Commentary: Report Demonstrates Need for Public Safety Priority in City

It has become commonplace within this community to assume that I am against law enforcement because of my proactiveness on the issue of police oversight. I also believe in oversight for all aspects of professional life whether it be medical, legal, or safety standards. I simply believe that oversight is always needed as a protection to the public–regardless of the industry. It is not anti-contractor to have building inspectors. It is simply a recognition that a few bad contractors can ruin it for the thousands of good contractors.

In any case, a number of councilmembers have staked their name as being staunch defenders of law enforcement mainly because they were viewed in opposition of efforts to create civilian review of police operations.

However, in my view it is not simply enough to oppose oversight in order to be pro-law enforcement. Looking at city budget priorities that have been largely put into place by this current council majority, I have to question why anyone would consider them (the council majority) pro-law enforcement.

This is largely made clear, at least in my opinion, in a staff report that will come before the city council this evening.

What is clear from the staff report that we will examine in more detail shortly is that the city lacks the money at present to make the upgrades that we need to protect our citizens in the form of public safety.

The city faces serious budget constraints at present. And more importantly it faces serious budget inflexibility in the future.

As we discussed in March, city practices implemented repeatedly by this council majority have served to hamstring the budget process. Current policy has created a situation where a retired employee needs to have worked only five years with the city in order to receive medical benefits for life after retirement. Current policy has created a stratospheric rise in salaries and benefits–not for the rank and file employee but for upper management.

The result of this practice is not only are we paying a tremendous amount of the city’s current budget to upper management, but we have produced a system whereby we are funding people long after they have left the system and we have done so for people who have not been longtime employees necessarily.

No only are we paying a large percentage of our budget to this now, but we will pay ever more in the future. We will have locked a large percentage of our budget away for entitlements and we will not have the budgetary flexibility to meet the needs of a growing and vital community especially in terms of public safety. We simply cannot continue down this path is we want a safe community.

Thus the staff is recommending three phases based on available budget. First, a phase based on changes that can be implemented immediately with minimal additional costs. Second, they would look toward flexibility and reallocation of money. Third, they would look toward new incoming revenue streams such as the Target store.

Our public safety is going to rely on the revenue stream from Target–which may or may not ever come to Davis and from which budgetary estimates are shaky at best?

What the report does not suggest is that many of these concerns could have been handled had the city looked at their budget a few years ago and done a better job of prioritizing their concerns. The bottom line here is that the city will find a way most likely to get the public safety the people need, but the people are going to have to pay for it and the citizens at some point should ask why.

The staff report argues:

“Simply adding “officers to the streets” will not address the overall needs of the Police Department in the long run. On the contrary, unless a sound management and oversight structure is in place first, the addition of officers may not meet community expectations for the type of service that the Department should provide. Furthermore, the addition of officers must be implemented strategically, with an eye on those community expectations and improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the Department.”

This is an interesting finding. As the Ombudsman, Bob Aaronson, suggested in his report back in February, there at that time criticized the leadership, management and supervision within the department. With the arrival of new police Chief Landy Black, there is reasonable hope that that situation will improve.

However, I would also suggest based on my experience on a ride-along, conversations with members of the business community, and conversations with the public as a whole, that we do need to add more officers to the streets. Much of the time, the current level of patrol is sufficient to cover the city, but it is not sufficient to have a real presence in key parts of the city. Nor is it sufficient to cover the city when a major incident occurs. For example, I watched what happened when there was a simple fight at an apartment complex that led to an injury. Most of their manpower was at the scene of this incident–which meant during a prime time for parties and mayhem, there were not officers on the street that could handle party calls. There were not officers patrolling the street.

So while I agree that “simply” adding “officers to the streets” will not solve the problems, they will go a long way toward helping resolve some of the issues that this community has.

The report further states,

“there is no one response time standard in law enforcement. Police response times vary greatly depending on the type and priority of call received.”

I agree. But where questions arise is why it takes a certain length of time to respond to what could potentially be serious calls downtown during key times. There was a broad daylight bank robbery where response time was questioned. I saw an incident personally where a fight could have been dangerous to the public at a popular Davis restaurant and it took the police over ten minutes to arrive.

We recognize that there are different priorities for different situations. No one is overly concerned if it takes the police half an hour to take down a report, but if there is a potentially dangerous situation, it is obvious to this layman that we need the manpower and flexibility to respond rapidly to such situations. And during downtimes, we could use the police presence in key areas to both deter troublemakers as well as foster relations with specific communities and neighborhoods.

Unfortunately none of this will happen unless the city can get control over the budget situation. And right now, they have not.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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60 thoughts on “Commentary: Report Demonstrates Need for Public Safety Priority in City”

  1. Anonymous

    The other half of public safety is Fire – the need for a fourth fire station is much greater than the need for more police officers.

    As for the police-
    Davis has two police departments and frankly the UCD Police Dept. does a better job than the city police, at least from my viewpoint. There has to be a more coordinated effort to share the services. Each department should have a sphere of influence. UCD gets the entire campus and most of West Davis,including University Mall and all of the apartments/dorms around it. DPD gets the rest. This even makes more sense as the West Campus area is built out. Geographically, the UCD Police are better situated to cover the West Davis area and they are better suited to deal with students – student housing dominates the area.

    In the long run, the UCD Police should just absorb the city police – reduce admin/overhead costs and improve police performance.SAH

  2. Anonymous

    The other half of public safety is Fire – the need for a fourth fire station is much greater than the need for more police officers.

    As for the police-
    Davis has two police departments and frankly the UCD Police Dept. does a better job than the city police, at least from my viewpoint. There has to be a more coordinated effort to share the services. Each department should have a sphere of influence. UCD gets the entire campus and most of West Davis,including University Mall and all of the apartments/dorms around it. DPD gets the rest. This even makes more sense as the West Campus area is built out. Geographically, the UCD Police are better situated to cover the West Davis area and they are better suited to deal with students – student housing dominates the area.

    In the long run, the UCD Police should just absorb the city police – reduce admin/overhead costs and improve police performance.SAH

  3. Anonymous

    The other half of public safety is Fire – the need for a fourth fire station is much greater than the need for more police officers.

    As for the police-
    Davis has two police departments and frankly the UCD Police Dept. does a better job than the city police, at least from my viewpoint. There has to be a more coordinated effort to share the services. Each department should have a sphere of influence. UCD gets the entire campus and most of West Davis,including University Mall and all of the apartments/dorms around it. DPD gets the rest. This even makes more sense as the West Campus area is built out. Geographically, the UCD Police are better situated to cover the West Davis area and they are better suited to deal with students – student housing dominates the area.

    In the long run, the UCD Police should just absorb the city police – reduce admin/overhead costs and improve police performance.SAH

  4. Anonymous

    The other half of public safety is Fire – the need for a fourth fire station is much greater than the need for more police officers.

    As for the police-
    Davis has two police departments and frankly the UCD Police Dept. does a better job than the city police, at least from my viewpoint. There has to be a more coordinated effort to share the services. Each department should have a sphere of influence. UCD gets the entire campus and most of West Davis,including University Mall and all of the apartments/dorms around it. DPD gets the rest. This even makes more sense as the West Campus area is built out. Geographically, the UCD Police are better situated to cover the West Davis area and they are better suited to deal with students – student housing dominates the area.

    In the long run, the UCD Police should just absorb the city police – reduce admin/overhead costs and improve police performance.SAH

  5. davisite

    The problem of run-a-way salaries and benefits to upper management is a Gordian knot that will be diffiult to cut. Those on the receiving end will not be leading the charge. Our citizen-representatives, all to often, want to avoid what will be an “unpleasant” policy situation. This holds true, more cynically, with our local politicians who see Davis and our Council as a brief stepping-stone to greater things, and could care less about Davis’ long-term budget problems. In fact,
    they welcome these problems as THEIR solution is more peripheral sprawl to bring in more development dollars into the city’s coffers.. of course, ignoring the fact that this is only a short-term fix and the sprawl must continue endlessly.

  6. davisite

    The problem of run-a-way salaries and benefits to upper management is a Gordian knot that will be diffiult to cut. Those on the receiving end will not be leading the charge. Our citizen-representatives, all to often, want to avoid what will be an “unpleasant” policy situation. This holds true, more cynically, with our local politicians who see Davis and our Council as a brief stepping-stone to greater things, and could care less about Davis’ long-term budget problems. In fact,
    they welcome these problems as THEIR solution is more peripheral sprawl to bring in more development dollars into the city’s coffers.. of course, ignoring the fact that this is only a short-term fix and the sprawl must continue endlessly.

  7. davisite

    The problem of run-a-way salaries and benefits to upper management is a Gordian knot that will be diffiult to cut. Those on the receiving end will not be leading the charge. Our citizen-representatives, all to often, want to avoid what will be an “unpleasant” policy situation. This holds true, more cynically, with our local politicians who see Davis and our Council as a brief stepping-stone to greater things, and could care less about Davis’ long-term budget problems. In fact,
    they welcome these problems as THEIR solution is more peripheral sprawl to bring in more development dollars into the city’s coffers.. of course, ignoring the fact that this is only a short-term fix and the sprawl must continue endlessly.

  8. davisite

    The problem of run-a-way salaries and benefits to upper management is a Gordian knot that will be diffiult to cut. Those on the receiving end will not be leading the charge. Our citizen-representatives, all to often, want to avoid what will be an “unpleasant” policy situation. This holds true, more cynically, with our local politicians who see Davis and our Council as a brief stepping-stone to greater things, and could care less about Davis’ long-term budget problems. In fact,
    they welcome these problems as THEIR solution is more peripheral sprawl to bring in more development dollars into the city’s coffers.. of course, ignoring the fact that this is only a short-term fix and the sprawl must continue endlessly.

  9. Ann

    UCD and the city of Davis are two separate entities.

    I agree with you “Doug” that we need more officers on the streets for purposes of public safety.

  10. Ann

    UCD and the city of Davis are two separate entities.

    I agree with you “Doug” that we need more officers on the streets for purposes of public safety.

  11. Ann

    UCD and the city of Davis are two separate entities.

    I agree with you “Doug” that we need more officers on the streets for purposes of public safety.

  12. Ann

    UCD and the city of Davis are two separate entities.

    I agree with you “Doug” that we need more officers on the streets for purposes of public safety.

  13. Richard

    davisite has identified the problem, but it goes further. . . the long term solution to this situation will, quite predictably, be propopals to increasingly privatize local police services, starting with ancillary support services, such as dispatch and record keeping, and expanding to include community relations officers, and, concluding, if they are able to get this far, with the actual officers themselves

    it is a process that has already begun at the federal level, conceptually with bipartisan support (remember Vice President Gore’s report on “Reinventing Government” back in the mid-1990s?), even if there is disagreement as to the extent of implementation, as we have already seen with the military and emergency response

    it will, quite predictably, be marketed as a cost savings to local government, a way to avoid the cost of health and pension benefits that have been impossible to contain, but, in the long run, it will become increasingly expensive, as the constituency of corporate providers will have the ability to demand and receive additional monies, over and above contractually agreed upon amounts, because they possess political influence that the general populace who currently benefit from the public provision of services does not

    –Richard Estes

  14. Richard

    davisite has identified the problem, but it goes further. . . the long term solution to this situation will, quite predictably, be propopals to increasingly privatize local police services, starting with ancillary support services, such as dispatch and record keeping, and expanding to include community relations officers, and, concluding, if they are able to get this far, with the actual officers themselves

    it is a process that has already begun at the federal level, conceptually with bipartisan support (remember Vice President Gore’s report on “Reinventing Government” back in the mid-1990s?), even if there is disagreement as to the extent of implementation, as we have already seen with the military and emergency response

    it will, quite predictably, be marketed as a cost savings to local government, a way to avoid the cost of health and pension benefits that have been impossible to contain, but, in the long run, it will become increasingly expensive, as the constituency of corporate providers will have the ability to demand and receive additional monies, over and above contractually agreed upon amounts, because they possess political influence that the general populace who currently benefit from the public provision of services does not

    –Richard Estes

  15. Richard

    davisite has identified the problem, but it goes further. . . the long term solution to this situation will, quite predictably, be propopals to increasingly privatize local police services, starting with ancillary support services, such as dispatch and record keeping, and expanding to include community relations officers, and, concluding, if they are able to get this far, with the actual officers themselves

    it is a process that has already begun at the federal level, conceptually with bipartisan support (remember Vice President Gore’s report on “Reinventing Government” back in the mid-1990s?), even if there is disagreement as to the extent of implementation, as we have already seen with the military and emergency response

    it will, quite predictably, be marketed as a cost savings to local government, a way to avoid the cost of health and pension benefits that have been impossible to contain, but, in the long run, it will become increasingly expensive, as the constituency of corporate providers will have the ability to demand and receive additional monies, over and above contractually agreed upon amounts, because they possess political influence that the general populace who currently benefit from the public provision of services does not

    –Richard Estes

  16. Richard

    davisite has identified the problem, but it goes further. . . the long term solution to this situation will, quite predictably, be propopals to increasingly privatize local police services, starting with ancillary support services, such as dispatch and record keeping, and expanding to include community relations officers, and, concluding, if they are able to get this far, with the actual officers themselves

    it is a process that has already begun at the federal level, conceptually with bipartisan support (remember Vice President Gore’s report on “Reinventing Government” back in the mid-1990s?), even if there is disagreement as to the extent of implementation, as we have already seen with the military and emergency response

    it will, quite predictably, be marketed as a cost savings to local government, a way to avoid the cost of health and pension benefits that have been impossible to contain, but, in the long run, it will become increasingly expensive, as the constituency of corporate providers will have the ability to demand and receive additional monies, over and above contractually agreed upon amounts, because they possess political influence that the general populace who currently benefit from the public provision of services does not

    –Richard Estes

  17. davisite

    Richard…..Until we reach our communal utopian potential, it may very well be that the private corporate model is the best(at least better) answer to some of these problems. What would be absolutely essential would be transparent and intense oversight as well as(that blasphemous word to free-market zealots)REGULATION.

  18. davisite

    Richard…..Until we reach our communal utopian potential, it may very well be that the private corporate model is the best(at least better) answer to some of these problems. What would be absolutely essential would be transparent and intense oversight as well as(that blasphemous word to free-market zealots)REGULATION.

  19. davisite

    Richard…..Until we reach our communal utopian potential, it may very well be that the private corporate model is the best(at least better) answer to some of these problems. What would be absolutely essential would be transparent and intense oversight as well as(that blasphemous word to free-market zealots)REGULATION.

  20. davisite

    Richard…..Until we reach our communal utopian potential, it may very well be that the private corporate model is the best(at least better) answer to some of these problems. What would be absolutely essential would be transparent and intense oversight as well as(that blasphemous word to free-market zealots)REGULATION.

  21. Richard

    . . . except that the notion of transparency and intense oversight of the private provision of public services is, by itself, a notion that appears to be increasingly utopian, indeed, the notion of such transparency and oversight of the private sector in any regard can be construed in this way, just at the last 10 years, the tech bubble, the dot.com boom, Enron, the securization of the home mortgage market and, of course, the response is . . . even less regulation and prosecution of misconduct

    this is the old, the market is better than the ballot box attitude that became so prevalent starting in the Reagan years, so, just because the ballot box is failing doesn’t necessarily mean that the market is any better, in fact, the recent track record suggests the contrary

    for a classic example of the private provision of public services, just look at the private prison system

    –Richard Estes

  22. Richard

    . . . except that the notion of transparency and intense oversight of the private provision of public services is, by itself, a notion that appears to be increasingly utopian, indeed, the notion of such transparency and oversight of the private sector in any regard can be construed in this way, just at the last 10 years, the tech bubble, the dot.com boom, Enron, the securization of the home mortgage market and, of course, the response is . . . even less regulation and prosecution of misconduct

    this is the old, the market is better than the ballot box attitude that became so prevalent starting in the Reagan years, so, just because the ballot box is failing doesn’t necessarily mean that the market is any better, in fact, the recent track record suggests the contrary

    for a classic example of the private provision of public services, just look at the private prison system

    –Richard Estes

  23. Richard

    . . . except that the notion of transparency and intense oversight of the private provision of public services is, by itself, a notion that appears to be increasingly utopian, indeed, the notion of such transparency and oversight of the private sector in any regard can be construed in this way, just at the last 10 years, the tech bubble, the dot.com boom, Enron, the securization of the home mortgage market and, of course, the response is . . . even less regulation and prosecution of misconduct

    this is the old, the market is better than the ballot box attitude that became so prevalent starting in the Reagan years, so, just because the ballot box is failing doesn’t necessarily mean that the market is any better, in fact, the recent track record suggests the contrary

    for a classic example of the private provision of public services, just look at the private prison system

    –Richard Estes

  24. Richard

    . . . except that the notion of transparency and intense oversight of the private provision of public services is, by itself, a notion that appears to be increasingly utopian, indeed, the notion of such transparency and oversight of the private sector in any regard can be construed in this way, just at the last 10 years, the tech bubble, the dot.com boom, Enron, the securization of the home mortgage market and, of course, the response is . . . even less regulation and prosecution of misconduct

    this is the old, the market is better than the ballot box attitude that became so prevalent starting in the Reagan years, so, just because the ballot box is failing doesn’t necessarily mean that the market is any better, in fact, the recent track record suggests the contrary

    for a classic example of the private provision of public services, just look at the private prison system

    –Richard Estes

  25. Rich Rifkin

    “The other half of public safety is Fire – the need for a fourth fire station is much greater than the need for more police officers.”

    There likely is an objective analysis of this that you base your opinion on. So don’t take my questions as judgmental.

    How do we know that we need a 4th fire station? What is the factual evidence for this?

    Have there been fires in Davis which caused undue damage because our three stations were incapable of reaching the fire on time?

    How many house fires do we usually have in Davis in a given year? (I believe there were 4 in the last 12 months.) Divided by how many firefighters we currently employ, how many house fires per firefighter do we now have? And how does that number compare with other communities?

    I realize that one important function of the DFD (and the UCD Fire Department) is to fight regional fires, such as the arson fighters that struck the Capay Valley last year (started by a firefighter). However, my sense is that with the 3 Davis firehouses and the UCDFD, we have sufficient coverage for the amount of fires we generally have. I’m happy, however, to be proved wrong.

  26. Rich Rifkin

    “The other half of public safety is Fire – the need for a fourth fire station is much greater than the need for more police officers.”

    There likely is an objective analysis of this that you base your opinion on. So don’t take my questions as judgmental.

    How do we know that we need a 4th fire station? What is the factual evidence for this?

    Have there been fires in Davis which caused undue damage because our three stations were incapable of reaching the fire on time?

    How many house fires do we usually have in Davis in a given year? (I believe there were 4 in the last 12 months.) Divided by how many firefighters we currently employ, how many house fires per firefighter do we now have? And how does that number compare with other communities?

    I realize that one important function of the DFD (and the UCD Fire Department) is to fight regional fires, such as the arson fighters that struck the Capay Valley last year (started by a firefighter). However, my sense is that with the 3 Davis firehouses and the UCDFD, we have sufficient coverage for the amount of fires we generally have. I’m happy, however, to be proved wrong.

  27. Rich Rifkin

    “The other half of public safety is Fire – the need for a fourth fire station is much greater than the need for more police officers.”

    There likely is an objective analysis of this that you base your opinion on. So don’t take my questions as judgmental.

    How do we know that we need a 4th fire station? What is the factual evidence for this?

    Have there been fires in Davis which caused undue damage because our three stations were incapable of reaching the fire on time?

    How many house fires do we usually have in Davis in a given year? (I believe there were 4 in the last 12 months.) Divided by how many firefighters we currently employ, how many house fires per firefighter do we now have? And how does that number compare with other communities?

    I realize that one important function of the DFD (and the UCD Fire Department) is to fight regional fires, such as the arson fighters that struck the Capay Valley last year (started by a firefighter). However, my sense is that with the 3 Davis firehouses and the UCDFD, we have sufficient coverage for the amount of fires we generally have. I’m happy, however, to be proved wrong.

  28. Rich Rifkin

    “The other half of public safety is Fire – the need for a fourth fire station is much greater than the need for more police officers.”

    There likely is an objective analysis of this that you base your opinion on. So don’t take my questions as judgmental.

    How do we know that we need a 4th fire station? What is the factual evidence for this?

    Have there been fires in Davis which caused undue damage because our three stations were incapable of reaching the fire on time?

    How many house fires do we usually have in Davis in a given year? (I believe there were 4 in the last 12 months.) Divided by how many firefighters we currently employ, how many house fires per firefighter do we now have? And how does that number compare with other communities?

    I realize that one important function of the DFD (and the UCD Fire Department) is to fight regional fires, such as the arson fighters that struck the Capay Valley last year (started by a firefighter). However, my sense is that with the 3 Davis firehouses and the UCDFD, we have sufficient coverage for the amount of fires we generally have. I’m happy, however, to be proved wrong.

  29. sharla

    I really like the reorganization, as long as the rank and file is up for it and happy with the changes. It is really hard on employees to have a new guy come in and change things around without increasing the tension in a department. I hope that Chief Black and Asst Chief Pierce have introduced the proposed changes well to the officers and staff.

    I have interest in role of the School Resource Officer position, but that is a discussion for next year.

    I am concerned about the proposed “9-1-1 fee.” This is also a discussion for the future, but the lack of information makes me nervous. What we don’t want is to have people hesitate on placing those 911 calls, if this would be a potential result.

    I agree that there is not enough police at certain times of the day or night, but I can see how it could be difficult to predict and plan for those extremely busy minutes in otherwise uneventful and boring shifts.

  30. sharla

    I really like the reorganization, as long as the rank and file is up for it and happy with the changes. It is really hard on employees to have a new guy come in and change things around without increasing the tension in a department. I hope that Chief Black and Asst Chief Pierce have introduced the proposed changes well to the officers and staff.

    I have interest in role of the School Resource Officer position, but that is a discussion for next year.

    I am concerned about the proposed “9-1-1 fee.” This is also a discussion for the future, but the lack of information makes me nervous. What we don’t want is to have people hesitate on placing those 911 calls, if this would be a potential result.

    I agree that there is not enough police at certain times of the day or night, but I can see how it could be difficult to predict and plan for those extremely busy minutes in otherwise uneventful and boring shifts.

  31. sharla

    I really like the reorganization, as long as the rank and file is up for it and happy with the changes. It is really hard on employees to have a new guy come in and change things around without increasing the tension in a department. I hope that Chief Black and Asst Chief Pierce have introduced the proposed changes well to the officers and staff.

    I have interest in role of the School Resource Officer position, but that is a discussion for next year.

    I am concerned about the proposed “9-1-1 fee.” This is also a discussion for the future, but the lack of information makes me nervous. What we don’t want is to have people hesitate on placing those 911 calls, if this would be a potential result.

    I agree that there is not enough police at certain times of the day or night, but I can see how it could be difficult to predict and plan for those extremely busy minutes in otherwise uneventful and boring shifts.

  32. sharla

    I really like the reorganization, as long as the rank and file is up for it and happy with the changes. It is really hard on employees to have a new guy come in and change things around without increasing the tension in a department. I hope that Chief Black and Asst Chief Pierce have introduced the proposed changes well to the officers and staff.

    I have interest in role of the School Resource Officer position, but that is a discussion for next year.

    I am concerned about the proposed “9-1-1 fee.” This is also a discussion for the future, but the lack of information makes me nervous. What we don’t want is to have people hesitate on placing those 911 calls, if this would be a potential result.

    I agree that there is not enough police at certain times of the day or night, but I can see how it could be difficult to predict and plan for those extremely busy minutes in otherwise uneventful and boring shifts.

  33. brian in davis

    Rich,

    Fighting fires is only one of the roles the fire department plays in emergency services. They are usually on the front lines of many 911 calls that are not necessarily fire-related. So the questions you ask should also include medical emergencies, not only fires.

  34. brian in davis

    Rich,

    Fighting fires is only one of the roles the fire department plays in emergency services. They are usually on the front lines of many 911 calls that are not necessarily fire-related. So the questions you ask should also include medical emergencies, not only fires.

  35. brian in davis

    Rich,

    Fighting fires is only one of the roles the fire department plays in emergency services. They are usually on the front lines of many 911 calls that are not necessarily fire-related. So the questions you ask should also include medical emergencies, not only fires.

  36. brian in davis

    Rich,

    Fighting fires is only one of the roles the fire department plays in emergency services. They are usually on the front lines of many 911 calls that are not necessarily fire-related. So the questions you ask should also include medical emergencies, not only fires.

  37. Anonymous

    Four fire stations – is more of a medical issue

    Heart attack victims have 5-6 minute to live without emergency help. If responders can not get there in five minutes then you need better coverage – closer Fire Stations. Otherwise people die needlessly. SAH

  38. Anonymous

    Four fire stations – is more of a medical issue

    Heart attack victims have 5-6 minute to live without emergency help. If responders can not get there in five minutes then you need better coverage – closer Fire Stations. Otherwise people die needlessly. SAH

  39. Anonymous

    Four fire stations – is more of a medical issue

    Heart attack victims have 5-6 minute to live without emergency help. If responders can not get there in five minutes then you need better coverage – closer Fire Stations. Otherwise people die needlessly. SAH

  40. Anonymous

    Four fire stations – is more of a medical issue

    Heart attack victims have 5-6 minute to live without emergency help. If responders can not get there in five minutes then you need better coverage – closer Fire Stations. Otherwise people die needlessly. SAH

  41. Rich Rifkin

    “Heart attack victims have 5-6 minute to live without emergency help. If responders can not get there in five minutes then you need better coverage – closer Fire Stations.”

    This is a good point. And it raises the question, how adequate is the response time in Davis to medical emergencies? It seems like an objective analysis of our current situation could answer that.

    Also, if response time in Davis is too slow, but we otherwise have adequate fire fighting capabilities, that suggests to me that we might do better to contract more private ambulance/EMT services in town. Anecdotally, I see an ambulance (waiting for calls) every day at one of the shopping centers near my house (not too far from Sutter Davis Hospital).

  42. Rich Rifkin

    “Heart attack victims have 5-6 minute to live without emergency help. If responders can not get there in five minutes then you need better coverage – closer Fire Stations.”

    This is a good point. And it raises the question, how adequate is the response time in Davis to medical emergencies? It seems like an objective analysis of our current situation could answer that.

    Also, if response time in Davis is too slow, but we otherwise have adequate fire fighting capabilities, that suggests to me that we might do better to contract more private ambulance/EMT services in town. Anecdotally, I see an ambulance (waiting for calls) every day at one of the shopping centers near my house (not too far from Sutter Davis Hospital).

  43. Rich Rifkin

    “Heart attack victims have 5-6 minute to live without emergency help. If responders can not get there in five minutes then you need better coverage – closer Fire Stations.”

    This is a good point. And it raises the question, how adequate is the response time in Davis to medical emergencies? It seems like an objective analysis of our current situation could answer that.

    Also, if response time in Davis is too slow, but we otherwise have adequate fire fighting capabilities, that suggests to me that we might do better to contract more private ambulance/EMT services in town. Anecdotally, I see an ambulance (waiting for calls) every day at one of the shopping centers near my house (not too far from Sutter Davis Hospital).

  44. Rich Rifkin

    “Heart attack victims have 5-6 minute to live without emergency help. If responders can not get there in five minutes then you need better coverage – closer Fire Stations.”

    This is a good point. And it raises the question, how adequate is the response time in Davis to medical emergencies? It seems like an objective analysis of our current situation could answer that.

    Also, if response time in Davis is too slow, but we otherwise have adequate fire fighting capabilities, that suggests to me that we might do better to contract more private ambulance/EMT services in town. Anecdotally, I see an ambulance (waiting for calls) every day at one of the shopping centers near my house (not too far from Sutter Davis Hospital).

  45. No on Xer

    The fourth fire station “carrot” in N. Davis was/and will be trotted out again when the Covell Village proposal is resurrected by the current Council Majority. These questions challenging the need for a fourth station have been all raised before and ,curiously, have never been adequatly responded to. Emergency Medical response evaluation and augmentation if needed, coordination of the Davis Fire Department and UCD Fire Department manpower and equipment are valid approaches to the problem(if in fact there is one).

  46. No on Xer

    The fourth fire station “carrot” in N. Davis was/and will be trotted out again when the Covell Village proposal is resurrected by the current Council Majority. These questions challenging the need for a fourth station have been all raised before and ,curiously, have never been adequatly responded to. Emergency Medical response evaluation and augmentation if needed, coordination of the Davis Fire Department and UCD Fire Department manpower and equipment are valid approaches to the problem(if in fact there is one).

  47. No on Xer

    The fourth fire station “carrot” in N. Davis was/and will be trotted out again when the Covell Village proposal is resurrected by the current Council Majority. These questions challenging the need for a fourth station have been all raised before and ,curiously, have never been adequatly responded to. Emergency Medical response evaluation and augmentation if needed, coordination of the Davis Fire Department and UCD Fire Department manpower and equipment are valid approaches to the problem(if in fact there is one).

  48. No on Xer

    The fourth fire station “carrot” in N. Davis was/and will be trotted out again when the Covell Village proposal is resurrected by the current Council Majority. These questions challenging the need for a fourth station have been all raised before and ,curiously, have never been adequatly responded to. Emergency Medical response evaluation and augmentation if needed, coordination of the Davis Fire Department and UCD Fire Department manpower and equipment are valid approaches to the problem(if in fact there is one).

  49. Anonymous

    The Davis Fire Department may be the most likely next candidate for the city to contract out to a private firm, much like our waste disposal.

  50. Anonymous

    The Davis Fire Department may be the most likely next candidate for the city to contract out to a private firm, much like our waste disposal.

  51. Anonymous

    The Davis Fire Department may be the most likely next candidate for the city to contract out to a private firm, much like our waste disposal.

  52. Anonymous

    The Davis Fire Department may be the most likely next candidate for the city to contract out to a private firm, much like our waste disposal.

  53. Anonymous

    we might do better to contract more private ambulance/EMT services in town.

    I was told by a firefighter in West Sac. that there are 4 ambulances in the entire county – one in Davis, two in West Sac and one in Woodland. If the one in Davis is occupied and another person calls, they send the “extra” West Sac ambulance over the Causeway which as you can imagine takes longer than you would want if you were suffering from a heart attack.

    Luckily, it is probably unusual that two are needed at the same time, but if that happens it must be a problem.

  54. Anonymous

    we might do better to contract more private ambulance/EMT services in town.

    I was told by a firefighter in West Sac. that there are 4 ambulances in the entire county – one in Davis, two in West Sac and one in Woodland. If the one in Davis is occupied and another person calls, they send the “extra” West Sac ambulance over the Causeway which as you can imagine takes longer than you would want if you were suffering from a heart attack.

    Luckily, it is probably unusual that two are needed at the same time, but if that happens it must be a problem.

  55. Anonymous

    we might do better to contract more private ambulance/EMT services in town.

    I was told by a firefighter in West Sac. that there are 4 ambulances in the entire county – one in Davis, two in West Sac and one in Woodland. If the one in Davis is occupied and another person calls, they send the “extra” West Sac ambulance over the Causeway which as you can imagine takes longer than you would want if you were suffering from a heart attack.

    Luckily, it is probably unusual that two are needed at the same time, but if that happens it must be a problem.

  56. Anonymous

    we might do better to contract more private ambulance/EMT services in town.

    I was told by a firefighter in West Sac. that there are 4 ambulances in the entire county – one in Davis, two in West Sac and one in Woodland. If the one in Davis is occupied and another person calls, they send the “extra” West Sac ambulance over the Causeway which as you can imagine takes longer than you would want if you were suffering from a heart attack.

    Luckily, it is probably unusual that two are needed at the same time, but if that happens it must be a problem.

  57. Anonymous

    Maybe our civic imperials should have considered “serious budget restraints” before they subsidized Bistro 33, the epitome of downtown Davis bourgeois eyesores.

  58. Anonymous

    Maybe our civic imperials should have considered “serious budget restraints” before they subsidized Bistro 33, the epitome of downtown Davis bourgeois eyesores.

  59. Anonymous

    Maybe our civic imperials should have considered “serious budget restraints” before they subsidized Bistro 33, the epitome of downtown Davis bourgeois eyesores.

  60. Anonymous

    Maybe our civic imperials should have considered “serious budget restraints” before they subsidized Bistro 33, the epitome of downtown Davis bourgeois eyesores.

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