3-2 Vote Moves Valley Oak Officially to the Chopping Block with only a Small Reprieve

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The day began with a show of force–the force of dozens of small school children laughing and screaming in the hopes of saving their school as they slowly marched from Valley Oak Elementary School to Council Chambers. It was a distance of nearly a mile and remarkably it seemed to take 45 to 50 minutes for their small legs to cross the distance.


They were hopeful and anxious, but soon enough that joy and anticipation turned into stone cold reality.

It was a night where the fate seemed sealed rather early on. In fact, most of the way through the staff presentation and question and answers, Ginny Davis, one of the assistants to the superintendent, made the comment that the staff was not making a recommendation to close Valley Oak this evening, a proclamation that induced a number of hearty laughs because from the very beginning it seemed that staff had in fact been a very heavy lean toward closing Valley Oak Elementary School and if they were not overtly recommending it, they stopped just shy of such a recommendation.

Superintendent Richard Whitmore gave a presentation in which he made a strong case that the district could close Valley Oak by 2007, however, in the end that seemed too liberal an estimate even for the majority on this board. And it would save enough money for the district given not only closing costs, but also a $50 to $75 thousand dollar consultant cost in addition to simply retaining all of the certificated staff (i.e. the teachers) and moving them from one location to another. So the costs would be heavy and the savings rather light in 2007-08.

One exchange in particular kind of summed up how this evening would go–Board Member Tim Taylor would mention that there were differing interpretations of the enrollment projections and he asked Mr. Whitmore which he should believe. Mr. Whitmore pointedly said that none of the staff were demographers, but that the Task Force had worked long and hard with the demographic data and he would tend to take their findings strongly into account.

By the time, the board went around the room and spoke, it was fait accompli. First, Board Member Keltie Jones somewhat tearfully suggested she had no choice but to close the school. Gina Daleiden followed suit. And then after a long and vigorous defense by Sheila Allen, Tim Taylor made it clear that this would be a 3-2 vote in favor of closure. They cited the report by the Task Force, they praised the work of the task force, they said this was the toughest decision that they had to make and that no one had gone onto the board believing that they would close an elementary school.

Jim Provenza introduced a substitute motion that would forestall the decision until the fall when they had the new enrollment data, and while Sheila Allen joined him, it failed by a 3-2 vote. Provenza argued that there was no immediate fiscal crisis and that this school was working and that the EL program at Valley Oak was exemplary.

This argument was countered by staff that argued that they could make the program work well wherever it moved and by the board majority who argued that this was about programs not facilities and that they could have successful programs regardless of where. The counter-argument that these are assumptions seemed to fall on deaf ears. The most vulnerable students in this district are being moved based on beliefs and assumptions by staff and trustees and not based on the actual knowledge that they can simply move a program from one school to another. We simply do not know.

In the end though, it seemed that the board, or at least Tim Taylor, while believing nine schools was unfair to the other eight, fiscally irresponsible, and unsupported by the demographic data, could not deliver the final death knell. He offered a massive motion which would do the following:

1. Open Korematsu as a K-2 school for 07-08.
2. Keep Valley Oak open in 07-08
3. Open Korematsu as a K-6 school in fall of ’08
4. Close Valley Oak in fall of ’08
5. Place on the ballot a second parcel tax to fund Valley Oak in November of 2007 provided that the first parcel tax passed.

This was too much for Keltie Jones who pushed hard and was very fearful a second tax bill would doom their first. She got Taylor to water down even the compromise language so that a poll would be taken and the second parcel tax would be put on the ballot only if it wasn’t going to doom the first. Now perhaps what Jones was forgetting is that by putting them both on there and tying the fate of Valley Oak to the first parcel tax, they are in essence recruiting 50 to 100 dedicated parents who have a vested interest in doing the grass roots work to get them both passed. If only the first parcel tax were on the ballot–none of those folks would work to get it placed on the ballot. So in actuality it might be more likely to pass because it is tied to Valley Oak than if it were not.

The final passage was 3-2–giving the parents at Valley Oak a glimmer of hope amid a huge valley of despair. At just after 1 am, the fate seem cast officially. A mix of anger, frustration, sadness, and exhaustion seemed to grip the people. And through it all, the folks at Valley Oak Elementary School still do not know their fate for sure, but somehow they managed to not die enough to perhaps muster the will and determination to fight another day.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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168 thoughts on “3-2 Vote Moves Valley Oak Officially to the Chopping Block with only a Small Reprieve”

  1. Don Shor

    “She got Taylor to water down even the compromise language so that a poll would be taken and the second parcel tax would be put on the ballot only if it wasn’t going to doom the first.”
    I think the vote to close VO may doom the parcel tax.

  2. Don Shor

    “She got Taylor to water down even the compromise language so that a poll would be taken and the second parcel tax would be put on the ballot only if it wasn’t going to doom the first.”
    I think the vote to close VO may doom the parcel tax.

  3. Don Shor

    “She got Taylor to water down even the compromise language so that a poll would be taken and the second parcel tax would be put on the ballot only if it wasn’t going to doom the first.”
    I think the vote to close VO may doom the parcel tax.

  4. Don Shor

    “She got Taylor to water down even the compromise language so that a poll would be taken and the second parcel tax would be put on the ballot only if it wasn’t going to doom the first.”
    I think the vote to close VO may doom the parcel tax.

  5. davisite

    The spotlight was on the school board last evening and it was not a pretty sight. The “Davis values” schism was fairly well drawn from the outset and courage and leadership by a swing vote was called for. Tragically, while clearly recognizing the stakes at peril, the swing vote failed to rise to the challenge. The board’s 3-2 decision last evening to close Valley Oak will seriously threaten the passage of a school board parcel tax in 2008. In addition, the plan to put an extra tax, specifically tied to passage of the general school board tax measure,to keep Valley Oak open, will further alienate the Davis voter who does not take kindly to being coerced and manipulated as the alternative to their elected representatives
    “doing the right thing”.

  6. davisite

    The spotlight was on the school board last evening and it was not a pretty sight. The “Davis values” schism was fairly well drawn from the outset and courage and leadership by a swing vote was called for. Tragically, while clearly recognizing the stakes at peril, the swing vote failed to rise to the challenge. The board’s 3-2 decision last evening to close Valley Oak will seriously threaten the passage of a school board parcel tax in 2008. In addition, the plan to put an extra tax, specifically tied to passage of the general school board tax measure,to keep Valley Oak open, will further alienate the Davis voter who does not take kindly to being coerced and manipulated as the alternative to their elected representatives
    “doing the right thing”.

  7. davisite

    The spotlight was on the school board last evening and it was not a pretty sight. The “Davis values” schism was fairly well drawn from the outset and courage and leadership by a swing vote was called for. Tragically, while clearly recognizing the stakes at peril, the swing vote failed to rise to the challenge. The board’s 3-2 decision last evening to close Valley Oak will seriously threaten the passage of a school board parcel tax in 2008. In addition, the plan to put an extra tax, specifically tied to passage of the general school board tax measure,to keep Valley Oak open, will further alienate the Davis voter who does not take kindly to being coerced and manipulated as the alternative to their elected representatives
    “doing the right thing”.

  8. davisite

    The spotlight was on the school board last evening and it was not a pretty sight. The “Davis values” schism was fairly well drawn from the outset and courage and leadership by a swing vote was called for. Tragically, while clearly recognizing the stakes at peril, the swing vote failed to rise to the challenge. The board’s 3-2 decision last evening to close Valley Oak will seriously threaten the passage of a school board parcel tax in 2008. In addition, the plan to put an extra tax, specifically tied to passage of the general school board tax measure,to keep Valley Oak open, will further alienate the Davis voter who does not take kindly to being coerced and manipulated as the alternative to their elected representatives
    “doing the right thing”.

  9. Anonymous

    I will be voting NO on the school board parcel tax.When this tax measure fails,I pledge to donate the amount of my parcel tax assessment value, for as long as the parcel tax was to have been in effect, to an organization formed by the Valley Oak community that will work to supplement the DUSD funds with these private(and hopefully, tax-deductible) donations .

  10. Anonymous

    I will be voting NO on the school board parcel tax.When this tax measure fails,I pledge to donate the amount of my parcel tax assessment value, for as long as the parcel tax was to have been in effect, to an organization formed by the Valley Oak community that will work to supplement the DUSD funds with these private(and hopefully, tax-deductible) donations .

  11. Anonymous

    I will be voting NO on the school board parcel tax.When this tax measure fails,I pledge to donate the amount of my parcel tax assessment value, for as long as the parcel tax was to have been in effect, to an organization formed by the Valley Oak community that will work to supplement the DUSD funds with these private(and hopefully, tax-deductible) donations .

  12. Anonymous

    I will be voting NO on the school board parcel tax.When this tax measure fails,I pledge to donate the amount of my parcel tax assessment value, for as long as the parcel tax was to have been in effect, to an organization formed by the Valley Oak community that will work to supplement the DUSD funds with these private(and hopefully, tax-deductible) donations .

  13. Rich Rifkin

    “The board’s 3-2 decision last evening to close Valley Oak will seriously threaten the passage of a school board parcel tax in 2008.”

    When it seemed clear to me (a few months ago) that the Board was going to close Valley Oak, this was my first thought: that it will doom the parcel tax.

    However, I’ve changed my mind on that. I will certainly vote in favor of it. I think most folks who support the public schools in Davis (which is the vast majority of Davis) won’t want to do anything to make the situation worse. Some, especially right now, might be thinking of that vote as an expression of protest or disgust. But in the end, I think they will come around to realize that such a protest will mostly just serve to harm the interests of the kids in the reading program, who often (though not always) come from lesser educated families.

    As far as an additional parcel tax goes, one that would be used to keep Valley Oak open, I have no idea how popular that would be. I think it might depend on the state of the economy at the time of the vote, how much money we are talking about, and whether or not the City of Davis is (around the same time) requesting a tax increase. Having watched a bit of the recent budget meetings, I know that the city leaders are contemplating some kind of tax increase to cover their expenses. So if the economy is good and the city is not asking for higher taxes, then that would help the chances for a VO tax increase. If the opposite are the conditions, then it would likely get less support.

    I should add that parcel taxes are somewhat unfair, in that they are neither based on the ability to pay or on the value of one’s property. Unfortunately, due to Prop 13, there is really no other viable alternative. However, if I had my druthers, I would make all of these local taxes based on the actual value of real estate. If that were done, the person who owns a small bungalow on 6th Street would pay far less that the multi-millionaire who lives out in North Davis Farms. But as things exist, they pay the same amount.

  14. Rich Rifkin

    “The board’s 3-2 decision last evening to close Valley Oak will seriously threaten the passage of a school board parcel tax in 2008.”

    When it seemed clear to me (a few months ago) that the Board was going to close Valley Oak, this was my first thought: that it will doom the parcel tax.

    However, I’ve changed my mind on that. I will certainly vote in favor of it. I think most folks who support the public schools in Davis (which is the vast majority of Davis) won’t want to do anything to make the situation worse. Some, especially right now, might be thinking of that vote as an expression of protest or disgust. But in the end, I think they will come around to realize that such a protest will mostly just serve to harm the interests of the kids in the reading program, who often (though not always) come from lesser educated families.

    As far as an additional parcel tax goes, one that would be used to keep Valley Oak open, I have no idea how popular that would be. I think it might depend on the state of the economy at the time of the vote, how much money we are talking about, and whether or not the City of Davis is (around the same time) requesting a tax increase. Having watched a bit of the recent budget meetings, I know that the city leaders are contemplating some kind of tax increase to cover their expenses. So if the economy is good and the city is not asking for higher taxes, then that would help the chances for a VO tax increase. If the opposite are the conditions, then it would likely get less support.

    I should add that parcel taxes are somewhat unfair, in that they are neither based on the ability to pay or on the value of one’s property. Unfortunately, due to Prop 13, there is really no other viable alternative. However, if I had my druthers, I would make all of these local taxes based on the actual value of real estate. If that were done, the person who owns a small bungalow on 6th Street would pay far less that the multi-millionaire who lives out in North Davis Farms. But as things exist, they pay the same amount.

  15. Rich Rifkin

    “The board’s 3-2 decision last evening to close Valley Oak will seriously threaten the passage of a school board parcel tax in 2008.”

    When it seemed clear to me (a few months ago) that the Board was going to close Valley Oak, this was my first thought: that it will doom the parcel tax.

    However, I’ve changed my mind on that. I will certainly vote in favor of it. I think most folks who support the public schools in Davis (which is the vast majority of Davis) won’t want to do anything to make the situation worse. Some, especially right now, might be thinking of that vote as an expression of protest or disgust. But in the end, I think they will come around to realize that such a protest will mostly just serve to harm the interests of the kids in the reading program, who often (though not always) come from lesser educated families.

    As far as an additional parcel tax goes, one that would be used to keep Valley Oak open, I have no idea how popular that would be. I think it might depend on the state of the economy at the time of the vote, how much money we are talking about, and whether or not the City of Davis is (around the same time) requesting a tax increase. Having watched a bit of the recent budget meetings, I know that the city leaders are contemplating some kind of tax increase to cover their expenses. So if the economy is good and the city is not asking for higher taxes, then that would help the chances for a VO tax increase. If the opposite are the conditions, then it would likely get less support.

    I should add that parcel taxes are somewhat unfair, in that they are neither based on the ability to pay or on the value of one’s property. Unfortunately, due to Prop 13, there is really no other viable alternative. However, if I had my druthers, I would make all of these local taxes based on the actual value of real estate. If that were done, the person who owns a small bungalow on 6th Street would pay far less that the multi-millionaire who lives out in North Davis Farms. But as things exist, they pay the same amount.

  16. Rich Rifkin

    “The board’s 3-2 decision last evening to close Valley Oak will seriously threaten the passage of a school board parcel tax in 2008.”

    When it seemed clear to me (a few months ago) that the Board was going to close Valley Oak, this was my first thought: that it will doom the parcel tax.

    However, I’ve changed my mind on that. I will certainly vote in favor of it. I think most folks who support the public schools in Davis (which is the vast majority of Davis) won’t want to do anything to make the situation worse. Some, especially right now, might be thinking of that vote as an expression of protest or disgust. But in the end, I think they will come around to realize that such a protest will mostly just serve to harm the interests of the kids in the reading program, who often (though not always) come from lesser educated families.

    As far as an additional parcel tax goes, one that would be used to keep Valley Oak open, I have no idea how popular that would be. I think it might depend on the state of the economy at the time of the vote, how much money we are talking about, and whether or not the City of Davis is (around the same time) requesting a tax increase. Having watched a bit of the recent budget meetings, I know that the city leaders are contemplating some kind of tax increase to cover their expenses. So if the economy is good and the city is not asking for higher taxes, then that would help the chances for a VO tax increase. If the opposite are the conditions, then it would likely get less support.

    I should add that parcel taxes are somewhat unfair, in that they are neither based on the ability to pay or on the value of one’s property. Unfortunately, due to Prop 13, there is really no other viable alternative. However, if I had my druthers, I would make all of these local taxes based on the actual value of real estate. If that were done, the person who owns a small bungalow on 6th Street would pay far less that the multi-millionaire who lives out in North Davis Farms. But as things exist, they pay the same amount.

  17. Anonymous

    One comment stands out in my memory aside from Ms. Jones’ aggressive bullying of Mr. Taylor. Gina Delaiden saying something like it was well-known that small schools don’t work for THEM. I noticed several board members squirm and roll their eyes at that moment.

  18. Anonymous

    One comment stands out in my memory aside from Ms. Jones’ aggressive bullying of Mr. Taylor. Gina Delaiden saying something like it was well-known that small schools don’t work for THEM. I noticed several board members squirm and roll their eyes at that moment.

  19. Anonymous

    One comment stands out in my memory aside from Ms. Jones’ aggressive bullying of Mr. Taylor. Gina Delaiden saying something like it was well-known that small schools don’t work for THEM. I noticed several board members squirm and roll their eyes at that moment.

  20. Anonymous

    One comment stands out in my memory aside from Ms. Jones’ aggressive bullying of Mr. Taylor. Gina Delaiden saying something like it was well-known that small schools don’t work for THEM. I noticed several board members squirm and roll their eyes at that moment.

  21. Sharla

    The school bond is an enrichment bond, which seems to affect the junior highs most visibly allowing music, art, etc. to be fit in to the curriculum by having a 7th period. There are many other programs, such as the reading program at Valley Oak which are being funded by the bond. This talk of not voting for it is just sour grapes.

    Remember the heartache over moving the neighborhood program at WDE to Willit and turning WDE into Cesar Chavez. There was concern about the neighborhood students then. Now Willet is one of our best schools and the neighborhood has adjusted.

    My last child is graduating from DSIS this year and I will no longer have a child in the District. I think that Davis schools are better than some, but I also think that there is tremendous room for improvement.

    Both my children struggled through school here in Davis. My daughter finally left DHS and did her senior year in the Bay Area, graduating from a smaller high school where she could play varsity sports and participate in music and drama. She was in a graduating class of 250 seniors.

    My son is at DSIS where he has flourished. He went to Valley Oak for a number of years. The lower grades were wonderful, with just the neighborhood kids. However, in the upper grades the school became different which I attribute to the addition of the out of neighborhood GATE kids into the school environment. I finally moved him to North Davis Elementary and its well-balanced neighborhood program.

    So I do support neighborhood programs. With that in mind, I do support opening Korematsu. But keeping Valley Oak’s small neighborhood program open too. Move the GATE program to Korematsu and move DSIS over to VO.

    Let’s support the parcel taxes to make this happen.

  22. Sharla

    The school bond is an enrichment bond, which seems to affect the junior highs most visibly allowing music, art, etc. to be fit in to the curriculum by having a 7th period. There are many other programs, such as the reading program at Valley Oak which are being funded by the bond. This talk of not voting for it is just sour grapes.

    Remember the heartache over moving the neighborhood program at WDE to Willit and turning WDE into Cesar Chavez. There was concern about the neighborhood students then. Now Willet is one of our best schools and the neighborhood has adjusted.

    My last child is graduating from DSIS this year and I will no longer have a child in the District. I think that Davis schools are better than some, but I also think that there is tremendous room for improvement.

    Both my children struggled through school here in Davis. My daughter finally left DHS and did her senior year in the Bay Area, graduating from a smaller high school where she could play varsity sports and participate in music and drama. She was in a graduating class of 250 seniors.

    My son is at DSIS where he has flourished. He went to Valley Oak for a number of years. The lower grades were wonderful, with just the neighborhood kids. However, in the upper grades the school became different which I attribute to the addition of the out of neighborhood GATE kids into the school environment. I finally moved him to North Davis Elementary and its well-balanced neighborhood program.

    So I do support neighborhood programs. With that in mind, I do support opening Korematsu. But keeping Valley Oak’s small neighborhood program open too. Move the GATE program to Korematsu and move DSIS over to VO.

    Let’s support the parcel taxes to make this happen.

  23. Sharla

    The school bond is an enrichment bond, which seems to affect the junior highs most visibly allowing music, art, etc. to be fit in to the curriculum by having a 7th period. There are many other programs, such as the reading program at Valley Oak which are being funded by the bond. This talk of not voting for it is just sour grapes.

    Remember the heartache over moving the neighborhood program at WDE to Willit and turning WDE into Cesar Chavez. There was concern about the neighborhood students then. Now Willet is one of our best schools and the neighborhood has adjusted.

    My last child is graduating from DSIS this year and I will no longer have a child in the District. I think that Davis schools are better than some, but I also think that there is tremendous room for improvement.

    Both my children struggled through school here in Davis. My daughter finally left DHS and did her senior year in the Bay Area, graduating from a smaller high school where she could play varsity sports and participate in music and drama. She was in a graduating class of 250 seniors.

    My son is at DSIS where he has flourished. He went to Valley Oak for a number of years. The lower grades were wonderful, with just the neighborhood kids. However, in the upper grades the school became different which I attribute to the addition of the out of neighborhood GATE kids into the school environment. I finally moved him to North Davis Elementary and its well-balanced neighborhood program.

    So I do support neighborhood programs. With that in mind, I do support opening Korematsu. But keeping Valley Oak’s small neighborhood program open too. Move the GATE program to Korematsu and move DSIS over to VO.

    Let’s support the parcel taxes to make this happen.

  24. Sharla

    The school bond is an enrichment bond, which seems to affect the junior highs most visibly allowing music, art, etc. to be fit in to the curriculum by having a 7th period. There are many other programs, such as the reading program at Valley Oak which are being funded by the bond. This talk of not voting for it is just sour grapes.

    Remember the heartache over moving the neighborhood program at WDE to Willit and turning WDE into Cesar Chavez. There was concern about the neighborhood students then. Now Willet is one of our best schools and the neighborhood has adjusted.

    My last child is graduating from DSIS this year and I will no longer have a child in the District. I think that Davis schools are better than some, but I also think that there is tremendous room for improvement.

    Both my children struggled through school here in Davis. My daughter finally left DHS and did her senior year in the Bay Area, graduating from a smaller high school where she could play varsity sports and participate in music and drama. She was in a graduating class of 250 seniors.

    My son is at DSIS where he has flourished. He went to Valley Oak for a number of years. The lower grades were wonderful, with just the neighborhood kids. However, in the upper grades the school became different which I attribute to the addition of the out of neighborhood GATE kids into the school environment. I finally moved him to North Davis Elementary and its well-balanced neighborhood program.

    So I do support neighborhood programs. With that in mind, I do support opening Korematsu. But keeping Valley Oak’s small neighborhood program open too. Move the GATE program to Korematsu and move DSIS over to VO.

    Let’s support the parcel taxes to make this happen.

  25. Adam Siegel

    Apparently the GATE program will have to be moved to North Davis, for geographic balance. How’s that going to affect NDE as a neighborhood school?

  26. Adam Siegel

    Apparently the GATE program will have to be moved to North Davis, for geographic balance. How’s that going to affect NDE as a neighborhood school?

  27. Adam Siegel

    Apparently the GATE program will have to be moved to North Davis, for geographic balance. How’s that going to affect NDE as a neighborhood school?

  28. Adam Siegel

    Apparently the GATE program will have to be moved to North Davis, for geographic balance. How’s that going to affect NDE as a neighborhood school?

  29. Anonymous

    The Board has unavoidably made this a huge campaign issue for both the upcoming parcel tax issues and the fall school board race. Look for Ms. Jones to announce her “retirement” in the days ahead.

  30. Anonymous

    The Board has unavoidably made this a huge campaign issue for both the upcoming parcel tax issues and the fall school board race. Look for Ms. Jones to announce her “retirement” in the days ahead.

  31. Anonymous

    The Board has unavoidably made this a huge campaign issue for both the upcoming parcel tax issues and the fall school board race. Look for Ms. Jones to announce her “retirement” in the days ahead.

  32. Anonymous

    The Board has unavoidably made this a huge campaign issue for both the upcoming parcel tax issues and the fall school board race. Look for Ms. Jones to announce her “retirement” in the days ahead.

  33. Anonymous

    “Jones’ retirement”

    Why does this remind me of councilman Puntillo being the driving force at dismantling the HRC just before his own “retirement”?

  34. Anonymous

    “Jones’ retirement”

    Why does this remind me of councilman Puntillo being the driving force at dismantling the HRC just before his own “retirement”?

  35. Anonymous

    “Jones’ retirement”

    Why does this remind me of councilman Puntillo being the driving force at dismantling the HRC just before his own “retirement”?

  36. Anonymous

    “Jones’ retirement”

    Why does this remind me of councilman Puntillo being the driving force at dismantling the HRC just before his own “retirement”?

  37. Don Shor

    Just for the record, I wasn’t advocating opposition to the parcel tax. Just predicting that it could be harder to pass. Valley Oak parents may feel they have little reason to vote for it.

    That Valley Oak/DSIS combination worked very well for my kids, too, Sharla. I am a big supporter of DSIS.

  38. Don Shor

    Just for the record, I wasn’t advocating opposition to the parcel tax. Just predicting that it could be harder to pass. Valley Oak parents may feel they have little reason to vote for it.

    That Valley Oak/DSIS combination worked very well for my kids, too, Sharla. I am a big supporter of DSIS.

  39. Don Shor

    Just for the record, I wasn’t advocating opposition to the parcel tax. Just predicting that it could be harder to pass. Valley Oak parents may feel they have little reason to vote for it.

    That Valley Oak/DSIS combination worked very well for my kids, too, Sharla. I am a big supporter of DSIS.

  40. Don Shor

    Just for the record, I wasn’t advocating opposition to the parcel tax. Just predicting that it could be harder to pass. Valley Oak parents may feel they have little reason to vote for it.

    That Valley Oak/DSIS combination worked very well for my kids, too, Sharla. I am a big supporter of DSIS.

  41. Anonymous

    I don’t get the Board’s decision, at all. They opened Korematsu prematurely (I think it should be opened, but not before a district plan was in place), then expanded it on a whim as a K-1 (disrupting a cohort at other schools). Now this.

    Board members need to understand that getting elected means you need to make tough and unpopular decisions. This decision allows the situation to linger on, and destabilizes VO (again) for yet another year (or, at least through November).

    Would you want to send your child to VO next year? I think it will be a very tough place to go to school.

    I hope the Board will be clear about what the 2nd parcel tax vote is all about. Are we voting on a nebulous “9-school” program to be determined later? Are we keeping VO open as a small school? Are we rezoning boundaries to balance the school populations?

    Maybe the Board will appoint another Task Force to figure that out, too. I guess I should anticipate voting on that in 2009.

  42. Anonymous

    I don’t get the Board’s decision, at all. They opened Korematsu prematurely (I think it should be opened, but not before a district plan was in place), then expanded it on a whim as a K-1 (disrupting a cohort at other schools). Now this.

    Board members need to understand that getting elected means you need to make tough and unpopular decisions. This decision allows the situation to linger on, and destabilizes VO (again) for yet another year (or, at least through November).

    Would you want to send your child to VO next year? I think it will be a very tough place to go to school.

    I hope the Board will be clear about what the 2nd parcel tax vote is all about. Are we voting on a nebulous “9-school” program to be determined later? Are we keeping VO open as a small school? Are we rezoning boundaries to balance the school populations?

    Maybe the Board will appoint another Task Force to figure that out, too. I guess I should anticipate voting on that in 2009.

  43. Anonymous

    I don’t get the Board’s decision, at all. They opened Korematsu prematurely (I think it should be opened, but not before a district plan was in place), then expanded it on a whim as a K-1 (disrupting a cohort at other schools). Now this.

    Board members need to understand that getting elected means you need to make tough and unpopular decisions. This decision allows the situation to linger on, and destabilizes VO (again) for yet another year (or, at least through November).

    Would you want to send your child to VO next year? I think it will be a very tough place to go to school.

    I hope the Board will be clear about what the 2nd parcel tax vote is all about. Are we voting on a nebulous “9-school” program to be determined later? Are we keeping VO open as a small school? Are we rezoning boundaries to balance the school populations?

    Maybe the Board will appoint another Task Force to figure that out, too. I guess I should anticipate voting on that in 2009.

  44. Anonymous

    I don’t get the Board’s decision, at all. They opened Korematsu prematurely (I think it should be opened, but not before a district plan was in place), then expanded it on a whim as a K-1 (disrupting a cohort at other schools). Now this.

    Board members need to understand that getting elected means you need to make tough and unpopular decisions. This decision allows the situation to linger on, and destabilizes VO (again) for yet another year (or, at least through November).

    Would you want to send your child to VO next year? I think it will be a very tough place to go to school.

    I hope the Board will be clear about what the 2nd parcel tax vote is all about. Are we voting on a nebulous “9-school” program to be determined later? Are we keeping VO open as a small school? Are we rezoning boundaries to balance the school populations?

    Maybe the Board will appoint another Task Force to figure that out, too. I guess I should anticipate voting on that in 2009.

  45. Anonymous

    What a mess. Board members should step up to the plate, face their responsibility and either support the school (through funding and/or rezoning) or decide to close it and follow through.

  46. Anonymous

    What a mess. Board members should step up to the plate, face their responsibility and either support the school (through funding and/or rezoning) or decide to close it and follow through.

  47. Anonymous

    What a mess. Board members should step up to the plate, face their responsibility and either support the school (through funding and/or rezoning) or decide to close it and follow through.

  48. Anonymous

    What a mess. Board members should step up to the plate, face their responsibility and either support the school (through funding and/or rezoning) or decide to close it and follow through.

  49. Richard

    Davis is going the way of much of upper middle income Northern California. It has rapidly getrified, and it is probable that future enrollment projections overestimate the number of students. The Board has already experienced this with Mace Ranch and Korematsu. Valley Oak may be the tip of a large demographic iceberg about to hit the District.

    In the Land Park and Curtis Park neighborhoods in Sacramento, it is striking how few kids there are, compared to say, 15 years ago, and I suspect that Davis is about to have the same experience over the next 10 years.

    –Richard Estes

  50. Richard

    Davis is going the way of much of upper middle income Northern California. It has rapidly getrified, and it is probable that future enrollment projections overestimate the number of students. The Board has already experienced this with Mace Ranch and Korematsu. Valley Oak may be the tip of a large demographic iceberg about to hit the District.

    In the Land Park and Curtis Park neighborhoods in Sacramento, it is striking how few kids there are, compared to say, 15 years ago, and I suspect that Davis is about to have the same experience over the next 10 years.

    –Richard Estes

  51. Richard

    Davis is going the way of much of upper middle income Northern California. It has rapidly getrified, and it is probable that future enrollment projections overestimate the number of students. The Board has already experienced this with Mace Ranch and Korematsu. Valley Oak may be the tip of a large demographic iceberg about to hit the District.

    In the Land Park and Curtis Park neighborhoods in Sacramento, it is striking how few kids there are, compared to say, 15 years ago, and I suspect that Davis is about to have the same experience over the next 10 years.

    –Richard Estes

  52. Richard

    Davis is going the way of much of upper middle income Northern California. It has rapidly getrified, and it is probable that future enrollment projections overestimate the number of students. The Board has already experienced this with Mace Ranch and Korematsu. Valley Oak may be the tip of a large demographic iceberg about to hit the District.

    In the Land Park and Curtis Park neighborhoods in Sacramento, it is striking how few kids there are, compared to say, 15 years ago, and I suspect that Davis is about to have the same experience over the next 10 years.

    –Richard Estes

  53. Davisite

    Richard… you are correct and the head of CHOC last evening addressed this very issue… more young families with kids in smaller, densified, affordable residential infill projects is a good part of the answer. Closing VO destines the neighborhood to become future student rentals rather than a vibrant neighborhood teeming with kids. This is an issue that will be shaped by the Housing Element determination and next city council majority.

  54. Davisite

    Richard… you are correct and the head of CHOC last evening addressed this very issue… more young families with kids in smaller, densified, affordable residential infill projects is a good part of the answer. Closing VO destines the neighborhood to become future student rentals rather than a vibrant neighborhood teeming with kids. This is an issue that will be shaped by the Housing Element determination and next city council majority.

  55. Davisite

    Richard… you are correct and the head of CHOC last evening addressed this very issue… more young families with kids in smaller, densified, affordable residential infill projects is a good part of the answer. Closing VO destines the neighborhood to become future student rentals rather than a vibrant neighborhood teeming with kids. This is an issue that will be shaped by the Housing Element determination and next city council majority.

  56. Davisite

    Richard… you are correct and the head of CHOC last evening addressed this very issue… more young families with kids in smaller, densified, affordable residential infill projects is a good part of the answer. Closing VO destines the neighborhood to become future student rentals rather than a vibrant neighborhood teeming with kids. This is an issue that will be shaped by the Housing Element determination and next city council majority.

  57. Anonymous

    Closing VO destines the neighborhood to become future student rentals rather than a vibrant neighborhood teeming with kids.Davisite, I’m curious why you feel this way? I live in this neighborhood and we already have many student rentals, but leaving that aside, we remain closer to two schools (NDE and BL) than many in, for example, North Davis are to their supposed “neighborhood” school. Mace Ranch has been teeming with kids for years even though it had no neighborhood school.
    -Katherine

  58. Anonymous

    Closing VO destines the neighborhood to become future student rentals rather than a vibrant neighborhood teeming with kids.Davisite, I’m curious why you feel this way? I live in this neighborhood and we already have many student rentals, but leaving that aside, we remain closer to two schools (NDE and BL) than many in, for example, North Davis are to their supposed “neighborhood” school. Mace Ranch has been teeming with kids for years even though it had no neighborhood school.
    -Katherine

  59. Anonymous

    Closing VO destines the neighborhood to become future student rentals rather than a vibrant neighborhood teeming with kids.Davisite, I’m curious why you feel this way? I live in this neighborhood and we already have many student rentals, but leaving that aside, we remain closer to two schools (NDE and BL) than many in, for example, North Davis are to their supposed “neighborhood” school. Mace Ranch has been teeming with kids for years even though it had no neighborhood school.
    -Katherine

  60. Anonymous

    Closing VO destines the neighborhood to become future student rentals rather than a vibrant neighborhood teeming with kids.Davisite, I’m curious why you feel this way? I live in this neighborhood and we already have many student rentals, but leaving that aside, we remain closer to two schools (NDE and BL) than many in, for example, North Davis are to their supposed “neighborhood” school. Mace Ranch has been teeming with kids for years even though it had no neighborhood school.
    -Katherine

  61. Anonymous

    I should have added, having VO open did not, unfortunately, make us a neighborhood teeming with kids… if we were, there would have been enough money (via revenue per child) and kids to keep the school open.
    -Katherine

  62. Anonymous

    I should have added, having VO open did not, unfortunately, make us a neighborhood teeming with kids… if we were, there would have been enough money (via revenue per child) and kids to keep the school open.
    -Katherine

  63. Anonymous

    I should have added, having VO open did not, unfortunately, make us a neighborhood teeming with kids… if we were, there would have been enough money (via revenue per child) and kids to keep the school open.
    -Katherine

  64. Anonymous

    I should have added, having VO open did not, unfortunately, make us a neighborhood teeming with kids… if we were, there would have been enough money (via revenue per child) and kids to keep the school open.
    -Katherine

  65. Davisite

    anonymous…

    I would think that quite a few small homes in the VO neighborhood are now occupied by older people without young children residing with them. These more affordable homes will become available for new young families when the current occupants “vacate”. Whether they then become more student rentals or family homes will be influenced by Valley Oak Elementary’s presence. Building infill housing that meets the needs of young families is also a part of the solution.

  66. Davisite

    anonymous…

    I would think that quite a few small homes in the VO neighborhood are now occupied by older people without young children residing with them. These more affordable homes will become available for new young families when the current occupants “vacate”. Whether they then become more student rentals or family homes will be influenced by Valley Oak Elementary’s presence. Building infill housing that meets the needs of young families is also a part of the solution.

  67. Davisite

    anonymous…

    I would think that quite a few small homes in the VO neighborhood are now occupied by older people without young children residing with them. These more affordable homes will become available for new young families when the current occupants “vacate”. Whether they then become more student rentals or family homes will be influenced by Valley Oak Elementary’s presence. Building infill housing that meets the needs of young families is also a part of the solution.

  68. Davisite

    anonymous…

    I would think that quite a few small homes in the VO neighborhood are now occupied by older people without young children residing with them. These more affordable homes will become available for new young families when the current occupants “vacate”. Whether they then become more student rentals or family homes will be influenced by Valley Oak Elementary’s presence. Building infill housing that meets the needs of young families is also a part of the solution.

  69. Rich Rifkin

    “Remember the heartache over moving the neighborhood program at WDE to Willit and turning WDE into Cesar Chavez. There was concern about the neighborhood students then. Now Willet is one of our best schools and the neighborhood has adjusted.”

    The big difference between that change and the current one is that WDE and WDI are about 75 yards apart, while VO and Korematsu are 1.6 miles apart. Kids who would have gone to K-3 at WDE, but now are doing so at Willett (WDI) are still essentially in their neighborhood.

    I should state that, as one who believes in the importance of neighborhood schools, it is crucial to fully open up Korematsu right away. It is the neighborhood school for Mace Ranch, and it will apparently serve far more kids than Valley Oak will. It’s just a shame that the District cannot figure out how to spread out the overhead such that they can, for the same cost, operate VO as a smaller neighborhood school.

  70. Rich Rifkin

    “Remember the heartache over moving the neighborhood program at WDE to Willit and turning WDE into Cesar Chavez. There was concern about the neighborhood students then. Now Willet is one of our best schools and the neighborhood has adjusted.”

    The big difference between that change and the current one is that WDE and WDI are about 75 yards apart, while VO and Korematsu are 1.6 miles apart. Kids who would have gone to K-3 at WDE, but now are doing so at Willett (WDI) are still essentially in their neighborhood.

    I should state that, as one who believes in the importance of neighborhood schools, it is crucial to fully open up Korematsu right away. It is the neighborhood school for Mace Ranch, and it will apparently serve far more kids than Valley Oak will. It’s just a shame that the District cannot figure out how to spread out the overhead such that they can, for the same cost, operate VO as a smaller neighborhood school.

  71. Rich Rifkin

    “Remember the heartache over moving the neighborhood program at WDE to Willit and turning WDE into Cesar Chavez. There was concern about the neighborhood students then. Now Willet is one of our best schools and the neighborhood has adjusted.”

    The big difference between that change and the current one is that WDE and WDI are about 75 yards apart, while VO and Korematsu are 1.6 miles apart. Kids who would have gone to K-3 at WDE, but now are doing so at Willett (WDI) are still essentially in their neighborhood.

    I should state that, as one who believes in the importance of neighborhood schools, it is crucial to fully open up Korematsu right away. It is the neighborhood school for Mace Ranch, and it will apparently serve far more kids than Valley Oak will. It’s just a shame that the District cannot figure out how to spread out the overhead such that they can, for the same cost, operate VO as a smaller neighborhood school.

  72. Rich Rifkin

    “Remember the heartache over moving the neighborhood program at WDE to Willit and turning WDE into Cesar Chavez. There was concern about the neighborhood students then. Now Willet is one of our best schools and the neighborhood has adjusted.”

    The big difference between that change and the current one is that WDE and WDI are about 75 yards apart, while VO and Korematsu are 1.6 miles apart. Kids who would have gone to K-3 at WDE, but now are doing so at Willett (WDI) are still essentially in their neighborhood.

    I should state that, as one who believes in the importance of neighborhood schools, it is crucial to fully open up Korematsu right away. It is the neighborhood school for Mace Ranch, and it will apparently serve far more kids than Valley Oak will. It’s just a shame that the District cannot figure out how to spread out the overhead such that they can, for the same cost, operate VO as a smaller neighborhood school.

  73. Anonymous

    I believe the demographics firm that worked with the district and Task Force said that Davis has an unusually high % of K-6 kids that choose to attend schools that are non-neighborhood schools (I believe it was over 40%, IIRC). Indeed, most of the families on my street have chosen options other then the neighborhood school, which is very close to us. We keep hearing about how important neighborhood schools are, but families seem to be voting with their feet against them.

    I value matching the child with the appropriate learning environment over a school that is closest.

  74. Anonymous

    I believe the demographics firm that worked with the district and Task Force said that Davis has an unusually high % of K-6 kids that choose to attend schools that are non-neighborhood schools (I believe it was over 40%, IIRC). Indeed, most of the families on my street have chosen options other then the neighborhood school, which is very close to us. We keep hearing about how important neighborhood schools are, but families seem to be voting with their feet against them.

    I value matching the child with the appropriate learning environment over a school that is closest.

  75. Anonymous

    I believe the demographics firm that worked with the district and Task Force said that Davis has an unusually high % of K-6 kids that choose to attend schools that are non-neighborhood schools (I believe it was over 40%, IIRC). Indeed, most of the families on my street have chosen options other then the neighborhood school, which is very close to us. We keep hearing about how important neighborhood schools are, but families seem to be voting with their feet against them.

    I value matching the child with the appropriate learning environment over a school that is closest.

  76. Anonymous

    I believe the demographics firm that worked with the district and Task Force said that Davis has an unusually high % of K-6 kids that choose to attend schools that are non-neighborhood schools (I believe it was over 40%, IIRC). Indeed, most of the families on my street have chosen options other then the neighborhood school, which is very close to us. We keep hearing about how important neighborhood schools are, but families seem to be voting with their feet against them.

    I value matching the child with the appropriate learning environment over a school that is closest.

  77. Davisite

    Anonymous….so, has the Task Force and School Board taken into consideration what the Iraqis..uupps..sorry, I mean the parents would choose themselves as the best”learning environment” for their children?

  78. Davisite

    Anonymous….so, has the Task Force and School Board taken into consideration what the Iraqis..uupps..sorry, I mean the parents would choose themselves as the best”learning environment” for their children?

  79. Davisite

    Anonymous….so, has the Task Force and School Board taken into consideration what the Iraqis..uupps..sorry, I mean the parents would choose themselves as the best”learning environment” for their children?

  80. Davisite

    Anonymous….so, has the Task Force and School Board taken into consideration what the Iraqis..uupps..sorry, I mean the parents would choose themselves as the best”learning environment” for their children?

  81. Sharla

    I had a friend who lamented the fact that her son did not attend the neighborhood school with the kids on the street in the upscale development where they lived. The neighborhood school was deemed unacceptable by her neighbors because of the slightly lower test scores there. Parents had gotten their kids into Spanish Emersion, Fairfield School and private schools and were driving their kids far and wide to avoid the potential stigmatization of attending the nearby neighborhood school in Davis. This was the same neighborhood that wanted to have their kids go to one junior high instead of over another because they didn’t want their kids to go to a school that drew from an older area of town.

    This is a Bay Area/urban city phenomenon – school shopping. It is not only about matching up their kids learning style to the best program for them, it’s about status and establishing social connections.

  82. Sharla

    I had a friend who lamented the fact that her son did not attend the neighborhood school with the kids on the street in the upscale development where they lived. The neighborhood school was deemed unacceptable by her neighbors because of the slightly lower test scores there. Parents had gotten their kids into Spanish Emersion, Fairfield School and private schools and were driving their kids far and wide to avoid the potential stigmatization of attending the nearby neighborhood school in Davis. This was the same neighborhood that wanted to have their kids go to one junior high instead of over another because they didn’t want their kids to go to a school that drew from an older area of town.

    This is a Bay Area/urban city phenomenon – school shopping. It is not only about matching up their kids learning style to the best program for them, it’s about status and establishing social connections.

  83. Sharla

    I had a friend who lamented the fact that her son did not attend the neighborhood school with the kids on the street in the upscale development where they lived. The neighborhood school was deemed unacceptable by her neighbors because of the slightly lower test scores there. Parents had gotten their kids into Spanish Emersion, Fairfield School and private schools and were driving their kids far and wide to avoid the potential stigmatization of attending the nearby neighborhood school in Davis. This was the same neighborhood that wanted to have their kids go to one junior high instead of over another because they didn’t want their kids to go to a school that drew from an older area of town.

    This is a Bay Area/urban city phenomenon – school shopping. It is not only about matching up their kids learning style to the best program for them, it’s about status and establishing social connections.

  84. Sharla

    I had a friend who lamented the fact that her son did not attend the neighborhood school with the kids on the street in the upscale development where they lived. The neighborhood school was deemed unacceptable by her neighbors because of the slightly lower test scores there. Parents had gotten their kids into Spanish Emersion, Fairfield School and private schools and were driving their kids far and wide to avoid the potential stigmatization of attending the nearby neighborhood school in Davis. This was the same neighborhood that wanted to have their kids go to one junior high instead of over another because they didn’t want their kids to go to a school that drew from an older area of town.

    This is a Bay Area/urban city phenomenon – school shopping. It is not only about matching up their kids learning style to the best program for them, it’s about status and establishing social connections.

  85. Natalie

    “I value matching the child with the appropriate learning environment over a school that is closest.”

    Unfortunately for a lot of people at Valley Oak, Valley Oak is the appropriate learning environment. Certainly it is for families in the ELL program.

    Unfortunately for me, a parent of a child who should start at Valley Oak in the fall, Valley Oak seemed like a perfect environment, a small school with a wonderful mix of diversity that you don’t typically find in Davis.

    Now I’m faced with a tough decision. Do I stick with the original plan and enroll my son in Kindergarten at Valley Oak and realize that there is a good possibility that he’ll go to North Davis the following year if the parcel tax fails? Or do I just take a preemptive step and request an intradistrict transfer for North Davis this year? He’ll go to a school that is further away, but will have continuity if Valley Oak does close. (And we’ll feel like fools if the parcel tax passes.)

    I’m leaning towards sticking with Valley Oak bacause 1) it is the right thing to do; 2) I hate to take part in the middle class flight from VO that I suspect is about to occur, at least at the K-level; 3) I know that my son handles transitions pretty well. If the parcel tax fails in November, I know we’ll have plenty of time to prep him for a change in schools the following year.

    To speak frankly though, Kindergarten Info Night at Valley Oak last night depressed me. There looked to be only about fifteen families there. Of those people, you could tell that there were already one or two who were ready to explore other schools. I can only imagine that that number will grow with the board’s decision. I’m sure I’m not the only one currently agonizing over the registration process.

  86. Natalie

    “I value matching the child with the appropriate learning environment over a school that is closest.”

    Unfortunately for a lot of people at Valley Oak, Valley Oak is the appropriate learning environment. Certainly it is for families in the ELL program.

    Unfortunately for me, a parent of a child who should start at Valley Oak in the fall, Valley Oak seemed like a perfect environment, a small school with a wonderful mix of diversity that you don’t typically find in Davis.

    Now I’m faced with a tough decision. Do I stick with the original plan and enroll my son in Kindergarten at Valley Oak and realize that there is a good possibility that he’ll go to North Davis the following year if the parcel tax fails? Or do I just take a preemptive step and request an intradistrict transfer for North Davis this year? He’ll go to a school that is further away, but will have continuity if Valley Oak does close. (And we’ll feel like fools if the parcel tax passes.)

    I’m leaning towards sticking with Valley Oak bacause 1) it is the right thing to do; 2) I hate to take part in the middle class flight from VO that I suspect is about to occur, at least at the K-level; 3) I know that my son handles transitions pretty well. If the parcel tax fails in November, I know we’ll have plenty of time to prep him for a change in schools the following year.

    To speak frankly though, Kindergarten Info Night at Valley Oak last night depressed me. There looked to be only about fifteen families there. Of those people, you could tell that there were already one or two who were ready to explore other schools. I can only imagine that that number will grow with the board’s decision. I’m sure I’m not the only one currently agonizing over the registration process.

  87. Natalie

    “I value matching the child with the appropriate learning environment over a school that is closest.”

    Unfortunately for a lot of people at Valley Oak, Valley Oak is the appropriate learning environment. Certainly it is for families in the ELL program.

    Unfortunately for me, a parent of a child who should start at Valley Oak in the fall, Valley Oak seemed like a perfect environment, a small school with a wonderful mix of diversity that you don’t typically find in Davis.

    Now I’m faced with a tough decision. Do I stick with the original plan and enroll my son in Kindergarten at Valley Oak and realize that there is a good possibility that he’ll go to North Davis the following year if the parcel tax fails? Or do I just take a preemptive step and request an intradistrict transfer for North Davis this year? He’ll go to a school that is further away, but will have continuity if Valley Oak does close. (And we’ll feel like fools if the parcel tax passes.)

    I’m leaning towards sticking with Valley Oak bacause 1) it is the right thing to do; 2) I hate to take part in the middle class flight from VO that I suspect is about to occur, at least at the K-level; 3) I know that my son handles transitions pretty well. If the parcel tax fails in November, I know we’ll have plenty of time to prep him for a change in schools the following year.

    To speak frankly though, Kindergarten Info Night at Valley Oak last night depressed me. There looked to be only about fifteen families there. Of those people, you could tell that there were already one or two who were ready to explore other schools. I can only imagine that that number will grow with the board’s decision. I’m sure I’m not the only one currently agonizing over the registration process.

  88. Natalie

    “I value matching the child with the appropriate learning environment over a school that is closest.”

    Unfortunately for a lot of people at Valley Oak, Valley Oak is the appropriate learning environment. Certainly it is for families in the ELL program.

    Unfortunately for me, a parent of a child who should start at Valley Oak in the fall, Valley Oak seemed like a perfect environment, a small school with a wonderful mix of diversity that you don’t typically find in Davis.

    Now I’m faced with a tough decision. Do I stick with the original plan and enroll my son in Kindergarten at Valley Oak and realize that there is a good possibility that he’ll go to North Davis the following year if the parcel tax fails? Or do I just take a preemptive step and request an intradistrict transfer for North Davis this year? He’ll go to a school that is further away, but will have continuity if Valley Oak does close. (And we’ll feel like fools if the parcel tax passes.)

    I’m leaning towards sticking with Valley Oak bacause 1) it is the right thing to do; 2) I hate to take part in the middle class flight from VO that I suspect is about to occur, at least at the K-level; 3) I know that my son handles transitions pretty well. If the parcel tax fails in November, I know we’ll have plenty of time to prep him for a change in schools the following year.

    To speak frankly though, Kindergarten Info Night at Valley Oak last night depressed me. There looked to be only about fifteen families there. Of those people, you could tell that there were already one or two who were ready to explore other schools. I can only imagine that that number will grow with the board’s decision. I’m sure I’m not the only one currently agonizing over the registration process.

  89. Anonymous

    Natalie,

    You’re right. You’re not the only one, though. I am in the same boat with you. Last night, after coming back from the Board meeting, my wife and I sat down and talked about what we should do. We are inclined to stick with Valley Oak. So I would encourage you to do the same but would definitely understand if you choose not to. Should you want to contact me, you can reach me at btezcan@ucdavis.edu

  90. Anonymous

    Natalie,

    You’re right. You’re not the only one, though. I am in the same boat with you. Last night, after coming back from the Board meeting, my wife and I sat down and talked about what we should do. We are inclined to stick with Valley Oak. So I would encourage you to do the same but would definitely understand if you choose not to. Should you want to contact me, you can reach me at btezcan@ucdavis.edu

  91. Anonymous

    Natalie,

    You’re right. You’re not the only one, though. I am in the same boat with you. Last night, after coming back from the Board meeting, my wife and I sat down and talked about what we should do. We are inclined to stick with Valley Oak. So I would encourage you to do the same but would definitely understand if you choose not to. Should you want to contact me, you can reach me at btezcan@ucdavis.edu

  92. Anonymous

    Natalie,

    You’re right. You’re not the only one, though. I am in the same boat with you. Last night, after coming back from the Board meeting, my wife and I sat down and talked about what we should do. We are inclined to stick with Valley Oak. So I would encourage you to do the same but would definitely understand if you choose not to. Should you want to contact me, you can reach me at btezcan@ucdavis.edu

  93. Baki

    Natalie, also don’t take the info night as a measure. A lot of people, like myself, were busy fighting the impending closure and did not make it to the information night. Moreover, there will definitely be some who will come and join us later. I am definitely planning on volunteering for an hour a week and also doing my share for the PTA.
    All the best,
    Baki

  94. Baki

    Natalie, also don’t take the info night as a measure. A lot of people, like myself, were busy fighting the impending closure and did not make it to the information night. Moreover, there will definitely be some who will come and join us later. I am definitely planning on volunteering for an hour a week and also doing my share for the PTA.
    All the best,
    Baki

  95. Baki

    Natalie, also don’t take the info night as a measure. A lot of people, like myself, were busy fighting the impending closure and did not make it to the information night. Moreover, there will definitely be some who will come and join us later. I am definitely planning on volunteering for an hour a week and also doing my share for the PTA.
    All the best,
    Baki

  96. Baki

    Natalie, also don’t take the info night as a measure. A lot of people, like myself, were busy fighting the impending closure and did not make it to the information night. Moreover, there will definitely be some who will come and join us later. I am definitely planning on volunteering for an hour a week and also doing my share for the PTA.
    All the best,
    Baki

  97. Anonymous

    Our family is appalled by the lack of leadership on the part of the present and past school boards. While some members truly serve the whole district, others look past the most diverse school in this district towards the bigger prize their coveted school bond.

    Although easy to see where things went wrong over the last 10 years, it shouldn’t be Valley Oak that pays the price. The financial mismanagement of this district has left the board no choice other than pick the most needy (voiceless) region of Davis to make up the difference.

    I see members of the city council appearing at the end of the march to pose for photo op’s, where were they when all this was going on? The Davis City Council afraid to push itself into another ones business?

    I can only see the Valley Oak regions population of children growing in light of housing prices. It is Hard to believe they won’t get a neighborhood school.

    And don’t think we believed that the school board actually went into this with a open mind, like Mr. Tezcan demonstrated, the data can be viewed any way the school boards “consultants” were paid to. It is easy to spend our money when the poor people of Far East Davis got screwed by a developer. Even easier to rub out the less fortunate when the curtain comes down on this three ring circus.

    Don’t count out the habitants of Middle Davis, those of us who can read and can vote will.

    Viva America

  98. Anonymous

    Our family is appalled by the lack of leadership on the part of the present and past school boards. While some members truly serve the whole district, others look past the most diverse school in this district towards the bigger prize their coveted school bond.

    Although easy to see where things went wrong over the last 10 years, it shouldn’t be Valley Oak that pays the price. The financial mismanagement of this district has left the board no choice other than pick the most needy (voiceless) region of Davis to make up the difference.

    I see members of the city council appearing at the end of the march to pose for photo op’s, where were they when all this was going on? The Davis City Council afraid to push itself into another ones business?

    I can only see the Valley Oak regions population of children growing in light of housing prices. It is Hard to believe they won’t get a neighborhood school.

    And don’t think we believed that the school board actually went into this with a open mind, like Mr. Tezcan demonstrated, the data can be viewed any way the school boards “consultants” were paid to. It is easy to spend our money when the poor people of Far East Davis got screwed by a developer. Even easier to rub out the less fortunate when the curtain comes down on this three ring circus.

    Don’t count out the habitants of Middle Davis, those of us who can read and can vote will.

    Viva America

  99. Anonymous

    Our family is appalled by the lack of leadership on the part of the present and past school boards. While some members truly serve the whole district, others look past the most diverse school in this district towards the bigger prize their coveted school bond.

    Although easy to see where things went wrong over the last 10 years, it shouldn’t be Valley Oak that pays the price. The financial mismanagement of this district has left the board no choice other than pick the most needy (voiceless) region of Davis to make up the difference.

    I see members of the city council appearing at the end of the march to pose for photo op’s, where were they when all this was going on? The Davis City Council afraid to push itself into another ones business?

    I can only see the Valley Oak regions population of children growing in light of housing prices. It is Hard to believe they won’t get a neighborhood school.

    And don’t think we believed that the school board actually went into this with a open mind, like Mr. Tezcan demonstrated, the data can be viewed any way the school boards “consultants” were paid to. It is easy to spend our money when the poor people of Far East Davis got screwed by a developer. Even easier to rub out the less fortunate when the curtain comes down on this three ring circus.

    Don’t count out the habitants of Middle Davis, those of us who can read and can vote will.

    Viva America

  100. Anonymous

    Our family is appalled by the lack of leadership on the part of the present and past school boards. While some members truly serve the whole district, others look past the most diverse school in this district towards the bigger prize their coveted school bond.

    Although easy to see where things went wrong over the last 10 years, it shouldn’t be Valley Oak that pays the price. The financial mismanagement of this district has left the board no choice other than pick the most needy (voiceless) region of Davis to make up the difference.

    I see members of the city council appearing at the end of the march to pose for photo op’s, where were they when all this was going on? The Davis City Council afraid to push itself into another ones business?

    I can only see the Valley Oak regions population of children growing in light of housing prices. It is Hard to believe they won’t get a neighborhood school.

    And don’t think we believed that the school board actually went into this with a open mind, like Mr. Tezcan demonstrated, the data can be viewed any way the school boards “consultants” were paid to. It is easy to spend our money when the poor people of Far East Davis got screwed by a developer. Even easier to rub out the less fortunate when the curtain comes down on this three ring circus.

    Don’t count out the habitants of Middle Davis, those of us who can read and can vote will.

    Viva America

  101. Davisite

    We have seen this before, the arrogance of power, in our current city council majority, actually claiming that their arbitrary residential growth policies should not be challenged or altered by future councils. We are witnessing the same arrogance with some on this current school board. The unyielding demand to close Valley Oak ASAP will effectively eliminate any chance of a future school board, with different “priorities” considering other scenerios for Valley Oak Elementary. As much as possible, the future should be left in the hands of those whom we elect to lead us in that future, not those who are in power now but will be gone soon, some voluntarily, in “retirement” and others rejected by the voters.

  102. Davisite

    We have seen this before, the arrogance of power, in our current city council majority, actually claiming that their arbitrary residential growth policies should not be challenged or altered by future councils. We are witnessing the same arrogance with some on this current school board. The unyielding demand to close Valley Oak ASAP will effectively eliminate any chance of a future school board, with different “priorities” considering other scenerios for Valley Oak Elementary. As much as possible, the future should be left in the hands of those whom we elect to lead us in that future, not those who are in power now but will be gone soon, some voluntarily, in “retirement” and others rejected by the voters.

  103. Davisite

    We have seen this before, the arrogance of power, in our current city council majority, actually claiming that their arbitrary residential growth policies should not be challenged or altered by future councils. We are witnessing the same arrogance with some on this current school board. The unyielding demand to close Valley Oak ASAP will effectively eliminate any chance of a future school board, with different “priorities” considering other scenerios for Valley Oak Elementary. As much as possible, the future should be left in the hands of those whom we elect to lead us in that future, not those who are in power now but will be gone soon, some voluntarily, in “retirement” and others rejected by the voters.

  104. Davisite

    We have seen this before, the arrogance of power, in our current city council majority, actually claiming that their arbitrary residential growth policies should not be challenged or altered by future councils. We are witnessing the same arrogance with some on this current school board. The unyielding demand to close Valley Oak ASAP will effectively eliminate any chance of a future school board, with different “priorities” considering other scenerios for Valley Oak Elementary. As much as possible, the future should be left in the hands of those whom we elect to lead us in that future, not those who are in power now but will be gone soon, some voluntarily, in “retirement” and others rejected by the voters.

  105. Rich Rifkin

    “And don’t think we believed that the school board actually went into this with a open mind, like Mr. Tezcan demonstrated, the data can be viewed any way the school boards “consultants” were paid to.”

    That may be so. I think that from a conceptual point of view, the Board has not shown a great deal of creativity on this, so far.

    However, I think it’s wrong to suggest that they are not doing what they truly believe is best for the entire school district. You or I might feel that what they are doing is a mistake, but that doesn’t mean that their decision is somehow corrupt or motivated by a lack of caring.

  106. Rich Rifkin

    “And don’t think we believed that the school board actually went into this with a open mind, like Mr. Tezcan demonstrated, the data can be viewed any way the school boards “consultants” were paid to.”

    That may be so. I think that from a conceptual point of view, the Board has not shown a great deal of creativity on this, so far.

    However, I think it’s wrong to suggest that they are not doing what they truly believe is best for the entire school district. You or I might feel that what they are doing is a mistake, but that doesn’t mean that their decision is somehow corrupt or motivated by a lack of caring.

  107. Rich Rifkin

    “And don’t think we believed that the school board actually went into this with a open mind, like Mr. Tezcan demonstrated, the data can be viewed any way the school boards “consultants” were paid to.”

    That may be so. I think that from a conceptual point of view, the Board has not shown a great deal of creativity on this, so far.

    However, I think it’s wrong to suggest that they are not doing what they truly believe is best for the entire school district. You or I might feel that what they are doing is a mistake, but that doesn’t mean that their decision is somehow corrupt or motivated by a lack of caring.

  108. Rich Rifkin

    “And don’t think we believed that the school board actually went into this with a open mind, like Mr. Tezcan demonstrated, the data can be viewed any way the school boards “consultants” were paid to.”

    That may be so. I think that from a conceptual point of view, the Board has not shown a great deal of creativity on this, so far.

    However, I think it’s wrong to suggest that they are not doing what they truly believe is best for the entire school district. You or I might feel that what they are doing is a mistake, but that doesn’t mean that their decision is somehow corrupt or motivated by a lack of caring.

  109. Rich Rifkin

    “We have seen this before, the arrogance of power, in our current city council majority, actually claiming that their arbitrary residential growth policies should not be challenged or altered by future councils. We are witnessing the same arrogance with some on this current school board.”

    In yet another post, you are trying to assassinate the characters of your neighbors. This not only harms our community, it fails to move us toward a better outcome. Rather than anonymously throwing so much of your mean-spirited mud, I suggest that you try to come up with a workable, creative solution.

  110. Rich Rifkin

    “We have seen this before, the arrogance of power, in our current city council majority, actually claiming that their arbitrary residential growth policies should not be challenged or altered by future councils. We are witnessing the same arrogance with some on this current school board.”

    In yet another post, you are trying to assassinate the characters of your neighbors. This not only harms our community, it fails to move us toward a better outcome. Rather than anonymously throwing so much of your mean-spirited mud, I suggest that you try to come up with a workable, creative solution.

  111. Rich Rifkin

    “We have seen this before, the arrogance of power, in our current city council majority, actually claiming that their arbitrary residential growth policies should not be challenged or altered by future councils. We are witnessing the same arrogance with some on this current school board.”

    In yet another post, you are trying to assassinate the characters of your neighbors. This not only harms our community, it fails to move us toward a better outcome. Rather than anonymously throwing so much of your mean-spirited mud, I suggest that you try to come up with a workable, creative solution.

  112. Rich Rifkin

    “We have seen this before, the arrogance of power, in our current city council majority, actually claiming that their arbitrary residential growth policies should not be challenged or altered by future councils. We are witnessing the same arrogance with some on this current school board.”

    In yet another post, you are trying to assassinate the characters of your neighbors. This not only harms our community, it fails to move us toward a better outcome. Rather than anonymously throwing so much of your mean-spirited mud, I suggest that you try to come up with a workable, creative solution.

  113. Chris

    While I do not fault the current school board for inheriting the budgetary mess of the past few years, I do criticize their decision to tie Valley Oak’s survival to a parcel tax.

    I feel that by passing this onto the voters, they are shrinking from their responsibilities as elected board members to make the tough decisions that their position obligates them to do. Much like the City Council did with the Target issue, the Board is putting the responsiblity on the public. What we will see is another heated passionate campaign with the potential for more division and bitterness in a community already blasted with wedge issues like the Covell Village project, the Big Green Target for South Davis, and allegations of racial profiling by the Davis PD.

    Out of principle, I will not support a second parcel tax. The Board was elected to provide leadership for the community. Their task, their responsiblity, and their duty is to take the information presented to them and make the appropriate decisions. Since closing a neighborhood school is a politically dangerous decision, the ‘passing of the buck’ begins with the vote to put it to the voters. Now the district will seek more out of the taxpayer to pay for the ‘program’.

    Yes, they inherited a budgetary mess. But they also decided that the Superintendent David Murphy needed to be removed immediately and are now paying Murphy’s salary as well as Whitmore’s.

    I am a supporter of neighborhood schools. I am also a supporter of fiscal responsibility and a practical and pragmatic approach to management. Letting the voters of Davis decide just drags out the process and absolves Taylor, Daleidan, Jones and co. the sole blame for an unpopular decision.

  114. Chris

    While I do not fault the current school board for inheriting the budgetary mess of the past few years, I do criticize their decision to tie Valley Oak’s survival to a parcel tax.

    I feel that by passing this onto the voters, they are shrinking from their responsibilities as elected board members to make the tough decisions that their position obligates them to do. Much like the City Council did with the Target issue, the Board is putting the responsiblity on the public. What we will see is another heated passionate campaign with the potential for more division and bitterness in a community already blasted with wedge issues like the Covell Village project, the Big Green Target for South Davis, and allegations of racial profiling by the Davis PD.

    Out of principle, I will not support a second parcel tax. The Board was elected to provide leadership for the community. Their task, their responsiblity, and their duty is to take the information presented to them and make the appropriate decisions. Since closing a neighborhood school is a politically dangerous decision, the ‘passing of the buck’ begins with the vote to put it to the voters. Now the district will seek more out of the taxpayer to pay for the ‘program’.

    Yes, they inherited a budgetary mess. But they also decided that the Superintendent David Murphy needed to be removed immediately and are now paying Murphy’s salary as well as Whitmore’s.

    I am a supporter of neighborhood schools. I am also a supporter of fiscal responsibility and a practical and pragmatic approach to management. Letting the voters of Davis decide just drags out the process and absolves Taylor, Daleidan, Jones and co. the sole blame for an unpopular decision.

  115. Chris

    While I do not fault the current school board for inheriting the budgetary mess of the past few years, I do criticize their decision to tie Valley Oak’s survival to a parcel tax.

    I feel that by passing this onto the voters, they are shrinking from their responsibilities as elected board members to make the tough decisions that their position obligates them to do. Much like the City Council did with the Target issue, the Board is putting the responsiblity on the public. What we will see is another heated passionate campaign with the potential for more division and bitterness in a community already blasted with wedge issues like the Covell Village project, the Big Green Target for South Davis, and allegations of racial profiling by the Davis PD.

    Out of principle, I will not support a second parcel tax. The Board was elected to provide leadership for the community. Their task, their responsiblity, and their duty is to take the information presented to them and make the appropriate decisions. Since closing a neighborhood school is a politically dangerous decision, the ‘passing of the buck’ begins with the vote to put it to the voters. Now the district will seek more out of the taxpayer to pay for the ‘program’.

    Yes, they inherited a budgetary mess. But they also decided that the Superintendent David Murphy needed to be removed immediately and are now paying Murphy’s salary as well as Whitmore’s.

    I am a supporter of neighborhood schools. I am also a supporter of fiscal responsibility and a practical and pragmatic approach to management. Letting the voters of Davis decide just drags out the process and absolves Taylor, Daleidan, Jones and co. the sole blame for an unpopular decision.

  116. Chris

    While I do not fault the current school board for inheriting the budgetary mess of the past few years, I do criticize their decision to tie Valley Oak’s survival to a parcel tax.

    I feel that by passing this onto the voters, they are shrinking from their responsibilities as elected board members to make the tough decisions that their position obligates them to do. Much like the City Council did with the Target issue, the Board is putting the responsiblity on the public. What we will see is another heated passionate campaign with the potential for more division and bitterness in a community already blasted with wedge issues like the Covell Village project, the Big Green Target for South Davis, and allegations of racial profiling by the Davis PD.

    Out of principle, I will not support a second parcel tax. The Board was elected to provide leadership for the community. Their task, their responsiblity, and their duty is to take the information presented to them and make the appropriate decisions. Since closing a neighborhood school is a politically dangerous decision, the ‘passing of the buck’ begins with the vote to put it to the voters. Now the district will seek more out of the taxpayer to pay for the ‘program’.

    Yes, they inherited a budgetary mess. But they also decided that the Superintendent David Murphy needed to be removed immediately and are now paying Murphy’s salary as well as Whitmore’s.

    I am a supporter of neighborhood schools. I am also a supporter of fiscal responsibility and a practical and pragmatic approach to management. Letting the voters of Davis decide just drags out the process and absolves Taylor, Daleidan, Jones and co. the sole blame for an unpopular decision.

  117. Anonymous

    Tim Taylor knew when he raised his motion that there is no way that 2/3 of Davis voters will approve a second parcel tax specifically to support Valley Oak. My guess is that it won’t make it past the polling phase.

    I don’t know him, so I don’t know if he did this out of arrogance, a half-hearted attempt to throw the VO folks a bone or a real fear that the VO community would bring down the entire parcel tax, but it certainly didn’t sit well with me. I found it insulting.

  118. Anonymous

    Tim Taylor knew when he raised his motion that there is no way that 2/3 of Davis voters will approve a second parcel tax specifically to support Valley Oak. My guess is that it won’t make it past the polling phase.

    I don’t know him, so I don’t know if he did this out of arrogance, a half-hearted attempt to throw the VO folks a bone or a real fear that the VO community would bring down the entire parcel tax, but it certainly didn’t sit well with me. I found it insulting.

  119. Anonymous

    Tim Taylor knew when he raised his motion that there is no way that 2/3 of Davis voters will approve a second parcel tax specifically to support Valley Oak. My guess is that it won’t make it past the polling phase.

    I don’t know him, so I don’t know if he did this out of arrogance, a half-hearted attempt to throw the VO folks a bone or a real fear that the VO community would bring down the entire parcel tax, but it certainly didn’t sit well with me. I found it insulting.

  120. Anonymous

    Tim Taylor knew when he raised his motion that there is no way that 2/3 of Davis voters will approve a second parcel tax specifically to support Valley Oak. My guess is that it won’t make it past the polling phase.

    I don’t know him, so I don’t know if he did this out of arrogance, a half-hearted attempt to throw the VO folks a bone or a real fear that the VO community would bring down the entire parcel tax, but it certainly didn’t sit well with me. I found it insulting.

  121. Baki

    Dear Rich,

    I have been following your views on Valley Oak on and off. You have been a supporter of the school, which I do appreciate.

    I do believe, however, that you are being a little too generous with the School Board. It would be very easy to restore legitimacy to the Final Report of the Task Force by inviting the DDP representatives to a Town Hall meeting, and let the citizens of Davis ask them what exactly happened, when, and why. Mr. Taylor blamed everyone who questioned the integrity of the fact-finding process, which, for me, is not a very convincing way of responding to citizens who believe that certain facts may have been manipulated. To the contrary, his accusatory statement, “shame on you,” made me suspect everything even more. A good leader would try to persuade people who have questions, not insult them. Being defensive is usually a sign of weakness in one’s position.

    As for the second parcel tax, I believe it is an insult on the Valley Oak neighborhood. If the Board had adopted this tax measure as part of the general parcel tax, every neighborhood in town would unite in making an effort to pass it, which would be a great opportunity for the unity we need at the moment. At least, they could have called it the “nine-elementary-schools tax,” as suggested by Mr. Provenza. Then a unique opportunity would be born for the Mace Ranch and Valley Oak neighborhoods to cooperate in a political campaign to pass it. But the majority of our Board failed us. Most probably inspired by the example established by the Task Force, which managed to pit one neighborhood against another by fixating on the question of school closure to the exclusion of any other alternative, the Board is now pitting one neighborhood against the rest of the city and makes it beg for charity to keep its school open. This is not a smart solution for a disenfranchised neighborhood to feel better about its relationship with the rest of the city.

    Baki

  122. Baki

    Dear Rich,

    I have been following your views on Valley Oak on and off. You have been a supporter of the school, which I do appreciate.

    I do believe, however, that you are being a little too generous with the School Board. It would be very easy to restore legitimacy to the Final Report of the Task Force by inviting the DDP representatives to a Town Hall meeting, and let the citizens of Davis ask them what exactly happened, when, and why. Mr. Taylor blamed everyone who questioned the integrity of the fact-finding process, which, for me, is not a very convincing way of responding to citizens who believe that certain facts may have been manipulated. To the contrary, his accusatory statement, “shame on you,” made me suspect everything even more. A good leader would try to persuade people who have questions, not insult them. Being defensive is usually a sign of weakness in one’s position.

    As for the second parcel tax, I believe it is an insult on the Valley Oak neighborhood. If the Board had adopted this tax measure as part of the general parcel tax, every neighborhood in town would unite in making an effort to pass it, which would be a great opportunity for the unity we need at the moment. At least, they could have called it the “nine-elementary-schools tax,” as suggested by Mr. Provenza. Then a unique opportunity would be born for the Mace Ranch and Valley Oak neighborhoods to cooperate in a political campaign to pass it. But the majority of our Board failed us. Most probably inspired by the example established by the Task Force, which managed to pit one neighborhood against another by fixating on the question of school closure to the exclusion of any other alternative, the Board is now pitting one neighborhood against the rest of the city and makes it beg for charity to keep its school open. This is not a smart solution for a disenfranchised neighborhood to feel better about its relationship with the rest of the city.

    Baki

  123. Baki

    Dear Rich,

    I have been following your views on Valley Oak on and off. You have been a supporter of the school, which I do appreciate.

    I do believe, however, that you are being a little too generous with the School Board. It would be very easy to restore legitimacy to the Final Report of the Task Force by inviting the DDP representatives to a Town Hall meeting, and let the citizens of Davis ask them what exactly happened, when, and why. Mr. Taylor blamed everyone who questioned the integrity of the fact-finding process, which, for me, is not a very convincing way of responding to citizens who believe that certain facts may have been manipulated. To the contrary, his accusatory statement, “shame on you,” made me suspect everything even more. A good leader would try to persuade people who have questions, not insult them. Being defensive is usually a sign of weakness in one’s position.

    As for the second parcel tax, I believe it is an insult on the Valley Oak neighborhood. If the Board had adopted this tax measure as part of the general parcel tax, every neighborhood in town would unite in making an effort to pass it, which would be a great opportunity for the unity we need at the moment. At least, they could have called it the “nine-elementary-schools tax,” as suggested by Mr. Provenza. Then a unique opportunity would be born for the Mace Ranch and Valley Oak neighborhoods to cooperate in a political campaign to pass it. But the majority of our Board failed us. Most probably inspired by the example established by the Task Force, which managed to pit one neighborhood against another by fixating on the question of school closure to the exclusion of any other alternative, the Board is now pitting one neighborhood against the rest of the city and makes it beg for charity to keep its school open. This is not a smart solution for a disenfranchised neighborhood to feel better about its relationship with the rest of the city.

    Baki

  124. Baki

    Dear Rich,

    I have been following your views on Valley Oak on and off. You have been a supporter of the school, which I do appreciate.

    I do believe, however, that you are being a little too generous with the School Board. It would be very easy to restore legitimacy to the Final Report of the Task Force by inviting the DDP representatives to a Town Hall meeting, and let the citizens of Davis ask them what exactly happened, when, and why. Mr. Taylor blamed everyone who questioned the integrity of the fact-finding process, which, for me, is not a very convincing way of responding to citizens who believe that certain facts may have been manipulated. To the contrary, his accusatory statement, “shame on you,” made me suspect everything even more. A good leader would try to persuade people who have questions, not insult them. Being defensive is usually a sign of weakness in one’s position.

    As for the second parcel tax, I believe it is an insult on the Valley Oak neighborhood. If the Board had adopted this tax measure as part of the general parcel tax, every neighborhood in town would unite in making an effort to pass it, which would be a great opportunity for the unity we need at the moment. At least, they could have called it the “nine-elementary-schools tax,” as suggested by Mr. Provenza. Then a unique opportunity would be born for the Mace Ranch and Valley Oak neighborhoods to cooperate in a political campaign to pass it. But the majority of our Board failed us. Most probably inspired by the example established by the Task Force, which managed to pit one neighborhood against another by fixating on the question of school closure to the exclusion of any other alternative, the Board is now pitting one neighborhood against the rest of the city and makes it beg for charity to keep its school open. This is not a smart solution for a disenfranchised neighborhood to feel better about its relationship with the rest of the city.

    Baki

  125. Anonymous

    Mr. Murphy’s severance agreement is public information. It makes for six pages of fascinating reading. File a request with the district and see how much it was worth to the to pay him out. ($16016.00/month until June 2008.) Not to mention 42 acrued vacation days.
    Can someone tell me just what was so egregious about this man that after seven years of growth and prosperity in this district under his stewardship, it was so necessary to end it this way?

  126. Anonymous

    Mr. Murphy’s severance agreement is public information. It makes for six pages of fascinating reading. File a request with the district and see how much it was worth to the to pay him out. ($16016.00/month until June 2008.) Not to mention 42 acrued vacation days.
    Can someone tell me just what was so egregious about this man that after seven years of growth and prosperity in this district under his stewardship, it was so necessary to end it this way?

  127. Anonymous

    Mr. Murphy’s severance agreement is public information. It makes for six pages of fascinating reading. File a request with the district and see how much it was worth to the to pay him out. ($16016.00/month until June 2008.) Not to mention 42 acrued vacation days.
    Can someone tell me just what was so egregious about this man that after seven years of growth and prosperity in this district under his stewardship, it was so necessary to end it this way?

  128. Anonymous

    Mr. Murphy’s severance agreement is public information. It makes for six pages of fascinating reading. File a request with the district and see how much it was worth to the to pay him out. ($16016.00/month until June 2008.) Not to mention 42 acrued vacation days.
    Can someone tell me just what was so egregious about this man that after seven years of growth and prosperity in this district under his stewardship, it was so necessary to end it this way?

  129. 無名 - wu ming

    it really is depressing to see the school board fail those whom they were elected to serve. i was brought up to always vote for schools, and hope that the two parcel tax option passes and gets valley oak funded, but i agree with don that this’ll make it harder to do, especially singling out valley oak for its own tax.

    i would hope that the city’s voters are decent enough people to see what’s going on here, and not just play it selfish and cut off kids from the other neighborhoods to save a buck on their own taxes, but i’m increasingly pessimistic that the people of this city actually have the character to help each other out when needed.

    given the platform that taylor ran on in the last election, stressing the importance of diversity and not ignoring disadvantaged or minority youth in town, it’s pretty upsetting to see him cast the deciding vote.

  130. 無名 - wu ming

    it really is depressing to see the school board fail those whom they were elected to serve. i was brought up to always vote for schools, and hope that the two parcel tax option passes and gets valley oak funded, but i agree with don that this’ll make it harder to do, especially singling out valley oak for its own tax.

    i would hope that the city’s voters are decent enough people to see what’s going on here, and not just play it selfish and cut off kids from the other neighborhoods to save a buck on their own taxes, but i’m increasingly pessimistic that the people of this city actually have the character to help each other out when needed.

    given the platform that taylor ran on in the last election, stressing the importance of diversity and not ignoring disadvantaged or minority youth in town, it’s pretty upsetting to see him cast the deciding vote.

  131. 無名 - wu ming

    it really is depressing to see the school board fail those whom they were elected to serve. i was brought up to always vote for schools, and hope that the two parcel tax option passes and gets valley oak funded, but i agree with don that this’ll make it harder to do, especially singling out valley oak for its own tax.

    i would hope that the city’s voters are decent enough people to see what’s going on here, and not just play it selfish and cut off kids from the other neighborhoods to save a buck on their own taxes, but i’m increasingly pessimistic that the people of this city actually have the character to help each other out when needed.

    given the platform that taylor ran on in the last election, stressing the importance of diversity and not ignoring disadvantaged or minority youth in town, it’s pretty upsetting to see him cast the deciding vote.

  132. 無名 - wu ming

    it really is depressing to see the school board fail those whom they were elected to serve. i was brought up to always vote for schools, and hope that the two parcel tax option passes and gets valley oak funded, but i agree with don that this’ll make it harder to do, especially singling out valley oak for its own tax.

    i would hope that the city’s voters are decent enough people to see what’s going on here, and not just play it selfish and cut off kids from the other neighborhoods to save a buck on their own taxes, but i’m increasingly pessimistic that the people of this city actually have the character to help each other out when needed.

    given the platform that taylor ran on in the last election, stressing the importance of diversity and not ignoring disadvantaged or minority youth in town, it’s pretty upsetting to see him cast the deciding vote.

  133. Rich Rifkin

    “Can someone tell me just what was so egregious about this man that after seven years of growth and prosperity in this district under his stewardship, it was so necessary to end it this way?”

    I really think the double-paying for a superintendent is a terrible waste of money. As such, I agree with your sentiment.

    But as far as ‘egregious’ mistakes, it is hard to top the $5 million that Murphy and his subordinates lost in the funding of Montgomery Elementary. If you consider how much his $250,000 greenmail is costing us, then multiply that by 20 and you can see how egregious his failings as an administrator were. In no uncertain terms, a five million mistake is worthy of being fired.

  134. Rich Rifkin

    “Can someone tell me just what was so egregious about this man that after seven years of growth and prosperity in this district under his stewardship, it was so necessary to end it this way?”

    I really think the double-paying for a superintendent is a terrible waste of money. As such, I agree with your sentiment.

    But as far as ‘egregious’ mistakes, it is hard to top the $5 million that Murphy and his subordinates lost in the funding of Montgomery Elementary. If you consider how much his $250,000 greenmail is costing us, then multiply that by 20 and you can see how egregious his failings as an administrator were. In no uncertain terms, a five million mistake is worthy of being fired.

  135. Rich Rifkin

    “Can someone tell me just what was so egregious about this man that after seven years of growth and prosperity in this district under his stewardship, it was so necessary to end it this way?”

    I really think the double-paying for a superintendent is a terrible waste of money. As such, I agree with your sentiment.

    But as far as ‘egregious’ mistakes, it is hard to top the $5 million that Murphy and his subordinates lost in the funding of Montgomery Elementary. If you consider how much his $250,000 greenmail is costing us, then multiply that by 20 and you can see how egregious his failings as an administrator were. In no uncertain terms, a five million mistake is worthy of being fired.

  136. Rich Rifkin

    “Can someone tell me just what was so egregious about this man that after seven years of growth and prosperity in this district under his stewardship, it was so necessary to end it this way?”

    I really think the double-paying for a superintendent is a terrible waste of money. As such, I agree with your sentiment.

    But as far as ‘egregious’ mistakes, it is hard to top the $5 million that Murphy and his subordinates lost in the funding of Montgomery Elementary. If you consider how much his $250,000 greenmail is costing us, then multiply that by 20 and you can see how egregious his failings as an administrator were. In no uncertain terms, a five million mistake is worthy of being fired.

  137. Lynn

    “i would hope that the city’s voters are decent enough people to see what’s going on here, and not just play it selfish and cut off kids from the other neighborhoods to save a buck on their own taxes, but i’m increasingly pessimistic that the people of this city actually have the character to help each other out when needed.”

    Yeah, I thought people were going to be decent enough to see what’s going on and not vote for a Target in our neighborhood. Apparently I was wrong as well. Every person for themselves! Good luck with that VO parcel tax vote. Y’all will need it.

  138. Lynn

    “i would hope that the city’s voters are decent enough people to see what’s going on here, and not just play it selfish and cut off kids from the other neighborhoods to save a buck on their own taxes, but i’m increasingly pessimistic that the people of this city actually have the character to help each other out when needed.”

    Yeah, I thought people were going to be decent enough to see what’s going on and not vote for a Target in our neighborhood. Apparently I was wrong as well. Every person for themselves! Good luck with that VO parcel tax vote. Y’all will need it.

  139. Lynn

    “i would hope that the city’s voters are decent enough people to see what’s going on here, and not just play it selfish and cut off kids from the other neighborhoods to save a buck on their own taxes, but i’m increasingly pessimistic that the people of this city actually have the character to help each other out when needed.”

    Yeah, I thought people were going to be decent enough to see what’s going on and not vote for a Target in our neighborhood. Apparently I was wrong as well. Every person for themselves! Good luck with that VO parcel tax vote. Y’all will need it.

  140. Lynn

    “i would hope that the city’s voters are decent enough people to see what’s going on here, and not just play it selfish and cut off kids from the other neighborhoods to save a buck on their own taxes, but i’m increasingly pessimistic that the people of this city actually have the character to help each other out when needed.”

    Yeah, I thought people were going to be decent enough to see what’s going on and not vote for a Target in our neighborhood. Apparently I was wrong as well. Every person for themselves! Good luck with that VO parcel tax vote. Y’all will need it.

  141. Don Shor

    East Davis voters are already feeling pretty alienated. Take a look at the parks tax vote in June 2006. The County Clerk’s web site shows the breakdown by precinct, and the precincts which failed to provide a 2/3 vote were in East and South Davis. The Target vote just added to the feeling that the rest of the city doesn’t much care about East Davis concerns. Add to that the negative issues swirling around the school district right now, and the likelihood of a pretty bitter school board contest, and I don’t know that any parcel tax is a slam dunk in the next year or so.

  142. Don Shor

    East Davis voters are already feeling pretty alienated. Take a look at the parks tax vote in June 2006. The County Clerk’s web site shows the breakdown by precinct, and the precincts which failed to provide a 2/3 vote were in East and South Davis. The Target vote just added to the feeling that the rest of the city doesn’t much care about East Davis concerns. Add to that the negative issues swirling around the school district right now, and the likelihood of a pretty bitter school board contest, and I don’t know that any parcel tax is a slam dunk in the next year or so.

  143. Don Shor

    East Davis voters are already feeling pretty alienated. Take a look at the parks tax vote in June 2006. The County Clerk’s web site shows the breakdown by precinct, and the precincts which failed to provide a 2/3 vote were in East and South Davis. The Target vote just added to the feeling that the rest of the city doesn’t much care about East Davis concerns. Add to that the negative issues swirling around the school district right now, and the likelihood of a pretty bitter school board contest, and I don’t know that any parcel tax is a slam dunk in the next year or so.

  144. Don Shor

    East Davis voters are already feeling pretty alienated. Take a look at the parks tax vote in June 2006. The County Clerk’s web site shows the breakdown by precinct, and the precincts which failed to provide a 2/3 vote were in East and South Davis. The Target vote just added to the feeling that the rest of the city doesn’t much care about East Davis concerns. Add to that the negative issues swirling around the school district right now, and the likelihood of a pretty bitter school board contest, and I don’t know that any parcel tax is a slam dunk in the next year or so.

  145. Anonymous

    Lynn – Isn’t the Mace Ranch area getting something that they want – a K-6 school in their neighborhood? This issue isn’t about Target. It is about kids and their educational program. Hey, my old neighborhood had the cold weather shelter, the Food closet and a day time homeless/drug abuse counseling center. Other neighborhoods have group homes, sexual violence centers, fraternities and sororities, student housing, low income housing, etc. The Old North Davis neighborhood has a freeway (5th street) running through it and attempts to slow the street down have been met with resistance by people (East, West & South) who want a quick way across town. We all have something in our neighborhood that is less than ideal. Hey, the far east and southern neighborhoods voted down the first school bond which failed and left my kids in overcrowded schools for all of their education. The enrichment bond coming up has been renewed by the Davis community every four years for 20 years. We expect the new people moving to Davis to join us in voting for this regardless of current politics in town.

  146. Anonymous

    Lynn – Isn’t the Mace Ranch area getting something that they want – a K-6 school in their neighborhood? This issue isn’t about Target. It is about kids and their educational program. Hey, my old neighborhood had the cold weather shelter, the Food closet and a day time homeless/drug abuse counseling center. Other neighborhoods have group homes, sexual violence centers, fraternities and sororities, student housing, low income housing, etc. The Old North Davis neighborhood has a freeway (5th street) running through it and attempts to slow the street down have been met with resistance by people (East, West & South) who want a quick way across town. We all have something in our neighborhood that is less than ideal. Hey, the far east and southern neighborhoods voted down the first school bond which failed and left my kids in overcrowded schools for all of their education. The enrichment bond coming up has been renewed by the Davis community every four years for 20 years. We expect the new people moving to Davis to join us in voting for this regardless of current politics in town.

  147. Anonymous

    Lynn – Isn’t the Mace Ranch area getting something that they want – a K-6 school in their neighborhood? This issue isn’t about Target. It is about kids and their educational program. Hey, my old neighborhood had the cold weather shelter, the Food closet and a day time homeless/drug abuse counseling center. Other neighborhoods have group homes, sexual violence centers, fraternities and sororities, student housing, low income housing, etc. The Old North Davis neighborhood has a freeway (5th street) running through it and attempts to slow the street down have been met with resistance by people (East, West & South) who want a quick way across town. We all have something in our neighborhood that is less than ideal. Hey, the far east and southern neighborhoods voted down the first school bond which failed and left my kids in overcrowded schools for all of their education. The enrichment bond coming up has been renewed by the Davis community every four years for 20 years. We expect the new people moving to Davis to join us in voting for this regardless of current politics in town.

  148. Anonymous

    Lynn – Isn’t the Mace Ranch area getting something that they want – a K-6 school in their neighborhood? This issue isn’t about Target. It is about kids and their educational program. Hey, my old neighborhood had the cold weather shelter, the Food closet and a day time homeless/drug abuse counseling center. Other neighborhoods have group homes, sexual violence centers, fraternities and sororities, student housing, low income housing, etc. The Old North Davis neighborhood has a freeway (5th street) running through it and attempts to slow the street down have been met with resistance by people (East, West & South) who want a quick way across town. We all have something in our neighborhood that is less than ideal. Hey, the far east and southern neighborhoods voted down the first school bond which failed and left my kids in overcrowded schools for all of their education. The enrichment bond coming up has been renewed by the Davis community every four years for 20 years. We expect the new people moving to Davis to join us in voting for this regardless of current politics in town.

  149. Anonymous

    If it’s to be one school pitted against another, then perhaps all bets are off concerning Davis community support for the upcoming renewal of the enrichment bond. There are those of us who feel that keeping Valley Oak open and its programs fully funded is certainly as important as violin lessons. Since the balloting plan is to single out Valley Oak as the only school that would require special designation for additional funding from the taxpayer,the ballot measure should read, “The enrichment bond measure is renewed only if the additional funding measure for Valley Oak is also passed” IF the object is really to get a ballot measure passed to keep Valley Oak open, then the ballot wording above has the best chance of getting 2/3 of the vote.

  150. Anonymous

    If it’s to be one school pitted against another, then perhaps all bets are off concerning Davis community support for the upcoming renewal of the enrichment bond. There are those of us who feel that keeping Valley Oak open and its programs fully funded is certainly as important as violin lessons. Since the balloting plan is to single out Valley Oak as the only school that would require special designation for additional funding from the taxpayer,the ballot measure should read, “The enrichment bond measure is renewed only if the additional funding measure for Valley Oak is also passed” IF the object is really to get a ballot measure passed to keep Valley Oak open, then the ballot wording above has the best chance of getting 2/3 of the vote.

  151. Anonymous

    If it’s to be one school pitted against another, then perhaps all bets are off concerning Davis community support for the upcoming renewal of the enrichment bond. There are those of us who feel that keeping Valley Oak open and its programs fully funded is certainly as important as violin lessons. Since the balloting plan is to single out Valley Oak as the only school that would require special designation for additional funding from the taxpayer,the ballot measure should read, “The enrichment bond measure is renewed only if the additional funding measure for Valley Oak is also passed” IF the object is really to get a ballot measure passed to keep Valley Oak open, then the ballot wording above has the best chance of getting 2/3 of the vote.

  152. Anonymous

    If it’s to be one school pitted against another, then perhaps all bets are off concerning Davis community support for the upcoming renewal of the enrichment bond. There are those of us who feel that keeping Valley Oak open and its programs fully funded is certainly as important as violin lessons. Since the balloting plan is to single out Valley Oak as the only school that would require special designation for additional funding from the taxpayer,the ballot measure should read, “The enrichment bond measure is renewed only if the additional funding measure for Valley Oak is also passed” IF the object is really to get a ballot measure passed to keep Valley Oak open, then the ballot wording above has the best chance of getting 2/3 of the vote.

  153. Lynn C.

    Yet another anonymous said… “Hey, my old neighborhood had the cold weather shelter, the Food closet and a day time homeless/drug abuse counseling center.”

    Yeah, that’s what the Target parking lot and our neighborhood park (required to adjoin the lot) will be as well …in addition to the source of the next Amber alert.

    Yes, you’re right, this is about VO not Target, but many people in Mace Ranch are resentful of Measure K and the time and effort it took getting Korematsu open. They have long memories …even after they move to different areas. Besides everyone knows that Davis homeowning voters are financially conservative first and altruistic second. I will not be voting for the second parcel tax …no matter where I live.

  154. Lynn C.

    Yet another anonymous said… “Hey, my old neighborhood had the cold weather shelter, the Food closet and a day time homeless/drug abuse counseling center.”

    Yeah, that’s what the Target parking lot and our neighborhood park (required to adjoin the lot) will be as well …in addition to the source of the next Amber alert.

    Yes, you’re right, this is about VO not Target, but many people in Mace Ranch are resentful of Measure K and the time and effort it took getting Korematsu open. They have long memories …even after they move to different areas. Besides everyone knows that Davis homeowning voters are financially conservative first and altruistic second. I will not be voting for the second parcel tax …no matter where I live.

  155. Lynn C.

    Yet another anonymous said… “Hey, my old neighborhood had the cold weather shelter, the Food closet and a day time homeless/drug abuse counseling center.”

    Yeah, that’s what the Target parking lot and our neighborhood park (required to adjoin the lot) will be as well …in addition to the source of the next Amber alert.

    Yes, you’re right, this is about VO not Target, but many people in Mace Ranch are resentful of Measure K and the time and effort it took getting Korematsu open. They have long memories …even after they move to different areas. Besides everyone knows that Davis homeowning voters are financially conservative first and altruistic second. I will not be voting for the second parcel tax …no matter where I live.

  156. Lynn C.

    Yet another anonymous said… “Hey, my old neighborhood had the cold weather shelter, the Food closet and a day time homeless/drug abuse counseling center.”

    Yeah, that’s what the Target parking lot and our neighborhood park (required to adjoin the lot) will be as well …in addition to the source of the next Amber alert.

    Yes, you’re right, this is about VO not Target, but many people in Mace Ranch are resentful of Measure K and the time and effort it took getting Korematsu open. They have long memories …even after they move to different areas. Besides everyone knows that Davis homeowning voters are financially conservative first and altruistic second. I will not be voting for the second parcel tax …no matter where I live.

  157. Anonymous

    Yes, you’re right, this is about VO not Target, but many people in Mace Ranch are resentful of Measure K and the time and effort it took getting Korematsu open. They have long memories …even after they move to different areas.

    And what about the Mace Ranch residents whose kids are now happily attending Valley Oak? I guess they are irrelevant. I’m sure they’re happy to know that their neighbors aren’t willing to support their bid to keep their school open.

  158. Anonymous

    Yes, you’re right, this is about VO not Target, but many people in Mace Ranch are resentful of Measure K and the time and effort it took getting Korematsu open. They have long memories …even after they move to different areas.

    And what about the Mace Ranch residents whose kids are now happily attending Valley Oak? I guess they are irrelevant. I’m sure they’re happy to know that their neighbors aren’t willing to support their bid to keep their school open.

  159. Anonymous

    Yes, you’re right, this is about VO not Target, but many people in Mace Ranch are resentful of Measure K and the time and effort it took getting Korematsu open. They have long memories …even after they move to different areas.

    And what about the Mace Ranch residents whose kids are now happily attending Valley Oak? I guess they are irrelevant. I’m sure they’re happy to know that their neighbors aren’t willing to support their bid to keep their school open.

  160. Anonymous

    Yes, you’re right, this is about VO not Target, but many people in Mace Ranch are resentful of Measure K and the time and effort it took getting Korematsu open. They have long memories …even after they move to different areas.

    And what about the Mace Ranch residents whose kids are now happily attending Valley Oak? I guess they are irrelevant. I’m sure they’re happy to know that their neighbors aren’t willing to support their bid to keep their school open.

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