Davis Democrats United Around the Concept of Change

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Last night the Davis Democratic Club came together for their annual Valentine’s Day potluck. While they may not agree on who should be the Presidential nominee from the party as the close battle between Senators Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama moves on past Super Tuesday, what is clear is that the leaders of the local party are united around the concept of change from the current leadership under George W. Bush.

Assemblywoman Los Wolk told the crowd that she was

“incredibly excited that we were going to take back the White House.”

She continued,

“Throughout the state, the number of Democrats that came out and voted exceeded the number of Republicans by three-to-one. There are just not enough voting machines, it is just unbelievable what is going on.”

Assemblywoman Wolk told the crowd that in March she would formally kick her race to succeed Senator Mike Machado for the 5th Senate District of California. It will be a tough battle against right wing Republican Greg Aghazarian. She will be spending much of her time campaigning in San Joaquin County.

Davis Mayor Sue Greenwald acknowledged that the Presidential Primaries have been so exciting that it’s been hard to concentrate on her own reelection campaign.

Supervisor Mariko Yamada, candidate for the 8th Assembly District joked,

“Today is the only day when red is my favorite color, the rest of the year blue is my favorite color.”

She pointed out that there were 79 days until the June 3, 2008 election in which she would faced West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Cabaldon.

The West Sacramento Mayor Cabaldon remarked,

“Watching over the last couple of months this election, I heard Bill Clinton say just the other day ‘looking at the faces of young people,’ well looking at the faces of people of all ages over the last several months about our Democratic Primary, for the last couple of years over our ability to actually do something about big problems like global warming, we’re starting to believe in change and possibility again and young people are certainly the best example of that, but all of us are doing that. We can’t blow this one. It’s too easy to take that for granted. In November if we don’t have that same sense of hope and possibility and energy and optimism, we will lose and we know what another four or eight years of a Republican in the White House will mean.”

Jim Provenza, former Davis School Board President and current candidate for the 4th Supervisorial District remarked:

“I’m very excited about what’s going on in the Presidential race as everyone else is, but one of the things that really moves me is that both candidates for President have really called on all of us to be part of change. It’s not just electing someone, having them go to office, and then go back to what we do in our daily lives and expect everything to get better. Instead they are both talking about a movement that will involve all of us as agents of change on a national, state, and local level and that’s really what essential because we elect our leaders to take us in that direction but it is all of us that will accomplish these things.”

Mr. Provenza then hearkened back to John F. Kennedy’s call to arms about public service asking the nation to sacrifice in order to accomplish collective goals.

Jim Provenza’s opponent, John Ferrera who works in the State Senate for Senator Denise Ducheney.

“We share a lot of the same values. My wife Anna and I for instance grew up in families that were very active in their communities.”

He remarked that Democrats in the legislature are united for the first time in many years.

“Something that is so different this year is that for the first time in many years… Assembly Democrats and Senate Democrats are actually on the same page, working together because we know, that beyond the competition between house, beyond the competition between Assemblymembers vying for the next Senate seat or Senate members vying for the next constitutional office what is absolutely critical this year is that Democrats stick together. Otherwise we will have a Governor’s budget where we trick poor people into having to file for their health care often enough that the fall out of eligibility that just isn’t how we save money. We will raise college fees again. We will cut off aid to children of working parents because they come up a percent short of a federal work requirement… That’s not the kind of California that we want.”

In the coming weeks and months many of the people in the room last night will be working against each other. Davis is largely a Democratic town. All of the candidates for non-partisan offices such as the County Supervisor and City Council will be Democrats. However on this night at least people saw beyond those battles to the big picture. The fight at the national level, the fight at the state level, and the fight at the local level for the kinds of Democratic, big D values that unite us in common purpose.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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40 thoughts on “Davis Democrats United Around the Concept of Change”

  1. Anonymous

    dpd-
    it looks as if there weren’t many other members from the public in attendance, other than electeds, or candidates.

    why, oh why, are they meeting on valentines day?

  2. Anonymous

    dpd-
    it looks as if there weren’t many other members from the public in attendance, other than electeds, or candidates.

    why, oh why, are they meeting on valentines day?

  3. Anonymous

    dpd-
    it looks as if there weren’t many other members from the public in attendance, other than electeds, or candidates.

    why, oh why, are they meeting on valentines day?

  4. Anonymous

    dpd-
    it looks as if there weren’t many other members from the public in attendance, other than electeds, or candidates.

    why, oh why, are they meeting on valentines day?

  5. Rich Rifkin

    David,

    Out of curiosity, what’s your opinion on what should be done with the Michigan and Florida delegates?

    I heard the head of the Florida Democratic Party yesterday on NPR, making a convincing case that the Florida delegates should be seated. She said that the reason Florida’s Democratic primary was held before February 5 (against the mandate of the national DNC) was because the Republican-controlled legislature and governor put it there. She said all of the Democrats in the legislature voted against the bill for the premature primary, but they were powerless to change it. Even a lawsuit failed to move the primary back.

    That seemed to me to be a good argument for not punishing Florida Democrats. They had no way to follow the DNC’s rules.

    It is true, of course, that none of the Democratic candidates campaigned in Florida. Hillary did attend a fundraiser there before the vote; and Obama’s national cable TV commercials ran there. But for the most part, the Florida voters were voting based on the national campaign, not a local one. Perhaps if the candidates had been there, the vote would have come out differently. As it was, they voted 50:33 for Clinton.

    Not seating the Florida delegation is costing Hillary about 67 delegates, enough to put her in the lead. For that reason, the Clinton camp is arguing vigorously that Florida’s delegates need to be seated. If you add in the Michigan unseated delegates, she would be ahead by a good amount right now….

    On something unrelated… Hillary lost one of her committed Superdelegates the other day. When Rep. Tom Lantos died, Clinton lost a vote at the convention. He will not be replaced, so that vote simply does not exist. It would be interesting, then, if by chance Hillary came up one vote short of what was needed to take the nomination.

  6. Rich Rifkin

    David,

    Out of curiosity, what’s your opinion on what should be done with the Michigan and Florida delegates?

    I heard the head of the Florida Democratic Party yesterday on NPR, making a convincing case that the Florida delegates should be seated. She said that the reason Florida’s Democratic primary was held before February 5 (against the mandate of the national DNC) was because the Republican-controlled legislature and governor put it there. She said all of the Democrats in the legislature voted against the bill for the premature primary, but they were powerless to change it. Even a lawsuit failed to move the primary back.

    That seemed to me to be a good argument for not punishing Florida Democrats. They had no way to follow the DNC’s rules.

    It is true, of course, that none of the Democratic candidates campaigned in Florida. Hillary did attend a fundraiser there before the vote; and Obama’s national cable TV commercials ran there. But for the most part, the Florida voters were voting based on the national campaign, not a local one. Perhaps if the candidates had been there, the vote would have come out differently. As it was, they voted 50:33 for Clinton.

    Not seating the Florida delegation is costing Hillary about 67 delegates, enough to put her in the lead. For that reason, the Clinton camp is arguing vigorously that Florida’s delegates need to be seated. If you add in the Michigan unseated delegates, she would be ahead by a good amount right now….

    On something unrelated… Hillary lost one of her committed Superdelegates the other day. When Rep. Tom Lantos died, Clinton lost a vote at the convention. He will not be replaced, so that vote simply does not exist. It would be interesting, then, if by chance Hillary came up one vote short of what was needed to take the nomination.

  7. Rich Rifkin

    David,

    Out of curiosity, what’s your opinion on what should be done with the Michigan and Florida delegates?

    I heard the head of the Florida Democratic Party yesterday on NPR, making a convincing case that the Florida delegates should be seated. She said that the reason Florida’s Democratic primary was held before February 5 (against the mandate of the national DNC) was because the Republican-controlled legislature and governor put it there. She said all of the Democrats in the legislature voted against the bill for the premature primary, but they were powerless to change it. Even a lawsuit failed to move the primary back.

    That seemed to me to be a good argument for not punishing Florida Democrats. They had no way to follow the DNC’s rules.

    It is true, of course, that none of the Democratic candidates campaigned in Florida. Hillary did attend a fundraiser there before the vote; and Obama’s national cable TV commercials ran there. But for the most part, the Florida voters were voting based on the national campaign, not a local one. Perhaps if the candidates had been there, the vote would have come out differently. As it was, they voted 50:33 for Clinton.

    Not seating the Florida delegation is costing Hillary about 67 delegates, enough to put her in the lead. For that reason, the Clinton camp is arguing vigorously that Florida’s delegates need to be seated. If you add in the Michigan unseated delegates, she would be ahead by a good amount right now….

    On something unrelated… Hillary lost one of her committed Superdelegates the other day. When Rep. Tom Lantos died, Clinton lost a vote at the convention. He will not be replaced, so that vote simply does not exist. It would be interesting, then, if by chance Hillary came up one vote short of what was needed to take the nomination.

  8. Rich Rifkin

    David,

    Out of curiosity, what’s your opinion on what should be done with the Michigan and Florida delegates?

    I heard the head of the Florida Democratic Party yesterday on NPR, making a convincing case that the Florida delegates should be seated. She said that the reason Florida’s Democratic primary was held before February 5 (against the mandate of the national DNC) was because the Republican-controlled legislature and governor put it there. She said all of the Democrats in the legislature voted against the bill for the premature primary, but they were powerless to change it. Even a lawsuit failed to move the primary back.

    That seemed to me to be a good argument for not punishing Florida Democrats. They had no way to follow the DNC’s rules.

    It is true, of course, that none of the Democratic candidates campaigned in Florida. Hillary did attend a fundraiser there before the vote; and Obama’s national cable TV commercials ran there. But for the most part, the Florida voters were voting based on the national campaign, not a local one. Perhaps if the candidates had been there, the vote would have come out differently. As it was, they voted 50:33 for Clinton.

    Not seating the Florida delegation is costing Hillary about 67 delegates, enough to put her in the lead. For that reason, the Clinton camp is arguing vigorously that Florida’s delegates need to be seated. If you add in the Michigan unseated delegates, she would be ahead by a good amount right now….

    On something unrelated… Hillary lost one of her committed Superdelegates the other day. When Rep. Tom Lantos died, Clinton lost a vote at the convention. He will not be replaced, so that vote simply does not exist. It would be interesting, then, if by chance Hillary came up one vote short of what was needed to take the nomination.

  9. Doug Paul Davis

    The problem with seating the delegation is that the DNC went to court to prevent it from being seated in the first place. So Obama did not campaign in Florida. Florida at least h was on the ballot, in Michigan he was not. So they if they decide to allow delegates from Michigan, almost have to have a new selection process, if they do it in Michigan, why not do it from Florida.

    Basically you would be penalizing Obama for following the rules laid out by the DNC at the time. I agree there was not a good reason to penalize Florida, but it happened and there’s not a good reason to penalize Obama for adhering to the policy at the time.

    I think they should have some sort of selection process or allow for open delegates.

  10. Doug Paul Davis

    The problem with seating the delegation is that the DNC went to court to prevent it from being seated in the first place. So Obama did not campaign in Florida. Florida at least h was on the ballot, in Michigan he was not. So they if they decide to allow delegates from Michigan, almost have to have a new selection process, if they do it in Michigan, why not do it from Florida.

    Basically you would be penalizing Obama for following the rules laid out by the DNC at the time. I agree there was not a good reason to penalize Florida, but it happened and there’s not a good reason to penalize Obama for adhering to the policy at the time.

    I think they should have some sort of selection process or allow for open delegates.

  11. Doug Paul Davis

    The problem with seating the delegation is that the DNC went to court to prevent it from being seated in the first place. So Obama did not campaign in Florida. Florida at least h was on the ballot, in Michigan he was not. So they if they decide to allow delegates from Michigan, almost have to have a new selection process, if they do it in Michigan, why not do it from Florida.

    Basically you would be penalizing Obama for following the rules laid out by the DNC at the time. I agree there was not a good reason to penalize Florida, but it happened and there’s not a good reason to penalize Obama for adhering to the policy at the time.

    I think they should have some sort of selection process or allow for open delegates.

  12. Doug Paul Davis

    The problem with seating the delegation is that the DNC went to court to prevent it from being seated in the first place. So Obama did not campaign in Florida. Florida at least h was on the ballot, in Michigan he was not. So they if they decide to allow delegates from Michigan, almost have to have a new selection process, if they do it in Michigan, why not do it from Florida.

    Basically you would be penalizing Obama for following the rules laid out by the DNC at the time. I agree there was not a good reason to penalize Florida, but it happened and there’s not a good reason to penalize Obama for adhering to the policy at the time.

    I think they should have some sort of selection process or allow for open delegates.

  13. 無名 - wu ming

    in fact, the florida democrats voted for the primary date shift, although had they tried to prevent it, they would have lost the vote.

    the irony, of course, is that the strict rules about stripping states of delegates if they cross a set starting date was established by terry macauliffe, currently part of the clinton campaign, when he was chair of the DNC. in 2004, he stripped DC of its delegates for jumping the gun, so it’s not as if this is something unprecedented.

    my feeling is that both michigan and florida should hold caucuses in june, before the convention. that way they could have their voices heard, and their delegates seated, in a fair election with all candidate names on the ballot.

    at any rate, clinton’s grasping for straws. my guess is that the FL and MI delegates will not decide the nomination, because obama will put it beyond reach with a growing pledged delegate lead and a nod from a growing number of superdelegates.

  14. 無名 - wu ming

    in fact, the florida democrats voted for the primary date shift, although had they tried to prevent it, they would have lost the vote.

    the irony, of course, is that the strict rules about stripping states of delegates if they cross a set starting date was established by terry macauliffe, currently part of the clinton campaign, when he was chair of the DNC. in 2004, he stripped DC of its delegates for jumping the gun, so it’s not as if this is something unprecedented.

    my feeling is that both michigan and florida should hold caucuses in june, before the convention. that way they could have their voices heard, and their delegates seated, in a fair election with all candidate names on the ballot.

    at any rate, clinton’s grasping for straws. my guess is that the FL and MI delegates will not decide the nomination, because obama will put it beyond reach with a growing pledged delegate lead and a nod from a growing number of superdelegates.

  15. 無名 - wu ming

    in fact, the florida democrats voted for the primary date shift, although had they tried to prevent it, they would have lost the vote.

    the irony, of course, is that the strict rules about stripping states of delegates if they cross a set starting date was established by terry macauliffe, currently part of the clinton campaign, when he was chair of the DNC. in 2004, he stripped DC of its delegates for jumping the gun, so it’s not as if this is something unprecedented.

    my feeling is that both michigan and florida should hold caucuses in june, before the convention. that way they could have their voices heard, and their delegates seated, in a fair election with all candidate names on the ballot.

    at any rate, clinton’s grasping for straws. my guess is that the FL and MI delegates will not decide the nomination, because obama will put it beyond reach with a growing pledged delegate lead and a nod from a growing number of superdelegates.

  16. 無名 - wu ming

    in fact, the florida democrats voted for the primary date shift, although had they tried to prevent it, they would have lost the vote.

    the irony, of course, is that the strict rules about stripping states of delegates if they cross a set starting date was established by terry macauliffe, currently part of the clinton campaign, when he was chair of the DNC. in 2004, he stripped DC of its delegates for jumping the gun, so it’s not as if this is something unprecedented.

    my feeling is that both michigan and florida should hold caucuses in june, before the convention. that way they could have their voices heard, and their delegates seated, in a fair election with all candidate names on the ballot.

    at any rate, clinton’s grasping for straws. my guess is that the FL and MI delegates will not decide the nomination, because obama will put it beyond reach with a growing pledged delegate lead and a nod from a growing number of superdelegates.

  17. Solomon

    They should apportion the delegates from Michigan and Florida based on the national popular vote (and caucus votes) in the other states. This would ensure that both states were represented, but would also penalize them for breaking the rules. It would say to them, “Look, even though you broke the rules, we will let you participate, but you are going to follow the rest of us who played by the rules. Next time, follow the rules and you can pick your delegates any way you want.”

  18. Solomon

    They should apportion the delegates from Michigan and Florida based on the national popular vote (and caucus votes) in the other states. This would ensure that both states were represented, but would also penalize them for breaking the rules. It would say to them, “Look, even though you broke the rules, we will let you participate, but you are going to follow the rest of us who played by the rules. Next time, follow the rules and you can pick your delegates any way you want.”

  19. Solomon

    They should apportion the delegates from Michigan and Florida based on the national popular vote (and caucus votes) in the other states. This would ensure that both states were represented, but would also penalize them for breaking the rules. It would say to them, “Look, even though you broke the rules, we will let you participate, but you are going to follow the rest of us who played by the rules. Next time, follow the rules and you can pick your delegates any way you want.”

  20. Solomon

    They should apportion the delegates from Michigan and Florida based on the national popular vote (and caucus votes) in the other states. This would ensure that both states were represented, but would also penalize them for breaking the rules. It would say to them, “Look, even though you broke the rules, we will let you participate, but you are going to follow the rest of us who played by the rules. Next time, follow the rules and you can pick your delegates any way you want.”

  21. Rich Rifkin

    “my guess is that the FL and MI delegates will not decide the nomination, because obama will put it beyond reach with a growing pledged delegate lead and a nod from a growing number of superdelegates.”

    On CNN, they have this big electronic delegate gizmo map. One of the CNN talking heads showed that even if Obama wins all of the remaining states (including PA, TX and OH), with an average of 55% of the vote, he won’t reach the magic number. Same if Clinton wins all the remaining states, 55-45. Obama can get the nomination if he wins all the remaining states with 60% or more in each, but that seems unlikely.

    Nevertheless, my sense is that the majority of Democrats across the country want Obama as their nominee; and with the momentum he has, he will be the nominee, even if he goes to the convention a few votes short of the needed majority.

    Personally, I don’t think the Florida or Michigan delegations should be seated no matter what. I think that would set a bad precedent for the future. Ultimately, the national parties need to take charge of the primary calendars, to prevent so much front-loading. Yet I am sympathetic to Sen. Clinton, because she did (sort of) win Florida. (Michigan doesn’t count, because the others were not on the ballot.)

  22. Rich Rifkin

    “my guess is that the FL and MI delegates will not decide the nomination, because obama will put it beyond reach with a growing pledged delegate lead and a nod from a growing number of superdelegates.”

    On CNN, they have this big electronic delegate gizmo map. One of the CNN talking heads showed that even if Obama wins all of the remaining states (including PA, TX and OH), with an average of 55% of the vote, he won’t reach the magic number. Same if Clinton wins all the remaining states, 55-45. Obama can get the nomination if he wins all the remaining states with 60% or more in each, but that seems unlikely.

    Nevertheless, my sense is that the majority of Democrats across the country want Obama as their nominee; and with the momentum he has, he will be the nominee, even if he goes to the convention a few votes short of the needed majority.

    Personally, I don’t think the Florida or Michigan delegations should be seated no matter what. I think that would set a bad precedent for the future. Ultimately, the national parties need to take charge of the primary calendars, to prevent so much front-loading. Yet I am sympathetic to Sen. Clinton, because she did (sort of) win Florida. (Michigan doesn’t count, because the others were not on the ballot.)

  23. Rich Rifkin

    “my guess is that the FL and MI delegates will not decide the nomination, because obama will put it beyond reach with a growing pledged delegate lead and a nod from a growing number of superdelegates.”

    On CNN, they have this big electronic delegate gizmo map. One of the CNN talking heads showed that even if Obama wins all of the remaining states (including PA, TX and OH), with an average of 55% of the vote, he won’t reach the magic number. Same if Clinton wins all the remaining states, 55-45. Obama can get the nomination if he wins all the remaining states with 60% or more in each, but that seems unlikely.

    Nevertheless, my sense is that the majority of Democrats across the country want Obama as their nominee; and with the momentum he has, he will be the nominee, even if he goes to the convention a few votes short of the needed majority.

    Personally, I don’t think the Florida or Michigan delegations should be seated no matter what. I think that would set a bad precedent for the future. Ultimately, the national parties need to take charge of the primary calendars, to prevent so much front-loading. Yet I am sympathetic to Sen. Clinton, because she did (sort of) win Florida. (Michigan doesn’t count, because the others were not on the ballot.)

  24. Rich Rifkin

    “my guess is that the FL and MI delegates will not decide the nomination, because obama will put it beyond reach with a growing pledged delegate lead and a nod from a growing number of superdelegates.”

    On CNN, they have this big electronic delegate gizmo map. One of the CNN talking heads showed that even if Obama wins all of the remaining states (including PA, TX and OH), with an average of 55% of the vote, he won’t reach the magic number. Same if Clinton wins all the remaining states, 55-45. Obama can get the nomination if he wins all the remaining states with 60% or more in each, but that seems unlikely.

    Nevertheless, my sense is that the majority of Democrats across the country want Obama as their nominee; and with the momentum he has, he will be the nominee, even if he goes to the convention a few votes short of the needed majority.

    Personally, I don’t think the Florida or Michigan delegations should be seated no matter what. I think that would set a bad precedent for the future. Ultimately, the national parties need to take charge of the primary calendars, to prevent so much front-loading. Yet I am sympathetic to Sen. Clinton, because she did (sort of) win Florida. (Michigan doesn’t count, because the others were not on the ballot.)

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