Davis Police Officer Arrested In Sacramento

Share:
imageCity of Davis

Davis Police Officer Antoine Feher, 26, was arrested on the evening of Friday, September 12, 2008, outside the Park Ultra Lounge Night Club in Sacramento for a violation of California Penal Code 647(F), public intoxication.

The officer on the scene described Feher in a police report as having slurred speech, being unsteady and belligerent, while having a “strong odor of alcoholic beverage on his breath.”

Officer Feher was asked numerous times to leave the premises by security guards and officers, but he refused. He remained belligerent and argumentative and was taken into custody for public intoxication. In his police report, Officer Hanks of the Sacramento Police Department described the incident. He and Sgt. Lau observed Officer Feher “arguing and being belligerent with three security guards that work for the bar.”

The security staff had asked Officer Feher to leave but he “refused to leave and stated that he wanted to talk to the police. We advised Feher that the security at the bar no longer wanted him there and that he had to leave.”

Officer Feher then purportedly told the police officers, “So this is how your (sic) are going to treat another cop.”

Officer Hanks responded “that it didn’t matter if he was a cop or not, if you are asked to leave the bar by security you have to leave.”

Sgt. Lau reportly asked Officer Feher what agency he worked for. His first response was YONET. He was asked again and responded, “BNE.”

“Feher identified himself as working for YONET. I recognized this as Yolo Narcotics Enforcement Team. I asked Feher which agency he worked for. Feher again stated, “YONET.” I said that I understood that but that YONET was a task force and which agency he actually was employed by. Feher stated that he worked for BNE (Bureau of Narcotic Enforcement, Ca DOJ).”

“It wasn’t until after S-Feher was placed under arrest that we found out that S-Feher actually worked for Davis Police Department. A Davis Police Department Identification was located in his wallet.”

A security guard for the night club also spoke to the arresting police.

The security guard reported that, “As I was walking around my post, I was grabbed by a customer who stated that there was an altercation in the patio near the entrance of Mason’s bar. I responded to the area and saw [Feher] arguing with about 5 different customers.”

He continued, “As I approached the group, all the patrons around Feher told me that he was harassing the girls in the group and would not leave them alone.”

“I asked Feher to leave. He refused and became argumentative. I was concerned that Feher may become physically violent and called for additional security staff via my radio to assist. We had about five of our interior staff escort him out. He remained argumentative and belligerent. He would refuse to leave then slowly walk toward the exit then stop and argue again.”

According to a female witness at the bar, who was there with several companions, Feher repeatedly attempted to talk to one of her companions and refused to leave her alone when requested to do so.

The witness then stated, “One of [Officer Feher’s] friends tried to get him to leave and he shoved his friend and became aggressive towards him. He tried again to talk to [her companion] and I got afraid and pushed him away from me. He pushed me back and a bunch of people stepped in. I didn’t throw a drink on him. The drink got on him when everybody stepped in. He is really drunk.”

When Officer Feher was arrested, Feher demanded that the above witness be arrested as well. The Sacramento Police reluctantly arrested her after Officer Feher filled out a citizen’s arrest.

He told the arresting officers:

“Well if that’s the game you want to play and take sides with the bar then I want to press charges… I want to press charges for 242 pc. The girl in the bar pushed me. I want her arrested.”

In his statement to the police Officer Feher said:

“I was inside the club trying to talk to girls when that girl pushed me with both hands in my chest area then threw a beer on me. I demand that she be arrested for 242PC. If you are going to make me leave, I want her arrested and you’ll be creating paper for yourself. I work for BNE. I’m a cop and I want her arrested. I work on YONET.

I can’t believe you guys are going to take sides with the security here over another cop. If you refuse to take my arrest, you’ll be making a big mistake. You will be talking to my superiors. I’ll be in contact with my watch commander. Are you going to arrest her or not? I can’t believe you guys aren’t arresting her. So this is how Sac PD does it huh? I will sign a citizen’s arrest against her for assaulting me. You wait till you’re in my jurisdiction because this type of treatment goes both ways.”

According to the records from booking, Officer Feher was told that “as long as he remained calm and cooperative he would be brought in discreetly in the back door.” They were concerned for his safety as a police officer and so they attempted to conduct the arrest and booking as discreetly as possible.

Officer Feher remained highly uncooperative as he was transported to the Sacramento County Jail by Officers Duink and Suehowicz.

He complained to Sacramento County Jail booking supervisor, Sgt. Vagt, that this was “bull****” and said “that this was no way to treat a brother officer.”

Sgt. Vagt told Officer Feher, “I don’t know if it’s the alcohol you have had tonight, but you are not cooperating like I asked you.”

Feher then apologized and said, “I don’t have a problem with you guys it’s Sac PD. However, the Sgt then described: “He then looked over at myself and [Officer] Suehowicz and began giving us “hard, challenging” stares. He looked at me and said words to the effect of
“you ain’t ****, Sac PD ain’t ****, I work narcotics.”

Officer Feher then is purported to have said:

“You think you are the ****, you ain’t man. I would love to meet you out somewhere and…”

The Sgt said: “And what?”

The reports says, “He smiled and looked hard and said “talk.”

According to reports, once inside, Feher again became mildly uncooperative with sheriff’s deputies by being “slow to follow instructions and making condescending comments.”

At one point when he was taking off his socks, he “tossed it towards the deputy and looked at him in a challenging manner. The deputy had to step back and allow another deputy to continue the booking search.”

The Vanguard spoke to Davis Police Chief Landy Black via phone last week. Due to this being a personnel matter, Chief Black could not directly respond to the specifics of the incident. However, he confirmed that an investigation is in progress and when it is completed a decision will be made that takes into account all factors. Chief Black pointed out that he has access to additional information in addition to the police report and that that will be weighed into any decision that the department makes.

Chief Black did very adamantly stress to the public that he believes that the Davis Police Department has the public interest at heart in all matters. He stressed that they will weigh the situation accordingly and do what they believe is right for all of the community and all involved and he promised to make sure that his department would always do right by the public. Having the public’s confidence is one of his top priorities and one of the reasons that he decided to take this job.

Councilmember Lamar Heystek told the Vanguard:

“The solemn oath to enforce the law comes with the equally solemn obligation to obey the law. The people of all communities deserve to feel confident in those with whom they entrust their quality of life, from day-to-day city employees to members of the City Council.”

Officer Feher remains on administrative leave pending the outcome of the Davis Police Department’s internal investigation.

—David M. Greenwald reporting

Share:

About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

Related posts

311 thoughts on “Davis Police Officer Arrested In Sacramento”

  1. Bob Aaronson

    Obviously, the incident described in the Sacramento Police report is very concerning. As Police Ombudsman, I have been reviewing the Davis Police Department’s internal investigation of the underlying incident. While my review is still on-going, thus far I am satisfied that the police department’s response to and investigation of the incident has been proportionate to the gravity of it. I have already engaged in lengthy discussions with various police department managers regarding the matter and am also satisfied that they are treating it with all due concern. These department managers have been candid with me and solicitous of my views. As the matter is still pending internally, I don’t know what Chief Landy’s decision ultimately will be; but based upon my experience working with him for nearly 18 months, I trust that his response will be commensurate with the facts established by the internal investigation.

  2. Bob Aaronson

    Obviously, the incident described in the Sacramento Police report is very concerning. As Police Ombudsman, I have been reviewing the Davis Police Department’s internal investigation of the underlying incident. While my review is still on-going, thus far I am satisfied that the police department’s response to and investigation of the incident has been proportionate to the gravity of it. I have already engaged in lengthy discussions with various police department managers regarding the matter and am also satisfied that they are treating it with all due concern. These department managers have been candid with me and solicitous of my views. As the matter is still pending internally, I don’t know what Chief Landy’s decision ultimately will be; but based upon my experience working with him for nearly 18 months, I trust that his response will be commensurate with the facts established by the internal investigation.

  3. Bob Aaronson

    Obviously, the incident described in the Sacramento Police report is very concerning. As Police Ombudsman, I have been reviewing the Davis Police Department’s internal investigation of the underlying incident. While my review is still on-going, thus far I am satisfied that the police department’s response to and investigation of the incident has been proportionate to the gravity of it. I have already engaged in lengthy discussions with various police department managers regarding the matter and am also satisfied that they are treating it with all due concern. These department managers have been candid with me and solicitous of my views. As the matter is still pending internally, I don’t know what Chief Landy’s decision ultimately will be; but based upon my experience working with him for nearly 18 months, I trust that his response will be commensurate with the facts established by the internal investigation.

  4. Bob Aaronson

    Obviously, the incident described in the Sacramento Police report is very concerning. As Police Ombudsman, I have been reviewing the Davis Police Department’s internal investigation of the underlying incident. While my review is still on-going, thus far I am satisfied that the police department’s response to and investigation of the incident has been proportionate to the gravity of it. I have already engaged in lengthy discussions with various police department managers regarding the matter and am also satisfied that they are treating it with all due concern. These department managers have been candid with me and solicitous of my views. As the matter is still pending internally, I don’t know what Chief Landy’s decision ultimately will be; but based upon my experience working with him for nearly 18 months, I trust that his response will be commensurate with the facts established by the internal investigation.

  5. Anonymous

    ….not all that surprising. Serious alcoholic intoxication, public or not, “messes you up”. Let’s hope that Mr. Feher learned something from this incident.

  6. Anonymous

    ….not all that surprising. Serious alcoholic intoxication, public or not, “messes you up”. Let’s hope that Mr. Feher learned something from this incident.

  7. Anonymous

    ….not all that surprising. Serious alcoholic intoxication, public or not, “messes you up”. Let’s hope that Mr. Feher learned something from this incident.

  8. Anonymous

    ….not all that surprising. Serious alcoholic intoxication, public or not, “messes you up”. Let’s hope that Mr. Feher learned something from this incident.

  9. Anonymous

    I’m sure the Officer is highly embarrassed now that he has sobered up. Kudos to Sac PD for apparently treating him well, but not special. I have concern for the girl who was arrested at Officer Feher insistence for defending herself in the bar. Feher should do the right thing and drop the charges and cover any of her out of pocket costs while apologizing repeatedly.

  10. Anonymous

    I’m sure the Officer is highly embarrassed now that he has sobered up. Kudos to Sac PD for apparently treating him well, but not special. I have concern for the girl who was arrested at Officer Feher insistence for defending herself in the bar. Feher should do the right thing and drop the charges and cover any of her out of pocket costs while apologizing repeatedly.

  11. Anonymous

    I’m sure the Officer is highly embarrassed now that he has sobered up. Kudos to Sac PD for apparently treating him well, but not special. I have concern for the girl who was arrested at Officer Feher insistence for defending herself in the bar. Feher should do the right thing and drop the charges and cover any of her out of pocket costs while apologizing repeatedly.

  12. Anonymous

    I’m sure the Officer is highly embarrassed now that he has sobered up. Kudos to Sac PD for apparently treating him well, but not special. I have concern for the girl who was arrested at Officer Feher insistence for defending herself in the bar. Feher should do the right thing and drop the charges and cover any of her out of pocket costs while apologizing repeatedly.

  13. Anonymous

    I am wondering why this was never published in the Davis Enterprise (or if it was I never saw it). I think the public has the right to be informed of these types of issues. It will be really hard to take this officer seriously after he himself broke the very laws he is enforcing. I have had my share of negative experiences with the Davis PD, and unfortunately this story does not surprise me.

  14. Anonymous

    I am wondering why this was never published in the Davis Enterprise (or if it was I never saw it). I think the public has the right to be informed of these types of issues. It will be really hard to take this officer seriously after he himself broke the very laws he is enforcing. I have had my share of negative experiences with the Davis PD, and unfortunately this story does not surprise me.

  15. Anonymous

    I am wondering why this was never published in the Davis Enterprise (or if it was I never saw it). I think the public has the right to be informed of these types of issues. It will be really hard to take this officer seriously after he himself broke the very laws he is enforcing. I have had my share of negative experiences with the Davis PD, and unfortunately this story does not surprise me.

  16. Anonymous

    I am wondering why this was never published in the Davis Enterprise (or if it was I never saw it). I think the public has the right to be informed of these types of issues. It will be really hard to take this officer seriously after he himself broke the very laws he is enforcing. I have had my share of negative experiences with the Davis PD, and unfortunately this story does not surprise me.

  17. FastFwed

    Based on the little bit here, and that Yonet is a promotional position(you have to apply for it and there is a selection process) Tony should be back in patrol on nights blue since that’s the slowest shift and he’s such a tough guy he’ll have plenty of time to re-think what a buffoon he has become. I heard about his arrest on Sept. 14th but figured Black, Pierce and Pytel had been successful in getting it permanently removed from the records.

  18. FastFwed

    Based on the little bit here, and that Yonet is a promotional position(you have to apply for it and there is a selection process) Tony should be back in patrol on nights blue since that’s the slowest shift and he’s such a tough guy he’ll have plenty of time to re-think what a buffoon he has become. I heard about his arrest on Sept. 14th but figured Black, Pierce and Pytel had been successful in getting it permanently removed from the records.

  19. FastFwed

    Based on the little bit here, and that Yonet is a promotional position(you have to apply for it and there is a selection process) Tony should be back in patrol on nights blue since that’s the slowest shift and he’s such a tough guy he’ll have plenty of time to re-think what a buffoon he has become. I heard about his arrest on Sept. 14th but figured Black, Pierce and Pytel had been successful in getting it permanently removed from the records.

  20. FastFwed

    Based on the little bit here, and that Yonet is a promotional position(you have to apply for it and there is a selection process) Tony should be back in patrol on nights blue since that’s the slowest shift and he’s such a tough guy he’ll have plenty of time to re-think what a buffoon he has become. I heard about his arrest on Sept. 14th but figured Black, Pierce and Pytel had been successful in getting it permanently removed from the records.

  21. Rich Rifkin

    “Serious alcoholic intoxication, public or not, “messes you up”. Let’s hope that Mr. Feher learned something from this incident.”

    Perhaps this was just a one-time thing or there were some extenuating circumstances in his life which put him under a terrible strain which led to him being this drunk and belligerent. However, reading David’s report, it sure sounds like alcoholism. People who can handle booze don’t normally behave that way when drunk.

    As a general rule, I would think that the Davis PD would require any officer with a drinking problem to get into AA or rehab or whatever works before rejoining the force. Even if Feher is not an alcoholic, that disease is fairly common and so a general policy in dealing with it makes sense.

  22. Rich Rifkin

    “Serious alcoholic intoxication, public or not, “messes you up”. Let’s hope that Mr. Feher learned something from this incident.”

    Perhaps this was just a one-time thing or there were some extenuating circumstances in his life which put him under a terrible strain which led to him being this drunk and belligerent. However, reading David’s report, it sure sounds like alcoholism. People who can handle booze don’t normally behave that way when drunk.

    As a general rule, I would think that the Davis PD would require any officer with a drinking problem to get into AA or rehab or whatever works before rejoining the force. Even if Feher is not an alcoholic, that disease is fairly common and so a general policy in dealing with it makes sense.

  23. Rich Rifkin

    “Serious alcoholic intoxication, public or not, “messes you up”. Let’s hope that Mr. Feher learned something from this incident.”

    Perhaps this was just a one-time thing or there were some extenuating circumstances in his life which put him under a terrible strain which led to him being this drunk and belligerent. However, reading David’s report, it sure sounds like alcoholism. People who can handle booze don’t normally behave that way when drunk.

    As a general rule, I would think that the Davis PD would require any officer with a drinking problem to get into AA or rehab or whatever works before rejoining the force. Even if Feher is not an alcoholic, that disease is fairly common and so a general policy in dealing with it makes sense.

  24. Rich Rifkin

    “Serious alcoholic intoxication, public or not, “messes you up”. Let’s hope that Mr. Feher learned something from this incident.”

    Perhaps this was just a one-time thing or there were some extenuating circumstances in his life which put him under a terrible strain which led to him being this drunk and belligerent. However, reading David’s report, it sure sounds like alcoholism. People who can handle booze don’t normally behave that way when drunk.

    As a general rule, I would think that the Davis PD would require any officer with a drinking problem to get into AA or rehab or whatever works before rejoining the force. Even if Feher is not an alcoholic, that disease is fairly common and so a general policy in dealing with it makes sense.

  25. Questions

    “not public ridicule”

    Are you considering this article “public ridicule”? Do you think the people of Davis should know if an officer behaved in this manner? Do you believe that an officer should be required less latitude and privacy because of the huge responsibility they carry?

  26. Questions

    “not public ridicule”

    Are you considering this article “public ridicule”? Do you think the people of Davis should know if an officer behaved in this manner? Do you believe that an officer should be required less latitude and privacy because of the huge responsibility they carry?

  27. Questions

    “not public ridicule”

    Are you considering this article “public ridicule”? Do you think the people of Davis should know if an officer behaved in this manner? Do you believe that an officer should be required less latitude and privacy because of the huge responsibility they carry?

  28. Questions

    “not public ridicule”

    Are you considering this article “public ridicule”? Do you think the people of Davis should know if an officer behaved in this manner? Do you believe that an officer should be required less latitude and privacy because of the huge responsibility they carry?

  29. Concerned

    I worry that this out of control officer has access to a gun. Aren’t off duty police officers allowed to carry their weapons on them at all times? Correct me if this is not true. What if this officer had had a gun in that bar. As far as I am concerned, until he gets his alcohol problem under control, there is no way this guy should be anywhere near a loaded gun.

  30. Concerned

    I worry that this out of control officer has access to a gun. Aren’t off duty police officers allowed to carry their weapons on them at all times? Correct me if this is not true. What if this officer had had a gun in that bar. As far as I am concerned, until he gets his alcohol problem under control, there is no way this guy should be anywhere near a loaded gun.

  31. Concerned

    I worry that this out of control officer has access to a gun. Aren’t off duty police officers allowed to carry their weapons on them at all times? Correct me if this is not true. What if this officer had had a gun in that bar. As far as I am concerned, until he gets his alcohol problem under control, there is no way this guy should be anywhere near a loaded gun.

  32. Concerned

    I worry that this out of control officer has access to a gun. Aren’t off duty police officers allowed to carry their weapons on them at all times? Correct me if this is not true. What if this officer had had a gun in that bar. As far as I am concerned, until he gets his alcohol problem under control, there is no way this guy should be anywhere near a loaded gun.

  33. Madam X

    I can’t identify myself due to my involved in an ongoing case. DPD here is actually being nice to Feher. Much stuff still out there far worse than what’s written here.

  34. Madam X

    I can’t identify myself due to my involved in an ongoing case. DPD here is actually being nice to Feher. Much stuff still out there far worse than what’s written here.

  35. Madam X

    I can’t identify myself due to my involved in an ongoing case. DPD here is actually being nice to Feher. Much stuff still out there far worse than what’s written here.

  36. Madam X

    I can’t identify myself due to my involved in an ongoing case. DPD here is actually being nice to Feher. Much stuff still out there far worse than what’s written here.

  37. Vincente

    Isn’t transparency a part of the justice system? No one was convicted on this blog. They laid out the police report and said that the investigation is underway.

  38. Vincente

    Isn’t transparency a part of the justice system? No one was convicted on this blog. They laid out the police report and said that the investigation is underway.

  39. Vincente

    Isn’t transparency a part of the justice system? No one was convicted on this blog. They laid out the police report and said that the investigation is underway.

  40. Vincente

    Isn’t transparency a part of the justice system? No one was convicted on this blog. They laid out the police report and said that the investigation is underway.

  41. Anonymous

    Alcoholism is a real concern.

    I’m certain that the Landy is taking this seriously. He just lost one officer to suicide after drinking heavily and I’m sure he doesn’t want to lose any more. These are young guys who work in a very high pressure job. If properly dealt with, I’m sure that Feher will come through this and be a better officer on the other side.

  42. Anonymous

    Alcoholism is a real concern.

    I’m certain that the Landy is taking this seriously. He just lost one officer to suicide after drinking heavily and I’m sure he doesn’t want to lose any more. These are young guys who work in a very high pressure job. If properly dealt with, I’m sure that Feher will come through this and be a better officer on the other side.

  43. Anonymous

    Alcoholism is a real concern.

    I’m certain that the Landy is taking this seriously. He just lost one officer to suicide after drinking heavily and I’m sure he doesn’t want to lose any more. These are young guys who work in a very high pressure job. If properly dealt with, I’m sure that Feher will come through this and be a better officer on the other side.

  44. Anonymous

    Alcoholism is a real concern.

    I’m certain that the Landy is taking this seriously. He just lost one officer to suicide after drinking heavily and I’m sure he doesn’t want to lose any more. These are young guys who work in a very high pressure job. If properly dealt with, I’m sure that Feher will come through this and be a better officer on the other side.

  45. David M. Greenwald

    That’s a good question. Perhaps if Bob Aaronson comes back on and wants to respond, he could explain better than I will be able to.

    I would suspect that they would have to talk to as many of the parties as they can and figure out what happened. They may also have some sort of process that waits for whatever legal issues be resolved which takes time as well. When they complete their investigation, the leadership in the department would have to review it. It sounds like Bob Aaronson as the Ombudsman is also auditing their internal investigation that takes some time as well as recall he has been working on the fire department report. So that is probably a contributing factor as well.

    Bottom line, I’m not sure two months is really a tremendously long period of time. Perhaps again, Mr. Aaronson, can put more meat and details onto that.

  46. David M. Greenwald

    That’s a good question. Perhaps if Bob Aaronson comes back on and wants to respond, he could explain better than I will be able to.

    I would suspect that they would have to talk to as many of the parties as they can and figure out what happened. They may also have some sort of process that waits for whatever legal issues be resolved which takes time as well. When they complete their investigation, the leadership in the department would have to review it. It sounds like Bob Aaronson as the Ombudsman is also auditing their internal investigation that takes some time as well as recall he has been working on the fire department report. So that is probably a contributing factor as well.

    Bottom line, I’m not sure two months is really a tremendously long period of time. Perhaps again, Mr. Aaronson, can put more meat and details onto that.

  47. David M. Greenwald

    That’s a good question. Perhaps if Bob Aaronson comes back on and wants to respond, he could explain better than I will be able to.

    I would suspect that they would have to talk to as many of the parties as they can and figure out what happened. They may also have some sort of process that waits for whatever legal issues be resolved which takes time as well. When they complete their investigation, the leadership in the department would have to review it. It sounds like Bob Aaronson as the Ombudsman is also auditing their internal investigation that takes some time as well as recall he has been working on the fire department report. So that is probably a contributing factor as well.

    Bottom line, I’m not sure two months is really a tremendously long period of time. Perhaps again, Mr. Aaronson, can put more meat and details onto that.

  48. David M. Greenwald

    That’s a good question. Perhaps if Bob Aaronson comes back on and wants to respond, he could explain better than I will be able to.

    I would suspect that they would have to talk to as many of the parties as they can and figure out what happened. They may also have some sort of process that waits for whatever legal issues be resolved which takes time as well. When they complete their investigation, the leadership in the department would have to review it. It sounds like Bob Aaronson as the Ombudsman is also auditing their internal investigation that takes some time as well as recall he has been working on the fire department report. So that is probably a contributing factor as well.

    Bottom line, I’m not sure two months is really a tremendously long period of time. Perhaps again, Mr. Aaronson, can put more meat and details onto that.

  49. chester

    “Perhaps this was just a one-time thing or there were some extenuating circumstances in his life which put him under a terrible strain which led to him being this drunk and belligerent. However, reading David’s report, it sure sounds like alcoholism. People who can handle booze don’t normally behave that way when drunk.”

    Thanks Rich for the thoughtful words. I just love our supposedly thoughtful and caring community that would forgive just about any other soul in this circumstance other than a cop. I guess cops will always be politically incorrect in this town, and therefore subject to a form of reverse harassment.

    Tony Feher was a very close friend of Paul Narr, who took his own life a few months ago. I have heard from numerous sources close to him and the Narr family that office Feher is struggling through some pretty severe depression and emotional turmoil. I am guessing that his excess drinking is a direct result of this.

    In 2006 there were about 180 cop deaths in the line of duty. There were over 450 copy suicides. Why didn’t the Enterprise report this situation with Tony Feher? Could it possibly be because they have better sense than DPD and his activist friends that can’t find a better way to grow a political or journalism career?

  50. chester

    “Perhaps this was just a one-time thing or there were some extenuating circumstances in his life which put him under a terrible strain which led to him being this drunk and belligerent. However, reading David’s report, it sure sounds like alcoholism. People who can handle booze don’t normally behave that way when drunk.”

    Thanks Rich for the thoughtful words. I just love our supposedly thoughtful and caring community that would forgive just about any other soul in this circumstance other than a cop. I guess cops will always be politically incorrect in this town, and therefore subject to a form of reverse harassment.

    Tony Feher was a very close friend of Paul Narr, who took his own life a few months ago. I have heard from numerous sources close to him and the Narr family that office Feher is struggling through some pretty severe depression and emotional turmoil. I am guessing that his excess drinking is a direct result of this.

    In 2006 there were about 180 cop deaths in the line of duty. There were over 450 copy suicides. Why didn’t the Enterprise report this situation with Tony Feher? Could it possibly be because they have better sense than DPD and his activist friends that can’t find a better way to grow a political or journalism career?

  51. chester

    “Perhaps this was just a one-time thing or there were some extenuating circumstances in his life which put him under a terrible strain which led to him being this drunk and belligerent. However, reading David’s report, it sure sounds like alcoholism. People who can handle booze don’t normally behave that way when drunk.”

    Thanks Rich for the thoughtful words. I just love our supposedly thoughtful and caring community that would forgive just about any other soul in this circumstance other than a cop. I guess cops will always be politically incorrect in this town, and therefore subject to a form of reverse harassment.

    Tony Feher was a very close friend of Paul Narr, who took his own life a few months ago. I have heard from numerous sources close to him and the Narr family that office Feher is struggling through some pretty severe depression and emotional turmoil. I am guessing that his excess drinking is a direct result of this.

    In 2006 there were about 180 cop deaths in the line of duty. There were over 450 copy suicides. Why didn’t the Enterprise report this situation with Tony Feher? Could it possibly be because they have better sense than DPD and his activist friends that can’t find a better way to grow a political or journalism career?

  52. chester

    “Perhaps this was just a one-time thing or there were some extenuating circumstances in his life which put him under a terrible strain which led to him being this drunk and belligerent. However, reading David’s report, it sure sounds like alcoholism. People who can handle booze don’t normally behave that way when drunk.”

    Thanks Rich for the thoughtful words. I just love our supposedly thoughtful and caring community that would forgive just about any other soul in this circumstance other than a cop. I guess cops will always be politically incorrect in this town, and therefore subject to a form of reverse harassment.

    Tony Feher was a very close friend of Paul Narr, who took his own life a few months ago. I have heard from numerous sources close to him and the Narr family that office Feher is struggling through some pretty severe depression and emotional turmoil. I am guessing that his excess drinking is a direct result of this.

    In 2006 there were about 180 cop deaths in the line of duty. There were over 450 copy suicides. Why didn’t the Enterprise report this situation with Tony Feher? Could it possibly be because they have better sense than DPD and his activist friends that can’t find a better way to grow a political or journalism career?

  53. Anonymous

    I will be completely straight – I have beem more critical of the Davis Police Department than anyone on this blog. In fact I will never trust any police officer again after my experience with several Davis police officers. However, I must admit things have changed for the better (at least they seem better) since Chief Landy arrived.

    As far as this incident – it really is too bad. There could be very serious consequences. I hope the guy gets due process and is judged fairly!

  54. Anonymous

    I will be completely straight – I have beem more critical of the Davis Police Department than anyone on this blog. In fact I will never trust any police officer again after my experience with several Davis police officers. However, I must admit things have changed for the better (at least they seem better) since Chief Landy arrived.

    As far as this incident – it really is too bad. There could be very serious consequences. I hope the guy gets due process and is judged fairly!

  55. Anonymous

    I will be completely straight – I have beem more critical of the Davis Police Department than anyone on this blog. In fact I will never trust any police officer again after my experience with several Davis police officers. However, I must admit things have changed for the better (at least they seem better) since Chief Landy arrived.

    As far as this incident – it really is too bad. There could be very serious consequences. I hope the guy gets due process and is judged fairly!

  56. Anonymous

    I will be completely straight – I have beem more critical of the Davis Police Department than anyone on this blog. In fact I will never trust any police officer again after my experience with several Davis police officers. However, I must admit things have changed for the better (at least they seem better) since Chief Landy arrived.

    As far as this incident – it really is too bad. There could be very serious consequences. I hope the guy gets due process and is judged fairly!

  57. STD

    Feher has (from what I’ve personally observed) had a fair and steady hand behind the the uniform of DPD, and I for one think that he has done a bit to help the much maligned public imagine of DPD. It’s a shame to see off duty activities potentially jeopardize a budding career. One should consider the implications of their actions, but when your inebriated…

  58. STD

    Feher has (from what I’ve personally observed) had a fair and steady hand behind the the uniform of DPD, and I for one think that he has done a bit to help the much maligned public imagine of DPD. It’s a shame to see off duty activities potentially jeopardize a budding career. One should consider the implications of their actions, but when your inebriated…

  59. STD

    Feher has (from what I’ve personally observed) had a fair and steady hand behind the the uniform of DPD, and I for one think that he has done a bit to help the much maligned public imagine of DPD. It’s a shame to see off duty activities potentially jeopardize a budding career. One should consider the implications of their actions, but when your inebriated…

  60. STD

    Feher has (from what I’ve personally observed) had a fair and steady hand behind the the uniform of DPD, and I for one think that he has done a bit to help the much maligned public imagine of DPD. It’s a shame to see off duty activities potentially jeopardize a budding career. One should consider the implications of their actions, but when your inebriated…

  61. Bob Aaronson

    “That’s a good question. Perhaps if Bob Aaronson comes back on and wants to respond, he could explain better than I will be able to.”

    Competent investigations, particularly nuanced ones, always take more time than you’d think. Apart from all the logistics of witness interviews and document research, a lot of time is spent processing and digesting.

    A scholarly 500 page book covering some aspect of American history, which I can read in a week, may take its author three to five years to compile. Research/investigation is exceedingly labor intensive.

    All that said, it is up to the department to respond more specifically to this question.

  62. Bob Aaronson

    “That’s a good question. Perhaps if Bob Aaronson comes back on and wants to respond, he could explain better than I will be able to.”

    Competent investigations, particularly nuanced ones, always take more time than you’d think. Apart from all the logistics of witness interviews and document research, a lot of time is spent processing and digesting.

    A scholarly 500 page book covering some aspect of American history, which I can read in a week, may take its author three to five years to compile. Research/investigation is exceedingly labor intensive.

    All that said, it is up to the department to respond more specifically to this question.

  63. Bob Aaronson

    “That’s a good question. Perhaps if Bob Aaronson comes back on and wants to respond, he could explain better than I will be able to.”

    Competent investigations, particularly nuanced ones, always take more time than you’d think. Apart from all the logistics of witness interviews and document research, a lot of time is spent processing and digesting.

    A scholarly 500 page book covering some aspect of American history, which I can read in a week, may take its author three to five years to compile. Research/investigation is exceedingly labor intensive.

    All that said, it is up to the department to respond more specifically to this question.

  64. Bob Aaronson

    “That’s a good question. Perhaps if Bob Aaronson comes back on and wants to respond, he could explain better than I will be able to.”

    Competent investigations, particularly nuanced ones, always take more time than you’d think. Apart from all the logistics of witness interviews and document research, a lot of time is spent processing and digesting.

    A scholarly 500 page book covering some aspect of American history, which I can read in a week, may take its author three to five years to compile. Research/investigation is exceedingly labor intensive.

    All that said, it is up to the department to respond more specifically to this question.

  65. Holdem Accountable

    “Tony Feher was a very close friend of Paul Narr, who took his own life a few months ago. I have heard from numerous sources close to him and the Narr family that office Feher is struggling through some pretty severe depression and emotional turmoil. I am guessing that his excess drinking is a direct result of this.”

    That doesn’t absolve Officer Feher from carrying out his duties in a professional manner including representing the police department in a professional way at all times. Nor does it absolve him from taking full responsibility when he has engaged in improper conduct. No one is crucifying Officer Feher, nor condemning him. But we do want our officers held to the proper standard we expect of our police officers, and that includes not using their status as a police officer to get preferential treatment when they have misbehaved.

    It sounds to me as if this officer needs to be disciplined internally by his own co-workers and the department (he makes the Davis Police Dept. look bad); disciplined externally by the justice system for misbehaving in the bar just as if he were any other drunk citizen who’s behavior got out of control; and needs some sort of psychiatric help for his emotional problems. Only after he completes all those things should he be allowed to come back on the police force.

    If you let this sort of thing go, what message does that send to the public at large? There are one set of rules for police officers, and another set for the rest of us? That we need to be afraid of our own police?

    Generally, throughout my life I have had good interactions with the police, including the Davis Police Dept. But I (a single white mother with three smalll children who were with me at the time) had one terrible experience with the Sacramento Police Dept – a bad apple who got out of control. It does happen, and when it does, it needs to be addressed. Period. No excuses.

  66. Holdem Accountable

    “Tony Feher was a very close friend of Paul Narr, who took his own life a few months ago. I have heard from numerous sources close to him and the Narr family that office Feher is struggling through some pretty severe depression and emotional turmoil. I am guessing that his excess drinking is a direct result of this.”

    That doesn’t absolve Officer Feher from carrying out his duties in a professional manner including representing the police department in a professional way at all times. Nor does it absolve him from taking full responsibility when he has engaged in improper conduct. No one is crucifying Officer Feher, nor condemning him. But we do want our officers held to the proper standard we expect of our police officers, and that includes not using their status as a police officer to get preferential treatment when they have misbehaved.

    It sounds to me as if this officer needs to be disciplined internally by his own co-workers and the department (he makes the Davis Police Dept. look bad); disciplined externally by the justice system for misbehaving in the bar just as if he were any other drunk citizen who’s behavior got out of control; and needs some sort of psychiatric help for his emotional problems. Only after he completes all those things should he be allowed to come back on the police force.

    If you let this sort of thing go, what message does that send to the public at large? There are one set of rules for police officers, and another set for the rest of us? That we need to be afraid of our own police?

    Generally, throughout my life I have had good interactions with the police, including the Davis Police Dept. But I (a single white mother with three smalll children who were with me at the time) had one terrible experience with the Sacramento Police Dept – a bad apple who got out of control. It does happen, and when it does, it needs to be addressed. Period. No excuses.

  67. Holdem Accountable

    “Tony Feher was a very close friend of Paul Narr, who took his own life a few months ago. I have heard from numerous sources close to him and the Narr family that office Feher is struggling through some pretty severe depression and emotional turmoil. I am guessing that his excess drinking is a direct result of this.”

    That doesn’t absolve Officer Feher from carrying out his duties in a professional manner including representing the police department in a professional way at all times. Nor does it absolve him from taking full responsibility when he has engaged in improper conduct. No one is crucifying Officer Feher, nor condemning him. But we do want our officers held to the proper standard we expect of our police officers, and that includes not using their status as a police officer to get preferential treatment when they have misbehaved.

    It sounds to me as if this officer needs to be disciplined internally by his own co-workers and the department (he makes the Davis Police Dept. look bad); disciplined externally by the justice system for misbehaving in the bar just as if he were any other drunk citizen who’s behavior got out of control; and needs some sort of psychiatric help for his emotional problems. Only after he completes all those things should he be allowed to come back on the police force.

    If you let this sort of thing go, what message does that send to the public at large? There are one set of rules for police officers, and another set for the rest of us? That we need to be afraid of our own police?

    Generally, throughout my life I have had good interactions with the police, including the Davis Police Dept. But I (a single white mother with three smalll children who were with me at the time) had one terrible experience with the Sacramento Police Dept – a bad apple who got out of control. It does happen, and when it does, it needs to be addressed. Period. No excuses.

  68. Holdem Accountable

    “Tony Feher was a very close friend of Paul Narr, who took his own life a few months ago. I have heard from numerous sources close to him and the Narr family that office Feher is struggling through some pretty severe depression and emotional turmoil. I am guessing that his excess drinking is a direct result of this.”

    That doesn’t absolve Officer Feher from carrying out his duties in a professional manner including representing the police department in a professional way at all times. Nor does it absolve him from taking full responsibility when he has engaged in improper conduct. No one is crucifying Officer Feher, nor condemning him. But we do want our officers held to the proper standard we expect of our police officers, and that includes not using their status as a police officer to get preferential treatment when they have misbehaved.

    It sounds to me as if this officer needs to be disciplined internally by his own co-workers and the department (he makes the Davis Police Dept. look bad); disciplined externally by the justice system for misbehaving in the bar just as if he were any other drunk citizen who’s behavior got out of control; and needs some sort of psychiatric help for his emotional problems. Only after he completes all those things should he be allowed to come back on the police force.

    If you let this sort of thing go, what message does that send to the public at large? There are one set of rules for police officers, and another set for the rest of us? That we need to be afraid of our own police?

    Generally, throughout my life I have had good interactions with the police, including the Davis Police Dept. But I (a single white mother with three smalll children who were with me at the time) had one terrible experience with the Sacramento Police Dept – a bad apple who got out of control. It does happen, and when it does, it needs to be addressed. Period. No excuses.

  69. Davis Mother

    Chester, I’ve read your post at least three times now an each time it’s more disturbing. For one reason, you appear to be a police officer or at least close to the dpd based on this and other comments written in the past.

    You tell us “I just love our supposedly thoughtful and caring community that would forgive just about any other soul in this circumstance other than a cop. I guess cops will always be politically incorrect in this town, and therefore subject to a form of reverse harassment.” Really? Well let’s see, how would I feel about an air traffic controller, a doctor, a teacher, or a bus driver who behaved this way??? Each of these people of course share one thing with a police officer, public trust and public safety. When that is violated, then it makes it difficult to trust someone. You don’t appear to get it, the average citizen doesn’t hold a badge, a gun, have the license to take a life or take our freedom. That priviledge comes with tremendous responsibility and Feher violated that.

    What happened to Paul Narr is horrible. And I feel very bad for Tony having to deal with this tremendous loss. However, unless he gave up his badge and gun, I have little sympathy as it extends to his behavior. what if he flipped out while on duty? What if someone were hurt because of his behavior in Sacto? His condition puts more responsibility for him to act the right way given the fact that he’s a cop, not less. And who was supervising him during this time? Was there proper counseling provided to him? This is very concerning Chester and you want to write off as if it had never happened.

  70. Davis Mother

    Chester, I’ve read your post at least three times now an each time it’s more disturbing. For one reason, you appear to be a police officer or at least close to the dpd based on this and other comments written in the past.

    You tell us “I just love our supposedly thoughtful and caring community that would forgive just about any other soul in this circumstance other than a cop. I guess cops will always be politically incorrect in this town, and therefore subject to a form of reverse harassment.” Really? Well let’s see, how would I feel about an air traffic controller, a doctor, a teacher, or a bus driver who behaved this way??? Each of these people of course share one thing with a police officer, public trust and public safety. When that is violated, then it makes it difficult to trust someone. You don’t appear to get it, the average citizen doesn’t hold a badge, a gun, have the license to take a life or take our freedom. That priviledge comes with tremendous responsibility and Feher violated that.

    What happened to Paul Narr is horrible. And I feel very bad for Tony having to deal with this tremendous loss. However, unless he gave up his badge and gun, I have little sympathy as it extends to his behavior. what if he flipped out while on duty? What if someone were hurt because of his behavior in Sacto? His condition puts more responsibility for him to act the right way given the fact that he’s a cop, not less. And who was supervising him during this time? Was there proper counseling provided to him? This is very concerning Chester and you want to write off as if it had never happened.

  71. Davis Mother

    Chester, I’ve read your post at least three times now an each time it’s more disturbing. For one reason, you appear to be a police officer or at least close to the dpd based on this and other comments written in the past.

    You tell us “I just love our supposedly thoughtful and caring community that would forgive just about any other soul in this circumstance other than a cop. I guess cops will always be politically incorrect in this town, and therefore subject to a form of reverse harassment.” Really? Well let’s see, how would I feel about an air traffic controller, a doctor, a teacher, or a bus driver who behaved this way??? Each of these people of course share one thing with a police officer, public trust and public safety. When that is violated, then it makes it difficult to trust someone. You don’t appear to get it, the average citizen doesn’t hold a badge, a gun, have the license to take a life or take our freedom. That priviledge comes with tremendous responsibility and Feher violated that.

    What happened to Paul Narr is horrible. And I feel very bad for Tony having to deal with this tremendous loss. However, unless he gave up his badge and gun, I have little sympathy as it extends to his behavior. what if he flipped out while on duty? What if someone were hurt because of his behavior in Sacto? His condition puts more responsibility for him to act the right way given the fact that he’s a cop, not less. And who was supervising him during this time? Was there proper counseling provided to him? This is very concerning Chester and you want to write off as if it had never happened.

  72. Davis Mother

    Chester, I’ve read your post at least three times now an each time it’s more disturbing. For one reason, you appear to be a police officer or at least close to the dpd based on this and other comments written in the past.

    You tell us “I just love our supposedly thoughtful and caring community that would forgive just about any other soul in this circumstance other than a cop. I guess cops will always be politically incorrect in this town, and therefore subject to a form of reverse harassment.” Really? Well let’s see, how would I feel about an air traffic controller, a doctor, a teacher, or a bus driver who behaved this way??? Each of these people of course share one thing with a police officer, public trust and public safety. When that is violated, then it makes it difficult to trust someone. You don’t appear to get it, the average citizen doesn’t hold a badge, a gun, have the license to take a life or take our freedom. That priviledge comes with tremendous responsibility and Feher violated that.

    What happened to Paul Narr is horrible. And I feel very bad for Tony having to deal with this tremendous loss. However, unless he gave up his badge and gun, I have little sympathy as it extends to his behavior. what if he flipped out while on duty? What if someone were hurt because of his behavior in Sacto? His condition puts more responsibility for him to act the right way given the fact that he’s a cop, not less. And who was supervising him during this time? Was there proper counseling provided to him? This is very concerning Chester and you want to write off as if it had never happened.

  73. wdf

    I couldn’t find his name in the Enterprise or Bee online crime report (Bee would be the likelier paper) for that incident. I wonder why.

    Mr. Feher is also a DHS graduate, class of 2000.

    I hope he’s able to get his life back in order.

  74. wdf

    I couldn’t find his name in the Enterprise or Bee online crime report (Bee would be the likelier paper) for that incident. I wonder why.

    Mr. Feher is also a DHS graduate, class of 2000.

    I hope he’s able to get his life back in order.

  75. wdf

    I couldn’t find his name in the Enterprise or Bee online crime report (Bee would be the likelier paper) for that incident. I wonder why.

    Mr. Feher is also a DHS graduate, class of 2000.

    I hope he’s able to get his life back in order.

  76. wdf

    I couldn’t find his name in the Enterprise or Bee online crime report (Bee would be the likelier paper) for that incident. I wonder why.

    Mr. Feher is also a DHS graduate, class of 2000.

    I hope he’s able to get his life back in order.

  77. concerned Davisite

    Chester you are wrong. Cops are not politically incorrect in this town. We have many fine, hard-working officers and this particular officer is simply not cut out for law enforcement.

    Perhaps he should look into another field AND get help for what appears to be a problem.

    Regardless of his profession if he does not get help with his anger and possible alcoholism it will ruin him.

    I wish him the best.

    Thank you for this story David. I hope he is held accountable, but mostly by himself.

  78. concerned Davisite

    Chester you are wrong. Cops are not politically incorrect in this town. We have many fine, hard-working officers and this particular officer is simply not cut out for law enforcement.

    Perhaps he should look into another field AND get help for what appears to be a problem.

    Regardless of his profession if he does not get help with his anger and possible alcoholism it will ruin him.

    I wish him the best.

    Thank you for this story David. I hope he is held accountable, but mostly by himself.

  79. concerned Davisite

    Chester you are wrong. Cops are not politically incorrect in this town. We have many fine, hard-working officers and this particular officer is simply not cut out for law enforcement.

    Perhaps he should look into another field AND get help for what appears to be a problem.

    Regardless of his profession if he does not get help with his anger and possible alcoholism it will ruin him.

    I wish him the best.

    Thank you for this story David. I hope he is held accountable, but mostly by himself.

  80. concerned Davisite

    Chester you are wrong. Cops are not politically incorrect in this town. We have many fine, hard-working officers and this particular officer is simply not cut out for law enforcement.

    Perhaps he should look into another field AND get help for what appears to be a problem.

    Regardless of his profession if he does not get help with his anger and possible alcoholism it will ruin him.

    I wish him the best.

    Thank you for this story David. I hope he is held accountable, but mostly by himself.

  81. Anonymous

    Alcoholic, depressed, needs psychiatric help, head buster, needs drug treatment, etc., All attributed to Mr. Feher, probably by most people here that don’t know him from Adam. I certainly can’t make that leap on what I’ve read here. Armchair experts abound.

  82. Anonymous

    Alcoholic, depressed, needs psychiatric help, head buster, needs drug treatment, etc., All attributed to Mr. Feher, probably by most people here that don’t know him from Adam. I certainly can’t make that leap on what I’ve read here. Armchair experts abound.

  83. Anonymous

    Alcoholic, depressed, needs psychiatric help, head buster, needs drug treatment, etc., All attributed to Mr. Feher, probably by most people here that don’t know him from Adam. I certainly can’t make that leap on what I’ve read here. Armchair experts abound.

  84. Anonymous

    Alcoholic, depressed, needs psychiatric help, head buster, needs drug treatment, etc., All attributed to Mr. Feher, probably by most people here that don’t know him from Adam. I certainly can’t make that leap on what I’ve read here. Armchair experts abound.

  85. Vanguardian

    Anonymous – You ask,

    “In 2006 there were about 180 cop deaths in the line of duty. There were over 450 copy suicides. Why didn’t the Enterprise report this situation with Tony Feher? Could it possibly be because they have better sense than DPD and his activist friends that can’t find a better way to grow a political or journalism career?”

    Could it be that the Enterprise doesn’t like to report the news and want us to believe that we live in DISNEYLAND? Guess what? We don’t. We live in a real community with REAL problems.

    Real problems like:

    1) People paying too much for sewer rates
    2) Fire dept. staff drinking too much and sleeping off hangovers at the local fire dept.
    3) A police officer who harassed a female, was drunk and made a fool of himself.
    4) A council majority who wants this town to grow, grow, grow when the economy and residents cannot sustain the growth…

    etc., etc., etc….

    We are very thankful that Daivd Greenwald has devoted the time and energy to dig deep and report on issues that are of importance to the community of Davis. Without the Vanguard we would only know the FLUFFY news reported in the Enterprise.

    If you don’t like the Vanguard then don’t click and read. Go pick up a copy of the Enterprise.

  86. Vanguardian

    Anonymous – You ask,

    “In 2006 there were about 180 cop deaths in the line of duty. There were over 450 copy suicides. Why didn’t the Enterprise report this situation with Tony Feher? Could it possibly be because they have better sense than DPD and his activist friends that can’t find a better way to grow a political or journalism career?”

    Could it be that the Enterprise doesn’t like to report the news and want us to believe that we live in DISNEYLAND? Guess what? We don’t. We live in a real community with REAL problems.

    Real problems like:

    1) People paying too much for sewer rates
    2) Fire dept. staff drinking too much and sleeping off hangovers at the local fire dept.
    3) A police officer who harassed a female, was drunk and made a fool of himself.
    4) A council majority who wants this town to grow, grow, grow when the economy and residents cannot sustain the growth…

    etc., etc., etc….

    We are very thankful that Daivd Greenwald has devoted the time and energy to dig deep and report on issues that are of importance to the community of Davis. Without the Vanguard we would only know the FLUFFY news reported in the Enterprise.

    If you don’t like the Vanguard then don’t click and read. Go pick up a copy of the Enterprise.

  87. Vanguardian

    Anonymous – You ask,

    “In 2006 there were about 180 cop deaths in the line of duty. There were over 450 copy suicides. Why didn’t the Enterprise report this situation with Tony Feher? Could it possibly be because they have better sense than DPD and his activist friends that can’t find a better way to grow a political or journalism career?”

    Could it be that the Enterprise doesn’t like to report the news and want us to believe that we live in DISNEYLAND? Guess what? We don’t. We live in a real community with REAL problems.

    Real problems like:

    1) People paying too much for sewer rates
    2) Fire dept. staff drinking too much and sleeping off hangovers at the local fire dept.
    3) A police officer who harassed a female, was drunk and made a fool of himself.
    4) A council majority who wants this town to grow, grow, grow when the economy and residents cannot sustain the growth…

    etc., etc., etc….

    We are very thankful that Daivd Greenwald has devoted the time and energy to dig deep and report on issues that are of importance to the community of Davis. Without the Vanguard we would only know the FLUFFY news reported in the Enterprise.

    If you don’t like the Vanguard then don’t click and read. Go pick up a copy of the Enterprise.

  88. Vanguardian

    Anonymous – You ask,

    “In 2006 there were about 180 cop deaths in the line of duty. There were over 450 copy suicides. Why didn’t the Enterprise report this situation with Tony Feher? Could it possibly be because they have better sense than DPD and his activist friends that can’t find a better way to grow a political or journalism career?”

    Could it be that the Enterprise doesn’t like to report the news and want us to believe that we live in DISNEYLAND? Guess what? We don’t. We live in a real community with REAL problems.

    Real problems like:

    1) People paying too much for sewer rates
    2) Fire dept. staff drinking too much and sleeping off hangovers at the local fire dept.
    3) A police officer who harassed a female, was drunk and made a fool of himself.
    4) A council majority who wants this town to grow, grow, grow when the economy and residents cannot sustain the growth…

    etc., etc., etc….

    We are very thankful that Daivd Greenwald has devoted the time and energy to dig deep and report on issues that are of importance to the community of Davis. Without the Vanguard we would only know the FLUFFY news reported in the Enterprise.

    If you don’t like the Vanguard then don’t click and read. Go pick up a copy of the Enterprise.

  89. Vanguardian

    I forgot to give a big thank you to Chief Landy Black and Bob Aaronson for the work they are doing. It’s not easy and they are a huge improvement from the prior administration.

    I trust that they will encourage Mr. Feher to get some help and will ultimately make the right decision.

    Also, it is normal to place an employee on Paid Admin Leave while an investigation is conducted. You have to conduct a very thorough investigation (which takes time) and provide the employee the paid time off.

    Employees are innocent until proven guilty.

    Thank you for the story DPD.

  90. Vanguardian

    I forgot to give a big thank you to Chief Landy Black and Bob Aaronson for the work they are doing. It’s not easy and they are a huge improvement from the prior administration.

    I trust that they will encourage Mr. Feher to get some help and will ultimately make the right decision.

    Also, it is normal to place an employee on Paid Admin Leave while an investigation is conducted. You have to conduct a very thorough investigation (which takes time) and provide the employee the paid time off.

    Employees are innocent until proven guilty.

    Thank you for the story DPD.

  91. Vanguardian

    I forgot to give a big thank you to Chief Landy Black and Bob Aaronson for the work they are doing. It’s not easy and they are a huge improvement from the prior administration.

    I trust that they will encourage Mr. Feher to get some help and will ultimately make the right decision.

    Also, it is normal to place an employee on Paid Admin Leave while an investigation is conducted. You have to conduct a very thorough investigation (which takes time) and provide the employee the paid time off.

    Employees are innocent until proven guilty.

    Thank you for the story DPD.

  92. Vanguardian

    I forgot to give a big thank you to Chief Landy Black and Bob Aaronson for the work they are doing. It’s not easy and they are a huge improvement from the prior administration.

    I trust that they will encourage Mr. Feher to get some help and will ultimately make the right decision.

    Also, it is normal to place an employee on Paid Admin Leave while an investigation is conducted. You have to conduct a very thorough investigation (which takes time) and provide the employee the paid time off.

    Employees are innocent until proven guilty.

    Thank you for the story DPD.

  93. Anonymous

    Now Bob, what about his cases and his past with DPD?

    You had said over a year ago that there were no known cases of police misconduct that it was simply some sort of misunderstanding after you reviewed them. Really?

  94. Anonymous

    Now Bob, what about his cases and his past with DPD?

    You had said over a year ago that there were no known cases of police misconduct that it was simply some sort of misunderstanding after you reviewed them. Really?

  95. Anonymous

    Now Bob, what about his cases and his past with DPD?

    You had said over a year ago that there were no known cases of police misconduct that it was simply some sort of misunderstanding after you reviewed them. Really?

  96. Anonymous

    Now Bob, what about his cases and his past with DPD?

    You had said over a year ago that there were no known cases of police misconduct that it was simply some sort of misunderstanding after you reviewed them. Really?

  97. chester

    “Chester, I’ve read your post at least three times now an each time it’s more disturbing. For one reason, you appear to be a police officer or at least close to the dpd based on this and other comments written in the past.”

    Davis mother, I am not a cop and am not particularily close to the DPD, but I know cops and have relatives in law enforcement. I have been treated harshly by Davis cops at times in the 30+ years I have lived in this town (especially in my younger “long-hair-musician” years). Even so, I value and have empathy for the job that cops do. More importantly, I can see though the hypocrisy of those that demand for privacy in their personal lives, and care and compassion for humanity, but then quickly jump on the band wagon to insert their nose into a cop’s personal business and be hyper-critical of behaviors that they accept and defend in themselves and almost every other group of people. It is disingenuous to claim your concern for public safety. You mention teachers. How about we dig into the private lives of all teachers to make sure they don’t damage all those young minds they care for? I know teachers that drink to excess at times. There are many people in other lines of work that get busted for drunk and disorderly conduct. Ever been to a bar or a sporting event? Why doesn’t DPD investigate these and report line-by-line what has happened. The obvious answer is that he has an anti-cop agenda and he is supported by the fact that cops are easy targets for anti-establishment activists simply because of the job they must do.

    As I understand, Mr. Feher was not on duty when this event occurred. Cops have enough stress and scrutiny while on the job. What gives anyone the right to extend this to their personal life? How about this… everyone that feels the need to dig into this cop’s personal incident would allow the same inquiry into their own past behaviors. I suspect that most in this town would have a problem with that given the general politics do not even support wiretapping calls to known terrorists.

    I am all for rational and calm police oversight, but not discrimination and veiled meanness again cops. This is a detailed review of a police report encapsulated in a shaming, conspiratorial-cover-up context. I am more than disturbed by the general acceptance of this practice by many in this town. I assume you would not accept the same had Paul Narr and Tony Feher been teachers, so why because they are cops? Think a bit more please.

  98. chester

    “Chester, I’ve read your post at least three times now an each time it’s more disturbing. For one reason, you appear to be a police officer or at least close to the dpd based on this and other comments written in the past.”

    Davis mother, I am not a cop and am not particularily close to the DPD, but I know cops and have relatives in law enforcement. I have been treated harshly by Davis cops at times in the 30+ years I have lived in this town (especially in my younger “long-hair-musician” years). Even so, I value and have empathy for the job that cops do. More importantly, I can see though the hypocrisy of those that demand for privacy in their personal lives, and care and compassion for humanity, but then quickly jump on the band wagon to insert their nose into a cop’s personal business and be hyper-critical of behaviors that they accept and defend in themselves and almost every other group of people. It is disingenuous to claim your concern for public safety. You mention teachers. How about we dig into the private lives of all teachers to make sure they don’t damage all those young minds they care for? I know teachers that drink to excess at times. There are many people in other lines of work that get busted for drunk and disorderly conduct. Ever been to a bar or a sporting event? Why doesn’t DPD investigate these and report line-by-line what has happened. The obvious answer is that he has an anti-cop agenda and he is supported by the fact that cops are easy targets for anti-establishment activists simply because of the job they must do.

    As I understand, Mr. Feher was not on duty when this event occurred. Cops have enough stress and scrutiny while on the job. What gives anyone the right to extend this to their personal life? How about this… everyone that feels the need to dig into this cop’s personal incident would allow the same inquiry into their own past behaviors. I suspect that most in this town would have a problem with that given the general politics do not even support wiretapping calls to known terrorists.

    I am all for rational and calm police oversight, but not discrimination and veiled meanness again cops. This is a detailed review of a police report encapsulated in a shaming, conspiratorial-cover-up context. I am more than disturbed by the general acceptance of this practice by many in this town. I assume you would not accept the same had Paul Narr and Tony Feher been teachers, so why because they are cops? Think a bit more please.

  99. chester

    “Chester, I’ve read your post at least three times now an each time it’s more disturbing. For one reason, you appear to be a police officer or at least close to the dpd based on this and other comments written in the past.”

    Davis mother, I am not a cop and am not particularily close to the DPD, but I know cops and have relatives in law enforcement. I have been treated harshly by Davis cops at times in the 30+ years I have lived in this town (especially in my younger “long-hair-musician” years). Even so, I value and have empathy for the job that cops do. More importantly, I can see though the hypocrisy of those that demand for privacy in their personal lives, and care and compassion for humanity, but then quickly jump on the band wagon to insert their nose into a cop’s personal business and be hyper-critical of behaviors that they accept and defend in themselves and almost every other group of people. It is disingenuous to claim your concern for public safety. You mention teachers. How about we dig into the private lives of all teachers to make sure they don’t damage all those young minds they care for? I know teachers that drink to excess at times. There are many people in other lines of work that get busted for drunk and disorderly conduct. Ever been to a bar or a sporting event? Why doesn’t DPD investigate these and report line-by-line what has happened. The obvious answer is that he has an anti-cop agenda and he is supported by the fact that cops are easy targets for anti-establishment activists simply because of the job they must do.

    As I understand, Mr. Feher was not on duty when this event occurred. Cops have enough stress and scrutiny while on the job. What gives anyone the right to extend this to their personal life? How about this… everyone that feels the need to dig into this cop’s personal incident would allow the same inquiry into their own past behaviors. I suspect that most in this town would have a problem with that given the general politics do not even support wiretapping calls to known terrorists.

    I am all for rational and calm police oversight, but not discrimination and veiled meanness again cops. This is a detailed review of a police report encapsulated in a shaming, conspiratorial-cover-up context. I am more than disturbed by the general acceptance of this practice by many in this town. I assume you would not accept the same had Paul Narr and Tony Feher been teachers, so why because they are cops? Think a bit more please.

  100. chester

    “Chester, I’ve read your post at least three times now an each time it’s more disturbing. For one reason, you appear to be a police officer or at least close to the dpd based on this and other comments written in the past.”

    Davis mother, I am not a cop and am not particularily close to the DPD, but I know cops and have relatives in law enforcement. I have been treated harshly by Davis cops at times in the 30+ years I have lived in this town (especially in my younger “long-hair-musician” years). Even so, I value and have empathy for the job that cops do. More importantly, I can see though the hypocrisy of those that demand for privacy in their personal lives, and care and compassion for humanity, but then quickly jump on the band wagon to insert their nose into a cop’s personal business and be hyper-critical of behaviors that they accept and defend in themselves and almost every other group of people. It is disingenuous to claim your concern for public safety. You mention teachers. How about we dig into the private lives of all teachers to make sure they don’t damage all those young minds they care for? I know teachers that drink to excess at times. There are many people in other lines of work that get busted for drunk and disorderly conduct. Ever been to a bar or a sporting event? Why doesn’t DPD investigate these and report line-by-line what has happened. The obvious answer is that he has an anti-cop agenda and he is supported by the fact that cops are easy targets for anti-establishment activists simply because of the job they must do.

    As I understand, Mr. Feher was not on duty when this event occurred. Cops have enough stress and scrutiny while on the job. What gives anyone the right to extend this to their personal life? How about this… everyone that feels the need to dig into this cop’s personal incident would allow the same inquiry into their own past behaviors. I suspect that most in this town would have a problem with that given the general politics do not even support wiretapping calls to known terrorists.

    I am all for rational and calm police oversight, but not discrimination and veiled meanness again cops. This is a detailed review of a police report encapsulated in a shaming, conspiratorial-cover-up context. I am more than disturbed by the general acceptance of this practice by many in this town. I assume you would not accept the same had Paul Narr and Tony Feher been teachers, so why because they are cops? Think a bit more please.

  101. Bob Aaronson

    “You had said over a year ago that there were no known cases of police misconduct that it was simply some sort of misunderstanding after you reviewed them.”

    I don’t recall ever saying anything like this.

    In the course of my work for the City, I have been troubled periodically by certain incidents. I have addressed those concerns internally with the appropriate police administrators. They have taken my feedback seriously and continue to work on the underlying issues.

    As well, I have been clear in my periodic public reports to the City Council and the community regarding the general outlines of the areas the DPD still need to improve in.

    Apart from posting here, please consider contacting me directly so I can clear this up. Anyone can reach me at aaronson(at)sonic.net.

  102. Bob Aaronson

    “You had said over a year ago that there were no known cases of police misconduct that it was simply some sort of misunderstanding after you reviewed them.”

    I don’t recall ever saying anything like this.

    In the course of my work for the City, I have been troubled periodically by certain incidents. I have addressed those concerns internally with the appropriate police administrators. They have taken my feedback seriously and continue to work on the underlying issues.

    As well, I have been clear in my periodic public reports to the City Council and the community regarding the general outlines of the areas the DPD still need to improve in.

    Apart from posting here, please consider contacting me directly so I can clear this up. Anyone can reach me at aaronson(at)sonic.net.

  103. Bob Aaronson

    “You had said over a year ago that there were no known cases of police misconduct that it was simply some sort of misunderstanding after you reviewed them.”

    I don’t recall ever saying anything like this.

    In the course of my work for the City, I have been troubled periodically by certain incidents. I have addressed those concerns internally with the appropriate police administrators. They have taken my feedback seriously and continue to work on the underlying issues.

    As well, I have been clear in my periodic public reports to the City Council and the community regarding the general outlines of the areas the DPD still need to improve in.

    Apart from posting here, please consider contacting me directly so I can clear this up. Anyone can reach me at aaronson(at)sonic.net.

  104. Bob Aaronson

    “You had said over a year ago that there were no known cases of police misconduct that it was simply some sort of misunderstanding after you reviewed them.”

    I don’t recall ever saying anything like this.

    In the course of my work for the City, I have been troubled periodically by certain incidents. I have addressed those concerns internally with the appropriate police administrators. They have taken my feedback seriously and continue to work on the underlying issues.

    As well, I have been clear in my periodic public reports to the City Council and the community regarding the general outlines of the areas the DPD still need to improve in.

    Apart from posting here, please consider contacting me directly so I can clear this up. Anyone can reach me at aaronson(at)sonic.net.

  105. Mike

    Let’s hold on here Chester, part of your case here is based at least in part that Officer Feher was doing things ordinary citizens do and we find acceptable.

    I have a good deal of trouble accepting that premise. I’m generally a supporter of the police and not a big fan of Greenwald. But let’s review this case for a minute.

    Guy goes into bar, gets drunk, is a nuissance to women, asked to leave, refuses, police get involved, he gets arrested. If the story stops here, I’m with you this is a non-issue. But it doesn’t.

    At least twice from the discription of the report (which has not been contested by anyone on here a fact I find very tell) he brings up the fact that he’s a cop as a way to get out of this.

    He’s non-cooperative to the police.

    He threatens the police at multiple points in time. He says at one point wait until you get into my jurisdiction, another time he threatens the officer but backs off when the officer says and what.

    Are you telling me if I act like this to the police all I get is a PC 647(F)? There’s no way all I get is a drunk in public for that display.

    Also, he becomes vengeful by demanding that they arrest a woman for pushing him, when he clearly initiated the incident. Why didn’t they also charge him with a PC 332?

    Seems to me he got off lightly by the police.

    Sorry Chester, but, I am with Greenwald here as much as it pains me to say it, this is more than a guy just getting too drunk. And if he’s really having depression problems, someone needed to get him off his beat before he hurt someone on duty.

  106. Mike

    Let’s hold on here Chester, part of your case here is based at least in part that Officer Feher was doing things ordinary citizens do and we find acceptable.

    I have a good deal of trouble accepting that premise. I’m generally a supporter of the police and not a big fan of Greenwald. But let’s review this case for a minute.

    Guy goes into bar, gets drunk, is a nuissance to women, asked to leave, refuses, police get involved, he gets arrested. If the story stops here, I’m with you this is a non-issue. But it doesn’t.

    At least twice from the discription of the report (which has not been contested by anyone on here a fact I find very tell) he brings up the fact that he’s a cop as a way to get out of this.

    He’s non-cooperative to the police.

    He threatens the police at multiple points in time. He says at one point wait until you get into my jurisdiction, another time he threatens the officer but backs off when the officer says and what.

    Are you telling me if I act like this to the police all I get is a PC 647(F)? There’s no way all I get is a drunk in public for that display.

    Also, he becomes vengeful by demanding that they arrest a woman for pushing him, when he clearly initiated the incident. Why didn’t they also charge him with a PC 332?

    Seems to me he got off lightly by the police.

    Sorry Chester, but, I am with Greenwald here as much as it pains me to say it, this is more than a guy just getting too drunk. And if he’s really having depression problems, someone needed to get him off his beat before he hurt someone on duty.

  107. Mike

    Let’s hold on here Chester, part of your case here is based at least in part that Officer Feher was doing things ordinary citizens do and we find acceptable.

    I have a good deal of trouble accepting that premise. I’m generally a supporter of the police and not a big fan of Greenwald. But let’s review this case for a minute.

    Guy goes into bar, gets drunk, is a nuissance to women, asked to leave, refuses, police get involved, he gets arrested. If the story stops here, I’m with you this is a non-issue. But it doesn’t.

    At least twice from the discription of the report (which has not been contested by anyone on here a fact I find very tell) he brings up the fact that he’s a cop as a way to get out of this.

    He’s non-cooperative to the police.

    He threatens the police at multiple points in time. He says at one point wait until you get into my jurisdiction, another time he threatens the officer but backs off when the officer says and what.

    Are you telling me if I act like this to the police all I get is a PC 647(F)? There’s no way all I get is a drunk in public for that display.

    Also, he becomes vengeful by demanding that they arrest a woman for pushing him, when he clearly initiated the incident. Why didn’t they also charge him with a PC 332?

    Seems to me he got off lightly by the police.

    Sorry Chester, but, I am with Greenwald here as much as it pains me to say it, this is more than a guy just getting too drunk. And if he’s really having depression problems, someone needed to get him off his beat before he hurt someone on duty.

  108. Mike

    Let’s hold on here Chester, part of your case here is based at least in part that Officer Feher was doing things ordinary citizens do and we find acceptable.

    I have a good deal of trouble accepting that premise. I’m generally a supporter of the police and not a big fan of Greenwald. But let’s review this case for a minute.

    Guy goes into bar, gets drunk, is a nuissance to women, asked to leave, refuses, police get involved, he gets arrested. If the story stops here, I’m with you this is a non-issue. But it doesn’t.

    At least twice from the discription of the report (which has not been contested by anyone on here a fact I find very tell) he brings up the fact that he’s a cop as a way to get out of this.

    He’s non-cooperative to the police.

    He threatens the police at multiple points in time. He says at one point wait until you get into my jurisdiction, another time he threatens the officer but backs off when the officer says and what.

    Are you telling me if I act like this to the police all I get is a PC 647(F)? There’s no way all I get is a drunk in public for that display.

    Also, he becomes vengeful by demanding that they arrest a woman for pushing him, when he clearly initiated the incident. Why didn’t they also charge him with a PC 332?

    Seems to me he got off lightly by the police.

    Sorry Chester, but, I am with Greenwald here as much as it pains me to say it, this is more than a guy just getting too drunk. And if he’s really having depression problems, someone needed to get him off his beat before he hurt someone on duty.

  109. Anonymous

    A young guy on a day off goes out and gets really drunk and obnoxious. He hits on women and when rebuffed becomes rude and offensive, argues with security and the police, behaves generally like a jerk and finally gets arrested for being drunk in public.

    Sorry, but this sounds like something men tend to do from time to time. We can roll our eyes, condemn his soundly and hope that he straightens up.

    Then we hear that he has a close friend that committed suicide after binge drinking…

    Let’s let this be. I truly believe that Landy and his staff, the young officers family and friends see the seriousness of this incident and are addressing it. I really think that we all need to decide that it’s none of our business.

  110. Anonymous

    A young guy on a day off goes out and gets really drunk and obnoxious. He hits on women and when rebuffed becomes rude and offensive, argues with security and the police, behaves generally like a jerk and finally gets arrested for being drunk in public.

    Sorry, but this sounds like something men tend to do from time to time. We can roll our eyes, condemn his soundly and hope that he straightens up.

    Then we hear that he has a close friend that committed suicide after binge drinking…

    Let’s let this be. I truly believe that Landy and his staff, the young officers family and friends see the seriousness of this incident and are addressing it. I really think that we all need to decide that it’s none of our business.

  111. Anonymous

    A young guy on a day off goes out and gets really drunk and obnoxious. He hits on women and when rebuffed becomes rude and offensive, argues with security and the police, behaves generally like a jerk and finally gets arrested for being drunk in public.

    Sorry, but this sounds like something men tend to do from time to time. We can roll our eyes, condemn his soundly and hope that he straightens up.

    Then we hear that he has a close friend that committed suicide after binge drinking…

    Let’s let this be. I truly believe that Landy and his staff, the young officers family and friends see the seriousness of this incident and are addressing it. I really think that we all need to decide that it’s none of our business.

  112. Anonymous

    A young guy on a day off goes out and gets really drunk and obnoxious. He hits on women and when rebuffed becomes rude and offensive, argues with security and the police, behaves generally like a jerk and finally gets arrested for being drunk in public.

    Sorry, but this sounds like something men tend to do from time to time. We can roll our eyes, condemn his soundly and hope that he straightens up.

    Then we hear that he has a close friend that committed suicide after binge drinking…

    Let’s let this be. I truly believe that Landy and his staff, the young officers family and friends see the seriousness of this incident and are addressing it. I really think that we all need to decide that it’s none of our business.

  113. Anonymous

    To add to what Mike said, I think there is another important distinction between a cop and a teacher or a grocery clerk. Cops enforce the law. Cops have to live by the law on duty and off. What might be a minor infraction for an accountant or a press operator is a bigger deal for a cop because of his public role in law enforcement. It becomes much worse if it’s not an isolated incident or if the cop has a substance abuse problem. None of those apply to people who are not paid to enforce our laws. If a judge had behaved as the officer is alleged to have behaved, that would be troubling as well.

  114. Anonymous

    To add to what Mike said, I think there is another important distinction between a cop and a teacher or a grocery clerk. Cops enforce the law. Cops have to live by the law on duty and off. What might be a minor infraction for an accountant or a press operator is a bigger deal for a cop because of his public role in law enforcement. It becomes much worse if it’s not an isolated incident or if the cop has a substance abuse problem. None of those apply to people who are not paid to enforce our laws. If a judge had behaved as the officer is alleged to have behaved, that would be troubling as well.

  115. Anonymous

    To add to what Mike said, I think there is another important distinction between a cop and a teacher or a grocery clerk. Cops enforce the law. Cops have to live by the law on duty and off. What might be a minor infraction for an accountant or a press operator is a bigger deal for a cop because of his public role in law enforcement. It becomes much worse if it’s not an isolated incident or if the cop has a substance abuse problem. None of those apply to people who are not paid to enforce our laws. If a judge had behaved as the officer is alleged to have behaved, that would be troubling as well.

  116. Anonymous

    To add to what Mike said, I think there is another important distinction between a cop and a teacher or a grocery clerk. Cops enforce the law. Cops have to live by the law on duty and off. What might be a minor infraction for an accountant or a press operator is a bigger deal for a cop because of his public role in law enforcement. It becomes much worse if it’s not an isolated incident or if the cop has a substance abuse problem. None of those apply to people who are not paid to enforce our laws. If a judge had behaved as the officer is alleged to have behaved, that would be troubling as well.

  117. Chester

    “someone needed to get him off his beat before he hurt someone on duty.”

    I think you are still way off base. Don’t you think it is a very big step making a case that he will “hurt someone on duty” because he was drunk off duty? Even if he is having depression problems (I suggested that because I had heard it from someone else, but I don’t know), many people do and continue to work.

    Think about that. How do you make that leap that he is a problem cop? I think it is indicative of the exact problem I am discussing. What other profession gets that same cover and quick and illogical assignment of “danger”? This was his personal time. He was not being paid to be a cop. He was drunk. He has a potential explanation for why he was drunk, but that is besides the point. He has the right to get drunk on his own time. Drunk people say stupid things.

    If he was drinking on the job, that would be a completely different issue and I would support having him disciplined or dismissed. But, this report was/is entirely inappropriate and indicative of a larger issue of anti-cop attitudes.

    Even if you have no problem with DPD’s mission to “clean up” Davis law enforcement, you should have a problem with so much intrusion into the personal and private problems of this one person. He has a right to drink, get drunk and face the consequences of the stupid things he says without it being broadcast for political gain. Read it again and pay attention to the tone.

    Mr. Feher got off lightly from the police because they understand the situation much better than any of us armchair quarterbacks.

    So, sorry mike said… I don’t think you understand my point, or else we will have to agree to disagree.

  118. Chester

    “someone needed to get him off his beat before he hurt someone on duty.”

    I think you are still way off base. Don’t you think it is a very big step making a case that he will “hurt someone on duty” because he was drunk off duty? Even if he is having depression problems (I suggested that because I had heard it from someone else, but I don’t know), many people do and continue to work.

    Think about that. How do you make that leap that he is a problem cop? I think it is indicative of the exact problem I am discussing. What other profession gets that same cover and quick and illogical assignment of “danger”? This was his personal time. He was not being paid to be a cop. He was drunk. He has a potential explanation for why he was drunk, but that is besides the point. He has the right to get drunk on his own time. Drunk people say stupid things.

    If he was drinking on the job, that would be a completely different issue and I would support having him disciplined or dismissed. But, this report was/is entirely inappropriate and indicative of a larger issue of anti-cop attitudes.

    Even if you have no problem with DPD’s mission to “clean up” Davis law enforcement, you should have a problem with so much intrusion into the personal and private problems of this one person. He has a right to drink, get drunk and face the consequences of the stupid things he says without it being broadcast for political gain. Read it again and pay attention to the tone.

    Mr. Feher got off lightly from the police because they understand the situation much better than any of us armchair quarterbacks.

    So, sorry mike said… I don’t think you understand my point, or else we will have to agree to disagree.

  119. Chester

    “someone needed to get him off his beat before he hurt someone on duty.”

    I think you are still way off base. Don’t you think it is a very big step making a case that he will “hurt someone on duty” because he was drunk off duty? Even if he is having depression problems (I suggested that because I had heard it from someone else, but I don’t know), many people do and continue to work.

    Think about that. How do you make that leap that he is a problem cop? I think it is indicative of the exact problem I am discussing. What other profession gets that same cover and quick and illogical assignment of “danger”? This was his personal time. He was not being paid to be a cop. He was drunk. He has a potential explanation for why he was drunk, but that is besides the point. He has the right to get drunk on his own time. Drunk people say stupid things.

    If he was drinking on the job, that would be a completely different issue and I would support having him disciplined or dismissed. But, this report was/is entirely inappropriate and indicative of a larger issue of anti-cop attitudes.

    Even if you have no problem with DPD’s mission to “clean up” Davis law enforcement, you should have a problem with so much intrusion into the personal and private problems of this one person. He has a right to drink, get drunk and face the consequences of the stupid things he says without it being broadcast for political gain. Read it again and pay attention to the tone.

    Mr. Feher got off lightly from the police because they understand the situation much better than any of us armchair quarterbacks.

    So, sorry mike said… I don’t think you understand my point, or else we will have to agree to disagree.

  120. Chester

    “someone needed to get him off his beat before he hurt someone on duty.”

    I think you are still way off base. Don’t you think it is a very big step making a case that he will “hurt someone on duty” because he was drunk off duty? Even if he is having depression problems (I suggested that because I had heard it from someone else, but I don’t know), many people do and continue to work.

    Think about that. How do you make that leap that he is a problem cop? I think it is indicative of the exact problem I am discussing. What other profession gets that same cover and quick and illogical assignment of “danger”? This was his personal time. He was not being paid to be a cop. He was drunk. He has a potential explanation for why he was drunk, but that is besides the point. He has the right to get drunk on his own time. Drunk people say stupid things.

    If he was drinking on the job, that would be a completely different issue and I would support having him disciplined or dismissed. But, this report was/is entirely inappropriate and indicative of a larger issue of anti-cop attitudes.

    Even if you have no problem with DPD’s mission to “clean up” Davis law enforcement, you should have a problem with so much intrusion into the personal and private problems of this one person. He has a right to drink, get drunk and face the consequences of the stupid things he says without it being broadcast for political gain. Read it again and pay attention to the tone.

    Mr. Feher got off lightly from the police because they understand the situation much better than any of us armchair quarterbacks.

    So, sorry mike said… I don’t think you understand my point, or else we will have to agree to disagree.

  121. Mike

    “A young guy on a day off goes out and gets really drunk and obnoxious. He hits on women and when rebuffed becomes rude and offensive, argues with security and the police, behaves generally like a jerk and finally gets arrested for being drunk in public.

    Sorry, but this sounds like something men tend to do from time to time.”

    Interesting you cut it off at the point where I said if it stopped there I would agree. But what you don’t mention is what happened after he got arrested which is part of why I think this is more than something “men tend to do.” Also, add iin the fact he’s a cop and he’s held to a higher standard than what “men tend to do.”

  122. Mike

    “A young guy on a day off goes out and gets really drunk and obnoxious. He hits on women and when rebuffed becomes rude and offensive, argues with security and the police, behaves generally like a jerk and finally gets arrested for being drunk in public.

    Sorry, but this sounds like something men tend to do from time to time.”

    Interesting you cut it off at the point where I said if it stopped there I would agree. But what you don’t mention is what happened after he got arrested which is part of why I think this is more than something “men tend to do.” Also, add iin the fact he’s a cop and he’s held to a higher standard than what “men tend to do.”

  123. Mike

    “A young guy on a day off goes out and gets really drunk and obnoxious. He hits on women and when rebuffed becomes rude and offensive, argues with security and the police, behaves generally like a jerk and finally gets arrested for being drunk in public.

    Sorry, but this sounds like something men tend to do from time to time.”

    Interesting you cut it off at the point where I said if it stopped there I would agree. But what you don’t mention is what happened after he got arrested which is part of why I think this is more than something “men tend to do.” Also, add iin the fact he’s a cop and he’s held to a higher standard than what “men tend to do.”

  124. Mike

    “A young guy on a day off goes out and gets really drunk and obnoxious. He hits on women and when rebuffed becomes rude and offensive, argues with security and the police, behaves generally like a jerk and finally gets arrested for being drunk in public.

    Sorry, but this sounds like something men tend to do from time to time.”

    Interesting you cut it off at the point where I said if it stopped there I would agree. But what you don’t mention is what happened after he got arrested which is part of why I think this is more than something “men tend to do.” Also, add iin the fact he’s a cop and he’s held to a higher standard than what “men tend to do.”

  125. Mike

    “A young guy on a day off goes out and gets really drunk and obnoxious. He hits on women and when rebuffed becomes rude and offensive, argues with security and the police, behaves generally like a jerk and finally gets arrested for being drunk in public.

    Sorry, but this sounds like something men tend to do from time to time.”

    Interesting you cut it off at the point where I said if it stopped there I would agree. But what you don’t mention is what happened after he got arrested which is part of why I think this is more than something “men tend to do.” Also, add iin the fact he’s a cop and he’s held to a higher standard than what “men tend to do.”

  126. Mike

    Chester, no I don’t think it’s a big step, a person capable of acting this way while off-duty, a person who uses his badge in an effort to shield himself from the consequences of his actions on multiple occasions doesn’t get this benefit.

    Moreover, you argue that this is a private act, with all due respect, no it’s not. He did it in public. It involved other members of the public. He was arrested which is a public matter.

    I’m not going to make a judgment on Greenwald or his motives. They’re irrelevant to what Feher did. You’re defending it because he was depressed, sorry, he’s a cop, he’s SWORN to protect the law and now he’s violated it in a blatant manner. Sorry, I think this goes to the character of the officer sir, and I disagree with your attempts to minimize it.

  127. Mike

    Chester, no I don’t think it’s a big step, a person capable of acting this way while off-duty, a person who uses his badge in an effort to shield himself from the consequences of his actions on multiple occasions doesn’t get this benefit.

    Moreover, you argue that this is a private act, with all due respect, no it’s not. He did it in public. It involved other members of the public. He was arrested which is a public matter.

    I’m not going to make a judgment on Greenwald or his motives. They’re irrelevant to what Feher did. You’re defending it because he was depressed, sorry, he’s a cop, he’s SWORN to protect the law and now he’s violated it in a blatant manner. Sorry, I think this goes to the character of the officer sir, and I disagree with your attempts to minimize it.

  128. Mike

    Chester, no I don’t think it’s a big step, a person capable of acting this way while off-duty, a person who uses his badge in an effort to shield himself from the consequences of his actions on multiple occasions doesn’t get this benefit.

    Moreover, you argue that this is a private act, with all due respect, no it’s not. He did it in public. It involved other members of the public. He was arrested which is a public matter.

    I’m not going to make a judgment on Greenwald or his motives. They’re irrelevant to what Feher did. You’re defending it because he was depressed, sorry, he’s a cop, he’s SWORN to protect the law and now he’s violated it in a blatant manner. Sorry, I think this goes to the character of the officer sir, and I disagree with your attempts to minimize it.

  129. Mike

    Chester, no I don’t think it’s a big step, a person capable of acting this way while off-duty, a person who uses his badge in an effort to shield himself from the consequences of his actions on multiple occasions doesn’t get this benefit.

    Moreover, you argue that this is a private act, with all due respect, no it’s not. He did it in public. It involved other members of the public. He was arrested which is a public matter.

    I’m not going to make a judgment on Greenwald or his motives. They’re irrelevant to what Feher did. You’re defending it because he was depressed, sorry, he’s a cop, he’s SWORN to protect the law and now he’s violated it in a blatant manner. Sorry, I think this goes to the character of the officer sir, and I disagree with your attempts to minimize it.

  130. Mike

    Chester, no I don’t think it’s a big step, a person capable of acting this way while off-duty, a person who uses his badge in an effort to shield himself from the consequences of his actions on multiple occasions doesn’t get this benefit.

    Moreover, you argue that this is a private act, with all due respect, no it’s not. He did it in public. It involved other members of the public. He was arrested which is a public matter.

    I’m not going to make a judgment on Greenwald or his motives. They’re irrelevant to what Feher did. You’re defending it because he was depressed, sorry, he’s a cop, he’s SWORN to protect the law and now he’s violated it in a blatant manner. Sorry, I think this goes to the character of the officer sir, and I disagree with your attempts to minimize it.

  131. Anonymous

    Glad to know DPD is on top of things such as this. Now DPD how did you manage to dig this dirt up when no one else could or wanted to? Hmmm….did one of his fellow officers squeal? How else would you have known? Maybe an officer who feels that Feher is going to get off easy (again)? Next, cops are held to a higher standard and depending on what happens to this officer will be VERY telling of what kind of a leader Chief Black truly is. He has been talking the talk but now can he walk the walk? And since this is a personnel mattter, everything will remain confidential unless DPD can get someone to squeal again. My guess is that since this officer was raised in Davis and grew up here, he will be treated better. Davisites love their own don’t they?

  132. Anonymous

    Glad to know DPD is on top of things such as this. Now DPD how did you manage to dig this dirt up when no one else could or wanted to? Hmmm….did one of his fellow officers squeal? How else would you have known? Maybe an officer who feels that Feher is going to get off easy (again)? Next, cops are held to a higher standard and depending on what happens to this officer will be VERY telling of what kind of a leader Chief Black truly is. He has been talking the talk but now can he walk the walk? And since this is a personnel mattter, everything will remain confidential unless DPD can get someone to squeal again. My guess is that since this officer was raised in Davis and grew up here, he will be treated better. Davisites love their own don’t they?

  133. Anonymous

    Glad to know DPD is on top of things such as this. Now DPD how did you manage to dig this dirt up when no one else could or wanted to? Hmmm….did one of his fellow officers squeal? How else would you have known? Maybe an officer who feels that Feher is going to get off easy (again)? Next, cops are held to a higher standard and depending on what happens to this officer will be VERY telling of what kind of a leader Chief Black truly is. He has been talking the talk but now can he walk the walk? And since this is a personnel mattter, everything will remain confidential unless DPD can get someone to squeal again. My guess is that since this officer was raised in Davis and grew up here, he will be treated better. Davisites love their own don’t they?

  134. Anonymous

    Glad to know DPD is on top of things such as this. Now DPD how did you manage to dig this dirt up when no one else could or wanted to? Hmmm….did one of his fellow officers squeal? How else would you have known? Maybe an officer who feels that Feher is going to get off easy (again)? Next, cops are held to a higher standard and depending on what happens to this officer will be VERY telling of what kind of a leader Chief Black truly is. He has been talking the talk but now can he walk the walk? And since this is a personnel mattter, everything will remain confidential unless DPD can get someone to squeal again. My guess is that since this officer was raised in Davis and grew up here, he will be treated better. Davisites love their own don’t they?

  135. Anonymous

    Glad to know DPD is on top of things such as this. Now DPD how did you manage to dig this dirt up when no one else could or wanted to? Hmmm….did one of his fellow officers squeal? How else would you have known? Maybe an officer who feels that Feher is going to get off easy (again)? Next, cops are held to a higher standard and depending on what happens to this officer will be VERY telling of what kind of a leader Chief Black truly is. He has been talking the talk but now can he walk the walk? And since this is a personnel mattter, everything will remain confidential unless DPD can get someone to squeal again. My guess is that since this officer was raised in Davis and grew up here, he will be treated better. Davisites love their own don’t they?

  136. Anonymous

    Who was with Feher when he was arrested? The one that he pushed away? Any other Davis cops or firefighers there by chance? And what’s his past history like? Complaints? Use of force? False arrest? Cops generally treat other cops with favoritism so Feher must have really gone above and beyond the call of pissing off the wrong supervisor! Think about it- if you’re already a cop, just how bad do you have to behave to get arrested by another cop? This guy needs to find a new profession and not be given a slap on the wrist- which he will probably get. I’d love to be the next guy Feher arrests for drunk in public! Imagine that cartoon! Feher used his badge and standing as a cop to try and get off and do whatever he wanted. This is a disgrace to his law abiding fellow men and women in blue. They should all be angry at him for disgracing their uniform and profession. What else does this man do when he on duty? Funny part is he wouldn’t say he worked for DPD but rather DOJ. Was he ashamed to say he works for little ol’ DPD as compared with another big bad a** agency? Please stay on this story DPD!

  137. Anonymous

    Who was with Feher when he was arrested? The one that he pushed away? Any other Davis cops or firefighers there by chance? And what’s his past history like? Complaints? Use of force? False arrest? Cops generally treat other cops with favoritism so Feher must have really gone above and beyond the call of pissing off the wrong supervisor! Think about it- if you’re already a cop, just how bad do you have to behave to get arrested by another cop? This guy needs to find a new profession and not be given a slap on the wrist- which he will probably get. I’d love to be the next guy Feher arrests for drunk in public! Imagine that cartoon! Feher used his badge and standing as a cop to try and get off and do whatever he wanted. This is a disgrace to his law abiding fellow men and women in blue. They should all be angry at him for disgracing their uniform and profession. What else does this man do when he on duty? Funny part is he wouldn’t say he worked for DPD but rather DOJ. Was he ashamed to say he works for little ol’ DPD as compared with another big bad a** agency? Please stay on this story DPD!

  138. Anonymous

    Who was with Feher when he was arrested? The one that he pushed away? Any other Davis cops or firefighers there by chance? And what’s his past history like? Complaints? Use of force? False arrest? Cops generally treat other cops with favoritism so Feher must have really gone above and beyond the call of pissing off the wrong supervisor! Think about it- if you’re already a cop, just how bad do you have to behave to get arrested by another cop? This guy needs to find a new profession and not be given a slap on the wrist- which he will probably get. I’d love to be the next guy Feher arrests for drunk in public! Imagine that cartoon! Feher used his badge and standing as a cop to try and get off and do whatever he wanted. This is a disgrace to his law abiding fellow men and women in blue. They should all be angry at him for disgracing their uniform and profession. What else does this man do when he on duty? Funny part is he wouldn’t say he worked for DPD but rather DOJ. Was he ashamed to say he works for little ol’ DPD as compared with another big bad a** agency? Please stay on this story DPD!

  139. Anonymous

    Who was with Feher when he was arrested? The one that he pushed away? Any other Davis cops or firefighers there by chance? And what’s his past history like? Complaints? Use of force? False arrest? Cops generally treat other cops with favoritism so Feher must have really gone above and beyond the call of pissing off the wrong supervisor! Think about it- if you’re already a cop, just how bad do you have to behave to get arrested by another cop? This guy needs to find a new profession and not be given a slap on the wrist- which he will probably get. I’d love to be the next guy Feher arrests for drunk in public! Imagine that cartoon! Feher used his badge and standing as a cop to try and get off and do whatever he wanted. This is a disgrace to his law abiding fellow men and women in blue. They should all be angry at him for disgracing their uniform and profession. What else does this man do when he on duty? Funny part is he wouldn’t say he worked for DPD but rather DOJ. Was he ashamed to say he works for little ol’ DPD as compared with another big bad a** agency? Please stay on this story DPD!

  140. Anonymous

    Who was with Feher when he was arrested? The one that he pushed away? Any other Davis cops or firefighers there by chance? And what’s his past history like? Complaints? Use of force? False arrest? Cops generally treat other cops with favoritism so Feher must have really gone above and beyond the call of pissing off the wrong supervisor! Think about it- if you’re already a cop, just how bad do you have to behave to get arrested by another cop? This guy needs to find a new profession and not be given a slap on the wrist- which he will probably get. I’d love to be the next guy Feher arrests for drunk in public! Imagine that cartoon! Feher used his badge and standing as a cop to try and get off and do whatever he wanted. This is a disgrace to his law abiding fellow men and women in blue. They should all be angry at him for disgracing their uniform and profession. What else does this man do when he on duty? Funny part is he wouldn’t say he worked for DPD but rather DOJ. Was he ashamed to say he works for little ol’ DPD as compared with another big bad a** agency? Please stay on this story DPD!

  141. David M. Greenwald

    Chester:

    While I disagree with your views often, I do respect your opinion. If you ever want to talk face-to-face let me know. If not, I understand.

    Since the issue has come up, let me lay out my thinking on this, why I chose this story, and the process I went through in order to get there. It was my initial intention not to comment in this thread other than convey clarification and facts, however, since the issue has been raised by Chester, I decided I needed to compose a response in a thoughtful manner, reflective of the thoughtfulness of Chester’s post.

    I found out about the arrest of Feher on October 8, 2008. Almost a month after the arrest and also over a month ago. My first call was to the department where Assistant Chief Pierce cited personnel issues for not confirming the arrest.

    A few calls to other sources confirmed the arrest, but it was suggested to me what Chester said–that he was a close friend of Paul Narr and this was related to that incident. Based on that information I was inclined not to run a story on an officer who was off-duty and arrested in Sacramento.

    However, a week later, I was sent the arrest report. Once I read the arrest report, it changed my thinking on this incident.

    What concerned me was Feher’s use of his authority, his lack of cooperation, his threats to other officers, his basic demeanor, and his vindictiveness of dragging the woman into the legal problems because he was angry that he was going to be arrested.

    However, I would spend an additional three weeks of investigation and discussion before deciding with finality last week that this was a story that needed to run.

    There are a lot of reasons tied into the final decision that I cannot disclose at this point. But, the bottom line is that I think an individual who carries a badge and a gun, and can both take lives and take away freedom is held to a higher standard than the rest of us, even when off-duty. I think he attempted to abuse that responsibility by asserting the fact that he was an officer of the law when he was arrested, and I am concerned based on his behavior at the time about his mental state.

    These are private issues however and I made the determination to run this as a straight news story, with no commentary. I believe that the department will adequately handle this matter. I trust Landy Black and Bob Aaronson to do the right thing here. But I also think that the public deserves to know that this has occurred.

    I doubt Chester will agree with me here, but I attempted to cover this in the most professional and least judgmental way. In fact, I intentionally kept some more embarrassing facts out of this report out of respect for the department.

  142. David M. Greenwald

    Chester:

    While I disagree with your views often, I do respect your opinion. If you ever want to talk face-to-face let me know. If not, I understand.

    Since the issue has come up, let me lay out my thinking on this, why I chose this story, and the process I went through in order to get there. It was my initial intention not to comment in this thread other than convey clarification and facts, however, since the issue has been raised by Chester, I decided I needed to compose a response in a thoughtful manner, reflective of the thoughtfulness of Chester’s post.

    I found out about the arrest of Feher on October 8, 2008. Almost a month after the arrest and also over a month ago. My first call was to the department where Assistant Chief Pierce cited personnel issues for not confirming the arrest.

    A few calls to other sources confirmed the arrest, but it was suggested to me what Chester said–that he was a close friend of Paul Narr and this was related to that incident. Based on that information I was inclined not to run a story on an officer who was off-duty and arrested in Sacramento.

    However, a week later, I was sent the arrest report. Once I read the arrest report, it changed my thinking on this incident.

    What concerned me was Feher’s use of his authority, his lack of cooperation, his threats to other officers, his basic demeanor, and his vindictiveness of dragging the woman into the legal problems because he was angry that he was going to be arrested.

    However, I would spend an additional three weeks of investigation and discussion before deciding with finality last week that this was a story that needed to run.

    There are a lot of reasons tied into the final decision that I cannot disclose at this point. But, the bottom line is that I think an individual who carries a badge and a gun, and can both take lives and take away freedom is held to a higher standard than the rest of us, even when off-duty. I think he attempted to abuse that responsibility by asserting the fact that he was an officer of the law when he was arrested, and I am concerned based on his behavior at the time about his mental state.

    These are private issues however and I made the determination to run this as a straight news story, with no commentary. I believe that the department will adequately handle this matter. I trust Landy Black and Bob Aaronson to do the right thing here. But I also think that the public deserves to know that this has occurred.

    I doubt Chester will agree with me here, but I attempted to cover this in the most professional and least judgmental way. In fact, I intentionally kept some more embarrassing facts out of this report out of respect for the department.

  143. David M. Greenwald

    Chester:

    While I disagree with your views often, I do respect your opinion. If you ever want to talk face-to-face let me know. If not, I understand.

    Since the issue has come up, let me lay out my thinking on this, why I chose this story, and the process I went through in order to get there. It was my initial intention not to comment in this thread other than convey clarification and facts, however, since the issue has been raised by Chester, I decided I needed to compose a response in a thoughtful manner, reflective of the thoughtfulness of Chester’s post.

    I found out about the arrest of Feher on October 8, 2008. Almost a month after the arrest and also over a month ago. My first call was to the department where Assistant Chief Pierce cited personnel issues for not confirming the arrest.

    A few calls to other sources confirmed the arrest, but it was suggested to me what Chester said–that he was a close friend of Paul Narr and this was related to that incident. Based on that information I was inclined not to run a story on an officer who was off-duty and arrested in Sacramento.

    However, a week later, I was sent the arrest report. Once I read the arrest report, it changed my thinking on this incident.

    What concerned me was Feher’s use of his authority, his lack of cooperation, his threats to other officers, his basic demeanor, and his vindictiveness of dragging the woman into the legal problems because he was angry that he was going to be arrested.

    However, I would spend an additional three weeks of investigation and discussion before deciding with finality last week that this was a story that needed to run.

    There are a lot of reasons tied into the final decision that I cannot disclose at this point. But, the bottom line is that I think an individual who carries a badge and a gun, and can both take lives and take away freedom is held to a higher standard than the rest of us, even when off-duty. I think he attempted to abuse that responsibility by asserting the fact that he was an officer of the law when he was arrested, and I am concerned based on his behavior at the time about his mental state.

    These are private issues however and I made the determination to run this as a straight news story, with no commentary. I believe that the department will adequately handle this matter. I trust Landy Black and Bob Aaronson to do the right thing here. But I also think that the public deserves to know that this has occurred.

    I doubt Chester will agree with me here, but I attempted to cover this in the most professional and least judgmental way. In fact, I intentionally kept some more embarrassing facts out of this report out of respect for the department.

  144. David M. Greenwald

    Chester:

    While I disagree with your views often, I do respect your opinion. If you ever want to talk face-to-face let me know. If not, I understand.

    Since the issue has come up, let me lay out my thinking on this, why I chose this story, and the process I went through in order to get there. It was my initial intention not to comment in this thread other than convey clarification and facts, however, since the issue has been raised by Chester, I decided I needed to compose a response in a thoughtful manner, reflective of the thoughtfulness of Chester’s post.

    I found out about the arrest of Feher on October 8, 2008. Almost a month after the arrest and also over a month ago. My first call was to the department where Assistant Chief Pierce cited personnel issues for not confirming the arrest.

    A few calls to other sources confirmed the arrest, but it was suggested to me what Chester said–that he was a close friend of Paul Narr and this was related to that incident. Based on that information I was inclined not to run a story on an officer who was off-duty and arrested in Sacramento.

    However, a week later, I was sent the arrest report. Once I read the arrest report, it changed my thinking on this incident.

    What concerned me was Feher’s use of his authority, his lack of cooperation, his threats to other officers, his basic demeanor, and his vindictiveness of dragging the woman into the legal problems because he was angry that he was going to be arrested.

    However, I would spend an additional three weeks of investigation and discussion before deciding with finality last week that this was a story that needed to run.

    There are a lot of reasons tied into the final decision that I cannot disclose at this point. But, the bottom line is that I think an individual who carries a badge and a gun, and can both take lives and take away freedom is held to a higher standard than the rest of us, even when off-duty. I think he attempted to abuse that responsibility by asserting the fact that he was an officer of the law when he was arrested, and I am concerned based on his behavior at the time about his mental state.

    These are private issues however and I made the determination to run this as a straight news story, with no commentary. I believe that the department will adequately handle this matter. I trust Landy Black and Bob Aaronson to do the right thing here. But I also think that the public deserves to know that this has occurred.

    I doubt Chester will agree with me here, but I attempted to cover this in the most professional and least judgmental way. In fact, I intentionally kept some more embarrassing facts out of this report out of respect for the department.

  145. David M. Greenwald

    Chester:

    While I disagree with your views often, I do respect your opinion. If you ever want to talk face-to-face let me know. If not, I understand.

    Since the issue has come up, let me lay out my thinking on this, why I chose this story, and the process I went through in order to get there. It was my initial intention not to comment in this thread other than convey clarification and facts, however, since the issue has been raised by Chester, I decided I needed to compose a response in a thoughtful manner, reflective of the thoughtfulness of Chester’s post.

    I found out about the arrest of Feher on October 8, 2008. Almost a month after the arrest and also over a month ago. My first call was to the department where Assistant Chief Pierce cited personnel issues for not confirming the arrest.

    A few calls to other sources confirmed the arrest, but it was suggested to me what Chester said–that he was a close friend of Paul Narr and this was related to that incident. Based on that information I was inclined not to run a story on an officer who was off-duty and arrested in Sacramento.

    However, a week later, I was sent the arrest report. Once I read the arrest report, it changed my thinking on this incident.

    What concerned me was Feher’s use of his authority, his lack of cooperation, his threats to other officers, his basic demeanor, and his vindictiveness of dragging the woman into the legal problems because he was angry that he was going to be arrested.

    However, I would spend an additional three weeks of investigation and discussion before deciding with finality last week that this was a story that needed to run.

    There are a lot of reasons tied into the final decision that I cannot disclose at this point. But, the bottom line is that I think an individual who carries a badge and a gun, and can both take lives and take away freedom is held to a higher standard than the rest of us, even when off-duty. I think he attempted to abuse that responsibility by asserting the fact that he was an officer of the law when he was arrested, and I am concerned based on his behavior at the time about his mental state.

    These are private issues however and I made the determination to run this as a straight news story, with no commentary. I believe that the department will adequately handle this matter. I trust Landy Black and Bob Aaronson to do the right thing here. But I also think that the public deserves to know that this has occurred.

    I doubt Chester will agree with me here, but I attempted to cover this in the most professional and least judgmental way. In fact, I intentionally kept some more embarrassing facts out of this report out of respect for the department.

  146. Anonymous

    And the president of the united states needs to tell the truth always, even when the questions are about having an affair he doesn’t want his wife to know, because he is held to a higher standard than all of the rest of the men in the world.

    I have heard this before. The arguments here are nothing new.

  147. Anonymous

    And the president of the united states needs to tell the truth always, even when the questions are about having an affair he doesn’t want his wife to know, because he is held to a higher standard than all of the rest of the men in the world.

    I have heard this before. The arguments here are nothing new.

  148. Anonymous

    And the president of the united states needs to tell the truth always, even when the questions are about having an affair he doesn’t want his wife to know, because he is held to a higher standard than all of the rest of the men in the world.

    I have heard this before. The arguments here are nothing new.

  149. Anonymous

    And the president of the united states needs to tell the truth always, even when the questions are about having an affair he doesn’t want his wife to know, because he is held to a higher standard than all of the rest of the men in the world.

    I have heard this before. The arguments here are nothing new.

  150. Anonymous

    And the president of the united states needs to tell the truth always, even when the questions are about having an affair he doesn’t want his wife to know, because he is held to a higher standard than all of the rest of the men in the world.

    I have heard this before. The arguments here are nothing new.

  151. Anonymous

    Using Paul Narr’s name to excuse bad behavior- disgusting! I wonder how Narr would feel about that??? Feher was completely out of control and possibly threatened and assaulted other cops- a felony, yet he was only charged with public intoxication??? I know cops can arrest people for that and not press any charges. I bet that’s what happened to Feher- so hence there will be no court trial! DPD please post the entire police report if you can! I don’t think this man will learn his lesson and end up costing the city millions in some future lawsuit.

  152. Anonymous

    Using Paul Narr’s name to excuse bad behavior- disgusting! I wonder how Narr would feel about that??? Feher was completely out of control and possibly threatened and assaulted other cops- a felony, yet he was only charged with public intoxication??? I know cops can arrest people for that and not press any charges. I bet that’s what happened to Feher- so hence there will be no court trial! DPD please post the entire police report if you can! I don’t think this man will learn his lesson and end up costing the city millions in some future lawsuit.

  153. Anonymous

    Using Paul Narr’s name to excuse bad behavior- disgusting! I wonder how Narr would feel about that??? Feher was completely out of control and possibly threatened and assaulted other cops- a felony, yet he was only charged with public intoxication??? I know cops can arrest people for that and not press any charges. I bet that’s what happened to Feher- so hence there will be no court trial! DPD please post the entire police report if you can! I don’t think this man will learn his lesson and end up costing the city millions in some future lawsuit.

  154. Anonymous

    Using Paul Narr’s name to excuse bad behavior- disgusting! I wonder how Narr would feel about that??? Feher was completely out of control and possibly threatened and assaulted other cops- a felony, yet he was only charged with public intoxication??? I know cops can arrest people for that and not press any charges. I bet that’s what happened to Feher- so hence there will be no court trial! DPD please post the entire police report if you can! I don’t think this man will learn his lesson and end up costing the city millions in some future lawsuit.

  155. Anonymous

    Using Paul Narr’s name to excuse bad behavior- disgusting! I wonder how Narr would feel about that??? Feher was completely out of control and possibly threatened and assaulted other cops- a felony, yet he was only charged with public intoxication??? I know cops can arrest people for that and not press any charges. I bet that’s what happened to Feher- so hence there will be no court trial! DPD please post the entire police report if you can! I don’t think this man will learn his lesson and end up costing the city millions in some future lawsuit.

  156. Anonymous

    “Feher was ALLEGEDLY completely out of control and ALLEGEDLY possibly threatened and ALLEGEDLY assaulted other cops- ALLEGEDLY a felony, yet he was only charged with public intoxication???”

  157. Anonymous

    “Feher was ALLEGEDLY completely out of control and ALLEGEDLY possibly threatened and ALLEGEDLY assaulted other cops- ALLEGEDLY a felony, yet he was only charged with public intoxication???”

  158. Anonymous

    “Feher was ALLEGEDLY completely out of control and ALLEGEDLY possibly threatened and ALLEGEDLY assaulted other cops- ALLEGEDLY a felony, yet he was only charged with public intoxication???”

  159. Anonymous

    “Feher was ALLEGEDLY completely out of control and ALLEGEDLY possibly threatened and ALLEGEDLY assaulted other cops- ALLEGEDLY a felony, yet he was only charged with public intoxication???”

  160. Anonymous

    “Feher was ALLEGEDLY completely out of control and ALLEGEDLY possibly threatened and ALLEGEDLY assaulted other cops- ALLEGEDLY a felony, yet he was only charged with public intoxication???”

  161. Ex-police officer not in davis

    According to many laws, police who are off-duty really are never off duty. In many places they have to carry their weapons, they carry their badge, they can make arrests, etc.

    Furthermore, the matter is bieng investigated by the the internal affairs department, that indicates he is not being treated as though he were a private citizen.

  162. Ex-police officer not in davi

    According to many laws, police who are off-duty really are never off duty. In many places they have to carry their weapons, they carry their badge, they can make arrests, etc.

    Furthermore, the matter is bieng investigated by the the internal affairs department, that indicates he is not being treated as though he were a private citizen.

  163. Ex-police officer not in davi

    According to many laws, police who are off-duty really are never off duty. In many places they have to carry their weapons, they carry their badge, they can make arrests, etc.

    Furthermore, the matter is bieng investigated by the the internal affairs department, that indicates he is not being treated as though he were a private citizen.

  164. Ex-police officer not in davi

    According to many laws, police who are off-duty really are never off duty. In many places they have to carry their weapons, they carry their badge, they can make arrests, etc.

    Furthermore, the matter is bieng investigated by the the internal affairs department, that indicates he is not being treated as though he were a private citizen.

  165. Ex-police officer not in davi

    According to many laws, police who are off-duty really are never off duty. In many places they have to carry their weapons, they carry their badge, they can make arrests, etc.

    Furthermore, the matter is bieng investigated by the the internal affairs department, that indicates he is not being treated as though he were a private citizen.

  166. Anonymous

    I question the ethics and perhaps even the legality of obtaining and/or providing anyone who is not a party to this incident with a copy of the police report.

    My understanding has always been that police reports are available only to the parties involved. They are not public documents.

    Since I’m certain Officer Fehrer did not provide it, I have to assume that either someone with legal access to it and an ax to grind sent it or someone obtained it inappropriately.

  167. Anonymous

    I question the ethics and perhaps even the legality of obtaining and/or providing anyone who is not a party to this incident with a copy of the police report.

    My understanding has always been that police reports are available only to the parties involved. They are not public documents.

    Since I’m certain Officer Fehrer did not provide it, I have to assume that either someone with legal access to it and an ax to grind sent it or someone obtained it inappropriately.

  168. Anonymous

    I question the ethics and perhaps even the legality of obtaining and/or providing anyone who is not a party to this incident with a copy of the police report.

    My understanding has always been that police reports are available only to the parties involved. They are not public documents.

    Since I’m certain Officer Fehrer did not provide it, I have to assume that either someone with legal access to it and an ax to grind sent it or someone obtained it inappropriately.

  169. Anonymous

    I question the ethics and perhaps even the legality of obtaining and/or providing anyone who is not a party to this incident with a copy of the police report.

    My understanding has always been that police reports are available only to the parties involved. They are not public documents.

    Since I’m certain Officer Fehrer did not provide it, I have to assume that either someone with legal access to it and an ax to grind sent it or someone obtained it inappropriately.

  170. Anonymous

    I question the ethics and perhaps even the legality of obtaining and/or providing anyone who is not a party to this incident with a copy of the police report.

    My understanding has always been that police reports are available only to the parties involved. They are not public documents.

    Since I’m certain Officer Fehrer did not provide it, I have to assume that either someone with legal access to it and an ax to grind sent it or someone obtained it inappropriately.

  171. tired chester...

    “According to many laws, police who are off-duty really are never off duty. In many places they have to carry their weapons, they carry their badge, they can make arrests, etc.”

    There is a long history of discussion about the role of off-duty cops. Many departments expect cops to honor the code of cops being cops 24×7. However, something is broken in a system where suicide is 3-times the number of deaths in the line of duty, and much higher than the general population. There are new schools of thought about this practice. Cops are too proud and too focused on the “serve and protect” creed to suggest that they are not capable of maintaining consistent mental and emotional health without being allowed to “check out” of their daily job responsibility like the rest of us. They generally like what they do, so why not do it all the time? However, it is apparent that cops, like most other humans, do not always know what standards of behavior are actually good for them.

    It is commom knowledge that too much time on the job is generally not a healthy thing. When does a cop get to be a man, woman, father, mother, son, brother, etc… and not a cop? I would expect most people would snap at some point with far less-stressful jobs where they not allowed to significantly remove themselves from a sense of job-related duty and responsibility; especially when their private lives are constantly reviewed by so many anti-cop activists.

    In a job where one extreme domestic situation is more stress than most of us experience in a lifetime, and the fear of extreme conflict and death visits on a regular basis, and with the inability to check out and recharge on a regular basis, is it any wonder that a good man like Tony Feher has a personal break down?

    Davis residents do not seem to know the extent of the criminal element in their town. We have a crime denial attitude and a very low cop-to-citizen ratio. Meanwhile we are surrounded by cities that supply copious bad guys that leverage these points on a regular basis. We, in fact, cause more stress on the employees of the Davis PD just to maintain the illusion that our city is low-crime. Denial has a cost and the Davis PD bears the brunt of it.

    These proud men and women in the blue uniform are frequently over-worked, over-stressed and over-harassed. When we think about our own work-stress experience, compare this to the extreme type of stress prevalent in the job of law enforcement, and consider that we would need to carry our (mostly white-collar) job stress 24×7 (i.e., no down time)… then we should start to understand why drinking and suicide rates are higher for cops.

    Private Citizens like me cannot do much to reduce the workload and on-the-job stress for cops, but we can agitate against those that too quickly and too vigorously harass them. There seem to be plenty of activists watching the cops. Who is watching the activists?

  172. tired chester...

    “According to many laws, police who are off-duty really are never off duty. In many places they have to carry their weapons, they carry their badge, they can make arrests, etc.”

    There is a long history of discussion about the role of off-duty cops. Many departments expect cops to honor the code of cops being cops 24×7. However, something is broken in a system where suicide is 3-times the number of deaths in the line of duty, and much higher than the general population. There are new schools of thought about this practice. Cops are too proud and too focused on the “serve and protect” creed to suggest that they are not capable of maintaining consistent mental and emotional health without being allowed to “check out” of their daily job responsibility like the rest of us. They generally like what they do, so why not do it all the time? However, it is apparent that cops, like most other humans, do not always know what standards of behavior are actually good for them.

    It is commom knowledge that too much time on the job is generally not a healthy thing. When does a cop get to be a man, woman, father, mother, son, brother, etc… and not a cop? I would expect most people would snap at some point with far less-stressful jobs where they not allowed to significantly remove themselves from a sense of job-related duty and responsibility; especially when their private lives are constantly reviewed by so many anti-cop activists.

    In a job where one extreme domestic situation is more stress than most of us experience in a lifetime, and the fear of extreme conflict and death visits on a regular basis, and with the inability to check out and recharge on a regular basis, is it any wonder that a good man like Tony Feher has a personal break down?

    Davis residents do not seem to know the extent of the criminal element in their town. We have a crime denial attitude and a very low cop-to-citizen ratio. Meanwhile we are surrounded by cities that supply copious bad guys that leverage these points on a regular basis. We, in fact, cause more stress on the employees of the Davis PD just to maintain the illusion that our city is low-crime. Denial has a cost and the Davis PD bears the brunt of it.

    These proud men and women in the blue uniform are frequently over-worked, over-stressed and over-harassed. When we think about our own work-stress experience, compare this to the extreme type of stress prevalent in the job of law enforcement, and consider that we would need to carry our (mostly white-collar) job stress 24×7 (i.e., no down time)… then we should start to understand why drinking and suicide rates are higher for cops.

    Private Citizens like me cannot do much to reduce the workload and on-the-job stress for cops, but we can agitate against those that too quickly and too vigorously harass them. There seem to be plenty of activists watching the cops. Who is watching the activists?

  173. tired chester...

    “According to many laws, police who are off-duty really are never off duty. In many places they have to carry their weapons, they carry their badge, they can make arrests, etc.”

    There is a long history of discussion about the role of off-duty cops. Many departments expect cops to honor the code of cops being cops 24×7. However, something is broken in a system where suicide is 3-times the number of deaths in the line of duty, and much higher than the general population. There are new schools of thought about this practice. Cops are too proud and too focused on the “serve and protect” creed to suggest that they are not capable of maintaining consistent mental and emotional health without being allowed to “check out” of their daily job responsibility like the rest of us. They generally like what they do, so why not do it all the time? However, it is apparent that cops, like most other humans, do not always know what standards of behavior are actually good for them.

    It is commom knowledge that too much time on the job is generally not a healthy thing. When does a cop get to be a man, woman, father, mother, son, brother, etc… and not a cop? I would expect most people would snap at some point with far less-stressful jobs where they not allowed to significantly remove themselves from a sense of job-related duty and responsibility; especially when their private lives are constantly reviewed by so many anti-cop activists.

    In a job where one extreme domestic situation is more stress than most of us experience in a lifetime, and the fear of extreme conflict and death visits on a regular basis, and with the inability to check out and recharge on a regular basis, is it any wonder that a good man like Tony Feher has a personal break down?

    Davis residents do not seem to know the extent of the criminal element in their town. We have a crime denial attitude and a very low cop-to-citizen ratio. Meanwhile we are surrounded by cities that supply copious bad guys that leverage these points on a regular basis. We, in fact, cause more stress on the employees of the Davis PD just to maintain the illusion that our city is low-crime. Denial has a cost and the Davis PD bears the brunt of it.

    These proud men and women in the blue uniform are frequently over-worked, over-stressed and over-harassed. When we think about our own work-stress experience, compare this to the extreme type of stress prevalent in the job of law enforcement, and consider that we would need to carry our (mostly white-collar) job stress 24×7 (i.e., no down time)… then we should start to understand why drinking and suicide rates are higher for cops.

    Private Citizens like me cannot do much to reduce the workload and on-the-job stress for cops, but we can agitate against those that too quickly and too vigorously harass them. There seem to be plenty of activists watching the cops. Who is watching the activists?

  174. tired chester...

    “According to many laws, police who are off-duty really are never off duty. In many places they have to carry their weapons, they carry their badge, they can make arrests, etc.”

    There is a long history of discussion about the role of off-duty cops. Many departments expect cops to honor the code of cops being cops 24×7. However, something is broken in a system where suicide is 3-times the number of deaths in the line of duty, and much higher than the general population. There are new schools of thought about this practice. Cops are too proud and too focused on the “serve and protect” creed to suggest that they are not capable of maintaining consistent mental and emotional health without being allowed to “check out” of their daily job responsibility like the rest of us. They generally like what they do, so why not do it all the time? However, it is apparent that cops, like most other humans, do not always know what standards of behavior are actually good for them.

    It is commom knowledge that too much time on the job is generally not a healthy thing. When does a cop get to be a man, woman, father, mother, son, brother, etc… and not a cop? I would expect most people would snap at some point with far less-stressful jobs where they not allowed to significantly remove themselves from a sense of job-related duty and responsibility; especially when their private lives are constantly reviewed by so many anti-cop activists.

    In a job where one extreme domestic situation is more stress than most of us experience in a lifetime, and the fear of extreme conflict and death visits on a regular basis, and with the inability to check out and recharge on a regular basis, is it any wonder that a good man like Tony Feher has a personal break down?

    Davis residents do not seem to know the extent of the criminal element in their town. We have a crime denial attitude and a very low cop-to-citizen ratio. Meanwhile we are surrounded by cities that supply copious bad guys that leverage these points on a regular basis. We, in fact, cause more stress on the employees of the Davis PD just to maintain the illusion that our city is low-crime. Denial has a cost and the Davis PD bears the brunt of it.

    These proud men and women in the blue uniform are frequently over-worked, over-stressed and over-harassed. When we think about our own work-stress experience, compare this to the extreme type of stress prevalent in the job of law enforcement, and consider that we would need to carry our (mostly white-collar) job stress 24×7 (i.e., no down time)… then we should start to understand why drinking and suicide rates are higher for cops.

    Private Citizens like me cannot do much to reduce the workload and on-the-job stress for cops, but we can agitate against those that too quickly and too vigorously harass them. There seem to be plenty of activists watching the cops. Who is watching the activists?

  175. bigshot

    "My understanding has always been that police reports are available only to the parties involved."

    Wrong.

    Under the California Public Records Act ("PRA"-), Govt. Code section 6250 et seq., records in the possession of state or local public agencies are presumed to be public unless an exemption to disclosure applies.

    The PRA exemption is found at Government Code section 6254(f), which exempts from disclosure records of law enforcement complaints and investigations. Although this section exempts the records themselves from disclosure, a police agency is nevertheless required to provide you with certain information pertaining to arrests, complaints, and requests for assistance.

    Here's what section 6254(f) says the department has to provide to the public:

    "The time, substance, and location of all complaints or requests for assistance received by the agency and the time and nature of the response thereto, including, to the extent the information regarding crimes alleged or committed or any other incident investigated is recorded, the time, date, and location of occurrence, the time and date of the report, the name and age of the victim, the factual circumstances surrounding the crime or incident, and a general description of any injuries, property, or weapons involved.” Govt. Code section 6254(f)(2).

    Agencies must also disclose to the public "[t]he full name and occupation of every individual arrested by the agency, the individual's physical description including date of birth, color of eyes and hair, sex, height and weight, the time and date of arrest, the time and date of booking, the location of the arrest, the factual circumstances surrounding the arrest, the amount of bail set, the time and manner of release or the location where the individual is currently being held, and all charges the individual is being held upon, including any outstanding warrants from other jurisdictions and parole or probation holds." Subject to certain conditions, the agency is also required to release the address of every individual arrested by the agency. Govt. Code section 6254(f)(1) & (3).

    It is important to remember that in most instances the section 6254(f) exemption is permissive, not mandatory. In other words, although the law enforcement agency is not required to provide you with documents reflecting complaints or investigations, they are nevertheless free to do so. It is in fact quite common for law enforcement agencies to provide the press and public with documents that are technically exempt under 6254(f).

    With regard to police reports, in a case called Williams v. Superior Court, 5 Cal. 4th 337 (1993), the California Supreme Court concluded that under 6254(f), a law enforcement agency can properly refuse to provide police reports themselves (although there is nothing to prevent the agency from providing you with a copy of the police report if they wished). However, as noted, the law enforcement agency is obligated to provide you with certain information typically found in a police report. Given all of the information that a law enforcement agency is required to provide about arrests and requests for assistance upon request by a member of the public, it is often easier for them to provide a copy of the report. As with 911 tapes, many law enforcement agencies regularly provide copies of police reports upon request.

  176. bigshot

    "My understanding has always been that police reports are available only to the parties involved."

    Wrong.

    Under the California Public Records Act ("PRA"-), Govt. Code section 6250 et seq., records in the possession of state or local public agencies are presumed to be public unless an exemption to disclosure applies.

    The PRA exemption is found at Government Code section 6254(f), which exempts from disclosure records of law enforcement complaints and investigations. Although this section exempts the records themselves from disclosure, a police agency is nevertheless required to provide you with certain information pertaining to arrests, complaints, and requests for assistance.

    Here's what section 6254(f) says the department has to provide to the public:

    "The time, substance, and location of all complaints or requests for assistance received by the agency and the time and nature of the response thereto, including, to the extent the information regarding crimes alleged or committed or any other incident investigated is recorded, the time, date, and location of occurrence, the time and date of the report, the name and age of the victim, the factual circumstances surrounding the crime or incident, and a general description of any injuries, property, or weapons involved.” Govt. Code section 6254(f)(2).

    Agencies must also disclose to the public "[t]he full name and occupation of every individual arrested by the agency, the individual's physical description including date of birth, color of eyes and hair, sex, height and weight, the time and date of arrest, the time and date of booking, the location of the arrest, the factual circumstances surrounding the arrest, the amount of bail set, the time and manner of release or the location where the individual is currently being held, and all charges the individual is being held upon, including any outstanding warrants from other jurisdictions and parole or probation holds." Subject to certain conditions, the agency is also required to release the address of every individual arrested by the agency. Govt. Code section 6254(f)(1) & (3).

    It is important to remember that in most instances the section 6254(f) exemption is permissive, not mandatory. In other words, although the law enforcement agency is not required to provide you with documents reflecting complaints or investigations, they are nevertheless free to do so. It is in fact quite common for law enforcement agencies to provide the press and public with documents that are technically exempt under 6254(f).

    With regard to police reports, in a case called Williams v. Superior Court, 5 Cal. 4th 337 (1993), the California Supreme Court concluded that under 6254(f), a law enforcement agency can properly refuse to provide police reports themselves (although there is nothing to prevent the agency from providing you with a copy of the police report if they wished). However, as noted, the law enforcement agency is obligated to provide you with certain information typically found in a police report. Given all of the information that a law enforcement agency is required to provide about arrests and requests for assistance upon request by a member of the public, it is often easier for them to provide a copy of the report. As with 911 tapes, many law enforcement agencies regularly provide copies of police reports upon request.

  177. bigshot

    "My understanding has always been that police reports are available only to the parties involved."

    Wrong.

    Under the California Public Records Act ("PRA"-), Govt. Code section 6250 et seq., records in the possession of state or local public agencies are presumed to be public unless an exemption to disclosure applies.

    The PRA exemption is found at Government Code section 6254(f), which exempts from disclosure records of law enforcement complaints and investigations. Although this section exempts the records themselves from disclosure, a police agency is nevertheless required to provide you with certain information pertaining to arrests, complaints, and requests for assistance.

    Here's what section 6254(f) says the department has to provide to the public:

    "The time, substance, and location of all complaints or requests for assistance received by the agency and the time and nature of the response thereto, including, to the extent the information regarding crimes alleged or committed or any other incident investigated is recorded, the time, date, and location of occurrence, the time and date of the report, the name and age of the victim, the factual circumstances surrounding the crime or incident, and a general description of any injuries, property, or weapons involved.” Govt. Code section 6254(f)(2).

    Agencies must also disclose to the public "[t]he full name and occupation of every individual arrested by the agency, the individual's physical description including date of birth, color of eyes and hair, sex, height and weight, the time and date of arrest, the time and date of booking, the location of the arrest, the factual circumstances surrounding the arrest, the amount of bail set, the time and manner of release or the location where the individual is currently being held, and all charges the individual is being held upon, including any outstanding warrants from other jurisdictions and parole or probation holds." Subject to certain conditions, the agency is also required to release the address of every individual arrested by the agency. Govt. Code section 6254(f)(1) & (3).

    It is important to remember that in most instances the section 6254(f) exemption is permissive, not mandatory. In other words, although the law enforcement agency is not required to provide you with documents reflecting complaints or investigations, they are nevertheless free to do so. It is in fact quite common for law enforcement agencies to provide the press and public with documents that are technically exempt under 6254(f).

    With regard to police reports, in a case called Williams v. Superior Court, 5 Cal. 4th 337 (1993), the California Supreme Court concluded that under 6254(f), a law enforcement agency can properly refuse to provide police reports themselves (although there is nothing to prevent the agency from providing you with a copy of the police report if they wished). However, as noted, the law enforcement agency is obligated to provide you with certain information typically found in a police report. Given all of the information that a law enforcement agency is required to provide about arrests and requests for assistance upon request by a member of the public, it is often easier for them to provide a copy of the report. As with 911 tapes, many law enforcement agencies regularly provide copies of police reports upon request.

  178. bigshot

    "My understanding has always been that police reports are available only to the parties involved."

    Wrong.

    Under the California Public Records Act ("PRA"-), Govt. Code section 6250 et seq., records in the possession of state or local public agencies are presumed to be public unless an exemption to disclosure applies.

    The PRA exemption is found at Government Code section 6254(f), which exempts from disclosure records of law enforcement complaints and investigations. Although this section exempts the records themselves from disclosure, a police agency is nevertheless required to provide you with certain information pertaining to arrests, complaints, and requests for assistance.

    Here's what section 6254(f) says the department has to provide to the public:

    "The time, substance, and location of all complaints or requests for assistance received by the agency and the time and nature of the response thereto, including, to the extent the information regarding crimes alleged or committed or any other incident investigated is recorded, the time, date, and location of occurrence, the time and date of the report, the name and age of the victim, the factual circumstances surrounding the crime or incident, and a general description of any injuries, property, or weapons involved.” Govt. Code section 6254(f)(2).

    Agencies must also disclose to the public "[t]he full name and occupation of every individual arrested by the agency, the individual's physical description including date of birth, color of eyes and hair, sex, height and weight, the time and date of arrest, the time and date of booking, the location of the arrest, the factual circumstances surrounding the arrest, the amount of bail set, the time and manner of release or the location where the individual is currently being held, and all charges the individual is being held upon, including any outstanding warrants from other jurisdictions and parole or probation holds." Subject to certain conditions, the agency is also required to release the address of every individual arrested by the agency. Govt. Code section 6254(f)(1) & (3).

    It is important to remember that in most instances the section 6254(f) exemption is permissive, not mandatory. In other words, although the law enforcement agency is not required to provide you with documents reflecting complaints or investigations, they are nevertheless free to do so. It is in fact quite common for law enforcement agencies to provide the press and public with documents that are technically exempt under 6254(f).

    With regard to police reports, in a case called Williams v. Superior Court, 5 Cal. 4th 337 (1993), the California Supreme Court concluded that under 6254(f), a law enforcement agency can properly refuse to provide police reports themselves (although there is nothing to prevent the agency from providing you with a copy of the police report if they wished). However, as noted, the law enforcement agency is obligated to provide you with certain information typically found in a police report. Given all of the information that a law enforcement agency is required to provide about arrests and requests for assistance upon request by a member of the public, it is often easier for them to provide a copy of the report. As with 911 tapes, many law enforcement agencies regularly provide copies of police reports upon request.

  179. Anonymous

    I tend to agree, we did not need to know all of the detail behind this case. However, the same should apply to all of the other cases out there.

    Whenever the Police make a “significant” arrest the first thing they do issue a press release promoting the arrest and sort of promoting themselves for making the arrest. I recall at least two Davis cases where the initial arrests were completely wrong – they did not stop promoting the cases even when it became apparent they got the facts wrong. The claim was “they were only promoting the current status of the case”. What did that mean? -the Court was relying on bad information given to them by the DPD and the DPD was unwilling to change the story until the Court figured out they had been given bad information. Seemed rather convoluted to me.

    I think the System would work much better if arrest information (at least the detail) was only released during trial.

    Of course that is not the case today. Since that is the way it is, arrests involving police officers should not get special treatment.

  180. Anonymous

    I tend to agree, we did not need to know all of the detail behind this case. However, the same should apply to all of the other cases out there.

    Whenever the Police make a “significant” arrest the first thing they do issue a press release promoting the arrest and sort of promoting themselves for making the arrest. I recall at least two Davis cases where the initial arrests were completely wrong – they did not stop promoting the cases even when it became apparent they got the facts wrong. The claim was “they were only promoting the current status of the case”. What did that mean? -the Court was relying on bad information given to them by the DPD and the DPD was unwilling to change the story until the Court figured out they had been given bad information. Seemed rather convoluted to me.

    I think the System would work much better if arrest information (at least the detail) was only released during trial.

    Of course that is not the case today. Since that is the way it is, arrests involving police officers should not get special treatment.

  181. Anonymous

    I tend to agree, we did not need to know all of the detail behind this case. However, the same should apply to all of the other cases out there.

    Whenever the Police make a “significant” arrest the first thing they do issue a press release promoting the arrest and sort of promoting themselves for making the arrest. I recall at least two Davis cases where the initial arrests were completely wrong – they did not stop promoting the cases even when it became apparent they got the facts wrong. The claim was “they were only promoting the current status of the case”. What did that mean? -the Court was relying on bad information given to them by the DPD and the DPD was unwilling to change the story until the Court figured out they had been given bad information. Seemed rather convoluted to me.

    I think the System would work much better if arrest information (at least the detail) was only released during trial.

    Of course that is not the case today. Since that is the way it is, arrests involving police officers should not get special treatment.

  182. Anonymous

    I tend to agree, we did not need to know all of the detail behind this case. However, the same should apply to all of the other cases out there.

    Whenever the Police make a “significant” arrest the first thing they do issue a press release promoting the arrest and sort of promoting themselves for making the arrest. I recall at least two Davis cases where the initial arrests were completely wrong – they did not stop promoting the cases even when it became apparent they got the facts wrong. The claim was “they were only promoting the current status of the case”. What did that mean? -the Court was relying on bad information given to them by the DPD and the DPD was unwilling to change the story until the Court figured out they had been given bad information. Seemed rather convoluted to me.

    I think the System would work much better if arrest information (at least the detail) was only released during trial.

    Of course that is not the case today. Since that is the way it is, arrests involving police officers should not get special treatment.

  183. Anonymous

    anon 1:19 PM …. You can only speak about what happened in your case. How can you assume he committed other “atrocities”, which happens to be a very powerful word to use without proof?

    When I first read this I wanted to come down hard on him, now I can see he is just being skewered relentlessly. I don’t like what he allegedly did, but man cut the guy some slack!

  184. Anonymous

    anon 1:19 PM …. You can only speak about what happened in your case. How can you assume he committed other “atrocities”, which happens to be a very powerful word to use without proof?

    When I first read this I wanted to come down hard on him, now I can see he is just being skewered relentlessly. I don’t like what he allegedly did, but man cut the guy some slack!

  185. Anonymous

    anon 1:19 PM …. You can only speak about what happened in your case. How can you assume he committed other “atrocities”, which happens to be a very powerful word to use without proof?

    When I first read this I wanted to come down hard on him, now I can see he is just being skewered relentlessly. I don’t like what he allegedly did, but man cut the guy some slack!

  186. Anonymous

    anon 1:19 PM …. You can only speak about what happened in your case. How can you assume he committed other “atrocities”, which happens to be a very powerful word to use without proof?

    When I first read this I wanted to come down hard on him, now I can see he is just being skewered relentlessly. I don’t like what he allegedly did, but man cut the guy some slack!

  187. Anonymous

    “Police Officers have a social and moral responsibility to the public. This is not to be taken lightly. Cutting slack is no option, unfortunately. This is a very serious issue. The concern is for the general public. This includes yourself. There is absoltely no middle ground.”

    I am not asking to cut him some slack from a legal standpoint. He is being attacked here with unsubtantiated accusations, from being an alcoholic, drug offender, mental problems, and most of all commmitting atrocities. Atrocities? I just don’t think the people saying these things really have a clue and are just jumping on the bandwagon.

  188. Anonymous

    “Police Officers have a social and moral responsibility to the public. This is not to be taken lightly. Cutting slack is no option, unfortunately. This is a very serious issue. The concern is for the general public. This includes yourself. There is absoltely no middle ground.”

    I am not asking to cut him some slack from a legal standpoint. He is being attacked here with unsubtantiated accusations, from being an alcoholic, drug offender, mental problems, and most of all commmitting atrocities. Atrocities? I just don’t think the people saying these things really have a clue and are just jumping on the bandwagon.

  189. Anonymous

    “Police Officers have a social and moral responsibility to the public. This is not to be taken lightly. Cutting slack is no option, unfortunately. This is a very serious issue. The concern is for the general public. This includes yourself. There is absoltely no middle ground.”

    I am not asking to cut him some slack from a legal standpoint. He is being attacked here with unsubtantiated accusations, from being an alcoholic, drug offender, mental problems, and most of all commmitting atrocities. Atrocities? I just don’t think the people saying these things really have a clue and are just jumping on the bandwagon.

  190. Anonymous

    “Police Officers have a social and moral responsibility to the public. This is not to be taken lightly. Cutting slack is no option, unfortunately. This is a very serious issue. The concern is for the general public. This includes yourself. There is absoltely no middle ground.”

    I am not asking to cut him some slack from a legal standpoint. He is being attacked here with unsubtantiated accusations, from being an alcoholic, drug offender, mental problems, and most of all commmitting atrocities. Atrocities? I just don’t think the people saying these things really have a clue and are just jumping on the bandwagon.

  191. Anonymous

    I happen to know for a fact that this officer has falsified police reports and has used excessive force in the past. It’s scary to imagine what other atrocities he’s committed! I certainly hope he doesn’t have the opportunity to victimize anyone else!

  192. Anonymous

    I happen to know for a fact that this officer has falsified police reports and has used excessive force in the past. It’s scary to imagine what other atrocities he’s committed! I certainly hope he doesn’t have the opportunity to victimize anyone else!

  193. Anonymous

    I happen to know for a fact that this officer has falsified police reports and has used excessive force in the past. It’s scary to imagine what other atrocities he’s committed! I certainly hope he doesn’t have the opportunity to victimize anyone else!

  194. Anonymous

    I happen to know for a fact that this officer has falsified police reports and has used excessive force in the past. It’s scary to imagine what other atrocities he’s committed! I certainly hope he doesn’t have the opportunity to victimize anyone else!

  195. Anonymous

    Anonymous 11/18 1:56,

    Police Officers have a social and moral responsibility to the public. This is not to be taken lightly. Cutting slack is no option, unfortunately. This is a very serious issue. The concern is for the general public. This includes yourself. There is absolutely no middle ground.

  196. Anonymous

    Anonymous 11/18 1:56,

    Police Officers have a social and moral responsibility to the public. This is not to be taken lightly. Cutting slack is no option, unfortunately. This is a very serious issue. The concern is for the general public. This includes yourself. There is absolutely no middle ground.

  197. Anonymous

    Anonymous 11/18 1:56,

    Police Officers have a social and moral responsibility to the public. This is not to be taken lightly. Cutting slack is no option, unfortunately. This is a very serious issue. The concern is for the general public. This includes yourself. There is absolutely no middle ground.

  198. Anonymous

    Anonymous 11/18 1:56,

    Police Officers have a social and moral responsibility to the public. This is not to be taken lightly. Cutting slack is no option, unfortunately. This is a very serious issue. The concern is for the general public. This includes yourself. There is absolutely no middle ground.

  199. Anonymous

    Re the police report.

    So I can go the week after someone was raped and request a copy of the police report and read all the gory details of the victim’s testimony just cuz I want to?

  200. Anonymous

    Re the police report.

    So I can go the week after someone was raped and request a copy of the police report and read all the gory details of the victim’s testimony just cuz I want to?

  201. Anonymous

    Re the police report.

    So I can go the week after someone was raped and request a copy of the police report and read all the gory details of the victim’s testimony just cuz I want to?

  202. Anonymous

    Re the police report.

    So I can go the week after someone was raped and request a copy of the police report and read all the gory details of the victim’s testimony just cuz I want to?

  203. New Thoughts

    This is in partial response to Chester, I guess but it’s also a more general response.

    I think if I committed the actions this officer did, that my actions would not be excused by a Davis Police Officer if they were informed that I was depressed and my friend had committed suicide. I believe that’s not an excuse. And I believe I would have been charged with more than a simple drunk in public It will be interesting to see what happens to Officer Feher, but I don’t believe anyone here has been unfair in their criticism.

  204. New Thoughts

    This is in partial response to Chester, I guess but it’s also a more general response.

    I think if I committed the actions this officer did, that my actions would not be excused by a Davis Police Officer if they were informed that I was depressed and my friend had committed suicide. I believe that’s not an excuse. And I believe I would have been charged with more than a simple drunk in public It will be interesting to see what happens to Officer Feher, but I don’t believe anyone here has been unfair in their criticism.

  205. New Thoughts

    This is in partial response to Chester, I guess but it’s also a more general response.

    I think if I committed the actions this officer did, that my actions would not be excused by a Davis Police Officer if they were informed that I was depressed and my friend had committed suicide. I believe that’s not an excuse. And I believe I would have been charged with more than a simple drunk in public It will be interesting to see what happens to Officer Feher, but I don’t believe anyone here has been unfair in their criticism.

  206. New Thoughts

    This is in partial response to Chester, I guess but it’s also a more general response.

    I think if I committed the actions this officer did, that my actions would not be excused by a Davis Police Officer if they were informed that I was depressed and my friend had committed suicide. I believe that’s not an excuse. And I believe I would have been charged with more than a simple drunk in public It will be interesting to see what happens to Officer Feher, but I don’t believe anyone here has been unfair in their criticism.

  207. Anonymous

    Anonymous 11/18 2:44 PM,

    When it comes to Officer Feher, I have more than a clue….wish I didn’t. I’ll just put it this way, if he goes back on patrol, we’d all better worry.

  208. Anonymous

    Anonymous 11/18 2:44 PM,

    When it comes to Officer Feher, I have more than a clue….wish I didn’t. I’ll just put it this way, if he goes back on patrol, we’d all better worry.

  209. Anonymous

    Anonymous 11/18 2:44 PM,

    When it comes to Officer Feher, I have more than a clue….wish I didn’t. I’ll just put it this way, if he goes back on patrol, we’d all better worry.

  210. Anonymous

    Anonymous 11/18 2:44 PM,

    When it comes to Officer Feher, I have more than a clue….wish I didn’t. I’ll just put it this way, if he goes back on patrol, we’d all better worry.

  211. Anonymous

    I have been in this town longer than Feher has been alive. If he has been such a menace to everyone why hasn’t anything come up before? If you were a victim of his and did nothing then it’s your fault for not doing anything about it but whine on a blog. I’m not worried, I’ll leave that up to you.

  212. Anonymous

    I have been in this town longer than Feher has been alive. If he has been such a menace to everyone why hasn’t anything come up before? If you were a victim of his and did nothing then it’s your fault for not doing anything about it but whine on a blog. I’m not worried, I’ll leave that up to you.

  213. Anonymous

    I have been in this town longer than Feher has been alive. If he has been such a menace to everyone why hasn’t anything come up before? If you were a victim of his and did nothing then it’s your fault for not doing anything about it but whine on a blog. I’m not worried, I’ll leave that up to you.

  214. Anonymous

    I have been in this town longer than Feher has been alive. If he has been such a menace to everyone why hasn’t anything come up before? If you were a victim of his and did nothing then it’s your fault for not doing anything about it but whine on a blog. I’m not worried, I’ll leave that up to you.

  215. Anonymous

    Anonymous 11/18 9:20 PM,

    I did not state that nothing is being done about it. He has only been on the force since 2004 and does have some pending court cases. It is not my intention to whine. That is your interpretation.

  216. Anonymous

    Anonymous 11/18 9:20 PM,

    I did not state that nothing is being done about it. He has only been on the force since 2004 and does have some pending court cases. It is not my intention to whine. That is your interpretation.

  217. Anonymous

    Anonymous 11/18 9:20 PM,

    I did not state that nothing is being done about it. He has only been on the force since 2004 and does have some pending court cases. It is not my intention to whine. That is your interpretation.

  218. Anonymous

    Anonymous 11/18 9:20 PM,

    I did not state that nothing is being done about it. He has only been on the force since 2004 and does have some pending court cases. It is not my intention to whine. That is your interpretation.

  219. Anonymous

    I work for DPD and have been there before Antoine “Tony” Feher was. First, let there be no doubt, Tony is a hard worker who has made many great arrests and cases. He comes to work and gives 100%. He is not a lazy cop who only comes to work to collect a paycheck. Tony grew up in the Davis community and still has friends and family in the area. That being said, Tony still has a lot of growing up to do. He can be immature at times and make stupid decisions. This was clearly one of them. It is one thing to get arrested for 647f, it is a whole ‘nother to act the way he did towards other fellow cops. There is no doubt in my mind that had he not been a cop, he would have found himself in the hospital after the cops and especially the jail deputies got done with him, based on the way he was acting towards them. He disrespected them, the profession, his YONET unit, and ultimately the fine men and women who make up the Davis Police Department. As a coworker I knew that Tony had been arrested but I had no idea what other circumstances had been involved in his arrest. Now that I do, I can say that I am appalled. This was not a simple and routine 647f arrest. This was an angry tirade by a young boy who used his badge, training and knowledge of the legal system for all the wrong reasons. Tony, please take a good look at yourself, you have alot of potential, but you must make the decision now to grow up and become a man. This is probably your last chance to do so. We will support you through this time but you must also show that you are willing and able to grow up.

  220. Anonymous

    I work for DPD and have been there before Antoine “Tony” Feher was. First, let there be no doubt, Tony is a hard worker who has made many great arrests and cases. He comes to work and gives 100%. He is not a lazy cop who only comes to work to collect a paycheck. Tony grew up in the Davis community and still has friends and family in the area. That being said, Tony still has a lot of growing up to do. He can be immature at times and make stupid decisions. This was clearly one of them. It is one thing to get arrested for 647f, it is a whole ‘nother to act the way he did towards other fellow cops. There is no doubt in my mind that had he not been a cop, he would have found himself in the hospital after the cops and especially the jail deputies got done with him, based on the way he was acting towards them. He disrespected them, the profession, his YONET unit, and ultimately the fine men and women who make up the Davis Police Department. As a coworker I knew that Tony had been arrested but I had no idea what other circumstances had been involved in his arrest. Now that I do, I can say that I am appalled. This was not a simple and routine 647f arrest. This was an angry tirade by a young boy who used his badge, training and knowledge of the legal system for all the wrong reasons. Tony, please take a good look at yourself, you have alot of potential, but you must make the decision now to grow up and become a man. This is probably your last chance to do so. We will support you through this time but you must also show that you are willing and able to grow up.

  221. Anonymous

    I work for DPD and have been there before Antoine “Tony” Feher was. First, let there be no doubt, Tony is a hard worker who has made many great arrests and cases. He comes to work and gives 100%. He is not a lazy cop who only comes to work to collect a paycheck. Tony grew up in the Davis community and still has friends and family in the area. That being said, Tony still has a lot of growing up to do. He can be immature at times and make stupid decisions. This was clearly one of them. It is one thing to get arrested for 647f, it is a whole ‘nother to act the way he did towards other fellow cops. There is no doubt in my mind that had he not been a cop, he would have found himself in the hospital after the cops and especially the jail deputies got done with him, based on the way he was acting towards them. He disrespected them, the profession, his YONET unit, and ultimately the fine men and women who make up the Davis Police Department. As a coworker I knew that Tony had been arrested but I had no idea what other circumstances had been involved in his arrest. Now that I do, I can say that I am appalled. This was not a simple and routine 647f arrest. This was an angry tirade by a young boy who used his badge, training and knowledge of the legal system for all the wrong reasons. Tony, please take a good look at yourself, you have alot of potential, but you must make the decision now to grow up and become a man. This is probably your last chance to do so. We will support you through this time but you must also show that you are willing and able to grow up.

  222. Anonymous

    I work for DPD and have been there before Antoine “Tony” Feher was. First, let there be no doubt, Tony is a hard worker who has made many great arrests and cases. He comes to work and gives 100%. He is not a lazy cop who only comes to work to collect a paycheck. Tony grew up in the Davis community and still has friends and family in the area. That being said, Tony still has a lot of growing up to do. He can be immature at times and make stupid decisions. This was clearly one of them. It is one thing to get arrested for 647f, it is a whole ‘nother to act the way he did towards other fellow cops. There is no doubt in my mind that had he not been a cop, he would have found himself in the hospital after the cops and especially the jail deputies got done with him, based on the way he was acting towards them. He disrespected them, the profession, his YONET unit, and ultimately the fine men and women who make up the Davis Police Department. As a coworker I knew that Tony had been arrested but I had no idea what other circumstances had been involved in his arrest. Now that I do, I can say that I am appalled. This was not a simple and routine 647f arrest. This was an angry tirade by a young boy who used his badge, training and knowledge of the legal system for all the wrong reasons. Tony, please take a good look at yourself, you have alot of potential, but you must make the decision now to grow up and become a man. This is probably your last chance to do so. We will support you through this time but you must also show that you are willing and able to grow up.

  223. Anonymous

    “There is no doubt in my mind that had he not been a cop, he would have found himself in the hospital after the cops and especially the jail deputies got done with him, based on the way he was acting towards them.”

    This is a serious allegation that needs to be investigated. That an alleged DPD employee would admit an ordinary citizen would have been assaulted by law enforcement officials is disturbing.

  224. Anonymous

    “There is no doubt in my mind that had he not been a cop, he would have found himself in the hospital after the cops and especially the jail deputies got done with him, based on the way he was acting towards them.”

    This is a serious allegation that needs to be investigated. That an alleged DPD employee would admit an ordinary citizen would have been assaulted by law enforcement officials is disturbing.

  225. Anonymous

    “There is no doubt in my mind that had he not been a cop, he would have found himself in the hospital after the cops and especially the jail deputies got done with him, based on the way he was acting towards them.”

    This is a serious allegation that needs to be investigated. That an alleged DPD employee would admit an ordinary citizen would have been assaulted by law enforcement officials is disturbing.

  226. Anonymous

    “There is no doubt in my mind that had he not been a cop, he would have found himself in the hospital after the cops and especially the jail deputies got done with him, based on the way he was acting towards them.”

    This is a serious allegation that needs to be investigated. That an alleged DPD employee would admit an ordinary citizen would have been assaulted by law enforcement officials is disturbing.

  227. ACLU Member

    I find it interesting the contrast between anonymous and some of the previous comments that appeared to come from or near law enforment (such as Chester’s). I’m glad to see the rsponse by an officer–the show of support but also condemnation. It gives me a lot of hope.

  228. ACLU Member

    I find it interesting the contrast between anonymous and some of the previous comments that appeared to come from or near law enforment (such as Chester’s). I’m glad to see the rsponse by an officer–the show of support but also condemnation. It gives me a lot of hope.

  229. ACLU Member

    I find it interesting the contrast between anonymous and some of the previous comments that appeared to come from or near law enforment (such as Chester’s). I’m glad to see the rsponse by an officer–the show of support but also condemnation. It gives me a lot of hope.

  230. ACLU Member

    I find it interesting the contrast between anonymous and some of the previous comments that appeared to come from or near law enforment (such as Chester’s). I’m glad to see the rsponse by an officer–the show of support but also condemnation. It gives me a lot of hope.

  231. Get help Tony

    What Tony did showed a lot of disrespect for law enforcement and the people who entrust them to uphold the law even when off duty.

    I don’t always agree with a particular decision made by an officer, but that doesn’t make them bad. We have MANY hardworking men and women at the Davis Police Department who protect our community and keep it safe. They do not show dishonor.

    I hope Tony gets help and considers another profession. As someone said earlier, it doesn’t matter what profession he is in, if he does not get help he is headed down a path that is going to lead him nowhere. Please get help Tony.

    And, please be a man and apologize to the woman to whom you did a citizen’s arrest.

  232. Get help Tony

    What Tony did showed a lot of disrespect for law enforcement and the people who entrust them to uphold the law even when off duty.

    I don’t always agree with a particular decision made by an officer, but that doesn’t make them bad. We have MANY hardworking men and women at the Davis Police Department who protect our community and keep it safe. They do not show dishonor.

    I hope Tony gets help and considers another profession. As someone said earlier, it doesn’t matter what profession he is in, if he does not get help he is headed down a path that is going to lead him nowhere. Please get help Tony.

    And, please be a man and apologize to the woman to whom you did a citizen’s arrest.

  233. Get help Tony

    What Tony did showed a lot of disrespect for law enforcement and the people who entrust them to uphold the law even when off duty.

    I don’t always agree with a particular decision made by an officer, but that doesn’t make them bad. We have MANY hardworking men and women at the Davis Police Department who protect our community and keep it safe. They do not show dishonor.

    I hope Tony gets help and considers another profession. As someone said earlier, it doesn’t matter what profession he is in, if he does not get help he is headed down a path that is going to lead him nowhere. Please get help Tony.

    And, please be a man and apologize to the woman to whom you did a citizen’s arrest.

  234. Get help Tony

    What Tony did showed a lot of disrespect for law enforcement and the people who entrust them to uphold the law even when off duty.

    I don’t always agree with a particular decision made by an officer, but that doesn’t make them bad. We have MANY hardworking men and women at the Davis Police Department who protect our community and keep it safe. They do not show dishonor.

    I hope Tony gets help and considers another profession. As someone said earlier, it doesn’t matter what profession he is in, if he does not get help he is headed down a path that is going to lead him nowhere. Please get help Tony.

    And, please be a man and apologize to the woman to whom you did a citizen’s arrest.

  235. Anonymous

    I am no fan of the cops, but it is high time the abuse of Penal Code 647 was stopped. If he was unwanted there, the Sac PD should have given him a trespass warning, and if he failed to leave, arrested him for trespass. It is emphatically NOT a violation of 647 to be publicly intoxicated. 647 requires that a person is so intoxicated he is unable to care for his own safety. His attempts to verbally protect himself, however distasteful, demonstrate his innocence of the offense and the fact that he was falsely arrested. It is disgusting the extent to which custom displaces law.

  236. Anonymous

    I am no fan of the cops, but it is high time the abuse of Penal Code 647 was stopped. If he was unwanted there, the Sac PD should have given him a trespass warning, and if he failed to leave, arrested him for trespass. It is emphatically NOT a violation of 647 to be publicly intoxicated. 647 requires that a person is so intoxicated he is unable to care for his own safety. His attempts to verbally protect himself, however distasteful, demonstrate his innocence of the offense and the fact that he was falsely arrested. It is disgusting the extent to which custom displaces law.

  237. Anonymous

    I am no fan of the cops, but it is high time the abuse of Penal Code 647 was stopped. If he was unwanted there, the Sac PD should have given him a trespass warning, and if he failed to leave, arrested him for trespass. It is emphatically NOT a violation of 647 to be publicly intoxicated. 647 requires that a person is so intoxicated he is unable to care for his own safety. His attempts to verbally protect himself, however distasteful, demonstrate his innocence of the offense and the fact that he was falsely arrested. It is disgusting the extent to which custom displaces law.

  238. Anonymous

    I am no fan of the cops, but it is high time the abuse of Penal Code 647 was stopped. If he was unwanted there, the Sac PD should have given him a trespass warning, and if he failed to leave, arrested him for trespass. It is emphatically NOT a violation of 647 to be publicly intoxicated. 647 requires that a person is so intoxicated he is unable to care for his own safety. His attempts to verbally protect himself, however distasteful, demonstrate his innocence of the offense and the fact that he was falsely arrested. It is disgusting the extent to which custom displaces law.

  239. David M. Greenwald

    “If he was unwanted there, the Sac PD should have given him a trespass warning, and if he failed to leave, arrested him for trespass.”

    According to the report, he was given ample warning to leave, and only was arrested when he both refused to leave and became abusive and belligerent to the police.

    I’m with you on the abuse of 647, but in this case, he probably got off lighter than he should have by use of it.

  240. David M. Greenwald

    “If he was unwanted there, the Sac PD should have given him a trespass warning, and if he failed to leave, arrested him for trespass.”

    According to the report, he was given ample warning to leave, and only was arrested when he both refused to leave and became abusive and belligerent to the police.

    I’m with you on the abuse of 647, but in this case, he probably got off lighter than he should have by use of it.

  241. David M. Greenwald

    “If he was unwanted there, the Sac PD should have given him a trespass warning, and if he failed to leave, arrested him for trespass.”

    According to the report, he was given ample warning to leave, and only was arrested when he both refused to leave and became abusive and belligerent to the police.

    I’m with you on the abuse of 647, but in this case, he probably got off lighter than he should have by use of it.

  242. David M. Greenwald

    “If he was unwanted there, the Sac PD should have given him a trespass warning, and if he failed to leave, arrested him for trespass.”

    According to the report, he was given ample warning to leave, and only was arrested when he both refused to leave and became abusive and belligerent to the police.

    I’m with you on the abuse of 647, but in this case, he probably got off lighter than he should have by use of it.

  243. Anonymous

    I am glad to see people questioning Bob Aaronson. I once had the stupidity to contact him. I never will again. I contacted him because I didn’t want to deal directly with the police and expose myself to retaliation. Isn’t that why the Board created the ombudsman position — because people didnt’ want to or had negative experiences directly dealing with the police? What did Bob Aaronson do? Immediately forwarded my identity, email and information to internal affairs. Of course I had to drop the matter to protect myself. Thanks a lot jerk! I checked him out and with his police loving background, the source of his bias is obvious. We need to fire him and have a Civilian Review Board like civilized people do.

  244. Anonymous

    I am glad to see people questioning Bob Aaronson. I once had the stupidity to contact him. I never will again. I contacted him because I didn’t want to deal directly with the police and expose myself to retaliation. Isn’t that why the Board created the ombudsman position — because people didnt’ want to or had negative experiences directly dealing with the police? What did Bob Aaronson do? Immediately forwarded my identity, email and information to internal affairs. Of course I had to drop the matter to protect myself. Thanks a lot jerk! I checked him out and with his police loving background, the source of his bias is obvious. We need to fire him and have a Civilian Review Board like civilized people do.

  245. Anonymous

    I am glad to see people questioning Bob Aaronson. I once had the stupidity to contact him. I never will again. I contacted him because I didn’t want to deal directly with the police and expose myself to retaliation. Isn’t that why the Board created the ombudsman position — because people didnt’ want to or had negative experiences directly dealing with the police? What did Bob Aaronson do? Immediately forwarded my identity, email and information to internal affairs. Of course I had to drop the matter to protect myself. Thanks a lot jerk! I checked him out and with his police loving background, the source of his bias is obvious. We need to fire him and have a Civilian Review Board like civilized people do.

  246. Anonymous

    I am glad to see people questioning Bob Aaronson. I once had the stupidity to contact him. I never will again. I contacted him because I didn’t want to deal directly with the police and expose myself to retaliation. Isn’t that why the Board created the ombudsman position — because people didnt’ want to or had negative experiences directly dealing with the police? What did Bob Aaronson do? Immediately forwarded my identity, email and information to internal affairs. Of course I had to drop the matter to protect myself. Thanks a lot jerk! I checked him out and with his police loving background, the source of his bias is obvious. We need to fire him and have a Civilian Review Board like civilized people do.

  247. Bob Aaronson

    Obviously, I apologize to you if I failed to communicate clearly what my next steps were going to be. I was unaware that you desired anonymity.

    As a result of our extended conversation about your unsatisfactory interaction with the police officers, I had some real concerns, particularly because events were still unfolding. As well, I had only heard your perspective; in fairness, I needed to hear from the Department too.

    There is no way for me to follow up on a citizen complaint like yours without sharing the time, date and substance of the incident in question. That reveals the identity of the complainant. If, as you wished, you wanted certain issues addressed by the Department, that can only occur if the Department understands what was done wrongly, again requiring the sharing of identifying details.

    I know of no civilian review, whether board or auditor, that manages to keep secret the identities of complainants while successfully advocating for policing changes.

    Finally, if you believe you have been the victim of retaliation for making out your complaint, you should contact me. If you no longer trust me to bring forward your complaint, please be sure to contact either Police Chief Black or City Manager Bill Emlen; I know both of them well enough to know that neither of them tolerates retaliation against citizen complainants.

    Being unwilling to bear witness works a disservice to everyone, including the witnesser.

  248. Bob Aaronson

    Obviously, I apologize to you if I failed to communicate clearly what my next steps were going to be. I was unaware that you desired anonymity.

    As a result of our extended conversation about your unsatisfactory interaction with the police officers, I had some real concerns, particularly because events were still unfolding. As well, I had only heard your perspective; in fairness, I needed to hear from the Department too.

    There is no way for me to follow up on a citizen complaint like yours without sharing the time, date and substance of the incident in question. That reveals the identity of the complainant. If, as you wished, you wanted certain issues addressed by the Department, that can only occur if the Department understands what was done wrongly, again requiring the sharing of identifying details.

    I know of no civilian review, whether board or auditor, that manages to keep secret the identities of complainants while successfully advocating for policing changes.

    Finally, if you believe you have been the victim of retaliation for making out your complaint, you should contact me. If you no longer trust me to bring forward your complaint, please be sure to contact either Police Chief Black or City Manager Bill Emlen; I know both of them well enough to know that neither of them tolerates retaliation against citizen complainants.

    Being unwilling to bear witness works a disservice to everyone, including the witnesser.

  249. Bob Aaronson

    Obviously, I apologize to you if I failed to communicate clearly what my next steps were going to be. I was unaware that you desired anonymity.

    As a result of our extended conversation about your unsatisfactory interaction with the police officers, I had some real concerns, particularly because events were still unfolding. As well, I had only heard your perspective; in fairness, I needed to hear from the Department too.

    There is no way for me to follow up on a citizen complaint like yours without sharing the time, date and substance of the incident in question. That reveals the identity of the complainant. If, as you wished, you wanted certain issues addressed by the Department, that can only occur if the Department understands what was done wrongly, again requiring the sharing of identifying details.

    I know of no civilian review, whether board or auditor, that manages to keep secret the identities of complainants while successfully advocating for policing changes.

    Finally, if you believe you have been the victim of retaliation for making out your complaint, you should contact me. If you no longer trust me to bring forward your complaint, please be sure to contact either Police Chief Black or City Manager Bill Emlen; I know both of them well enough to know that neither of them tolerates retaliation against citizen complainants.

    Being unwilling to bear witness works a disservice to everyone, including the witnesser.

  250. Bob Aaronson

    Obviously, I apologize to you if I failed to communicate clearly what my next steps were going to be. I was unaware that you desired anonymity.

    As a result of our extended conversation about your unsatisfactory interaction with the police officers, I had some real concerns, particularly because events were still unfolding. As well, I had only heard your perspective; in fairness, I needed to hear from the Department too.

    There is no way for me to follow up on a citizen complaint like yours without sharing the time, date and substance of the incident in question. That reveals the identity of the complainant. If, as you wished, you wanted certain issues addressed by the Department, that can only occur if the Department understands what was done wrongly, again requiring the sharing of identifying details.

    I know of no civilian review, whether board or auditor, that manages to keep secret the identities of complainants while successfully advocating for policing changes.

    Finally, if you believe you have been the victim of retaliation for making out your complaint, you should contact me. If you no longer trust me to bring forward your complaint, please be sure to contact either Police Chief Black or City Manager Bill Emlen; I know both of them well enough to know that neither of them tolerates retaliation against citizen complainants.

    Being unwilling to bear witness works a disservice to everyone, including the witnesser.

  251. Anonymous

    This Seems to me like a microcosm of classic bad davis PD behavior. The group yonet spends most of its time building trumped up cases on teenagers and making them out to be delinquent in order to fill their davis quotas. Enjoy a taste of your own medicine, yonet.

  252. Anonymous

    This Seems to me like a microcosm of classic bad davis PD behavior. The group yonet spends most of its time building trumped up cases on teenagers and making them out to be delinquent in order to fill their davis quotas. Enjoy a taste of your own medicine, yonet.

  253. Anonymous

    This Seems to me like a microcosm of classic bad davis PD behavior. The group yonet spends most of its time building trumped up cases on teenagers and making them out to be delinquent in order to fill their davis quotas. Enjoy a taste of your own medicine, yonet.

  254. Anonymous

    This Seems to me like a microcosm of classic bad davis PD behavior. The group yonet spends most of its time building trumped up cases on teenagers and making them out to be delinquent in order to fill their davis quotas. Enjoy a taste of your own medicine, yonet.

  255. u.s.citizen

    This cop wasn’t drunk that was normal Y.O.N.E.T behavior these guys can do anything anywhere at anytime like strip search in Sacramento county (they enjoy) while serving a warrant on some one that dont live there. nothing will happen to him probly get a raise

Leave a Reply

X Close

Newsletter Sign-Up

X Close

Monthly Subscriber Sign-Up

Enter the maximum amount you want to pay each month
$ USD
Sign up for