

    Since the speech seems to be the reason the student was suspended, I would like to hear what was said. I assume there were quite a few people at the speech and could relay the information. It would be educational to know what words led to the suspension – if for no other reason, just to prevent others from making the same mistake.

    One thing that troubles me about Davis is that people overract to people’s comments. In the politically correct world of Davis it is far to easy to hurt a person’s feelings by making an insensitive comment. Davis should be open to free speech, but it isn’t. SAH

  60. Anonymous

    “For example your article I noticed failed to mention that the student is a member of that family that sued the City of Davis for unlawful arrest of their daughter last year, I am sure you all know that story.”

    *IF* that is true, what bearing does that have on this case?

    Actually the comment does have bearing – it indicates that the writer had formed a negative opinion about the family and the student. It makes me wonder if the punishment was related to the earlier case.

    Since the speech seems to be the reason the student was suspended, I would like to hear what was said. I assume there were quite a few people at the speech and could relay the information. It would be educational to know what words led to the suspension – if for no other reason, just to prevent others from making the same mistake.

    One thing that troubles me about Davis is that people overract to people’s comments. In the politically correct world of Davis it is far to easy to hurt a person’s feelings by making an insensitive comment. Davis should be open to free speech, but it isn’t. SAH

  61. Anonymous

    My very limited knowledge of the Koran is that it DEMANDS of its believers that they resist and speak out against injustice in the world. This can range from actual physical resistance to a conscious “taking into one’s heart” of the injustice being done to others. The Koran does not allow for turning ones eyes and “heart” away in denial. Malcom X’s statement, following his conversion to Islam, can be seen in this context.

  62. Anonymous

    My very limited knowledge of the Koran is that it DEMANDS of its believers that they resist and speak out against injustice in the world. This can range from actual physical resistance to a conscious “taking into one’s heart” of the injustice being done to others. The Koran does not allow for turning ones eyes and “heart” away in denial. Malcom X’s statement, following his conversion to Islam, can be seen in this context.

  63. Anonymous

    My very limited knowledge of the Koran is that it DEMANDS of its believers that they resist and speak out against injustice in the world. This can range from actual physical resistance to a conscious “taking into one’s heart” of the injustice being done to others. The Koran does not allow for turning ones eyes and “heart” away in denial. Malcom X’s statement, following his conversion to Islam, can be seen in this context.

  64. Anonymous

    My very limited knowledge of the Koran is that it DEMANDS of its believers that they resist and speak out against injustice in the world. This can range from actual physical resistance to a conscious “taking into one’s heart” of the injustice being done to others. The Koran does not allow for turning ones eyes and “heart” away in denial. Malcom X’s statement, following his conversion to Islam, can be seen in this context.

  65. Doug Paul Davis

    “Actually the comment does have bearing – it indicates that the writer had formed a negative opinion about the family and the student.”

    That is a good point. If what is being said is accurate, and that is indeed a teacher, and as I currently suspect it is the teacher, then I would suggest that in trying to defend his or her self, they may have convicted his or her self because they demonstrate that the above issue is relevant.

  66. Doug Paul Davis

    “Actually the comment does have bearing – it indicates that the writer had formed a negative opinion about the family and the student.”

    That is a good point. If what is being said is accurate, and that is indeed a teacher, and as I currently suspect it is the teacher, then I would suggest that in trying to defend his or her self, they may have convicted his or her self because they demonstrate that the above issue is relevant.

  67. Doug Paul Davis

    “Actually the comment does have bearing – it indicates that the writer had formed a negative opinion about the family and the student.”

    That is a good point. If what is being said is accurate, and that is indeed a teacher, and as I currently suspect it is the teacher, then I would suggest that in trying to defend his or her self, they may have convicted his or her self because they demonstrate that the above issue is relevant.

  68. Doug Paul Davis

    “Actually the comment does have bearing – it indicates that the writer had formed a negative opinion about the family and the student.”

    That is a good point. If what is being said is accurate, and that is indeed a teacher, and as I currently suspect it is the teacher, then I would suggest that in trying to defend his or her self, they may have convicted his or her self because they demonstrate that the above issue is relevant.

  69. Bob Aaronson

    Heaven help me, I’m taking a risk with this comment, but I feel I have an obligation.

    Malcolm X was an amazing figure in the history of the civil rights movement. The arc of his life spanned both reprehensible things (like patently criminal acts) to selfless, inspirational and effective struggle on behalf of a profoundly disadvantaged people. He was a very complicated man who came to see the light in a genuine, profound journey that was cruelly cut short. (I’d rather be judge based on where I was headed than what towns I stopped through on my way there.)

    “Did you KNOW Malcolm?” was the theme of Ossie Davis’s funeral eulogy for him. Almost no one now really does KNOW Malcolm. In many circles, the pejorative prejudices of a culture then threatened by his comments have evolved into the ‘recalled recollections’ of much of the community.

    The same way I would advocate a more honest teaching of American history in our schools (there’s some pretty ugly stuff that happened in this country), I would advocate an honest teaching of who Malcolm X really was, what he really did and what it all means. Our collective refusal to meaningful acknowledge the terrible mistakes in our past condemns us to walk in the dark shadow of our lies and undermines our international credibility.

    Malcolm X, in my view, was quintessentially a product of our America and an accurate reflection of the injustices he grew up with and lived around. I shall always wish I had his insight, his guts and his selflessness.

  70. Bob Aaronson

    Heaven help me, I’m taking a risk with this comment, but I feel I have an obligation.

    Malcolm X was an amazing figure in the history of the civil rights movement. The arc of his life spanned both reprehensible things (like patently criminal acts) to selfless, inspirational and effective struggle on behalf of a profoundly disadvantaged people. He was a very complicated man who came to see the light in a genuine, profound journey that was cruelly cut short. (I’d rather be judge based on where I was headed than what towns I stopped through on my way there.)

    “Did you KNOW Malcolm?” was the theme of Ossie Davis’s funeral eulogy for him. Almost no one now really does KNOW Malcolm. In many circles, the pejorative prejudices of a culture then threatened by his comments have evolved into the ‘recalled recollections’ of much of the community.

    The same way I would advocate a more honest teaching of American history in our schools (there’s some pretty ugly stuff that happened in this country), I would advocate an honest teaching of who Malcolm X really was, what he really did and what it all means. Our collective refusal to meaningful acknowledge the terrible mistakes in our past condemns us to walk in the dark shadow of our lies and undermines our international credibility.

    Malcolm X, in my view, was quintessentially a product of our America and an accurate reflection of the injustices he grew up with and lived around. I shall always wish I had his insight, his guts and his selflessness.

  71. Bob Aaronson

    Heaven help me, I’m taking a risk with this comment, but I feel I have an obligation.

    Malcolm X was an amazing figure in the history of the civil rights movement. The arc of his life spanned both reprehensible things (like patently criminal acts) to selfless, inspirational and effective struggle on behalf of a profoundly disadvantaged people. He was a very complicated man who came to see the light in a genuine, profound journey that was cruelly cut short. (I’d rather be judge based on where I was headed than what towns I stopped through on my way there.)

    “Did you KNOW Malcolm?” was the theme of Ossie Davis’s funeral eulogy for him. Almost no one now really does KNOW Malcolm. In many circles, the pejorative prejudices of a culture then threatened by his comments have evolved into the ‘recalled recollections’ of much of the community.

    The same way I would advocate a more honest teaching of American history in our schools (there’s some pretty ugly stuff that happened in this country), I would advocate an honest teaching of who Malcolm X really was, what he really did and what it all means. Our collective refusal to meaningful acknowledge the terrible mistakes in our past condemns us to walk in the dark shadow of our lies and undermines our international credibility.

    Malcolm X, in my view, was quintessentially a product of our America and an accurate reflection of the injustices he grew up with and lived around. I shall always wish I had his insight, his guts and his selflessness.

  72. Bob Aaronson

    Heaven help me, I’m taking a risk with this comment, but I feel I have an obligation.

    Malcolm X was an amazing figure in the history of the civil rights movement. The arc of his life spanned both reprehensible things (like patently criminal acts) to selfless, inspirational and effective struggle on behalf of a profoundly disadvantaged people. He was a very complicated man who came to see the light in a genuine, profound journey that was cruelly cut short. (I’d rather be judge based on where I was headed than what towns I stopped through on my way there.)

    “Did you KNOW Malcolm?” was the theme of Ossie Davis’s funeral eulogy for him. Almost no one now really does KNOW Malcolm. In many circles, the pejorative prejudices of a culture then threatened by his comments have evolved into the ‘recalled recollections’ of much of the community.

    The same way I would advocate a more honest teaching of American history in our schools (there’s some pretty ugly stuff that happened in this country), I would advocate an honest teaching of who Malcolm X really was, what he really did and what it all means. Our collective refusal to meaningful acknowledge the terrible mistakes in our past condemns us to walk in the dark shadow of our lies and undermines our international credibility.

    Malcolm X, in my view, was quintessentially a product of our America and an accurate reflection of the injustices he grew up with and lived around. I shall always wish I had his insight, his guts and his selflessness.

  73. Rich Rifkin

    “for example, if someone had put up a poster of Thomas Jefferson, would it have been torn down by a teacher, with someone, like Rich here, offering the explanation that Jefferson is a controversial figure because he owned slaves?”

    Thomas Jefferson should not only be viewed as controversial from our perspective 200-plus years later. He should be understood as someone who was extremely controversial in his own times. He was the most extreme partisan of his day; and there was seemingly no end to his hatred for his enemies, most notably John Marshall and Alexander Hamilton.

    So yes, absolutely, any teaching of Jefferson should be include the fact that he was far from a saint and that he was highly controversial. It should also be noted that in almost every controversy of his day, Jefferson’s side of the argument failed the test of history, whereas Hamilton (while personally a questionable man, even in his own times) came out on top.

    “Unless you were there and heard the remarks you are in no position to be passing judgment. You should get both sides of the story before publishing such an article. I think that is appropriate to remind the readers of this blog to take this into consideration before jumping to uniformed decisions and judgments.”

    I cannot understand why this is a controversial statement by the DHS teacher. Just about everyone on this blog ASSUMES he/she knows enough about this case to pass judgment on the suspension. It very well may be wholly inappropriate and wrong. But as far as I can tell, no one here knows just what the suspension was all about. I would not trust that David Greenwald has told the full story. Per usual, he has just inflamed one side using the few facts that were leaked to him.

    “suspending a student for quoting malcolm x or standing up for their own intellectual freedom is 180 degrees from what a reasonable educational system ought to be doing.”

    True enough. However, how do you know that is what happened here? Is it not possible that the suspension was for other (probably related) actions?

    “He was a very complicated man who came to see the light in a genuine, profound journey that was cruelly cut short. (I’d rather be judge based on where I was headed than what towns I stopped through on my way there.)”

    Again, it bears repeating that Malcolm X — who, if he is to be praised at all, should be referred to in praise as El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, the name he chose after he left the Nation of Islam — was a highly controversial leader of a hate group up until one year before he was murdered, likely by that same hate group.

    It is, of course, not the case that while he was in the Nation of Islam that everything he did and said was bad or unreasonable. The guy was very smart and articulate and spoke effectively about the mistreatment of blacks in America and had a large following for doing so. But in my mind, that doesn’t come close to excusing the evils of his group and what it stood for. He was clearly a racist and an anti-Semite for almost all of his public life. That deserves severe rebuke and condemnation, in any mention of Malcolm X or of his group.

    And while it is true that he changed his views and ultimately renounced the Nation of Islam, its racism and anti-Semitism and other contradictions of its leaders before he died, it’s wrong to ignore what he stood for and promoted for so long, prior to his trip to Mecca. After all, no one views Gov. George Wallace as a saintly or even respectable man, because Gov. Wallace changed his views on race and segregation in the later years of his life. When most people think of George Wallace, they think of him as the governor of Alabama who was a hard-line segregationist, who drew his support from the Ku Klux Klan, and who said these infamous words: “In the name of the greatest people that have ever trod this earth, I draw the line in the dust and toss the gauntlet before the feet of tyranny . . . and I say . . . segregation today . . . segregation tomorrow . . . segregation forever.”

  74. Rich Rifkin

    “for example, if someone had put up a poster of Thomas Jefferson, would it have been torn down by a teacher, with someone, like Rich here, offering the explanation that Jefferson is a controversial figure because he owned slaves?”

    Thomas Jefferson should not only be viewed as controversial from our perspective 200-plus years later. He should be understood as someone who was extremely controversial in his own times. He was the most extreme partisan of his day; and there was seemingly no end to his hatred for his enemies, most notably John Marshall and Alexander Hamilton.

    So yes, absolutely, any teaching of Jefferson should be include the fact that he was far from a saint and that he was highly controversial. It should also be noted that in almost every controversy of his day, Jefferson’s side of the argument failed the test of history, whereas Hamilton (while personally a questionable man, even in his own times) came out on top.

    “Unless you were there and heard the remarks you are in no position to be passing judgment. You should get both sides of the story before publishing such an article. I think that is appropriate to remind the readers of this blog to take this into consideration before jumping to uniformed decisions and judgments.”

    I cannot understand why this is a controversial statement by the DHS teacher. Just about everyone on this blog ASSUMES he/she knows enough about this case to pass judgment on the suspension. It very well may be wholly inappropriate and wrong. But as far as I can tell, no one here knows just what the suspension was all about. I would not trust that David Greenwald has told the full story. Per usual, he has just inflamed one side using the few facts that were leaked to him.

    “suspending a student for quoting malcolm x or standing up for their own intellectual freedom is 180 degrees from what a reasonable educational system ought to be doing.”

    True enough. However, how do you know that is what happened here? Is it not possible that the suspension was for other (probably related) actions?

    “He was a very complicated man who came to see the light in a genuine, profound journey that was cruelly cut short. (I’d rather be judge based on where I was headed than what towns I stopped through on my way there.)”

    Again, it bears repeating that Malcolm X — who, if he is to be praised at all, should be referred to in praise as El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, the name he chose after he left the Nation of Islam — was a highly controversial leader of a hate group up until one year before he was murdered, likely by that same hate group.

    It is, of course, not the case that while he was in the Nation of Islam that everything he did and said was bad or unreasonable. The guy was very smart and articulate and spoke effectively about the mistreatment of blacks in America and had a large following for doing so. But in my mind, that doesn’t come close to excusing the evils of his group and what it stood for. He was clearly a racist and an anti-Semite for almost all of his public life. That deserves severe rebuke and condemnation, in any mention of Malcolm X or of his group.

    And while it is true that he changed his views and ultimately renounced the Nation of Islam, its racism and anti-Semitism and other contradictions of its leaders before he died, it’s wrong to ignore what he stood for and promoted for so long, prior to his trip to Mecca. After all, no one views Gov. George Wallace as a saintly or even respectable man, because Gov. Wallace changed his views on race and segregation in the later years of his life. When most people think of George Wallace, they think of him as the governor of Alabama who was a hard-line segregationist, who drew his support from the Ku Klux Klan, and who said these infamous words: “In the name of the greatest people that have ever trod this earth, I draw the line in the dust and toss the gauntlet before the feet of tyranny . . . and I say . . . segregation today . . . segregation tomorrow . . . segregation forever.”

  75. Rich Rifkin

    “for example, if someone had put up a poster of Thomas Jefferson, would it have been torn down by a teacher, with someone, like Rich here, offering the explanation that Jefferson is a controversial figure because he owned slaves?”

    Thomas Jefferson should not only be viewed as controversial from our perspective 200-plus years later. He should be understood as someone who was extremely controversial in his own times. He was the most extreme partisan of his day; and there was seemingly no end to his hatred for his enemies, most notably John Marshall and Alexander Hamilton.

    So yes, absolutely, any teaching of Jefferson should be include the fact that he was far from a saint and that he was highly controversial. It should also be noted that in almost every controversy of his day, Jefferson’s side of the argument failed the test of history, whereas Hamilton (while personally a questionable man, even in his own times) came out on top.

    “Unless you were there and heard the remarks you are in no position to be passing judgment. You should get both sides of the story before publishing such an article. I think that is appropriate to remind the readers of this blog to take this into consideration before jumping to uniformed decisions and judgments.”

    I cannot understand why this is a controversial statement by the DHS teacher. Just about everyone on this blog ASSUMES he/she knows enough about this case to pass judgment on the suspension. It very well may be wholly inappropriate and wrong. But as far as I can tell, no one here knows just what the suspension was all about. I would not trust that David Greenwald has told the full story. Per usual, he has just inflamed one side using the few facts that were leaked to him.

    “suspending a student for quoting malcolm x or standing up for their own intellectual freedom is 180 degrees from what a reasonable educational system ought to be doing.”

    True enough. However, how do you know that is what happened here? Is it not possible that the suspension was for other (probably related) actions?

    “He was a very complicated man who came to see the light in a genuine, profound journey that was cruelly cut short. (I’d rather be judge based on where I was headed than what towns I stopped through on my way there.)”

    Again, it bears repeating that Malcolm X — who, if he is to be praised at all, should be referred to in praise as El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, the name he chose after he left the Nation of Islam — was a highly controversial leader of a hate group up until one year before he was murdered, likely by that same hate group.

    It is, of course, not the case that while he was in the Nation of Islam that everything he did and said was bad or unreasonable. The guy was very smart and articulate and spoke effectively about the mistreatment of blacks in America and had a large following for doing so. But in my mind, that doesn’t come close to excusing the evils of his group and what it stood for. He was clearly a racist and an anti-Semite for almost all of his public life. That deserves severe rebuke and condemnation, in any mention of Malcolm X or of his group.

    And while it is true that he changed his views and ultimately renounced the Nation of Islam, its racism and anti-Semitism and other contradictions of its leaders before he died, it’s wrong to ignore what he stood for and promoted for so long, prior to his trip to Mecca. After all, no one views Gov. George Wallace as a saintly or even respectable man, because Gov. Wallace changed his views on race and segregation in the later years of his life. When most people think of George Wallace, they think of him as the governor of Alabama who was a hard-line segregationist, who drew his support from the Ku Klux Klan, and who said these infamous words: “In the name of the greatest people that have ever trod this earth, I draw the line in the dust and toss the gauntlet before the feet of tyranny . . . and I say . . . segregation today . . . segregation tomorrow . . . segregation forever.”

  76. Rich Rifkin

    “for example, if someone had put up a poster of Thomas Jefferson, would it have been torn down by a teacher, with someone, like Rich here, offering the explanation that Jefferson is a controversial figure because he owned slaves?”

    Thomas Jefferson should not only be viewed as controversial from our perspective 200-plus years later. He should be understood as someone who was extremely controversial in his own times. He was the most extreme partisan of his day; and there was seemingly no end to his hatred for his enemies, most notably John Marshall and Alexander Hamilton.

    So yes, absolutely, any teaching of Jefferson should be include the fact that he was far from a saint and that he was highly controversial. It should also be noted that in almost every controversy of his day, Jefferson’s side of the argument failed the test of history, whereas Hamilton (while personally a questionable man, even in his own times) came out on top.

    “Unless you were there and heard the remarks you are in no position to be passing judgment. You should get both sides of the story before publishing such an article. I think that is appropriate to remind the readers of this blog to take this into consideration before jumping to uniformed decisions and judgments.”

    I cannot understand why this is a controversial statement by the DHS teacher. Just about everyone on this blog ASSUMES he/she knows enough about this case to pass judgment on the suspension. It very well may be wholly inappropriate and wrong. But as far as I can tell, no one here knows just what the suspension was all about. I would not trust that David Greenwald has told the full story. Per usual, he has just inflamed one side using the few facts that were leaked to him.

    “suspending a student for quoting malcolm x or standing up for their own intellectual freedom is 180 degrees from what a reasonable educational system ought to be doing.”

    True enough. However, how do you know that is what happened here? Is it not possible that the suspension was for other (probably related) actions?

    “He was a very complicated man who came to see the light in a genuine, profound journey that was cruelly cut short. (I’d rather be judge based on where I was headed than what towns I stopped through on my way there.)”

    Again, it bears repeating that Malcolm X — who, if he is to be praised at all, should be referred to in praise as El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, the name he chose after he left the Nation of Islam — was a highly controversial leader of a hate group up until one year before he was murdered, likely by that same hate group.

    It is, of course, not the case that while he was in the Nation of Islam that everything he did and said was bad or unreasonable. The guy was very smart and articulate and spoke effectively about the mistreatment of blacks in America and had a large following for doing so. But in my mind, that doesn’t come close to excusing the evils of his group and what it stood for. He was clearly a racist and an anti-Semite for almost all of his public life. That deserves severe rebuke and condemnation, in any mention of Malcolm X or of his group.

    And while it is true that he changed his views and ultimately renounced the Nation of Islam, its racism and anti-Semitism and other contradictions of its leaders before he died, it’s wrong to ignore what he stood for and promoted for so long, prior to his trip to Mecca. After all, no one views Gov. George Wallace as a saintly or even respectable man, because Gov. Wallace changed his views on race and segregation in the later years of his life. When most people think of George Wallace, they think of him as the governor of Alabama who was a hard-line segregationist, who drew his support from the Ku Klux Klan, and who said these infamous words: “In the name of the greatest people that have ever trod this earth, I draw the line in the dust and toss the gauntlet before the feet of tyranny . . . and I say . . . segregation today . . . segregation tomorrow . . . segregation forever.”

  77. Vincente

    < "Unless you were there and heard the remarks you are in no position to be passing judgment. You should get both sides of the story before publishing such an article. I think that is appropriate to remind the readers of this blog to take this into consideration before jumping to uniformed decisions and judgments." I cannot understand why this is a controversial statement by the DHS teacher. >

    As far as I can tell this is the not part of the statement that was controversial, it is what the teacher said next that was.

  78. Vincente

    < "Unless you were there and heard the remarks you are in no position to be passing judgment. You should get both sides of the story before publishing such an article. I think that is appropriate to remind the readers of this blog to take this into consideration before jumping to uniformed decisions and judgments." I cannot understand why this is a controversial statement by the DHS teacher. >

    As far as I can tell this is the not part of the statement that was controversial, it is what the teacher said next that was.

  79. Vincente

    < "Unless you were there and heard the remarks you are in no position to be passing judgment. You should get both sides of the story before publishing such an article. I think that is appropriate to remind the readers of this blog to take this into consideration before jumping to uniformed decisions and judgments." I cannot understand why this is a controversial statement by the DHS teacher. >

    As far as I can tell this is the not part of the statement that was controversial, it is what the teacher said next that was.

  80. Vincente

    < "Unless you were there and heard the remarks you are in no position to be passing judgment. You should get both sides of the story before publishing such an article. I think that is appropriate to remind the readers of this blog to take this into consideration before jumping to uniformed decisions and judgments." I cannot understand why this is a controversial statement by the DHS teacher. >

    As far as I can tell this is the not part of the statement that was controversial, it is what the teacher said next that was.

  81. Anonymous

    Let me get this straight:

    A DHS student is invited to bring a poster to his class and does so. The student brings in a Malcolm X poster which is hung up in the classroom with his teacher’s approval. But by the next day the teacher is having second thoughts, removes the poster and asserts publicly to the class that the Malcolm X poster the student brought in represents terrorism.

    Next the same DHS student is invited to give a talk at a school assembly during the high school’s Human Relations Week and he does so. His speech is pre-approved by school administrators.

    The context of the student’s speech addresses his own experience and feelings about being the victim of discrimination based upon his political views as well as possibly his ethnicity and religion that he experienced at school and at the hands of his teacher.

    After delivering the speech, he is suspended for three days by the high school’s administration.

    What is going on here?

    Short of anyone truly threatening someone (either physically or verbally) or in some real way jeopardizing the function of the school, should not all topics and viewpoints be open for discussion and argument? Is that not what schools should in part be doing: i.e. creating critical thinkers who challenge one another’ beliefs and points of view?

  82. Anonymous

    Let me get this straight:

    A DHS student is invited to bring a poster to his class and does so. The student brings in a Malcolm X poster which is hung up in the classroom with his teacher’s approval. But by the next day the teacher is having second thoughts, removes the poster and asserts publicly to the class that the Malcolm X poster the student brought in represents terrorism.

    Next the same DHS student is invited to give a talk at a school assembly during the high school’s Human Relations Week and he does so. His speech is pre-approved by school administrators.

    The context of the student’s speech addresses his own experience and feelings about being the victim of discrimination based upon his political views as well as possibly his ethnicity and religion that he experienced at school and at the hands of his teacher.

    After delivering the speech, he is suspended for three days by the high school’s administration.

    What is going on here?

    Short of anyone truly threatening someone (either physically or verbally) or in some real way jeopardizing the function of the school, should not all topics and viewpoints be open for discussion and argument? Is that not what schools should in part be doing: i.e. creating critical thinkers who challenge one another’ beliefs and points of view?

  83. Anonymous

    Let me get this straight:

    A DHS student is invited to bring a poster to his class and does so. The student brings in a Malcolm X poster which is hung up in the classroom with his teacher’s approval. But by the next day the teacher is having second thoughts, removes the poster and asserts publicly to the class that the Malcolm X poster the student brought in represents terrorism.

    Next the same DHS student is invited to give a talk at a school assembly during the high school’s Human Relations Week and he does so. His speech is pre-approved by school administrators.

    The context of the student’s speech addresses his own experience and feelings about being the victim of discrimination based upon his political views as well as possibly his ethnicity and religion that he experienced at school and at the hands of his teacher.

    After delivering the speech, he is suspended for three days by the high school’s administration.

    What is going on here?

    Short of anyone truly threatening someone (either physically or verbally) or in some real way jeopardizing the function of the school, should not all topics and viewpoints be open for discussion and argument? Is that not what schools should in part be doing: i.e. creating critical thinkers who challenge one another’ beliefs and points of view?

  84. Anonymous

    Let me get this straight:

    A DHS student is invited to bring a poster to his class and does so. The student brings in a Malcolm X poster which is hung up in the classroom with his teacher’s approval. But by the next day the teacher is having second thoughts, removes the poster and asserts publicly to the class that the Malcolm X poster the student brought in represents terrorism.

    Next the same DHS student is invited to give a talk at a school assembly during the high school’s Human Relations Week and he does so. His speech is pre-approved by school administrators.

    The context of the student’s speech addresses his own experience and feelings about being the victim of discrimination based upon his political views as well as possibly his ethnicity and religion that he experienced at school and at the hands of his teacher.

    After delivering the speech, he is suspended for three days by the high school’s administration.

    What is going on here?

    Short of anyone truly threatening someone (either physically or verbally) or in some real way jeopardizing the function of the school, should not all topics and viewpoints be open for discussion and argument? Is that not what schools should in part be doing: i.e. creating critical thinkers who challenge one another’ beliefs and points of view?

  85. Anonymous

    To the last Anonymous Commenter listed at 12:44: Your rendition of the facts is correct as I understand them. I have a daughter at DHS and I’ve spoken to the father of the suspended student. Breaking the story down to this elementary form exposes the absurdity of the situation. I couldn’t agree more with your conclusion.

    I think that the core issue here goes back to the Wheels of Justice incident at DHS years ago and the issues involving censorship, controversial issues, and the rights of students to academic freedom. Davis has attempted desperately to silence any form of descent. The Human Relations Commission was silenced and eventually gutted by the City Council for attempting to open a public discourse. I commend this blog for providing some small measure of the transparency Davis lacks.

  86. Anonymous

    To the last Anonymous Commenter listed at 12:44: Your rendition of the facts is correct as I understand them. I have a daughter at DHS and I’ve spoken to the father of the suspended student. Breaking the story down to this elementary form exposes the absurdity of the situation. I couldn’t agree more with your conclusion.

    I think that the core issue here goes back to the Wheels of Justice incident at DHS years ago and the issues involving censorship, controversial issues, and the rights of students to academic freedom. Davis has attempted desperately to silence any form of descent. The Human Relations Commission was silenced and eventually gutted by the City Council for attempting to open a public discourse. I commend this blog for providing some small measure of the transparency Davis lacks.

  87. Anonymous

    To the last Anonymous Commenter listed at 12:44: Your rendition of the facts is correct as I understand them. I have a daughter at DHS and I’ve spoken to the father of the suspended student. Breaking the story down to this elementary form exposes the absurdity of the situation. I couldn’t agree more with your conclusion.

    I think that the core issue here goes back to the Wheels of Justice incident at DHS years ago and the issues involving censorship, controversial issues, and the rights of students to academic freedom. Davis has attempted desperately to silence any form of descent. The Human Relations Commission was silenced and eventually gutted by the City Council for attempting to open a public discourse. I commend this blog for providing some small measure of the transparency Davis lacks.

  88. Anonymous

    To the last Anonymous Commenter listed at 12:44: Your rendition of the facts is correct as I understand them. I have a daughter at DHS and I’ve spoken to the father of the suspended student. Breaking the story down to this elementary form exposes the absurdity of the situation. I couldn’t agree more with your conclusion.

    I think that the core issue here goes back to the Wheels of Justice incident at DHS years ago and the issues involving censorship, controversial issues, and the rights of students to academic freedom. Davis has attempted desperately to silence any form of descent. The Human Relations Commission was silenced and eventually gutted by the City Council for attempting to open a public discourse. I commend this blog for providing some small measure of the transparency Davis lacks.

  89. Anonymous

    IT WOULD BE EASIER TO SEE ALL POINTS IF THE TEACHER IDENTIFIED HIM/HERSELF, MADE CHARGES AND THERE WAS SOME KIND OF DUE PROCESS PRIOR TO SUSPENSION. WHEN THE FACTS ARE KEPT SECRET WE ARE LEFT TO OUR OWN EDUCATED AND EXPERIENTIAL SPECULATIONS. THE CASE INVOLVING THE SISTER IS, FRANKLY, NONE OF THE TEACHER’S BUSINESS, BUT HE/SHE MADE IT HER BUSINESS. BLATANT GUILT BY ASSOCIATION. IF THIS IS A SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHER IT DOES NOT DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF JUSTICE OR HISTORY. LOVING KIDS ISN’T ENOUGH, WHAT ABOUT THIS KID? WHERE DOES THE LOVE COME THROUGH ALONG WITH AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE FIRST AMENDMENT? THE DEFENSE AS TO WHY HE/SHE BECAME A TEACHER SEEMS RIDICULOUS – WHO IS ON TRIAL HERE? WOULDN’T LIKE TO KNOW THAT OUR SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHERS HAVE SOME DEPTH OF UNDERSTANDING OF THE CONSTITUTION, HISTORY AND THE WAY POLITICS WORKS? MR. OR MS. ANONYMOUS MISS THE MARK. VERY REVEALING.

  90. Anonymous

    IT WOULD BE EASIER TO SEE ALL POINTS IF THE TEACHER IDENTIFIED HIM/HERSELF, MADE CHARGES AND THERE WAS SOME KIND OF DUE PROCESS PRIOR TO SUSPENSION. WHEN THE FACTS ARE KEPT SECRET WE ARE LEFT TO OUR OWN EDUCATED AND EXPERIENTIAL SPECULATIONS. THE CASE INVOLVING THE SISTER IS, FRANKLY, NONE OF THE TEACHER’S BUSINESS, BUT HE/SHE MADE IT HER BUSINESS. BLATANT GUILT BY ASSOCIATION. IF THIS IS A SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHER IT DOES NOT DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF JUSTICE OR HISTORY. LOVING KIDS ISN’T ENOUGH, WHAT ABOUT THIS KID? WHERE DOES THE LOVE COME THROUGH ALONG WITH AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE FIRST AMENDMENT? THE DEFENSE AS TO WHY HE/SHE BECAME A TEACHER SEEMS RIDICULOUS – WHO IS ON TRIAL HERE? WOULDN’T LIKE TO KNOW THAT OUR SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHERS HAVE SOME DEPTH OF UNDERSTANDING OF THE CONSTITUTION, HISTORY AND THE WAY POLITICS WORKS? MR. OR MS. ANONYMOUS MISS THE MARK. VERY REVEALING.

  91. Anonymous

    IT WOULD BE EASIER TO SEE ALL POINTS IF THE TEACHER IDENTIFIED HIM/HERSELF, MADE CHARGES AND THERE WAS SOME KIND OF DUE PROCESS PRIOR TO SUSPENSION. WHEN THE FACTS ARE KEPT SECRET WE ARE LEFT TO OUR OWN EDUCATED AND EXPERIENTIAL SPECULATIONS. THE CASE INVOLVING THE SISTER IS, FRANKLY, NONE OF THE TEACHER’S BUSINESS, BUT HE/SHE MADE IT HER BUSINESS. BLATANT GUILT BY ASSOCIATION. IF THIS IS A SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHER IT DOES NOT DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF JUSTICE OR HISTORY. LOVING KIDS ISN’T ENOUGH, WHAT ABOUT THIS KID? WHERE DOES THE LOVE COME THROUGH ALONG WITH AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE FIRST AMENDMENT? THE DEFENSE AS TO WHY HE/SHE BECAME A TEACHER SEEMS RIDICULOUS – WHO IS ON TRIAL HERE? WOULDN’T LIKE TO KNOW THAT OUR SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHERS HAVE SOME DEPTH OF UNDERSTANDING OF THE CONSTITUTION, HISTORY AND THE WAY POLITICS WORKS? MR. OR MS. ANONYMOUS MISS THE MARK. VERY REVEALING.

  92. Anonymous

    IT WOULD BE EASIER TO SEE ALL POINTS IF THE TEACHER IDENTIFIED HIM/HERSELF, MADE CHARGES AND THERE WAS SOME KIND OF DUE PROCESS PRIOR TO SUSPENSION. WHEN THE FACTS ARE KEPT SECRET WE ARE LEFT TO OUR OWN EDUCATED AND EXPERIENTIAL SPECULATIONS. THE CASE INVOLVING THE SISTER IS, FRANKLY, NONE OF THE TEACHER’S BUSINESS, BUT HE/SHE MADE IT HER BUSINESS. BLATANT GUILT BY ASSOCIATION. IF THIS IS A SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHER IT DOES NOT DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF JUSTICE OR HISTORY. LOVING KIDS ISN’T ENOUGH, WHAT ABOUT THIS KID? WHERE DOES THE LOVE COME THROUGH ALONG WITH AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE FIRST AMENDMENT? THE DEFENSE AS TO WHY HE/SHE BECAME A TEACHER SEEMS RIDICULOUS – WHO IS ON TRIAL HERE? WOULDN’T LIKE TO KNOW THAT OUR SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHERS HAVE SOME DEPTH OF UNDERSTANDING OF THE CONSTITUTION, HISTORY AND THE WAY POLITICS WORKS? MR. OR MS. ANONYMOUS MISS THE MARK. VERY REVEALING.

  93. Rich Rifkin

    While I concede that I don’t know any specifics about this case other than what has been reported on this blog, I do know Principal Mike Cawley a bit. And from what I know of him, he seems like a very decent, honorable man. It seems highly unlikely that he would suspend or punish any student for simply doing what has been described here:

    A DHS student is invited to bring a poster to his class and does so. The student brings in a Malcolm X poster which is hung up in the classroom with his teacher’s approval. … Next the same DHS student is invited to give a talk at a school assembly during the high school’s Human Relations Week and he does so. His speech is pre-approved by school administrators…. After delivering the speech, he is suspended for three days by the high school’s administration.

    It’s entirely possible that there is much more to this story that we do not know. I for one am willing to wait for an airing of the facts before I find one party guilty or innocent.

    I’m surprised that so many bloggers here are so quick to assume that an injustice has taken place, when they (I assume) know only one part of one side of the story.

    Again, I am not saying that an injustice has not taken place. It might have. But I don’t understand the need to castigate the town of Davis:

    “Davis has attempted desperately to silence any form of descent.”

    And “Davis seems destined to be a place that will always have a major problem with black people, especially assertive black males.”

    — to castigate the decision of the school administration:

    “Suspension is only to be used after other forms of discipline are used and found to be ineffective. Three days suspension?”

    — and to invite in lawyers:

    “I think a good demand letter from an attorney is in order, a letter demanding that their child be placed back in school immediately, a public letter of apology from the District and the teacher, with immediate legal action to follow.

    The frothing at the mouths to seek vengeance for this perceived injustice is a rush to judgment. My advice is you wait for all of the facts before you start throwing stones.

  94. Rich Rifkin

    While I concede that I don’t know any specifics about this case other than what has been reported on this blog, I do know Principal Mike Cawley a bit. And from what I know of him, he seems like a very decent, honorable man. It seems highly unlikely that he would suspend or punish any student for simply doing what has been described here:

    A DHS student is invited to bring a poster to his class and does so. The student brings in a Malcolm X poster which is hung up in the classroom with his teacher’s approval. … Next the same DHS student is invited to give a talk at a school assembly during the high school’s Human Relations Week and he does so. His speech is pre-approved by school administrators…. After delivering the speech, he is suspended for three days by the high school’s administration.

    It’s entirely possible that there is much more to this story that we do not know. I for one am willing to wait for an airing of the facts before I find one party guilty or innocent.

    I’m surprised that so many bloggers here are so quick to assume that an injustice has taken place, when they (I assume) know only one part of one side of the story.

    Again, I am not saying that an injustice has not taken place. It might have. But I don’t understand the need to castigate the town of Davis:

    “Davis has attempted desperately to silence any form of descent.”

    And “Davis seems destined to be a place that will always have a major problem with black people, especially assertive black males.”

    — to castigate the decision of the school administration:

    “Suspension is only to be used after other forms of discipline are used and found to be ineffective. Three days suspension?”

    — and to invite in lawyers:

    “I think a good demand letter from an attorney is in order, a letter demanding that their child be placed back in school immediately, a public letter of apology from the District and the teacher, with immediate legal action to follow.

    The frothing at the mouths to seek vengeance for this perceived injustice is a rush to judgment. My advice is you wait for all of the facts before you start throwing stones.

  95. Rich Rifkin

    While I concede that I don’t know any specifics about this case other than what has been reported on this blog, I do know Principal Mike Cawley a bit. And from what I know of him, he seems like a very decent, honorable man. It seems highly unlikely that he would suspend or punish any student for simply doing what has been described here:

    A DHS student is invited to bring a poster to his class and does so. The student brings in a Malcolm X poster which is hung up in the classroom with his teacher’s approval. … Next the same DHS student is invited to give a talk at a school assembly during the high school’s Human Relations Week and he does so. His speech is pre-approved by school administrators…. After delivering the speech, he is suspended for three days by the high school’s administration.

    It’s entirely possible that there is much more to this story that we do not know. I for one am willing to wait for an airing of the facts before I find one party guilty or innocent.

    I’m surprised that so many bloggers here are so quick to assume that an injustice has taken place, when they (I assume) know only one part of one side of the story.

    Again, I am not saying that an injustice has not taken place. It might have. But I don’t understand the need to castigate the town of Davis:

    “Davis has attempted desperately to silence any form of descent.”

    And “Davis seems destined to be a place that will always have a major problem with black people, especially assertive black males.”

    — to castigate the decision of the school administration:

    “Suspension is only to be used after other forms of discipline are used and found to be ineffective. Three days suspension?”

    — and to invite in lawyers:

    “I think a good demand letter from an attorney is in order, a letter demanding that their child be placed back in school immediately, a public letter of apology from the District and the teacher, with immediate legal action to follow.

    The frothing at the mouths to seek vengeance for this perceived injustice is a rush to judgment. My advice is you wait for all of the facts before you start throwing stones.

  96. Rich Rifkin

    While I concede that I don’t know any specifics about this case other than what has been reported on this blog, I do know Principal Mike Cawley a bit. And from what I know of him, he seems like a very decent, honorable man. It seems highly unlikely that he would suspend or punish any student for simply doing what has been described here:

    A DHS student is invited to bring a poster to his class and does so. The student brings in a Malcolm X poster which is hung up in the classroom with his teacher’s approval. … Next the same DHS student is invited to give a talk at a school assembly during the high school’s Human Relations Week and he does so. His speech is pre-approved by school administrators…. After delivering the speech, he is suspended for three days by the high school’s administration.

    It’s entirely possible that there is much more to this story that we do not know. I for one am willing to wait for an airing of the facts before I find one party guilty or innocent.

    I’m surprised that so many bloggers here are so quick to assume that an injustice has taken place, when they (I assume) know only one part of one side of the story.

    Again, I am not saying that an injustice has not taken place. It might have. But I don’t understand the need to castigate the town of Davis:

    “Davis has attempted desperately to silence any form of descent.”

    And “Davis seems destined to be a place that will always have a major problem with black people, especially assertive black males.”

    — to castigate the decision of the school administration:

    “Suspension is only to be used after other forms of discipline are used and found to be ineffective. Three days suspension?”

    — and to invite in lawyers:

    “I think a good demand letter from an attorney is in order, a letter demanding that their child be placed back in school immediately, a public letter of apology from the District and the teacher, with immediate legal action to follow.

    The frothing at the mouths to seek vengeance for this perceived injustice is a rush to judgment. My advice is you wait for all of the facts before you start throwing stones.

  97. tansey thomas

    Bob Aaronson, you did it. You made a fine courageous comment about Malcolm X. I am not sure but I think the City Council acknowledged Malcolm X last year for his birthday which is May 19. I believe that there is a tip to right going on in Davis schools.

  98. tansey thomas

    Bob Aaronson, you did it. You made a fine courageous comment about Malcolm X. I am not sure but I think the City Council acknowledged Malcolm X last year for his birthday which is May 19. I believe that there is a tip to right going on in Davis schools.

  99. tansey thomas

    Bob Aaronson, you did it. You made a fine courageous comment about Malcolm X. I am not sure but I think the City Council acknowledged Malcolm X last year for his birthday which is May 19. I believe that there is a tip to right going on in Davis schools.

  100. tansey thomas

    Bob Aaronson, you did it. You made a fine courageous comment about Malcolm X. I am not sure but I think the City Council acknowledged Malcolm X last year for his birthday which is May 19. I believe that there is a tip to right going on in Davis schools.

  101. DHS Teacher

    To set a little of the record straight, the teacher in question is not a member of the Social Studies Department.

    Please do not make assumptions without knowing all of the facts.

    The mistake was made by a young teacher who made an error in judgement. It was not an act of malice, but an act of ignorance. While I do not excuse ignorance in education, I wish that bloggers would resist the temptation to call for this teacher’s head.

    The true mistakes made were made by the DHS Administration in their handling of the situation. Rather than a suspension, a sit-down meeting with all parties involved could have been much more productive and useful.

    The teacher-in-question could be asked to explain her thinking in removing the poster, the student could express his thoughts and concerns, and a mediator could help both parties work through the situation. Given that the subject is out of this teacher’s expertise focus, it could be shared with her that “By any means necessary” is not a terrorist cry. She could be given more information regarding Malcolm X and his message. Similary, it could be explained to the student why using this personal example in a public speech might be hurtful and harmful to his teacher.

    Communication and dialogue, not suspension.

  102. DHS Teacher

    To set a little of the record straight, the teacher in question is not a member of the Social Studies Department.

    Please do not make assumptions without knowing all of the facts.

    The mistake was made by a young teacher who made an error in judgement. It was not an act of malice, but an act of ignorance. While I do not excuse ignorance in education, I wish that bloggers would resist the temptation to call for this teacher’s head.

    The true mistakes made were made by the DHS Administration in their handling of the situation. Rather than a suspension, a sit-down meeting with all parties involved could have been much more productive and useful.

    The teacher-in-question could be asked to explain her thinking in removing the poster, the student could express his thoughts and concerns, and a mediator could help both parties work through the situation. Given that the subject is out of this teacher’s expertise focus, it could be shared with her that “By any means necessary” is not a terrorist cry. She could be given more information regarding Malcolm X and his message. Similary, it could be explained to the student why using this personal example in a public speech might be hurtful and harmful to his teacher.

    Communication and dialogue, not suspension.

  103. DHS Teacher

    To set a little of the record straight, the teacher in question is not a member of the Social Studies Department.

    Please do not make assumptions without knowing all of the facts.

    The mistake was made by a young teacher who made an error in judgement. It was not an act of malice, but an act of ignorance. While I do not excuse ignorance in education, I wish that bloggers would resist the temptation to call for this teacher’s head.

    The true mistakes made were made by the DHS Administration in their handling of the situation. Rather than a suspension, a sit-down meeting with all parties involved could have been much more productive and useful.

    The teacher-in-question could be asked to explain her thinking in removing the poster, the student could express his thoughts and concerns, and a mediator could help both parties work through the situation. Given that the subject is out of this teacher’s expertise focus, it could be shared with her that “By any means necessary” is not a terrorist cry. She could be given more information regarding Malcolm X and his message. Similary, it could be explained to the student why using this personal example in a public speech might be hurtful and harmful to his teacher.

    Communication and dialogue, not suspension.

  104. DHS Teacher

    To set a little of the record straight, the teacher in question is not a member of the Social Studies Department.

    Please do not make assumptions without knowing all of the facts.

    The mistake was made by a young teacher who made an error in judgement. It was not an act of malice, but an act of ignorance. While I do not excuse ignorance in education, I wish that bloggers would resist the temptation to call for this teacher’s head.

    The true mistakes made were made by the DHS Administration in their handling of the situation. Rather than a suspension, a sit-down meeting with all parties involved could have been much more productive and useful.

    The teacher-in-question could be asked to explain her thinking in removing the poster, the student could express his thoughts and concerns, and a mediator could help both parties work through the situation. Given that the subject is out of this teacher’s expertise focus, it could be shared with her that “By any means necessary” is not a terrorist cry. She could be given more information regarding Malcolm X and his message. Similary, it could be explained to the student why using this personal example in a public speech might be hurtful and harmful to his teacher.

    Communication and dialogue, not suspension.

  105. Anonymous

    I’m not surprised. I attended Davis High School, and I actually dropped out because I was so upset by the dynamics there. Holmes Junior High was even worse. DHS can be a very hostile, racist school, and at least when I was there, the environment was worsened by the administration.

    It isn’t just the administration, though; whether Davis likes it or not, there is an undercurrent of racism in the town itself. A year or two ago, for example, I brought three inner-city Latina girls I was mentoring to spend a day with me in Davis. The small-town, friendly atmosphere quickly disappeared, and shopkeepers and community members alike treated us with obvious disdain.

    Sure, Davis is a progressive, inclusive town. But what if you aren’t white and well-educated?

  106. Anonymous

    I’m not surprised. I attended Davis High School, and I actually dropped out because I was so upset by the dynamics there. Holmes Junior High was even worse. DHS can be a very hostile, racist school, and at least when I was there, the environment was worsened by the administration.

    It isn’t just the administration, though; whether Davis likes it or not, there is an undercurrent of racism in the town itself. A year or two ago, for example, I brought three inner-city Latina girls I was mentoring to spend a day with me in Davis. The small-town, friendly atmosphere quickly disappeared, and shopkeepers and community members alike treated us with obvious disdain.

    Sure, Davis is a progressive, inclusive town. But what if you aren’t white and well-educated?

  107. Anonymous

    I’m not surprised. I attended Davis High School, and I actually dropped out because I was so upset by the dynamics there. Holmes Junior High was even worse. DHS can be a very hostile, racist school, and at least when I was there, the environment was worsened by the administration.

    It isn’t just the administration, though; whether Davis likes it or not, there is an undercurrent of racism in the town itself. A year or two ago, for example, I brought three inner-city Latina girls I was mentoring to spend a day with me in Davis. The small-town, friendly atmosphere quickly disappeared, and shopkeepers and community members alike treated us with obvious disdain.

    Sure, Davis is a progressive, inclusive town. But what if you aren’t white and well-educated?

  108. Anonymous

    I’m not surprised. I attended Davis High School, and I actually dropped out because I was so upset by the dynamics there. Holmes Junior High was even worse. DHS can be a very hostile, racist school, and at least when I was there, the environment was worsened by the administration.

    It isn’t just the administration, though; whether Davis likes it or not, there is an undercurrent of racism in the town itself. A year or two ago, for example, I brought three inner-city Latina girls I was mentoring to spend a day with me in Davis. The small-town, friendly atmosphere quickly disappeared, and shopkeepers and community members alike treated us with obvious disdain.

    Sure, Davis is a progressive, inclusive town. But what if you aren’t white and well-educated?

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