Interview with 8th Assembly District Candidate Mariko Yamada

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The Vanguard sat down last night with Yolo County Superisor Mariko Yamada who represents portions of Davis and a number of rural communities in the Fourth District of the Yolo County Board of Supervisors. She is running for the Democratic Nomination for the 8th Assembly District against West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Clabaldon. The Vanguard interviewed Mayor Cabaldon last week.

  • What do you consider the top issues facing the 8th Assembly District? Yolo County? Davis? And what are your priorities if elected to the state legislature?

Alright, well first thanks for having me on the Vanguard. I just want to give you some background on the overarching issues with the 8th Assembly District as well as the county and the City of Davis.

I think that foremost on everyone’s mind is healthcare, and also transportation and education and employment. Those are all interrelated, but those are, I think, the top four issues that that I see before us as the State grapples with some very difficult, very overarching issues. Yolo County, as one of the fifty-eight counties in California, is at the bottom of the property tax revenue retention and that has presented challenges to us as we are going forward into the twenty-first century with all of those overarching issues in play. As it relates to the City of Davis, I think the city and the county will hopefully engage in some very positive discussions as we go forward through this next General Plan process. And, we need to collaborate more and communicate more, so that we can work together on solving some of these overarching issues.

  • Can you get into [discuss] some of your priorities?

My priorities are pretty specific and I can share with you some of those that I’ve already put forth into my information and literature as we’ve been moving forward. As you may know, I am a social worker by profession, so with healthcare, I am a proponent of single payer universal. So, if elected to the Legislature, I will be advocating very strongly on that issue. I also have priorities in the areas of adults, aging and disability. And, you may have seen an article in the Davis Enterprise, just this last weekend, about the Aging Summit that we just put on. It’s the first one that Yolo County has had in the area of aging, adult and disability, I think that it is a primary concern of mine, because we’re about thirty years behind in addressing some of those issues, so I’ll be focusing on that as well.

I think I also have some specific proposals about how education and the social work profession can combine and collaborate to solve some of our serious issues within the education system. I think teachers are spending so much time on addressing social problems that they’re not really free to teach. Teachers certainly are not immune to the social problems of their students. But, I think what they went into their profession for was to teach and educate and I think a lot of their time is spent on addressing some of the social problems that children bring with them to school and if we are able to merge and able to have social workers and teachers partner I think that would go a long way into alleviating some of the teaching load and workload issues that teachers face. So, I would be looking at ways of collaborating.

How can the state on the one hand deal with tight budgets while at the same time provide a high level of services to those in most need—the poor, the aging, the disabled, and the children? In short, how can we take care of those most vulnerable?

I think the State has been under funding core services for a number of years now. I think first we had sixteen years of Republican rule followed by two short of a Democratic control of the Legislature and the state house. So, I think that when you have to address sixteen years of priorities that may not be directed to the most vulnerable in our state and our society and then only have a short time to address reorienting those priorities it becomes cumulative. It’s just a cascade on mostly having to catch up. I think that we have to address in a very realistic fashion the under funding of very real core services. Now having said that, I think there are ways to address some of the spending that may not be most appropriate, or the priorities that the state has had is directing money in not the best fashion. I think we are wasting funds in some respects. For example, going back to the healthcare discussion for a moment, we spend more in emergency room services than we would if we were investing in and funding preventive care. So I think it’s not only a matter of under funding, or a matter of not having enough money. The taxpayers are tired of hearing that there is not enough money, but I think that that is part of the problem. There are under funding issues, but the other side of that, is that we have to use the funds that we have in a much smarter fashion.

  • How would in your capacity as Assemblywoman, be able to assist the 8th District in bringing funding for these much needed service?

I think it is important, as the representative for this area, to clearly articulate the needs of local government. My background is in local government primarily. I’ve been in three counties and I think that we have to make sure that local priorities are articulated. I think that part of the problem has been the accusation is that when people go to Sacramento to work in the Legislature they forget where they came from – – where their roots are. I’m going to work very hard not to forget that all politics is local and all of our problems are local. If we can persuade enough of our colleagues in the Legislature, to return to the focus of how programs affect everyday people in the district, I think that is part of my commitment and my message at the state level.

One of the big problems facing virtually every local jurisdiction that I cover on a daily basis whether it be the schools, the city, the county, or special districts is a lack of flow of money from the state to local governments, a the same time a large burden has shifted toward those local jurisdictions to meet the service needs of their constituents, how can the state do a better job of helping local government meet the funding needs of local jurisdictions?

Well, that again goes back to my earlier answer, that is, I think that when you have more people in the Legislature that have a local government perspective that doesn’t become a “we – they” discussion, it becomes an “our” discussion. Remembering that counties are political subdivisions of the state, we’re very familiar with what the state is requiring. That’s what counties do. We are the administrative arm of the state, so it’s not as though counties are unfamiliar with what the state requirements are, but we all hear about unfunded mandates. It’s very important for state legislators that they may have the best ideas in the world about how to fix all the problems of the world, but unless they have a local government perspective, and remain close to people and see how their legislation could impact local individuals then I think they’re missing the boat. I think we need to focus our attention on how the state legislation actually affects everyday people and I think that maybe we’ve lost that communication and it’s become a “we / they” and hope is that we make it an “our” situation.

  • The other day, I was driving from Davis to Sacramento. It took me 20 minutes on I-80 to get from the highway 113 on ramp to the very far east outskirts of Davis. This region is set to grow a large amount in the coming years. How do you plan to prevent the I-80 Capitol Corridor from becoming the Congestion Corridor?

Well, you know David; I was actually on I-80 tonight, going back and forth, to Solano County, while I’ve been out precinct walking. And, actually the drive this evening, was not too bad, but that is always a gamble. You never know what it’s going to be like on I-80. I think we have made mistakes in the past in terms of how we have cited communities, in terms of how we have grown, and we need to capitalize on the good work that the SACOG (Sacramento Area Council of Governments) Blueprint began. That did not include Solano County. That was a six county study on the other side of the Causeway including Yolo County. I think what we need to do in the 8th Assembly District, because we’re kind of a hybrid, you know, we have an affinity to Sacramento, the region, but we also have an affinity to the Bay Area, because Solano is pulled on the other side. I haven’t seen that we’ve been able to get the Bay Area and the Sacramento Region to be in even a larger regional dialogue that we already are. So, I think what we need to do too, is make sure that we are focusing on transitory development. We need to take a look at — as lofty as a goal as it is — we need to look at a commitment at some mass transit.

I’ll digress for a second here. All of the money, the spending that’s been done on the war in Iraq, if we had the money to invest in infrastructure and light rail, we probably could have built light rail from New York to San Francisco. I don’t have those exact figures, but I think our spending priorities are completely upside down. We have made mistakes. We need to stop making the same mistakes to good planning. We need to open up an even a larger dialogue between the Sacramento Region and the Bay Area, because we’re all in this together. And I think too, when we achieve a better jobs / housing balance we’ve got to make sure that people don’t have to drive so far to go to work. I see in the mornings, as I’m on my way to Woodland, going over the Richards overpass – but I avoid the underpass, because I’m going to Woodland – so I’m looping around and going to I-80 to catch 113. I see all of those cars backed up on I-80 off of Richards trying to get to the university. So, there are a lot of people working at the university that either don’t or can’t live in Davis and I think that we need to have a dialogue about that with both our city partners and our county folks and the university.

  • What types of proposals would you support in order to help local business succeed in the face of the growing threat of big-box retail?

Well, you know, I was on the “no” side of the Target discussion. I was not a public figure in that, because it was what I considered to be a city vote than rather than a direct county issue. So, I want to make that clear that my opposition to the big box was no so much because I didn’t think that people shouldn’t have a choice, but because to amend the General Plan to chase sales tax revenue, is not the best reason to amend your General Plan. I think your threshold for amending your General Plan has to be a very high threshold. And, I didn’t think that chasing sales tax revenue was a very good reason to amend the General Plan, but now that we know that that ordinance has passed, that provides future opportunities for big box, I think that the Downtown Davis Business Association and the Chamber of Commerce have to work together to ensure that the shopping options for Davis residents remain attractive. We also need to look at the parking issues in downtown Davis. I know that there are a lot of concerns that I’ve heard from visitors as well as residents that parking downtown, is very difficult. So, perhaps we can make this a win / win and arrange for some kind of off site shuttle service into the downtown area. There are some downtowns that actually have some closed off streets and made them only pedestrian friendly or maybe electric vehicle friendly. Maybe we’ll use the new parking lot out at Target to arrange for shuttle service to downtown.

I’m trying to remember what the statistics were on the precinct by precinct vote, but as you know, one of my focuses, as I mentioned earlier, is on seniors and folks with disabilities. I’ve heard that, anecdotally, seniors were supportive of having Target or a Target-like store nearby, so that they didn’t have to drive so far. They didn’t have to go too far to do basic shopping. So now that it’s passed I hope that we can collaborate and make something positive out of it.

Concerns about flooding in California’s Central Valley exploded following the destruction of New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina. And yet, we continue to develop areas that are flood prone and in flood plains. Do you believe that this is a wise planning practice? What steps do you believe are needed to ensure protection from flood given growing population pressures?

My record on development in the flood plains [was] probably the most clear of anyone in local government. I was the only “no” vote on a major policy related project of the old sugar mill. I was the only “no” vote on the Board of Supervisors and that “no” vote was based on the fact that I actually drove the site three times that what I felt in my heart also matched what I felt in my head. And that was, to approve development behind an uncertified levy that close to where people would be put in harms way – – I just couldn’t in good conscious do that.

I think that development has occurred already in the flood zone. And because some of those mistakes that were made in the past I think it is easy for some policy makers to say, “Well, you know…there’s just one more development we can put in, because it’s already close to the housing, the infrastructure, that’s in existence.” But at some point, you have to say, “No.” At some point you have to say that there is a principle that is involved and that is that you should stop developing behind uncertified levees or in areas in which it’s very clear that the potential for flooding is so great.

I have another hat on the Board of Supervisors, and that is that I am Emergency Services Board Liaison. Remembering the tragedies and horrors of Katrina… We saw those tragedies and horrors played out both on television and in pictorials. I’m actually haunted still by some of those pictures…particularly, the disabled who were not able to get out. I think knowing what we know now, it’s basically unconscionable to approve development behind uncertified levees.

Now, when there are flood protections that a developer or a community can demonstrate. I think that one size does not always fit all. So I want to say in balance, when a developer or a community can come up with a standard of flood protection that can be proven and can be demonstrated then I think that that merits a look. But in principle, I think right now; until we achieve some real strong flood protection for our region we should really put either a moratorium on new development behind the flood plain or in the flood plain.

  • How can the 8th Assembly District balance the need for housing and jobs on one hand to accommodate huge projected growth particularly in the western part of the district with need to preserve agricultural land and environmental protection? How should California as a whole plan to deal with growth pressures in the coming decades?

I think if any one individual or one policy maker had the answer to that question we would have answered the question already. I think what I would want to put forth, as the answer to this question, is that it’s the approach that has to be taken rather than, how am I personally going to do it? The approach has to be one of balancing competing needs by listening carefully by listening to all points of view and not making a decision based on political expedience, or who’s yelling the loudest. I think that balancing growth and affordable housing and the environment and farmland…you almost have to do it at the same time on a policy level. You have to do it on a people level. As I said earlier in the interview, about the “one size does not always fit all,” I think that when you get good people around the table to have a rational discussion about how to balance growth, the environment, affordable housing and agriculture — ‘cause you know you need all four of those in order to make a healthy community.

California is such a complex state. From north to south, from coastal to inland, is very complex already, so I’m not sure I can say how California is going to address it. I can say how I would address it as a representative in the Legislature. I think we need to have that approach of collaborating and getting new partnerships developed, because what I see a lot, in my work at the County, as well as my interactions with the state, there’s such great polarization. Everyone seems to think that their point of view is the only point of view that is correct. And although I am a very liberal and partisan Democrat I also believe that reaching out across the isle to try to work out solutions with people who may not think exactly the way that we think, or that come from a different life experience, or may feel that they only have the right answer – we have to be able to be able to reach out across the isle to try to work out some of these intractable problems.

Social workers start where the client is. We start from the position of looking at the problem as a whole and then try to martial the resources around the problem to fix it. Again, it’s an approach rather than me saying, “I have the solution to all of these problems.” I think that the citizenry doesn’t want to hear promises from people who are running for office they want to find out whether that person has the approach that they feel is consistent with addressing some of these huge problems that we all face.

  • The recent dispute between Yolo County and the City of Davis over who should determine growth on the city edges erupted into at times bitter contentiousness. What did you learn from this situation in order to avoid repeat episodes in the future? And as a member of the Assembly what approaches would you take at the state level toward local growth and control?

You know, I think that the issue of who controls growth on the city edge is based upon twenty years of history. The Pass Through Agreement was negotiated first I think in 1987 was a very good agreement, and was renegotiated just a few years ago, and it has served well. I think that the County’s position is that we would like to engage the city in a collaborative discussion.

As far as what we learned, from sometimes a contentious presentation by some of the citizens of Davis, is that we need to establish mechanisms, so that we can have those kinds of discussions before it comes to the Board. I proposed having a Yolo County Council of Governments several years ago. Unfortunately, we did not have Board concurrence to engage in that. But, what struck me about going across the river to attend SACOG meetings — Sacramento Area Council of Government meetings, and that they’re very specific, they focus really on transportation funding – but the concept of having twenty-two jurisdictions sitting around the same board chambers and discussing issues of mutual concern I thought was a wise way to approach problems. But I always wondered how it was that all of the Yolo County representatives could go across the river to sit around that table before we sat around together in Yolo County. My hope is that we will some day have that mechanism that we can sit down as elected leaders as well as have open forums with the citizens to hear each other, not just hear one side. I look at the county, as the county as a whole, although I do have the privilege of representing ¾ of the City of Davis I also represent an area outside of Davis, which is the second largest farm acreage in Yolo County and a mixture of very diverse interests and rich habitat areas. So in balance, I think that the discussion that occurred at the Board was very unnecessarily contentious. We didn’t have communication mechanisms to engage each other before it got to that point.

You know, the Board did not vote to remove the areas entirely. That vote did fail on a 2 to 3 vote. But, we did remove the areas with hope that we would engage in future discussions with the city. My hope is that we can work that out.

  • And as a member of the Assembly what approaches would you take at the state level toward local growth and control?

The state does not regulate local planning decisions, so in terms of regulating where growth will go, there are certain guidelines, but local planning decisions will remain at the local level.

Well, one of the reasons I asked this question, is that there was a bill before the Assembly that died – fortunately – that would have changed the way that Housing Element updates to the General Plan were designed. And, it would have made it so that instead of a ten-year planning period it would be every five years. And so a lot of local governments became concerned that that would have been growth inducing.

I think that Dave Jones (Assemblyman) did have AB70, which not supported by the Yolo County Board of Supervisors, although I did support his bill, because it included some provisions for regulating growth behind the flood plain and that we would have state and local partnership in how those decisions are made. I know most of local government opposed AB70, because they felt that it was the state trying to regulate. But I think that again, it’s that approach of partnering instead of this we / they. It’s always, we / they. I hope we can get to the problems, more of solving the problems in more of a collaborative fashion.

  • At your first candidate’s debate, you supported the continuation of the two-thirds requirement for passing the state budget, has the recent budget impasse and the fact that a few members of the minority party held the budget highjacked, changed your view here?

At the first forum the question that was posed was; would you change the current way the budget was handled? Right? My view on that is that we have to preserve some aspect of the protection of the minority. What I would like to see is a two-year budget process with a sixty percent threshold. I think that when you have a two-thirds vote – at that forum the question was posed; would you preserve the current two-thirds majority? It only works to protect when the Democrats are in the majority. But I think that living with a year to year budget process can result in a tyranny of the minority, but a two-year process with a sixty percent threshold would be more fair.

  • Everyone is for health care reform. What approach do you most advocate and more importantly, how can you get it passed in the current climate or will you be looking toward 2011 with a Democratic Governor?

As an advocate for single payer universal it may only be achievable if we go to the ballot. I have been participating for the past 18 months on the California State Association of Counties Healthcare Reform Task Force. We have been examining all three of the proposals based on its effects on the county. And, AB8, which was put together as a merged bill from both the Senate and the House is not something that the counties can support, because of its 7.5% employer contribution threshold. In effect, that would affect us, as we are the employer of record for in home support health services providers. These are folks that are actually saving the state money, by performing the work that is needed to keep seniors and disabled individuals in their homes and in their community. So, AB8 was not the answer for us. The Governor’s proposal also, we have some concerns about.

Although, I think shared responsibility, which is part of the Governor’s proposal, is something that I personally can be supportive of, and I know that my friends out in the union community are not supporting shared responsibility, individual mandates. I think that there is a difference between shared responsibility and individual mandate. For those that cannot afford to pay for their own healthcare, counties already are responsible for indigent health. So I think that there are enough elements floating out there. Again, I think if we have the approach of collaborating and making sure that we have a shared discussion about how to solve it that’s how we’re going to get there, but I personally am a proponent of single payer, universal. That is in the context that healthcare is a right not a privilege. You know, there are still a couple of pillars in this whole discussion that need to come to the table, and that is the insurance companies and the pharmaceutical industry. I know that this is going out there in sort of “dangerous land,” but insurance companies do their business based on that you’re paying for something you hope will not happen. I think we ought to be investing money in what should happen, which is good, preventive healthcare, not waiting until an emergency occurs and when the costs are very high. If we invest more on the front end then we save money on the back end. Also, for a certain segment of our population that have pre-existing conditions – – we have to do away with that – we have to make sure that everyone is able to get healthcare when they need it. I think that there are enough good models throughout the world as well as other places in the country. San Francisco has started and Massachusetts has a system as well, so we need to take the best of what’s already happening to see if we can hammer out a solution. Who would have thought that, here we are in October, and here we are the Legislature is still working on just two small issues; water and health. It’s a symbol that people want to get these issues dealt with. I’m not sure how it’s going to go through the rest of this year. I would rather see something good and something substantial occur rather than something based on political expedience. I think that SB840 we just need to just convert to an initiative and see what the people have to say. The polling shows that the people want universal, single payer healthcare. And also with the Presidential Primary coming in February, February 5th, that is a huge issue for all of the candidates, at least on the Democratic side. We don’t hear too much about healthcare on the Republican side. I hope we get there.

  • The original gang injunction was thrown out by the courts. What do you think of efforts to renew the gang injunction—has it been improved upon? How can we balance and where do you balance the concerns between public safety on the one hand and the rights of the accused to have a fair trial with court representation?

I was not supportive of the original gang injunction, because it was vague and unconstitutional. I think the courts proved that to be true. The efforts to reinstate another gang injunction I do believe is still not fair, because I think that if you are going to apply a curfew, or rights to assembly orders in a community it should apply to the whole community not just to one segment. I think that beyond that, my interest is in supporting law enforcement in balance with addressing why there is criminal activity in the first place. We have families that are stretched to the limit, because of their economic situation. We have families that are addressing decades-long issues of poverty, unemployment and sub-standard schools. We have to go to the root causes of what is motivating some people into criminal activity. I think that if you only look at the law enforcement side, and you don’t look at the root causes of what draws some people into criminal activity, then you’re not taking a balanced approach to solving the problem. But I do think that if you’re going to apply restrictions to the citizenry then they have to be applied to everyone and that’s the only way you can achieve some democracy in such an activity.

  • What accomplishment on the Yolo County board of Supervisors are you most proud of?

Just one? [laugh] Well if I can give you more than one? Well I have a lot of accomplishments that I’m proud of. I think first of all our Board, and I as one member, have not been afraid to take on the big battles. So you may edit this out, because I’m only limited to one or two, but as I mentioned the other evening, when we were at The Bean Feed, our board has exhibited great courage in taking on issues like the Conway Ranch, SMUD annexation, certainly the General Plan is a very large issue. I think our Board has exhibited the courage to take on the big battles in the face of many pressures. Personal and professional accomplishments; I am very proud of working to get the In Home Supportive Services Public Authority established, working for our most vulnerable seniors and disabled residents. We were the first in the state to achieve that after the state mandate in 1999. I’m also very proud of the work we’ve done to strengthen the Aging and Adult Services Commission. It is now chaired by a member of the Board of Supervisors. It has achieved some parity with the Children and Families Commission. I’m also very proud of ensuring that our ambulance and emergency response services have been settled now for at least ten years. That is a negotiation that I led for the county in collaboration with our emergency services personnel. A lot of people don’t know what the link is between 9-1-1 and the ambulance arriving at your house. It’s actually a county related function, so we had improvements and sustainability in our emergency services. We have also done a lot of work with our Parks Master Plan, with the Grasslands Regional Park. We’re going to be hopefully concluding the acquisition and doubling the size of Grasslands Regional Park, which is in District 4. That will become probably the largest regional park near urban area in Yolo County. Many of our parks are out in the Capay Valley area further West, but Grasslands, is right across the way off of Mace Boulevard, so those are just some of the diverse issues and accomplishments I am most proud of.

  • If you could accomplish one thing if elected to the Assembly, what would it be?

I think IHHS (In Home Supportive Services) reform would be at the top of my priority list, because this program already has 400,000 Californians enrolled. The eligibility has not been reviewed for decades, and we’re going to have a growing need to fill to keep people safe in their communities.

It is a program that is actually eating up our realignment dollars and is causing competition amongst social services, public health, and probation. I think that the program needs to be stand alone and I think the workers in that program – we need to take a look at how they can be engaged and blended into perhaps, our retirement system for the state. It is something that you perhaps have not thought of yet, because you’re young and still able bodied, but for silver tsunami end of the age spectrum, it is a glaring need. Actually, the dependency ratio for those of you that are still able to work, there’s going to be greater burdens upon you as the other end of the age cohort progresses it’s shift. So, it’s going to be a top priority of mine along with healthcare reform.

Thanks to my wife Cecilia Escamilla-Greenwald for doing the transcription for this interview…

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

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About The Author

David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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224 thoughts on “Interview with 8th Assembly District Candidate Mariko Yamada”

  1. oiy

    *sigh* Oh Mariko.

    Can’t another Davisite run for Assembly? Sue Greenwald or Steve Souza or Lamar, please go back in time 6 months and announce your candidacy for Assembly. Hell, I’d settle for Saylor.

  2. oiy

    *sigh* Oh Mariko.

    Can’t another Davisite run for Assembly? Sue Greenwald or Steve Souza or Lamar, please go back in time 6 months and announce your candidacy for Assembly. Hell, I’d settle for Saylor.

  3. oiy

    *sigh* Oh Mariko.

    Can’t another Davisite run for Assembly? Sue Greenwald or Steve Souza or Lamar, please go back in time 6 months and announce your candidacy for Assembly. Hell, I’d settle for Saylor.

  4. oiy

    *sigh* Oh Mariko.

    Can’t another Davisite run for Assembly? Sue Greenwald or Steve Souza or Lamar, please go back in time 6 months and announce your candidacy for Assembly. Hell, I’d settle for Saylor.

  5. Voter in the 8th AD

    oiy at 10:05 –

    You make me want to say, “Ugh!”

    You would settle for Saylor, Souza or Greenwald in the Assembly? Pleeeeeeze spare us. Therein lies the problem. We don’t want to “settle.”

    We want a good person in the Assembly to represent us. I think Supervisor Yamada would do a fine job. I don’t agree with her on everything, but she’s approachable, she listens, and she’ll take the concerns of the 8th AD to Sacramento.

    She has my vote.

  6. Voter in the 8th AD

    oiy at 10:05 –

    You make me want to say, “Ugh!”

    You would settle for Saylor, Souza or Greenwald in the Assembly? Pleeeeeeze spare us. Therein lies the problem. We don’t want to “settle.”

    We want a good person in the Assembly to represent us. I think Supervisor Yamada would do a fine job. I don’t agree with her on everything, but she’s approachable, she listens, and she’ll take the concerns of the 8th AD to Sacramento.

    She has my vote.

  7. Voter in the 8th AD

    oiy at 10:05 –

    You make me want to say, “Ugh!”

    You would settle for Saylor, Souza or Greenwald in the Assembly? Pleeeeeeze spare us. Therein lies the problem. We don’t want to “settle.”

    We want a good person in the Assembly to represent us. I think Supervisor Yamada would do a fine job. I don’t agree with her on everything, but she’s approachable, she listens, and she’ll take the concerns of the 8th AD to Sacramento.

    She has my vote.

  8. Voter in the 8th AD

    oiy at 10:05 –

    You make me want to say, “Ugh!”

    You would settle for Saylor, Souza or Greenwald in the Assembly? Pleeeeeeze spare us. Therein lies the problem. We don’t want to “settle.”

    We want a good person in the Assembly to represent us. I think Supervisor Yamada would do a fine job. I don’t agree with her on everything, but she’s approachable, she listens, and she’ll take the concerns of the 8th AD to Sacramento.

    She has my vote.

  9. Another Progressive Voter

    Must be tough to be a Republican in Davis. Then again, it’s tough to be a Democrat in the US, so I have little sympathy.

    I agree with Mariko on every issue but the pass-through and county general plan, she will not be taking part in that process in the Assembly, I want to hear from the progressives on this blog who are voting for Cabaldon, why should I vote for Cabaldon over her?

  10. Another Progressive Voter

    Must be tough to be a Republican in Davis. Then again, it’s tough to be a Democrat in the US, so I have little sympathy.

    I agree with Mariko on every issue but the pass-through and county general plan, she will not be taking part in that process in the Assembly, I want to hear from the progressives on this blog who are voting for Cabaldon, why should I vote for Cabaldon over her?

  11. Another Progressive Voter

    Must be tough to be a Republican in Davis. Then again, it’s tough to be a Democrat in the US, so I have little sympathy.

    I agree with Mariko on every issue but the pass-through and county general plan, she will not be taking part in that process in the Assembly, I want to hear from the progressives on this blog who are voting for Cabaldon, why should I vote for Cabaldon over her?

  12. Another Progressive Voter

    Must be tough to be a Republican in Davis. Then again, it’s tough to be a Democrat in the US, so I have little sympathy.

    I agree with Mariko on every issue but the pass-through and county general plan, she will not be taking part in that process in the Assembly, I want to hear from the progressives on this blog who are voting for Cabaldon, why should I vote for Cabaldon over her?

  13. Davis Republican

    Actually, it’s not too bad being a republican in Davis, and many would be surprised at how many local issues we might agree on. I think Davis is very unique (and wonderful) in its vocal and involved citizenry…and I enjoy debating, anyway. Besides, I seriously rather be a minority in Davis than a majority in some big-box town where everyone is driving an SUV.

  14. Davis Republican

    Actually, it’s not too bad being a republican in Davis, and many would be surprised at how many local issues we might agree on. I think Davis is very unique (and wonderful) in its vocal and involved citizenry…and I enjoy debating, anyway. Besides, I seriously rather be a minority in Davis than a majority in some big-box town where everyone is driving an SUV.

  15. Davis Republican

    Actually, it’s not too bad being a republican in Davis, and many would be surprised at how many local issues we might agree on. I think Davis is very unique (and wonderful) in its vocal and involved citizenry…and I enjoy debating, anyway. Besides, I seriously rather be a minority in Davis than a majority in some big-box town where everyone is driving an SUV.

  16. Davis Republican

    Actually, it’s not too bad being a republican in Davis, and many would be surprised at how many local issues we might agree on. I think Davis is very unique (and wonderful) in its vocal and involved citizenry…and I enjoy debating, anyway. Besides, I seriously rather be a minority in Davis than a majority in some big-box town where everyone is driving an SUV.

  17. And yet another Progressive Voter in Davis

    I’m a Progressive and I’m a voter in Davis and I don’t think you should vote for Cabaldon. You should vote for Mariko. I’m not happy with her stance on some land preservation issues, but just drive into West Sac and your decision will be an easy one.

    He can say that residents of West Sacramento want the big box developments, but I’ve spoken with 3 people who live in West Sac and they want a more livable and walkable city as opposed to sprawl.

    I’m voting for Mariko. We can work with her.

  18. And yet another Progressive Vo

    I’m a Progressive and I’m a voter in Davis and I don’t think you should vote for Cabaldon. You should vote for Mariko. I’m not happy with her stance on some land preservation issues, but just drive into West Sac and your decision will be an easy one.

    He can say that residents of West Sacramento want the big box developments, but I’ve spoken with 3 people who live in West Sac and they want a more livable and walkable city as opposed to sprawl.

    I’m voting for Mariko. We can work with her.

  19. And yet another Progressive Vo

    I’m a Progressive and I’m a voter in Davis and I don’t think you should vote for Cabaldon. You should vote for Mariko. I’m not happy with her stance on some land preservation issues, but just drive into West Sac and your decision will be an easy one.

    He can say that residents of West Sacramento want the big box developments, but I’ve spoken with 3 people who live in West Sac and they want a more livable and walkable city as opposed to sprawl.

    I’m voting for Mariko. We can work with her.

  20. And yet another Progressive Vo

    I’m a Progressive and I’m a voter in Davis and I don’t think you should vote for Cabaldon. You should vote for Mariko. I’m not happy with her stance on some land preservation issues, but just drive into West Sac and your decision will be an easy one.

    He can say that residents of West Sacramento want the big box developments, but I’ve spoken with 3 people who live in West Sac and they want a more livable and walkable city as opposed to sprawl.

    I’m voting for Mariko. We can work with her.

  21. davis voter

    Mariko Yamada political “voice” is unnerving to those who have been raised on the polling-generated political campaign rhetoric that politicians like Cabaldon have mastered. This interview reveals a independant-minded candidate who CARES deeply about serving the people of the 8th District.

  22. davis voter

    Mariko Yamada political “voice” is unnerving to those who have been raised on the polling-generated political campaign rhetoric that politicians like Cabaldon have mastered. This interview reveals a independant-minded candidate who CARES deeply about serving the people of the 8th District.

  23. davis voter

    Mariko Yamada political “voice” is unnerving to those who have been raised on the polling-generated political campaign rhetoric that politicians like Cabaldon have mastered. This interview reveals a independant-minded candidate who CARES deeply about serving the people of the 8th District.

  24. davis voter

    Mariko Yamada political “voice” is unnerving to those who have been raised on the polling-generated political campaign rhetoric that politicians like Cabaldon have mastered. This interview reveals a independant-minded candidate who CARES deeply about serving the people of the 8th District.

  25. Anonymous

    So, Mariko thinks that citizens of Davis were “uncivil” when she stabbed them in the back?

    Beware of politicians who accuse others of “uncivility”. Be very wary.

  26. Anonymous

    So, Mariko thinks that citizens of Davis were “uncivil” when she stabbed them in the back?

    Beware of politicians who accuse others of “uncivility”. Be very wary.

  27. Anonymous

    So, Mariko thinks that citizens of Davis were “uncivil” when she stabbed them in the back?

    Beware of politicians who accuse others of “uncivility”. Be very wary.

  28. Anonymous

    So, Mariko thinks that citizens of Davis were “uncivil” when she stabbed them in the back?

    Beware of politicians who accuse others of “uncivility”. Be very wary.

  29. Anonymous

    “As far as what we learned, from sometimes a contentious presentation by some of the citizens of Davis…”
    — Mariko Yamada excerpt

    Sounds like more whining about the incivility of citizens to me.

  30. Anonymous

    “As far as what we learned, from sometimes a contentious presentation by some of the citizens of Davis…”
    — Mariko Yamada excerpt

    Sounds like more whining about the incivility of citizens to me.

  31. Anonymous

    “As far as what we learned, from sometimes a contentious presentation by some of the citizens of Davis…”
    — Mariko Yamada excerpt

    Sounds like more whining about the incivility of citizens to me.

  32. Anonymous

    “As far as what we learned, from sometimes a contentious presentation by some of the citizens of Davis…”
    — Mariko Yamada excerpt

    Sounds like more whining about the incivility of citizens to me.

  33. Anonymous

    ” I think that the County’s position is that we would like to engage the city in a collaborative discussion.”

    A perfectly reasonable suggestion but the fundamental miscalculation was for the BOS to try and FIRST change the County General Plan land use on Davis’ periphery and THEN piously suggest “joint discussions” with Davis. Our Pass-Through agreement called for the reverse with Davis’ approval being a necessary prerequsite BEFORE the county changed the land -use zoning. We are all in debt to Mayor Greenwald for rising to the occasion and publicly challenging
    Supervisor Thomson and Yamada with the possibility of a recall initiative. Supervisor
    Thomson’s recent history makes her the most likely driving force behind this attempt,with Yamada’s support, at intimidation directed against their own constituents.

  34. Anonymous

    ” I think that the County’s position is that we would like to engage the city in a collaborative discussion.”

    A perfectly reasonable suggestion but the fundamental miscalculation was for the BOS to try and FIRST change the County General Plan land use on Davis’ periphery and THEN piously suggest “joint discussions” with Davis. Our Pass-Through agreement called for the reverse with Davis’ approval being a necessary prerequsite BEFORE the county changed the land -use zoning. We are all in debt to Mayor Greenwald for rising to the occasion and publicly challenging
    Supervisor Thomson and Yamada with the possibility of a recall initiative. Supervisor
    Thomson’s recent history makes her the most likely driving force behind this attempt,with Yamada’s support, at intimidation directed against their own constituents.

  35. Anonymous

    ” I think that the County’s position is that we would like to engage the city in a collaborative discussion.”

    A perfectly reasonable suggestion but the fundamental miscalculation was for the BOS to try and FIRST change the County General Plan land use on Davis’ periphery and THEN piously suggest “joint discussions” with Davis. Our Pass-Through agreement called for the reverse with Davis’ approval being a necessary prerequsite BEFORE the county changed the land -use zoning. We are all in debt to Mayor Greenwald for rising to the occasion and publicly challenging
    Supervisor Thomson and Yamada with the possibility of a recall initiative. Supervisor
    Thomson’s recent history makes her the most likely driving force behind this attempt,with Yamada’s support, at intimidation directed against their own constituents.

  36. Anonymous

    ” I think that the County’s position is that we would like to engage the city in a collaborative discussion.”

    A perfectly reasonable suggestion but the fundamental miscalculation was for the BOS to try and FIRST change the County General Plan land use on Davis’ periphery and THEN piously suggest “joint discussions” with Davis. Our Pass-Through agreement called for the reverse with Davis’ approval being a necessary prerequsite BEFORE the county changed the land -use zoning. We are all in debt to Mayor Greenwald for rising to the occasion and publicly challenging
    Supervisor Thomson and Yamada with the possibility of a recall initiative. Supervisor
    Thomson’s recent history makes her the most likely driving force behind this attempt,with Yamada’s support, at intimidation directed against their own constituents.

  37. Anonymous

    “Sounds like more whining about the incivility of citizens to me.”

    To me what she was trying to say is that based on the reaction the citizens of Davis had to the proposal, they needed to have more communication with the public prior to these things being proposed. That does not seem to be a complaint about the incivility but rather a suggestion that using the response as a cue, how can we prevent that anger from being manifested in that way in future dealings. Again, that appears to be a perfectly reasonable response to me.

  38. Anonymous

    “Sounds like more whining about the incivility of citizens to me.”

    To me what she was trying to say is that based on the reaction the citizens of Davis had to the proposal, they needed to have more communication with the public prior to these things being proposed. That does not seem to be a complaint about the incivility but rather a suggestion that using the response as a cue, how can we prevent that anger from being manifested in that way in future dealings. Again, that appears to be a perfectly reasonable response to me.

  39. Anonymous

    “Sounds like more whining about the incivility of citizens to me.”

    To me what she was trying to say is that based on the reaction the citizens of Davis had to the proposal, they needed to have more communication with the public prior to these things being proposed. That does not seem to be a complaint about the incivility but rather a suggestion that using the response as a cue, how can we prevent that anger from being manifested in that way in future dealings. Again, that appears to be a perfectly reasonable response to me.

  40. Anonymous

    “Sounds like more whining about the incivility of citizens to me.”

    To me what she was trying to say is that based on the reaction the citizens of Davis had to the proposal, they needed to have more communication with the public prior to these things being proposed. That does not seem to be a complaint about the incivility but rather a suggestion that using the response as a cue, how can we prevent that anger from being manifested in that way in future dealings. Again, that appears to be a perfectly reasonable response to me.

  41. Richard

    I would advise people to read this interview carefully. Mariko’s empathetic responses are designed to create the impression that she has taken clearly defined positions on issues, when, in fact, she hasn’t. Such a rhetorical style partially explains how people could be so surprised when she embraced the Tsakapolis housing development proposal.

    –Richard Estes

  42. Richard

    I would advise people to read this interview carefully. Mariko’s empathetic responses are designed to create the impression that she has taken clearly defined positions on issues, when, in fact, she hasn’t. Such a rhetorical style partially explains how people could be so surprised when she embraced the Tsakapolis housing development proposal.

    –Richard Estes

  43. Richard

    I would advise people to read this interview carefully. Mariko’s empathetic responses are designed to create the impression that she has taken clearly defined positions on issues, when, in fact, she hasn’t. Such a rhetorical style partially explains how people could be so surprised when she embraced the Tsakapolis housing development proposal.

    –Richard Estes

  44. Richard

    I would advise people to read this interview carefully. Mariko’s empathetic responses are designed to create the impression that she has taken clearly defined positions on issues, when, in fact, she hasn’t. Such a rhetorical style partially explains how people could be so surprised when she embraced the Tsakapolis housing development proposal.

    –Richard Estes

  45. devout davis democrat

    “I think if any one individual or one policy maker had the answer to that question we would have answered the question already. I think what I would want to put forth, as the answer to this question, is that it’s the approach that has to be taken rather than, how am I personally going to do it?”

    This woman is incredibly inarticulate and at times incoherent. That’s not a good sign for someone hoping to go into a legislative body, where she would have to use skills of persuasion to best represent the interests of her potential district. It would be a great shame if she won — she will be miserable in the state assembly. This interview made up my mind for me. I won’t vote for Mariko.

  46. devout davis democrat

    “I think if any one individual or one policy maker had the answer to that question we would have answered the question already. I think what I would want to put forth, as the answer to this question, is that it’s the approach that has to be taken rather than, how am I personally going to do it?”

    This woman is incredibly inarticulate and at times incoherent. That’s not a good sign for someone hoping to go into a legislative body, where she would have to use skills of persuasion to best represent the interests of her potential district. It would be a great shame if she won — she will be miserable in the state assembly. This interview made up my mind for me. I won’t vote for Mariko.

  47. devout davis democrat

    “I think if any one individual or one policy maker had the answer to that question we would have answered the question already. I think what I would want to put forth, as the answer to this question, is that it’s the approach that has to be taken rather than, how am I personally going to do it?”

    This woman is incredibly inarticulate and at times incoherent. That’s not a good sign for someone hoping to go into a legislative body, where she would have to use skills of persuasion to best represent the interests of her potential district. It would be a great shame if she won — she will be miserable in the state assembly. This interview made up my mind for me. I won’t vote for Mariko.

  48. devout davis democrat

    “I think if any one individual or one policy maker had the answer to that question we would have answered the question already. I think what I would want to put forth, as the answer to this question, is that it’s the approach that has to be taken rather than, how am I personally going to do it?”

    This woman is incredibly inarticulate and at times incoherent. That’s not a good sign for someone hoping to go into a legislative body, where she would have to use skills of persuasion to best represent the interests of her potential district. It would be a great shame if she won — she will be miserable in the state assembly. This interview made up my mind for me. I won’t vote for Mariko.

  49. Anonymous

    I seriously would rather be a minority in Davis than a majority in some big-box town where everyone is driving an SUV.

    I love to walk by the elementary schools near my house in the morning. There, I can see lines of large cars and gas-guzzling SUVs, tagged with Save The Earth and Kerry-Edwards bumper stickers, dropping off 10 year olds who live 5 blocks away….

    I’m getting old. In my day, kids actually rode bicycles to school or walked. Up hill. Both ways. They didn’t need mommy to drive them down the street in her 5,000 pound car.

  50. Anonymous

    I seriously would rather be a minority in Davis than a majority in some big-box town where everyone is driving an SUV.

    I love to walk by the elementary schools near my house in the morning. There, I can see lines of large cars and gas-guzzling SUVs, tagged with Save The Earth and Kerry-Edwards bumper stickers, dropping off 10 year olds who live 5 blocks away….

    I’m getting old. In my day, kids actually rode bicycles to school or walked. Up hill. Both ways. They didn’t need mommy to drive them down the street in her 5,000 pound car.

  51. Anonymous

    I seriously would rather be a minority in Davis than a majority in some big-box town where everyone is driving an SUV.

    I love to walk by the elementary schools near my house in the morning. There, I can see lines of large cars and gas-guzzling SUVs, tagged with Save The Earth and Kerry-Edwards bumper stickers, dropping off 10 year olds who live 5 blocks away….

    I’m getting old. In my day, kids actually rode bicycles to school or walked. Up hill. Both ways. They didn’t need mommy to drive them down the street in her 5,000 pound car.

  52. Anonymous

    I seriously would rather be a minority in Davis than a majority in some big-box town where everyone is driving an SUV.

    I love to walk by the elementary schools near my house in the morning. There, I can see lines of large cars and gas-guzzling SUVs, tagged with Save The Earth and Kerry-Edwards bumper stickers, dropping off 10 year olds who live 5 blocks away….

    I’m getting old. In my day, kids actually rode bicycles to school or walked. Up hill. Both ways. They didn’t need mommy to drive them down the street in her 5,000 pound car.

  53. Anonymous

    I didn’t think that the people who showed up at the Supervisor’s meeting were uncivil and I don’t believe that Mariko was saying that they were.

    She said that there was a “contentious presentation” by some citizen’s of Davis. It may have felt that way during the meeting. However, if the people who showed up to talk about nothing else than the value of stem cell research and the need for lab space (this from the Director of the UCD Biotechnology program!) had not come, then I think the presentation wouldn’t have appeared so contentious. I think that valuable time was wasted by these out of county citizen’s who so obviously understood little about the local community and county land planning issues.

    The whole thing was confusing and the Board of Supervisors has to take responsibility for the confusion and concern created in the community.

    Mariko is correct in that there seems to be no other mechanism in place to discuss something like this before it gets to a Board meeting where open discussion is limited and, it has proven to be the case, can be hogtied by other special interests.

  54. Anonymous

    I didn’t think that the people who showed up at the Supervisor’s meeting were uncivil and I don’t believe that Mariko was saying that they were.

    She said that there was a “contentious presentation” by some citizen’s of Davis. It may have felt that way during the meeting. However, if the people who showed up to talk about nothing else than the value of stem cell research and the need for lab space (this from the Director of the UCD Biotechnology program!) had not come, then I think the presentation wouldn’t have appeared so contentious. I think that valuable time was wasted by these out of county citizen’s who so obviously understood little about the local community and county land planning issues.

    The whole thing was confusing and the Board of Supervisors has to take responsibility for the confusion and concern created in the community.

    Mariko is correct in that there seems to be no other mechanism in place to discuss something like this before it gets to a Board meeting where open discussion is limited and, it has proven to be the case, can be hogtied by other special interests.

  55. Anonymous

    I didn’t think that the people who showed up at the Supervisor’s meeting were uncivil and I don’t believe that Mariko was saying that they were.

    She said that there was a “contentious presentation” by some citizen’s of Davis. It may have felt that way during the meeting. However, if the people who showed up to talk about nothing else than the value of stem cell research and the need for lab space (this from the Director of the UCD Biotechnology program!) had not come, then I think the presentation wouldn’t have appeared so contentious. I think that valuable time was wasted by these out of county citizen’s who so obviously understood little about the local community and county land planning issues.

    The whole thing was confusing and the Board of Supervisors has to take responsibility for the confusion and concern created in the community.

    Mariko is correct in that there seems to be no other mechanism in place to discuss something like this before it gets to a Board meeting where open discussion is limited and, it has proven to be the case, can be hogtied by other special interests.

  56. Anonymous

    I didn’t think that the people who showed up at the Supervisor’s meeting were uncivil and I don’t believe that Mariko was saying that they were.

    She said that there was a “contentious presentation” by some citizen’s of Davis. It may have felt that way during the meeting. However, if the people who showed up to talk about nothing else than the value of stem cell research and the need for lab space (this from the Director of the UCD Biotechnology program!) had not come, then I think the presentation wouldn’t have appeared so contentious. I think that valuable time was wasted by these out of county citizen’s who so obviously understood little about the local community and county land planning issues.

    The whole thing was confusing and the Board of Supervisors has to take responsibility for the confusion and concern created in the community.

    Mariko is correct in that there seems to be no other mechanism in place to discuss something like this before it gets to a Board meeting where open discussion is limited and, it has proven to be the case, can be hogtied by other special interests.

  57. Painful Reading

    I’m glad that Mariko’s #1 legislative priority and top campaign platform if she gets elected to the Assembly is In Home Supportive Services. Who cares about education, flooding issues, land use issues, or the environment? They can go second. Skip these nonsense issues and go straight to the meat of priorities.

    Being a very staunch-but-not-really, non-vocal opponent of Target in Davis is an interesting answer.

    And what did she mean when she said, “I think first we had sixteen years of Republican rule followed by two short of a Democratic control of the Legislature and the state house.”

    If she loses politicos like those who read this blog with…”normal-alternative” (putting it nicely) answers, how can she connect with Blue-Collar-Joe in Rio Vista or Vacaville? And that’s without specific policy explanations on how to fund the education overhaul of social workers in every classroom.

  58. Painful Reading

    I’m glad that Mariko’s #1 legislative priority and top campaign platform if she gets elected to the Assembly is In Home Supportive Services. Who cares about education, flooding issues, land use issues, or the environment? They can go second. Skip these nonsense issues and go straight to the meat of priorities.

    Being a very staunch-but-not-really, non-vocal opponent of Target in Davis is an interesting answer.

    And what did she mean when she said, “I think first we had sixteen years of Republican rule followed by two short of a Democratic control of the Legislature and the state house.”

    If she loses politicos like those who read this blog with…”normal-alternative” (putting it nicely) answers, how can she connect with Blue-Collar-Joe in Rio Vista or Vacaville? And that’s without specific policy explanations on how to fund the education overhaul of social workers in every classroom.

  59. Painful Reading

    I’m glad that Mariko’s #1 legislative priority and top campaign platform if she gets elected to the Assembly is In Home Supportive Services. Who cares about education, flooding issues, land use issues, or the environment? They can go second. Skip these nonsense issues and go straight to the meat of priorities.

    Being a very staunch-but-not-really, non-vocal opponent of Target in Davis is an interesting answer.

    And what did she mean when she said, “I think first we had sixteen years of Republican rule followed by two short of a Democratic control of the Legislature and the state house.”

    If she loses politicos like those who read this blog with…”normal-alternative” (putting it nicely) answers, how can she connect with Blue-Collar-Joe in Rio Vista or Vacaville? And that’s without specific policy explanations on how to fund the education overhaul of social workers in every classroom.

  60. Painful Reading

    I’m glad that Mariko’s #1 legislative priority and top campaign platform if she gets elected to the Assembly is In Home Supportive Services. Who cares about education, flooding issues, land use issues, or the environment? They can go second. Skip these nonsense issues and go straight to the meat of priorities.

    Being a very staunch-but-not-really, non-vocal opponent of Target in Davis is an interesting answer.

    And what did she mean when she said, “I think first we had sixteen years of Republican rule followed by two short of a Democratic control of the Legislature and the state house.”

    If she loses politicos like those who read this blog with…”normal-alternative” (putting it nicely) answers, how can she connect with Blue-Collar-Joe in Rio Vista or Vacaville? And that’s without specific policy explanations on how to fund the education overhaul of social workers in every classroom.

  61. concernedaboutyolo

    I think Ms. Yamada should get a little bit more experience and accomplishments to tout before she runs for the State Legislature. She just won her only election just 3 years ago so she should get a little bit more time before she makes the jump to Assembly. With interview answers and regular conversations like this, she needs to work on communicating her priorities a little bit better. I’m not going to slam Ms. Yamada for some of her answers, but you have to admit that no voters were really won over after this interview.

  62. concernedaboutyolo

    I think Ms. Yamada should get a little bit more experience and accomplishments to tout before she runs for the State Legislature. She just won her only election just 3 years ago so she should get a little bit more time before she makes the jump to Assembly. With interview answers and regular conversations like this, she needs to work on communicating her priorities a little bit better. I’m not going to slam Ms. Yamada for some of her answers, but you have to admit that no voters were really won over after this interview.

  63. concernedaboutyolo

    I think Ms. Yamada should get a little bit more experience and accomplishments to tout before she runs for the State Legislature. She just won her only election just 3 years ago so she should get a little bit more time before she makes the jump to Assembly. With interview answers and regular conversations like this, she needs to work on communicating her priorities a little bit better. I’m not going to slam Ms. Yamada for some of her answers, but you have to admit that no voters were really won over after this interview.

  64. concernedaboutyolo

    I think Ms. Yamada should get a little bit more experience and accomplishments to tout before she runs for the State Legislature. She just won her only election just 3 years ago so she should get a little bit more time before she makes the jump to Assembly. With interview answers and regular conversations like this, she needs to work on communicating her priorities a little bit better. I’m not going to slam Ms. Yamada for some of her answers, but you have to admit that no voters were really won over after this interview.

  65. Anonymous

    As you will remember Sue Greenwald said she wanted the recall because she was tired of council and wanted a shot at the supervisor’s seat. Then when it did not reflect well on her she was saying that she had nothing to do with it. Now you want us to give her credit for the decision that the Board of Supvs made?

    Please take your request elsewhere. We’re too smart to fall for that one. She spoke at the BOS meeting as did many others. I will not give her sole credit or credit more than others.

    If anyone should be thanked it is The Vanguard for doing a live blog and keeping us all tuned in to what was taking place. Thanks David. The Vanguard and many others together made the difference.

    Open Space Supporter

  66. Anonymous

    As you will remember Sue Greenwald said she wanted the recall because she was tired of council and wanted a shot at the supervisor’s seat. Then when it did not reflect well on her she was saying that she had nothing to do with it. Now you want us to give her credit for the decision that the Board of Supvs made?

    Please take your request elsewhere. We’re too smart to fall for that one. She spoke at the BOS meeting as did many others. I will not give her sole credit or credit more than others.

    If anyone should be thanked it is The Vanguard for doing a live blog and keeping us all tuned in to what was taking place. Thanks David. The Vanguard and many others together made the difference.

    Open Space Supporter

  67. Anonymous

    As you will remember Sue Greenwald said she wanted the recall because she was tired of council and wanted a shot at the supervisor’s seat. Then when it did not reflect well on her she was saying that she had nothing to do with it. Now you want us to give her credit for the decision that the Board of Supvs made?

    Please take your request elsewhere. We’re too smart to fall for that one. She spoke at the BOS meeting as did many others. I will not give her sole credit or credit more than others.

    If anyone should be thanked it is The Vanguard for doing a live blog and keeping us all tuned in to what was taking place. Thanks David. The Vanguard and many others together made the difference.

    Open Space Supporter

  68. Anonymous

    As you will remember Sue Greenwald said she wanted the recall because she was tired of council and wanted a shot at the supervisor’s seat. Then when it did not reflect well on her she was saying that she had nothing to do with it. Now you want us to give her credit for the decision that the Board of Supvs made?

    Please take your request elsewhere. We’re too smart to fall for that one. She spoke at the BOS meeting as did many others. I will not give her sole credit or credit more than others.

    If anyone should be thanked it is The Vanguard for doing a live blog and keeping us all tuned in to what was taking place. Thanks David. The Vanguard and many others together made the difference.

    Open Space Supporter

  69. Sue Greenwald

    Wow, am I glad I checked this site.

    Sue Greenwald said no such thing. If
    people want to attribute statements to me without citation, they should at least identify themselves by name.

  70. Sue Greenwald

    Wow, am I glad I checked this site.

    Sue Greenwald said no such thing. If
    people want to attribute statements to me without citation, they should at least identify themselves by name.

  71. Sue Greenwald

    Wow, am I glad I checked this site.

    Sue Greenwald said no such thing. If
    people want to attribute statements to me without citation, they should at least identify themselves by name.

  72. Sue Greenwald

    Wow, am I glad I checked this site.

    Sue Greenwald said no such thing. If
    people want to attribute statements to me without citation, they should at least identify themselves by name.

  73. Sue Greenwald

    Wow, am I glad I checked this site.

    Sue Greenwald said no such thing. If
    people want to attribute statements to me without citation, they should at least identify themselves by name.

  74. Sue Greenwald

    Wow, am I glad I checked this site.

    Sue Greenwald said no such thing. If
    people want to attribute statements to me without citation, they should at least identify themselves by name.

  75. Sue Greenwald

    Wow, am I glad I checked this site.

    Sue Greenwald said no such thing. If
    people want to attribute statements to me without citation, they should at least identify themselves by name.

  76. Sue Greenwald

    Wow, am I glad I checked this site.

    Sue Greenwald said no such thing. If
    people want to attribute statements to me without citation, they should at least identify themselves by name.

  77. No on Xer

    Hummm…..Helen Thomson is a loyal Yolo-machine politician with a recent history of attempting to terrorize her own constituents with the Thomson letter during the Measure X(Covell Village)campaign.
    Yamada foolishly joins with
    Thomson(whose idea?) and grabs onto the 3rd-rail of Davis politics, our Pass-Through Agreement. Thomson had already announced that she will not be running for elected office again while Yamada, who is challenging Thomson’s Yolo-machine candidate, Cabaldon , is politically “electrocuted” …Hummmmm!

  78. No on Xer

    Hummm…..Helen Thomson is a loyal Yolo-machine politician with a recent history of attempting to terrorize her own constituents with the Thomson letter during the Measure X(Covell Village)campaign.
    Yamada foolishly joins with
    Thomson(whose idea?) and grabs onto the 3rd-rail of Davis politics, our Pass-Through Agreement. Thomson had already announced that she will not be running for elected office again while Yamada, who is challenging Thomson’s Yolo-machine candidate, Cabaldon , is politically “electrocuted” …Hummmmm!

  79. No on Xer

    Hummm…..Helen Thomson is a loyal Yolo-machine politician with a recent history of attempting to terrorize her own constituents with the Thomson letter during the Measure X(Covell Village)campaign.
    Yamada foolishly joins with
    Thomson(whose idea?) and grabs onto the 3rd-rail of Davis politics, our Pass-Through Agreement. Thomson had already announced that she will not be running for elected office again while Yamada, who is challenging Thomson’s Yolo-machine candidate, Cabaldon , is politically “electrocuted” …Hummmmm!

  80. No on Xer

    Hummm…..Helen Thomson is a loyal Yolo-machine politician with a recent history of attempting to terrorize her own constituents with the Thomson letter during the Measure X(Covell Village)campaign.
    Yamada foolishly joins with
    Thomson(whose idea?) and grabs onto the 3rd-rail of Davis politics, our Pass-Through Agreement. Thomson had already announced that she will not be running for elected office again while Yamada, who is challenging Thomson’s Yolo-machine candidate, Cabaldon , is politically “electrocuted” …Hummmmm!

  81. Sour Grapes

    Now Sue Greenwald speaks in the third person……

    Many people heard you say it Sue, some of them you told on the phone. Just remember that…….

  82. Sour Grapes

    Now Sue Greenwald speaks in the third person……

    Many people heard you say it Sue, some of them you told on the phone. Just remember that…….

  83. Sour Grapes

    Now Sue Greenwald speaks in the third person……

    Many people heard you say it Sue, some of them you told on the phone. Just remember that…….

  84. Sour Grapes

    Now Sue Greenwald speaks in the third person……

    Many people heard you say it Sue, some of them you told on the phone. Just remember that…….

  85. Anonymous

    Mayor Greenwald and Kopper had the political cajones to stand up and publically announce that they would launch a recall campaign unless
    Thomson and Yamada “reconsidered” their positions concerning the
    County changing land-use designations on Davis periphery in violation of our Pass-Through agreement. Greenwald and Kopper stood up and defended Davis while others dithered or offered politically useful(reelection campaign-wise) but “limp” responses.

  86. Anonymous

    Mayor Greenwald and Kopper had the political cajones to stand up and publically announce that they would launch a recall campaign unless
    Thomson and Yamada “reconsidered” their positions concerning the
    County changing land-use designations on Davis periphery in violation of our Pass-Through agreement. Greenwald and Kopper stood up and defended Davis while others dithered or offered politically useful(reelection campaign-wise) but “limp” responses.

  87. Anonymous

    Mayor Greenwald and Kopper had the political cajones to stand up and publically announce that they would launch a recall campaign unless
    Thomson and Yamada “reconsidered” their positions concerning the
    County changing land-use designations on Davis periphery in violation of our Pass-Through agreement. Greenwald and Kopper stood up and defended Davis while others dithered or offered politically useful(reelection campaign-wise) but “limp” responses.

  88. Anonymous

    Mayor Greenwald and Kopper had the political cajones to stand up and publically announce that they would launch a recall campaign unless
    Thomson and Yamada “reconsidered” their positions concerning the
    County changing land-use designations on Davis periphery in violation of our Pass-Through agreement. Greenwald and Kopper stood up and defended Davis while others dithered or offered politically useful(reelection campaign-wise) but “limp” responses.

  89. Sue Greenwald

    Okay.
    I will repeati n the first person.

    I said no such thing.

    If anonymous people persist in attributing bizarre and untruthful statements to others, and if they don’t have the courage to come forth and identify themselves, the blog will lose effectiveness as a community forum.

  90. Sue Greenwald

    Okay.
    I will repeati n the first person.

    I said no such thing.

    If anonymous people persist in attributing bizarre and untruthful statements to others, and if they don’t have the courage to come forth and identify themselves, the blog will lose effectiveness as a community forum.

  91. Sue Greenwald

    Okay.
    I will repeati n the first person.

    I said no such thing.

    If anonymous people persist in attributing bizarre and untruthful statements to others, and if they don’t have the courage to come forth and identify themselves, the blog will lose effectiveness as a community forum.

  92. Sue Greenwald

    Okay.
    I will repeati n the first person.

    I said no such thing.

    If anonymous people persist in attributing bizarre and untruthful statements to others, and if they don’t have the courage to come forth and identify themselves, the blog will lose effectiveness as a community forum.

  93. Cassanova

    At some point there needs to be an acknowledgement that Sue Greenwald and Bill Kopper were making calls through out the community suggesting that individuals support a recall and suggested that Sue Greenwald was tired of being on the City Council, would like to make a living and put money away, and could run against Helen Thomson if Thomson were recalled. Now Sue apparently wants to re-write history. And takes umbrage at the fact that I do not have to reveal my name… ha ha. You should have been more careful who you told those things to. Some people who you think are your friends, really aren’t.

  94. Cassanova

    At some point there needs to be an acknowledgement that Sue Greenwald and Bill Kopper were making calls through out the community suggesting that individuals support a recall and suggested that Sue Greenwald was tired of being on the City Council, would like to make a living and put money away, and could run against Helen Thomson if Thomson were recalled. Now Sue apparently wants to re-write history. And takes umbrage at the fact that I do not have to reveal my name… ha ha. You should have been more careful who you told those things to. Some people who you think are your friends, really aren’t.

  95. Cassanova

    At some point there needs to be an acknowledgement that Sue Greenwald and Bill Kopper were making calls through out the community suggesting that individuals support a recall and suggested that Sue Greenwald was tired of being on the City Council, would like to make a living and put money away, and could run against Helen Thomson if Thomson were recalled. Now Sue apparently wants to re-write history. And takes umbrage at the fact that I do not have to reveal my name… ha ha. You should have been more careful who you told those things to. Some people who you think are your friends, really aren’t.

  96. Cassanova

    At some point there needs to be an acknowledgement that Sue Greenwald and Bill Kopper were making calls through out the community suggesting that individuals support a recall and suggested that Sue Greenwald was tired of being on the City Council, would like to make a living and put money away, and could run against Helen Thomson if Thomson were recalled. Now Sue apparently wants to re-write history. And takes umbrage at the fact that I do not have to reveal my name… ha ha. You should have been more careful who you told those things to. Some people who you think are your friends, really aren’t.

  97. Sue Greenwald

    I have just finished my electronic work for the afternoon and have to run off to a meeting.

    But first, I actually welcome the opportunity that the anonymous poster has afforded me to mention that I have, over the last few months, discussed with many people my possible interest running for county supervisor someday. The best way to assure that the county won’t grow on our borders is to have candidates who believe that urban growth decisions should be left in the hands of our cities.

    Yes, it is a bit of a sacrifice to work for about $500 a month at a 60 hour a week job, and I did not make the decision to offer to run for re-election to the city council for another 4 year term lightly. However, right now there are just too many city projects that I want to follow through with.

    Were I to run for supervisor someday, I would far, far, prefer to do it during a regular election cycle.

  98. Sue Greenwald

    I have just finished my electronic work for the afternoon and have to run off to a meeting.

    But first, I actually welcome the opportunity that the anonymous poster has afforded me to mention that I have, over the last few months, discussed with many people my possible interest running for county supervisor someday. The best way to assure that the county won’t grow on our borders is to have candidates who believe that urban growth decisions should be left in the hands of our cities.

    Yes, it is a bit of a sacrifice to work for about $500 a month at a 60 hour a week job, and I did not make the decision to offer to run for re-election to the city council for another 4 year term lightly. However, right now there are just too many city projects that I want to follow through with.

    Were I to run for supervisor someday, I would far, far, prefer to do it during a regular election cycle.

  99. Sue Greenwald

    I have just finished my electronic work for the afternoon and have to run off to a meeting.

    But first, I actually welcome the opportunity that the anonymous poster has afforded me to mention that I have, over the last few months, discussed with many people my possible interest running for county supervisor someday. The best way to assure that the county won’t grow on our borders is to have candidates who believe that urban growth decisions should be left in the hands of our cities.

    Yes, it is a bit of a sacrifice to work for about $500 a month at a 60 hour a week job, and I did not make the decision to offer to run for re-election to the city council for another 4 year term lightly. However, right now there are just too many city projects that I want to follow through with.

    Were I to run for supervisor someday, I would far, far, prefer to do it during a regular election cycle.

  100. Sue Greenwald

    I have just finished my electronic work for the afternoon and have to run off to a meeting.

    But first, I actually welcome the opportunity that the anonymous poster has afforded me to mention that I have, over the last few months, discussed with many people my possible interest running for county supervisor someday. The best way to assure that the county won’t grow on our borders is to have candidates who believe that urban growth decisions should be left in the hands of our cities.

    Yes, it is a bit of a sacrifice to work for about $500 a month at a 60 hour a week job, and I did not make the decision to offer to run for re-election to the city council for another 4 year term lightly. However, right now there are just too many city projects that I want to follow through with.

    Were I to run for supervisor someday, I would far, far, prefer to do it during a regular election cycle.

  101. mariko....no....

    Mariko’s incoherence is obvious if you just look at her running a Board of Supervisor’s meeting. She is so singularly focused on Social Services, she has little interest or real understanding of environmental, land use, and transportation issues. They are all inter-related, and she can’t just pick one issue over another. Plus, she’s been actually miffed that constituents contact her and refers to it as being ‘bullied’. She drives those around her nuts, and has little vision for the future, let alone any solutions. You can tell from the interview she has little understanding or position on these things.

  102. mariko....no....

    Mariko’s incoherence is obvious if you just look at her running a Board of Supervisor’s meeting. She is so singularly focused on Social Services, she has little interest or real understanding of environmental, land use, and transportation issues. They are all inter-related, and she can’t just pick one issue over another. Plus, she’s been actually miffed that constituents contact her and refers to it as being ‘bullied’. She drives those around her nuts, and has little vision for the future, let alone any solutions. You can tell from the interview she has little understanding or position on these things.

  103. mariko....no....

    Mariko’s incoherence is obvious if you just look at her running a Board of Supervisor’s meeting. She is so singularly focused on Social Services, she has little interest or real understanding of environmental, land use, and transportation issues. They are all inter-related, and she can’t just pick one issue over another. Plus, she’s been actually miffed that constituents contact her and refers to it as being ‘bullied’. She drives those around her nuts, and has little vision for the future, let alone any solutions. You can tell from the interview she has little understanding or position on these things.

  104. mariko....no....

    Mariko’s incoherence is obvious if you just look at her running a Board of Supervisor’s meeting. She is so singularly focused on Social Services, she has little interest or real understanding of environmental, land use, and transportation issues. They are all inter-related, and she can’t just pick one issue over another. Plus, she’s been actually miffed that constituents contact her and refers to it as being ‘bullied’. She drives those around her nuts, and has little vision for the future, let alone any solutions. You can tell from the interview she has little understanding or position on these things.

  105. Anonymous

    I was always sort of blah about Yamada but I’m definitely voting for Cabaldon after this. Blaming the war in Iraq for gridlock on I80? There’s a difference between not articulating yourself well and being a wingnut.

  106. Anonymous

    I was always sort of blah about Yamada but I’m definitely voting for Cabaldon after this. Blaming the war in Iraq for gridlock on I80? There’s a difference between not articulating yourself well and being a wingnut.

  107. Anonymous

    I was always sort of blah about Yamada but I’m definitely voting for Cabaldon after this. Blaming the war in Iraq for gridlock on I80? There’s a difference between not articulating yourself well and being a wingnut.

  108. Anonymous

    I was always sort of blah about Yamada but I’m definitely voting for Cabaldon after this. Blaming the war in Iraq for gridlock on I80? There’s a difference between not articulating yourself well and being a wingnut.

  109. Vincente

    I have to say there are some realistic reasons to support or oppose Mariko on the basis of what she says above, but the post by anonymous 6:20 is absurd.

    It totally misconstrued what she said. What she said is that if we had invested the amount of money that we have spent in Iraq, instead in our infrastructure and I assume other things, we would have a better handle on our problems.

    Who can argue with that? Does recognizing that make one a wing nut? I think not.

    It’s funny that the very party that cries poverty repeatedly suddenly has plenty of money when it comes to doing the things they want to do.

  110. Vincente

    I have to say there are some realistic reasons to support or oppose Mariko on the basis of what she says above, but the post by anonymous 6:20 is absurd.

    It totally misconstrued what she said. What she said is that if we had invested the amount of money that we have spent in Iraq, instead in our infrastructure and I assume other things, we would have a better handle on our problems.

    Who can argue with that? Does recognizing that make one a wing nut? I think not.

    It’s funny that the very party that cries poverty repeatedly suddenly has plenty of money when it comes to doing the things they want to do.

  111. Vincente

    I have to say there are some realistic reasons to support or oppose Mariko on the basis of what she says above, but the post by anonymous 6:20 is absurd.

    It totally misconstrued what she said. What she said is that if we had invested the amount of money that we have spent in Iraq, instead in our infrastructure and I assume other things, we would have a better handle on our problems.

    Who can argue with that? Does recognizing that make one a wing nut? I think not.

    It’s funny that the very party that cries poverty repeatedly suddenly has plenty of money when it comes to doing the things they want to do.

  112. Vincente

    I have to say there are some realistic reasons to support or oppose Mariko on the basis of what she says above, but the post by anonymous 6:20 is absurd.

    It totally misconstrued what she said. What she said is that if we had invested the amount of money that we have spent in Iraq, instead in our infrastructure and I assume other things, we would have a better handle on our problems.

    Who can argue with that? Does recognizing that make one a wing nut? I think not.

    It’s funny that the very party that cries poverty repeatedly suddenly has plenty of money when it comes to doing the things they want to do.

  113. davisite

    “Some people who you think are your friends, really aren’t.”

    Cassanova… this kind of stuff is SO TIRESOME! It is just this kind of petty personal feuding that have kept the Davis progressive voters more often than not in the minority on the Council. Grow up! …… give Mayor Greenwald amd Bill Kopper their due.
    They were right on this one and deserve our thanks.

  114. davisite

    “Some people who you think are your friends, really aren’t.”

    Cassanova… this kind of stuff is SO TIRESOME! It is just this kind of petty personal feuding that have kept the Davis progressive voters more often than not in the minority on the Council. Grow up! …… give Mayor Greenwald amd Bill Kopper their due.
    They were right on this one and deserve our thanks.

  115. davisite

    “Some people who you think are your friends, really aren’t.”

    Cassanova… this kind of stuff is SO TIRESOME! It is just this kind of petty personal feuding that have kept the Davis progressive voters more often than not in the minority on the Council. Grow up! …… give Mayor Greenwald amd Bill Kopper their due.
    They were right on this one and deserve our thanks.

  116. davisite

    “Some people who you think are your friends, really aren’t.”

    Cassanova… this kind of stuff is SO TIRESOME! It is just this kind of petty personal feuding that have kept the Davis progressive voters more often than not in the minority on the Council. Grow up! …… give Mayor Greenwald amd Bill Kopper their due.
    They were right on this one and deserve our thanks.

  117. Anonymous

    “I love to walk by the elementary schools near my house in the morning. There, I can see lines of large cars and gas-guzzling SUVs, tagged with Save The Earth and Kerry-Edwards bumper stickers, dropping off 10 year olds who live 5 blocks away….

    I’m getting old. In my day, kids actually rode bicycles to school or walked. Up hill. Both ways. They didn’t need mommy to drive them down the street in her 5,000 pound car.”

    I also love walking by and noting the irony of the gridlocked SUV’s plastered with PC bumper stickers belching pollutants as they idle in front of various Davis schools…
    Perhaps this is stating the way-to-obvious:
    Why doesn’t the Davis School District use any school buses?

  118. Anonymous

    “I love to walk by the elementary schools near my house in the morning. There, I can see lines of large cars and gas-guzzling SUVs, tagged with Save The Earth and Kerry-Edwards bumper stickers, dropping off 10 year olds who live 5 blocks away….

    I’m getting old. In my day, kids actually rode bicycles to school or walked. Up hill. Both ways. They didn’t need mommy to drive them down the street in her 5,000 pound car.”

    I also love walking by and noting the irony of the gridlocked SUV’s plastered with PC bumper stickers belching pollutants as they idle in front of various Davis schools…
    Perhaps this is stating the way-to-obvious:
    Why doesn’t the Davis School District use any school buses?

  119. Anonymous

    “I love to walk by the elementary schools near my house in the morning. There, I can see lines of large cars and gas-guzzling SUVs, tagged with Save The Earth and Kerry-Edwards bumper stickers, dropping off 10 year olds who live 5 blocks away….

    I’m getting old. In my day, kids actually rode bicycles to school or walked. Up hill. Both ways. They didn’t need mommy to drive them down the street in her 5,000 pound car.”

    I also love walking by and noting the irony of the gridlocked SUV’s plastered with PC bumper stickers belching pollutants as they idle in front of various Davis schools…
    Perhaps this is stating the way-to-obvious:
    Why doesn’t the Davis School District use any school buses?

  120. Anonymous

    “I love to walk by the elementary schools near my house in the morning. There, I can see lines of large cars and gas-guzzling SUVs, tagged with Save The Earth and Kerry-Edwards bumper stickers, dropping off 10 year olds who live 5 blocks away….

    I’m getting old. In my day, kids actually rode bicycles to school or walked. Up hill. Both ways. They didn’t need mommy to drive them down the street in her 5,000 pound car.”

    I also love walking by and noting the irony of the gridlocked SUV’s plastered with PC bumper stickers belching pollutants as they idle in front of various Davis schools…
    Perhaps this is stating the way-to-obvious:
    Why doesn’t the Davis School District use any school buses?

  121. Rich Rifkin

    “Why doesn’t the Davis School District use any school buses?”

    Why don’t kids just walk or bike to school? Is it so horrible for kids to get some exercise?

    For children under 10 years old, they could be organized into groups of 5-7 walkers, led by a couple of parents. For any child 10 and up, save those who live way out of town, I don’t understand why they don’t just bike to school.

    If half the kids who are now riding in cars walked or biked to school, we could substantially lower our carbon emissions in Davis. If all of them did, we could wipe out childhood obesity, end world hunger, cure cancer and solve the debt crisis.

  122. Rich Rifkin

    “Why doesn’t the Davis School District use any school buses?”

    Why don’t kids just walk or bike to school? Is it so horrible for kids to get some exercise?

    For children under 10 years old, they could be organized into groups of 5-7 walkers, led by a couple of parents. For any child 10 and up, save those who live way out of town, I don’t understand why they don’t just bike to school.

    If half the kids who are now riding in cars walked or biked to school, we could substantially lower our carbon emissions in Davis. If all of them did, we could wipe out childhood obesity, end world hunger, cure cancer and solve the debt crisis.

  123. Rich Rifkin

    “Why doesn’t the Davis School District use any school buses?”

    Why don’t kids just walk or bike to school? Is it so horrible for kids to get some exercise?

    For children under 10 years old, they could be organized into groups of 5-7 walkers, led by a couple of parents. For any child 10 and up, save those who live way out of town, I don’t understand why they don’t just bike to school.

    If half the kids who are now riding in cars walked or biked to school, we could substantially lower our carbon emissions in Davis. If all of them did, we could wipe out childhood obesity, end world hunger, cure cancer and solve the debt crisis.

  124. Rich Rifkin

    “Why doesn’t the Davis School District use any school buses?”

    Why don’t kids just walk or bike to school? Is it so horrible for kids to get some exercise?

    For children under 10 years old, they could be organized into groups of 5-7 walkers, led by a couple of parents. For any child 10 and up, save those who live way out of town, I don’t understand why they don’t just bike to school.

    If half the kids who are now riding in cars walked or biked to school, we could substantially lower our carbon emissions in Davis. If all of them did, we could wipe out childhood obesity, end world hunger, cure cancer and solve the debt crisis.

  125. Anonymous

    I’m sure the republicans in Davis and the nimby progressives do have a lot in common; xenophobia and wealth just to mention two. Hey where were the progressives on the Sodexo workers? If its not about your home its not about anything the progressives care about.

  126. Anonymous

    I’m sure the republicans in Davis and the nimby progressives do have a lot in common; xenophobia and wealth just to mention two. Hey where were the progressives on the Sodexo workers? If its not about your home its not about anything the progressives care about.

  127. Anonymous

    I’m sure the republicans in Davis and the nimby progressives do have a lot in common; xenophobia and wealth just to mention two. Hey where were the progressives on the Sodexo workers? If its not about your home its not about anything the progressives care about.

  128. Anonymous

    I’m sure the republicans in Davis and the nimby progressives do have a lot in common; xenophobia and wealth just to mention two. Hey where were the progressives on the Sodexo workers? If its not about your home its not about anything the progressives care about.

  129. Not impressed with Sue

    Sue – You can’t have it both ways. First, you state that you did not say it. Scroll down and see below. Then you come back later to say, “thank you for the opportunity…” As if that is not enough. Then, Davisite panders to you too.

    Davisite, why should we thank Sue when she claims to not have supported the recall? Please don’t enable her.

    Kopper clearly asked for the recall and she supported it in private conversations with people but not out in the open. Now that she’s been outed she’s trying to backtrack and tossing out threats to the Vanguard.

    This blog is very effective Sue. Your threats are not going to change that.

    When people get the truth confused they usually lose track of what they said to whom. It’s much easier to simply tell the truth at the beginning.

    A lot of people spoke on the issue and put pressure on the BOS. It’s that simple.

    Sue Greenwald said…

    Wow, am I glad I checked this site.

    Sue Greenwald said no such thing. If
    people want to attribute statements to me without citation, they should at least identify themselves by name.

    10/4/07 3:01 PM

  130. Not impressed with Sue

    Sue – You can’t have it both ways. First, you state that you did not say it. Scroll down and see below. Then you come back later to say, “thank you for the opportunity…” As if that is not enough. Then, Davisite panders to you too.

    Davisite, why should we thank Sue when she claims to not have supported the recall? Please don’t enable her.

    Kopper clearly asked for the recall and she supported it in private conversations with people but not out in the open. Now that she’s been outed she’s trying to backtrack and tossing out threats to the Vanguard.

    This blog is very effective Sue. Your threats are not going to change that.

    When people get the truth confused they usually lose track of what they said to whom. It’s much easier to simply tell the truth at the beginning.

    A lot of people spoke on the issue and put pressure on the BOS. It’s that simple.

    Sue Greenwald said…

    Wow, am I glad I checked this site.

    Sue Greenwald said no such thing. If
    people want to attribute statements to me without citation, they should at least identify themselves by name.

    10/4/07 3:01 PM

  131. Not impressed with Sue

    Sue – You can’t have it both ways. First, you state that you did not say it. Scroll down and see below. Then you come back later to say, “thank you for the opportunity…” As if that is not enough. Then, Davisite panders to you too.

    Davisite, why should we thank Sue when she claims to not have supported the recall? Please don’t enable her.

    Kopper clearly asked for the recall and she supported it in private conversations with people but not out in the open. Now that she’s been outed she’s trying to backtrack and tossing out threats to the Vanguard.

    This blog is very effective Sue. Your threats are not going to change that.

    When people get the truth confused they usually lose track of what they said to whom. It’s much easier to simply tell the truth at the beginning.

    A lot of people spoke on the issue and put pressure on the BOS. It’s that simple.

    Sue Greenwald said…

    Wow, am I glad I checked this site.

    Sue Greenwald said no such thing. If
    people want to attribute statements to me without citation, they should at least identify themselves by name.

    10/4/07 3:01 PM

  132. Not impressed with Sue

    Sue – You can’t have it both ways. First, you state that you did not say it. Scroll down and see below. Then you come back later to say, “thank you for the opportunity…” As if that is not enough. Then, Davisite panders to you too.

    Davisite, why should we thank Sue when she claims to not have supported the recall? Please don’t enable her.

    Kopper clearly asked for the recall and she supported it in private conversations with people but not out in the open. Now that she’s been outed she’s trying to backtrack and tossing out threats to the Vanguard.

    This blog is very effective Sue. Your threats are not going to change that.

    When people get the truth confused they usually lose track of what they said to whom. It’s much easier to simply tell the truth at the beginning.

    A lot of people spoke on the issue and put pressure on the BOS. It’s that simple.

    Sue Greenwald said…

    Wow, am I glad I checked this site.

    Sue Greenwald said no such thing. If
    people want to attribute statements to me without citation, they should at least identify themselves by name.

    10/4/07 3:01 PM

  133. Betty Blogger

    Sad to say that there are too many perverts around and children cannot walk, run and play freely the way most adults did when they were young.

    Just think about how many times we’ve read stories about the “anonymous flasher” who flashes himself at women and children. I don’t believe it’s the same person, which makes it a bit frightening for parents and children.

    Back to the issue at hand on the blog today. I think that Mariko did a fine job and she’ll make a good member of the Legislature. She has my vote.

  134. Betty Blogger

    Sad to say that there are too many perverts around and children cannot walk, run and play freely the way most adults did when they were young.

    Just think about how many times we’ve read stories about the “anonymous flasher” who flashes himself at women and children. I don’t believe it’s the same person, which makes it a bit frightening for parents and children.

    Back to the issue at hand on the blog today. I think that Mariko did a fine job and she’ll make a good member of the Legislature. She has my vote.

  135. Betty Blogger

    Sad to say that there are too many perverts around and children cannot walk, run and play freely the way most adults did when they were young.

    Just think about how many times we’ve read stories about the “anonymous flasher” who flashes himself at women and children. I don’t believe it’s the same person, which makes it a bit frightening for parents and children.

    Back to the issue at hand on the blog today. I think that Mariko did a fine job and she’ll make a good member of the Legislature. She has my vote.

  136. Betty Blogger

    Sad to say that there are too many perverts around and children cannot walk, run and play freely the way most adults did when they were young.

    Just think about how many times we’ve read stories about the “anonymous flasher” who flashes himself at women and children. I don’t believe it’s the same person, which makes it a bit frightening for parents and children.

    Back to the issue at hand on the blog today. I think that Mariko did a fine job and she’ll make a good member of the Legislature. She has my vote.

  137. Davis Home Owner

    Home Sales Hit New Low FOX News – Sales of existing homes slump in August at slowest pace in more than 5 years

    Mayor Pro Tem Greenwald or Mayor Pro
    Tem Saylor in 2008?

    Your choice WILL be important in these times.

  138. Davis Home Owner

    Home Sales Hit New Low FOX News – Sales of existing homes slump in August at slowest pace in more than 5 years

    Mayor Pro Tem Greenwald or Mayor Pro
    Tem Saylor in 2008?

    Your choice WILL be important in these times.

  139. Davis Home Owner

    Home Sales Hit New Low FOX News – Sales of existing homes slump in August at slowest pace in more than 5 years

    Mayor Pro Tem Greenwald or Mayor Pro
    Tem Saylor in 2008?

    Your choice WILL be important in these times.

  140. Davis Home Owner

    Home Sales Hit New Low FOX News – Sales of existing homes slump in August at slowest pace in more than 5 years

    Mayor Pro Tem Greenwald or Mayor Pro
    Tem Saylor in 2008?

    Your choice WILL be important in these times.

  141. don shor

    “AB8, which was put together as a merged bill from both the Senate and the House is not something that the counties can support, because of its 7.5% employer contribution threshold. In effect, that would affect us, as we are the employer of record for in home support health services providers.”
    Which is precisely why small business owners strongly oppose single payer health care plans. Single payer would cost small businesses more than 7.5%.

  142. don shor

    “AB8, which was put together as a merged bill from both the Senate and the House is not something that the counties can support, because of its 7.5% employer contribution threshold. In effect, that would affect us, as we are the employer of record for in home support health services providers.”
    Which is precisely why small business owners strongly oppose single payer health care plans. Single payer would cost small businesses more than 7.5%.

  143. don shor

    “AB8, which was put together as a merged bill from both the Senate and the House is not something that the counties can support, because of its 7.5% employer contribution threshold. In effect, that would affect us, as we are the employer of record for in home support health services providers.”
    Which is precisely why small business owners strongly oppose single payer health care plans. Single payer would cost small businesses more than 7.5%.

  144. don shor

    “AB8, which was put together as a merged bill from both the Senate and the House is not something that the counties can support, because of its 7.5% employer contribution threshold. In effect, that would affect us, as we are the employer of record for in home support health services providers.”
    Which is precisely why small business owners strongly oppose single payer health care plans. Single payer would cost small businesses more than 7.5%.

  145. Anonymous

    Rich Rifkin wrote at 10/4/07 9:13 PM:

    “If half the kids who are now riding in cars walked or biked to school, we could substantially lower our carbon emissions in Davis. If all of them did, we could wipe out childhood obesity, end world hunger, cure cancer and solve the debt crisis.”

    The Woodland school district, like most school districts in the country, efficiently transports students to school and back home via school bus.
    All ironic kidding aside: isn’t that the point?

  146. Anonymous

    Rich Rifkin wrote at 10/4/07 9:13 PM:

    “If half the kids who are now riding in cars walked or biked to school, we could substantially lower our carbon emissions in Davis. If all of them did, we could wipe out childhood obesity, end world hunger, cure cancer and solve the debt crisis.”

    The Woodland school district, like most school districts in the country, efficiently transports students to school and back home via school bus.
    All ironic kidding aside: isn’t that the point?

  147. Anonymous

    Rich Rifkin wrote at 10/4/07 9:13 PM:

    “If half the kids who are now riding in cars walked or biked to school, we could substantially lower our carbon emissions in Davis. If all of them did, we could wipe out childhood obesity, end world hunger, cure cancer and solve the debt crisis.”

    The Woodland school district, like most school districts in the country, efficiently transports students to school and back home via school bus.
    All ironic kidding aside: isn’t that the point?

  148. Anonymous

    Rich Rifkin wrote at 10/4/07 9:13 PM:

    “If half the kids who are now riding in cars walked or biked to school, we could substantially lower our carbon emissions in Davis. If all of them did, we could wipe out childhood obesity, end world hunger, cure cancer and solve the debt crisis.”

    The Woodland school district, like most school districts in the country, efficiently transports students to school and back home via school bus.
    All ironic kidding aside: isn’t that the point?

  149. 無名 - wu ming

    that was not a particularly coherent set of answers. i think richard estes is ont something there.

    pity, i was hoping to be able to vote for someone, but from what i’ve read in these interviews, it looks like my primary vote will be another tactical lesser-of-two-mediocre choices sort of vote.

    oh, and while it’s tons of fun to repeat tired accusations about them hypocritical libruls, i see a ton of schoolchildren riding bikes and walking around my neighborhood on their way to patwin and emerson, and the parking lot tends towards the compact car/minivan/prium crowd more than the SUVs everyone loves to attribute to their enemies in the culture wars. granted, there used to be a lot more kids riding their bikes around here a decade or two ago, but that has more to do with the aging of neighborhoods (hallowe’en is pathetic around here these days) then dropping rates of biking to class.

  150. 無名 - wu ming

    that was not a particularly coherent set of answers. i think richard estes is ont something there.

    pity, i was hoping to be able to vote for someone, but from what i’ve read in these interviews, it looks like my primary vote will be another tactical lesser-of-two-mediocre choices sort of vote.

    oh, and while it’s tons of fun to repeat tired accusations about them hypocritical libruls, i see a ton of schoolchildren riding bikes and walking around my neighborhood on their way to patwin and emerson, and the parking lot tends towards the compact car/minivan/prium crowd more than the SUVs everyone loves to attribute to their enemies in the culture wars. granted, there used to be a lot more kids riding their bikes around here a decade or two ago, but that has more to do with the aging of neighborhoods (hallowe’en is pathetic around here these days) then dropping rates of biking to class.

  151. 無名 - wu ming

    that was not a particularly coherent set of answers. i think richard estes is ont something there.

    pity, i was hoping to be able to vote for someone, but from what i’ve read in these interviews, it looks like my primary vote will be another tactical lesser-of-two-mediocre choices sort of vote.

    oh, and while it’s tons of fun to repeat tired accusations about them hypocritical libruls, i see a ton of schoolchildren riding bikes and walking around my neighborhood on their way to patwin and emerson, and the parking lot tends towards the compact car/minivan/prium crowd more than the SUVs everyone loves to attribute to their enemies in the culture wars. granted, there used to be a lot more kids riding their bikes around here a decade or two ago, but that has more to do with the aging of neighborhoods (hallowe’en is pathetic around here these days) then dropping rates of biking to class.

  152. 無名 - wu ming

    that was not a particularly coherent set of answers. i think richard estes is ont something there.

    pity, i was hoping to be able to vote for someone, but from what i’ve read in these interviews, it looks like my primary vote will be another tactical lesser-of-two-mediocre choices sort of vote.

    oh, and while it’s tons of fun to repeat tired accusations about them hypocritical libruls, i see a ton of schoolchildren riding bikes and walking around my neighborhood on their way to patwin and emerson, and the parking lot tends towards the compact car/minivan/prium crowd more than the SUVs everyone loves to attribute to their enemies in the culture wars. granted, there used to be a lot more kids riding their bikes around here a decade or two ago, but that has more to do with the aging of neighborhoods (hallowe’en is pathetic around here these days) then dropping rates of biking to class.

  153. Anonymous

    thoroughly insulated from reality Wu Ming writes:

    it’s tons of fun to repeat tired accusations about them hypocritical libruls, i see a ton of schoolchildren…

    sheesh, wu, I guess you are tired of dealing with reality:
    School buses = less pollution, less gridlock.
    Wake up and smell the tons o’ SUV fumes, dude!
    School buses in Davis, how tacky?!

  154. Anonymous

    thoroughly insulated from reality Wu Ming writes:

    it’s tons of fun to repeat tired accusations about them hypocritical libruls, i see a ton of schoolchildren…

    sheesh, wu, I guess you are tired of dealing with reality:
    School buses = less pollution, less gridlock.
    Wake up and smell the tons o’ SUV fumes, dude!
    School buses in Davis, how tacky?!

  155. Anonymous

    thoroughly insulated from reality Wu Ming writes:

    it’s tons of fun to repeat tired accusations about them hypocritical libruls, i see a ton of schoolchildren…

    sheesh, wu, I guess you are tired of dealing with reality:
    School buses = less pollution, less gridlock.
    Wake up and smell the tons o’ SUV fumes, dude!
    School buses in Davis, how tacky?!

  156. Anonymous

    thoroughly insulated from reality Wu Ming writes:

    it’s tons of fun to repeat tired accusations about them hypocritical libruls, i see a ton of schoolchildren…

    sheesh, wu, I guess you are tired of dealing with reality:
    School buses = less pollution, less gridlock.
    Wake up and smell the tons o’ SUV fumes, dude!
    School buses in Davis, how tacky?!

  157. tansey thomas

    Any know the story of why Davis discontinued school buses? I seem to recall that it was decided that we couldn’t afford them. If that is true how is it that Woodland can?

  158. tansey thomas

    Any know the story of why Davis discontinued school buses? I seem to recall that it was decided that we couldn’t afford them. If that is true how is it that Woodland can?

  159. tansey thomas

    Any know the story of why Davis discontinued school buses? I seem to recall that it was decided that we couldn’t afford them. If that is true how is it that Woodland can?

  160. tansey thomas

    Any know the story of why Davis discontinued school buses? I seem to recall that it was decided that we couldn’t afford them. If that is true how is it that Woodland can?

  161. Anonymous

    Whatever happened to the Yamada/Cabaldon poll on this site? I may want to change my vote!

    The Yamada campaign is like the movie Dune – lots of hype, months of hope-filled anticipation, only to be left with a vast desert wasteland of dissapointment and few people in the seats.

    Is there anyone else?

    DPD, help me!

  162. Anonymous

    Whatever happened to the Yamada/Cabaldon poll on this site? I may want to change my vote!

    The Yamada campaign is like the movie Dune – lots of hype, months of hope-filled anticipation, only to be left with a vast desert wasteland of dissapointment and few people in the seats.

    Is there anyone else?

    DPD, help me!

  163. Anonymous

    Whatever happened to the Yamada/Cabaldon poll on this site? I may want to change my vote!

    The Yamada campaign is like the movie Dune – lots of hype, months of hope-filled anticipation, only to be left with a vast desert wasteland of dissapointment and few people in the seats.

    Is there anyone else?

    DPD, help me!

  164. Anonymous

    Whatever happened to the Yamada/Cabaldon poll on this site? I may want to change my vote!

    The Yamada campaign is like the movie Dune – lots of hype, months of hope-filled anticipation, only to be left with a vast desert wasteland of dissapointment and few people in the seats.

    Is there anyone else?

    DPD, help me!

  165. Anonymous

    Mayor Pro Tem Saylor? Please don’t make me sick.

    We can disagree with Sue, or anyone else, but to then say the alternative is Saylor? Open your eyes…you obviously have not been paying attention.

  166. Anonymous

    Mayor Pro Tem Saylor? Please don’t make me sick.

    We can disagree with Sue, or anyone else, but to then say the alternative is Saylor? Open your eyes…you obviously have not been paying attention.

  167. Anonymous

    Mayor Pro Tem Saylor? Please don’t make me sick.

    We can disagree with Sue, or anyone else, but to then say the alternative is Saylor? Open your eyes…you obviously have not been paying attention.

  168. Anonymous

    Mayor Pro Tem Saylor? Please don’t make me sick.

    We can disagree with Sue, or anyone else, but to then say the alternative is Saylor? Open your eyes…you obviously have not been paying attention.

  169. Anonymous

    Don Shor AB8 would cost small business 7.5%, and not more as you stated in your comment at 11:03 PM.

    Don Shor said:

    Which is precisely why small business owners strongly oppose single payer health care plans. Single payer would cost small businesses more than 7.5%.

    10/4/07 11:03 PM

    Below, is language taken directly from analysis of AB8. It comes from an Assembly analyst. It states that AB8 will cost small businesses 7.5 percent. Where do you get “more” from?

    Regarding AB8:

    EMPLOYERS: While most employers already provide coverage to their workers, all employers would have to contribute 7.5% of payroll to health care under AB8.

    For those that don’t provide coverage or provide minimal benefits, they would also have a new purchasing pool option to only pay 7.5% of payroll, and get the benefit of having all their workers covered. This is a significant, especially for low-wage and small employers, that would have to pay a much larger percentage of payroll to cover their workers, and is a reason they are more likely not to. Right now, most employers pay more than 7.5%.

    Like the minimum wage does for pay, this minimum employer contribution would set a standard that employers can’t go below, but that many do above, in order to attract and retain workers in the job market.

  170. Anonymous

    Don Shor AB8 would cost small business 7.5%, and not more as you stated in your comment at 11:03 PM.

    Don Shor said:

    Which is precisely why small business owners strongly oppose single payer health care plans. Single payer would cost small businesses more than 7.5%.

    10/4/07 11:03 PM

    Below, is language taken directly from analysis of AB8. It comes from an Assembly analyst. It states that AB8 will cost small businesses 7.5 percent. Where do you get “more” from?

    Regarding AB8:

    EMPLOYERS: While most employers already provide coverage to their workers, all employers would have to contribute 7.5% of payroll to health care under AB8.

    For those that don’t provide coverage or provide minimal benefits, they would also have a new purchasing pool option to only pay 7.5% of payroll, and get the benefit of having all their workers covered. This is a significant, especially for low-wage and small employers, that would have to pay a much larger percentage of payroll to cover their workers, and is a reason they are more likely not to. Right now, most employers pay more than 7.5%.

    Like the minimum wage does for pay, this minimum employer contribution would set a standard that employers can’t go below, but that many do above, in order to attract and retain workers in the job market.

  171. Anonymous

    Don Shor AB8 would cost small business 7.5%, and not more as you stated in your comment at 11:03 PM.

    Don Shor said:

    Which is precisely why small business owners strongly oppose single payer health care plans. Single payer would cost small businesses more than 7.5%.

    10/4/07 11:03 PM

    Below, is language taken directly from analysis of AB8. It comes from an Assembly analyst. It states that AB8 will cost small businesses 7.5 percent. Where do you get “more” from?

    Regarding AB8:

    EMPLOYERS: While most employers already provide coverage to their workers, all employers would have to contribute 7.5% of payroll to health care under AB8.

    For those that don’t provide coverage or provide minimal benefits, they would also have a new purchasing pool option to only pay 7.5% of payroll, and get the benefit of having all their workers covered. This is a significant, especially for low-wage and small employers, that would have to pay a much larger percentage of payroll to cover their workers, and is a reason they are more likely not to. Right now, most employers pay more than 7.5%.

    Like the minimum wage does for pay, this minimum employer contribution would set a standard that employers can’t go below, but that many do above, in order to attract and retain workers in the job market.

  172. Anonymous

    Don Shor AB8 would cost small business 7.5%, and not more as you stated in your comment at 11:03 PM.

    Don Shor said:

    Which is precisely why small business owners strongly oppose single payer health care plans. Single payer would cost small businesses more than 7.5%.

    10/4/07 11:03 PM

    Below, is language taken directly from analysis of AB8. It comes from an Assembly analyst. It states that AB8 will cost small businesses 7.5 percent. Where do you get “more” from?

    Regarding AB8:

    EMPLOYERS: While most employers already provide coverage to their workers, all employers would have to contribute 7.5% of payroll to health care under AB8.

    For those that don’t provide coverage or provide minimal benefits, they would also have a new purchasing pool option to only pay 7.5% of payroll, and get the benefit of having all their workers covered. This is a significant, especially for low-wage and small employers, that would have to pay a much larger percentage of payroll to cover their workers, and is a reason they are more likely not to. Right now, most employers pay more than 7.5%.

    Like the minimum wage does for pay, this minimum employer contribution would set a standard that employers can’t go below, but that many do above, in order to attract and retain workers in the job market.

  173. Anonymous

    Any know the story of why Davis discontinued school buses? I seem to recall that it was decided that we couldn’t afford them. If that is true how is it that Woodland can?

    Transportation funds are a state funded categorical program. If the district had buses when the categorical started, it gets funding for them now from the state. Districts that didn’t have buses at the time the categorical was instituted (and Davis didn’t, having eliminated them in what I’ve heard was a result of Prop 13 loss of funds) don’t get funds for buses.

  174. Anonymous

    Any know the story of why Davis discontinued school buses? I seem to recall that it was decided that we couldn’t afford them. If that is true how is it that Woodland can?

    Transportation funds are a state funded categorical program. If the district had buses when the categorical started, it gets funding for them now from the state. Districts that didn’t have buses at the time the categorical was instituted (and Davis didn’t, having eliminated them in what I’ve heard was a result of Prop 13 loss of funds) don’t get funds for buses.

  175. Anonymous

    Any know the story of why Davis discontinued school buses? I seem to recall that it was decided that we couldn’t afford them. If that is true how is it that Woodland can?

    Transportation funds are a state funded categorical program. If the district had buses when the categorical started, it gets funding for them now from the state. Districts that didn’t have buses at the time the categorical was instituted (and Davis didn’t, having eliminated them in what I’ve heard was a result of Prop 13 loss of funds) don’t get funds for buses.

  176. Anonymous

    Any know the story of why Davis discontinued school buses? I seem to recall that it was decided that we couldn’t afford them. If that is true how is it that Woodland can?

    Transportation funds are a state funded categorical program. If the district had buses when the categorical started, it gets funding for them now from the state. Districts that didn’t have buses at the time the categorical was instituted (and Davis didn’t, having eliminated them in what I’ve heard was a result of Prop 13 loss of funds) don’t get funds for buses.

  177. Doug Paul Davis

    Don:

    I understand your concerns along with other small businesses about single payer. But it does make me wonder what the true costs now of not having single payer are. If you look at the costs to the City of Davis example just in terms of health insurance you begin to get a handle on the magnitude of the costs. Then expand that out to all the businesses having to pay for inefficient and inflated health insurance and figure out the multiplier effect. If we had a good way to estimate the average cost to people for the current health system, I think a lot of those qualms by business might, and I repeat might, go away.

  178. Doug Paul Davis

    Don:

    I understand your concerns along with other small businesses about single payer. But it does make me wonder what the true costs now of not having single payer are. If you look at the costs to the City of Davis example just in terms of health insurance you begin to get a handle on the magnitude of the costs. Then expand that out to all the businesses having to pay for inefficient and inflated health insurance and figure out the multiplier effect. If we had a good way to estimate the average cost to people for the current health system, I think a lot of those qualms by business might, and I repeat might, go away.

  179. Doug Paul Davis

    Don:

    I understand your concerns along with other small businesses about single payer. But it does make me wonder what the true costs now of not having single payer are. If you look at the costs to the City of Davis example just in terms of health insurance you begin to get a handle on the magnitude of the costs. Then expand that out to all the businesses having to pay for inefficient and inflated health insurance and figure out the multiplier effect. If we had a good way to estimate the average cost to people for the current health system, I think a lot of those qualms by business might, and I repeat might, go away.

  180. Doug Paul Davis

    Don:

    I understand your concerns along with other small businesses about single payer. But it does make me wonder what the true costs now of not having single payer are. If you look at the costs to the City of Davis example just in terms of health insurance you begin to get a handle on the magnitude of the costs. Then expand that out to all the businesses having to pay for inefficient and inflated health insurance and figure out the multiplier effect. If we had a good way to estimate the average cost to people for the current health system, I think a lot of those qualms by business might, and I repeat might, go away.

  181. 無名 - wu ming

    how is stating what i observe in my neighborhood a disconnect with reality, exactly? i would be all for reinstating schoolbuses again, and agree that buses are far more efficient than private cars in terms of energy, pollution, etc.

    but kids are still walking and riding to school in my neighborhood, and no amount of tired jokes about liberals driving SUVs really negates that. perhaps not as many as we could or ought to have (and certainly much less once the wind and rain of winter set in), but this “kids are lazy and no longer ride bikes” rhetoric just doesn’t match up with what i’m actually seeing. in the winter, when i’m riding UNITRANS, i have noticed some kids riding the bus to and from school; might we be missing this in our discussion as well?

    additionally, i wonder how many of those complaining about bike riding rates ride bikes to work or take the bus themselves.

  182. 無名 - wu ming

    how is stating what i observe in my neighborhood a disconnect with reality, exactly? i would be all for reinstating schoolbuses again, and agree that buses are far more efficient than private cars in terms of energy, pollution, etc.

    but kids are still walking and riding to school in my neighborhood, and no amount of tired jokes about liberals driving SUVs really negates that. perhaps not as many as we could or ought to have (and certainly much less once the wind and rain of winter set in), but this “kids are lazy and no longer ride bikes” rhetoric just doesn’t match up with what i’m actually seeing. in the winter, when i’m riding UNITRANS, i have noticed some kids riding the bus to and from school; might we be missing this in our discussion as well?

    additionally, i wonder how many of those complaining about bike riding rates ride bikes to work or take the bus themselves.

  183. 無名 - wu ming

    how is stating what i observe in my neighborhood a disconnect with reality, exactly? i would be all for reinstating schoolbuses again, and agree that buses are far more efficient than private cars in terms of energy, pollution, etc.

    but kids are still walking and riding to school in my neighborhood, and no amount of tired jokes about liberals driving SUVs really negates that. perhaps not as many as we could or ought to have (and certainly much less once the wind and rain of winter set in), but this “kids are lazy and no longer ride bikes” rhetoric just doesn’t match up with what i’m actually seeing. in the winter, when i’m riding UNITRANS, i have noticed some kids riding the bus to and from school; might we be missing this in our discussion as well?

    additionally, i wonder how many of those complaining about bike riding rates ride bikes to work or take the bus themselves.

  184. 無名 - wu ming

    how is stating what i observe in my neighborhood a disconnect with reality, exactly? i would be all for reinstating schoolbuses again, and agree that buses are far more efficient than private cars in terms of energy, pollution, etc.

    but kids are still walking and riding to school in my neighborhood, and no amount of tired jokes about liberals driving SUVs really negates that. perhaps not as many as we could or ought to have (and certainly much less once the wind and rain of winter set in), but this “kids are lazy and no longer ride bikes” rhetoric just doesn’t match up with what i’m actually seeing. in the winter, when i’m riding UNITRANS, i have noticed some kids riding the bus to and from school; might we be missing this in our discussion as well?

    additionally, i wonder how many of those complaining about bike riding rates ride bikes to work or take the bus themselves.

  185. don shor

    ” Anonymous said…

    Don Shor AB8 would cost small business 7.5%, and not more as you stated in your comment at 11:03 PM.”

    Sorry, I didn’t make myself clear. AB8 is not single-payer. And at least in the version I last saw, it excluded the smallest businesses. You are correct that it would cost businesses 7.5%.

    Kuehl’s plan, SB840, is single-payer. She has not identified the exact cost to businesses, but in one version of the accompanying tax legislation which I saw a couple of months ago (which is no longer on her web site) it would funded by an employer tax of 8.5%. That would apply to all employers.

    DPD wrote:
    “Then expand that out to all the businesses having to pay for inefficient and inflated health insurance and figure out the multiplier effect.”

    40% or so of the uninsured are people who work for small businesses (and those who own the businesses, in many cases). These businesses do not presently pay anything for health insurance. So AB8 would be an immediate 7.5% tax on those business payrolls, except that it excludes businesses with payrolls under $100,000.
    SB840 would be an immediate 8.5%+ tax on those business payrolls regardless of their size. It would be a disaster for the smallest businesses. Bear in mind that payroll is nearly always the largest expense of any small business.

    This is somewhat moot to this thread, since both Yamada and Cabaldon are on record as favoring single-payer. As such, neither candidate is great for small businesses.

  186. don shor

    ” Anonymous said…

    Don Shor AB8 would cost small business 7.5%, and not more as you stated in your comment at 11:03 PM.”

    Sorry, I didn’t make myself clear. AB8 is not single-payer. And at least in the version I last saw, it excluded the smallest businesses. You are correct that it would cost businesses 7.5%.

    Kuehl’s plan, SB840, is single-payer. She has not identified the exact cost to businesses, but in one version of the accompanying tax legislation which I saw a couple of months ago (which is no longer on her web site) it would funded by an employer tax of 8.5%. That would apply to all employers.

    DPD wrote:
    “Then expand that out to all the businesses having to pay for inefficient and inflated health insurance and figure out the multiplier effect.”

    40% or so of the uninsured are people who work for small businesses (and those who own the businesses, in many cases). These businesses do not presently pay anything for health insurance. So AB8 would be an immediate 7.5% tax on those business payrolls, except that it excludes businesses with payrolls under $100,000.
    SB840 would be an immediate 8.5%+ tax on those business payrolls regardless of their size. It would be a disaster for the smallest businesses. Bear in mind that payroll is nearly always the largest expense of any small business.

    This is somewhat moot to this thread, since both Yamada and Cabaldon are on record as favoring single-payer. As such, neither candidate is great for small businesses.

  187. don shor

    ” Anonymous said…

    Don Shor AB8 would cost small business 7.5%, and not more as you stated in your comment at 11:03 PM.”

    Sorry, I didn’t make myself clear. AB8 is not single-payer. And at least in the version I last saw, it excluded the smallest businesses. You are correct that it would cost businesses 7.5%.

    Kuehl’s plan, SB840, is single-payer. She has not identified the exact cost to businesses, but in one version of the accompanying tax legislation which I saw a couple of months ago (which is no longer on her web site) it would funded by an employer tax of 8.5%. That would apply to all employers.

    DPD wrote:
    “Then expand that out to all the businesses having to pay for inefficient and inflated health insurance and figure out the multiplier effect.”

    40% or so of the uninsured are people who work for small businesses (and those who own the businesses, in many cases). These businesses do not presently pay anything for health insurance. So AB8 would be an immediate 7.5% tax on those business payrolls, except that it excludes businesses with payrolls under $100,000.
    SB840 would be an immediate 8.5%+ tax on those business payrolls regardless of their size. It would be a disaster for the smallest businesses. Bear in mind that payroll is nearly always the largest expense of any small business.

    This is somewhat moot to this thread, since both Yamada and Cabaldon are on record as favoring single-payer. As such, neither candidate is great for small businesses.

  188. don shor

    ” Anonymous said…

    Don Shor AB8 would cost small business 7.5%, and not more as you stated in your comment at 11:03 PM.”

    Sorry, I didn’t make myself clear. AB8 is not single-payer. And at least in the version I last saw, it excluded the smallest businesses. You are correct that it would cost businesses 7.5%.

    Kuehl’s plan, SB840, is single-payer. She has not identified the exact cost to businesses, but in one version of the accompanying tax legislation which I saw a couple of months ago (which is no longer on her web site) it would funded by an employer tax of 8.5%. That would apply to all employers.

    DPD wrote:
    “Then expand that out to all the businesses having to pay for inefficient and inflated health insurance and figure out the multiplier effect.”

    40% or so of the uninsured are people who work for small businesses (and those who own the businesses, in many cases). These businesses do not presently pay anything for health insurance. So AB8 would be an immediate 7.5% tax on those business payrolls, except that it excludes businesses with payrolls under $100,000.
    SB840 would be an immediate 8.5%+ tax on those business payrolls regardless of their size. It would be a disaster for the smallest businesses. Bear in mind that payroll is nearly always the largest expense of any small business.

    This is somewhat moot to this thread, since both Yamada and Cabaldon are on record as favoring single-payer. As such, neither candidate is great for small businesses.

  189. Rich Rifkin

    “Sad to say that there are too many perverts around and children cannot walk, run and play freely the way most adults did when they were young.”

    Not that facts really matter in these discussions, but the crime rate in California (including all violent and sex crimes and crimes against children) is a bit lower now than it was in 1975. What has changed is the perception of the crime rate. That is much higher. And that, I believe, is the fault of TV news, which focuses so exhaustively on things like “too many perverts around and children cannot walk, run and play freely.”

    I’m not saying that there are not dangers out there. It’s just that there always have been — we just are so much more paranoid than we ever were in the past.

  190. Rich Rifkin

    “Sad to say that there are too many perverts around and children cannot walk, run and play freely the way most adults did when they were young.”

    Not that facts really matter in these discussions, but the crime rate in California (including all violent and sex crimes and crimes against children) is a bit lower now than it was in 1975. What has changed is the perception of the crime rate. That is much higher. And that, I believe, is the fault of TV news, which focuses so exhaustively on things like “too many perverts around and children cannot walk, run and play freely.”

    I’m not saying that there are not dangers out there. It’s just that there always have been — we just are so much more paranoid than we ever were in the past.

  191. Rich Rifkin

    “Sad to say that there are too many perverts around and children cannot walk, run and play freely the way most adults did when they were young.”

    Not that facts really matter in these discussions, but the crime rate in California (including all violent and sex crimes and crimes against children) is a bit lower now than it was in 1975. What has changed is the perception of the crime rate. That is much higher. And that, I believe, is the fault of TV news, which focuses so exhaustively on things like “too many perverts around and children cannot walk, run and play freely.”

    I’m not saying that there are not dangers out there. It’s just that there always have been — we just are so much more paranoid than we ever were in the past.

  192. Rich Rifkin

    “Sad to say that there are too many perverts around and children cannot walk, run and play freely the way most adults did when they were young.”

    Not that facts really matter in these discussions, but the crime rate in California (including all violent and sex crimes and crimes against children) is a bit lower now than it was in 1975. What has changed is the perception of the crime rate. That is much higher. And that, I believe, is the fault of TV news, which focuses so exhaustively on things like “too many perverts around and children cannot walk, run and play freely.”

    I’m not saying that there are not dangers out there. It’s just that there always have been — we just are so much more paranoid than we ever were in the past.

  193. Vincente

    Rich:

    I would suggest that that is a spurious use of statistics. One possible explanation for the reduced rate of crime against children is not that they are more safe but rather that people have taken greater precautions to ensure their children’s safety. In other words, fewer opportunities for people to abduct and otherwise hurt children than in the 1970s because parents are less likely to allow them into situations where they are at personal risk.

  194. Vincente

    Rich:

    I would suggest that that is a spurious use of statistics. One possible explanation for the reduced rate of crime against children is not that they are more safe but rather that people have taken greater precautions to ensure their children’s safety. In other words, fewer opportunities for people to abduct and otherwise hurt children than in the 1970s because parents are less likely to allow them into situations where they are at personal risk.

  195. Vincente

    Rich:

    I would suggest that that is a spurious use of statistics. One possible explanation for the reduced rate of crime against children is not that they are more safe but rather that people have taken greater precautions to ensure their children’s safety. In other words, fewer opportunities for people to abduct and otherwise hurt children than in the 1970s because parents are less likely to allow them into situations where they are at personal risk.

  196. Vincente

    Rich:

    I would suggest that that is a spurious use of statistics. One possible explanation for the reduced rate of crime against children is not that they are more safe but rather that people have taken greater precautions to ensure their children’s safety. In other words, fewer opportunities for people to abduct and otherwise hurt children than in the 1970s because parents are less likely to allow them into situations where they are at personal risk.

  197. Rich Rifkin

    Vincente,

    What you say makes a little teeny bit of sense. However, crimes against children over the last 40 years have closely paralleled the overall crime rate. They have not declined at a greater rate since all of this awareness about perverts came about. When crime rates peaked in the early-mid ’90s, crimes against children peaked, too. And since the crime rate has fallen (pretty steeply) since then, the crime rate against kids has likewise fallen (admittedly, it has fallen a bit more steeply than the overall crime rate).

    What needs to be emphasized, however, is how extraordinarily rare certain crimes are, yet get so much attention that they seem to most people to be a great possible hazard. For example, in our country of 300 million people, there are usually around 100 stranger abductions of children in the United States each year. But when these cases occur, each one (usually) gets a tremendous amount of press. So families in every community are constantly on guard against strangers who might be trying to abduct their kids, despite the fact that the odds of such a crime occuring to them are terribly remote.

    By contrast, little focus is given to the increasing number of morons who won’t vaccinate their children (due to misinformation by other idiots). Lack of flu vaccine, for example, is very very dangerous. I recall reading a few years ago that close to 200 American children under age 5 who were not vaccinated died from influenza that year, and every one of these deaths was preventable. I would imagine that a far larger number actually got a serious case of the flu, and had to suffer the effects. (Obviously, for little kids and really old people, the flu is a dangerous illness.)

  198. Rich Rifkin

    Vincente,

    What you say makes a little teeny bit of sense. However, crimes against children over the last 40 years have closely paralleled the overall crime rate. They have not declined at a greater rate since all of this awareness about perverts came about. When crime rates peaked in the early-mid ’90s, crimes against children peaked, too. And since the crime rate has fallen (pretty steeply) since then, the crime rate against kids has likewise fallen (admittedly, it has fallen a bit more steeply than the overall crime rate).

    What needs to be emphasized, however, is how extraordinarily rare certain crimes are, yet get so much attention that they seem to most people to be a great possible hazard. For example, in our country of 300 million people, there are usually around 100 stranger abductions of children in the United States each year. But when these cases occur, each one (usually) gets a tremendous amount of press. So families in every community are constantly on guard against strangers who might be trying to abduct their kids, despite the fact that the odds of such a crime occuring to them are terribly remote.

    By contrast, little focus is given to the increasing number of morons who won’t vaccinate their children (due to misinformation by other idiots). Lack of flu vaccine, for example, is very very dangerous. I recall reading a few years ago that close to 200 American children under age 5 who were not vaccinated died from influenza that year, and every one of these deaths was preventable. I would imagine that a far larger number actually got a serious case of the flu, and had to suffer the effects. (Obviously, for little kids and really old people, the flu is a dangerous illness.)

  199. Rich Rifkin

    Vincente,

    What you say makes a little teeny bit of sense. However, crimes against children over the last 40 years have closely paralleled the overall crime rate. They have not declined at a greater rate since all of this awareness about perverts came about. When crime rates peaked in the early-mid ’90s, crimes against children peaked, too. And since the crime rate has fallen (pretty steeply) since then, the crime rate against kids has likewise fallen (admittedly, it has fallen a bit more steeply than the overall crime rate).

    What needs to be emphasized, however, is how extraordinarily rare certain crimes are, yet get so much attention that they seem to most people to be a great possible hazard. For example, in our country of 300 million people, there are usually around 100 stranger abductions of children in the United States each year. But when these cases occur, each one (usually) gets a tremendous amount of press. So families in every community are constantly on guard against strangers who might be trying to abduct their kids, despite the fact that the odds of such a crime occuring to them are terribly remote.

    By contrast, little focus is given to the increasing number of morons who won’t vaccinate their children (due to misinformation by other idiots). Lack of flu vaccine, for example, is very very dangerous. I recall reading a few years ago that close to 200 American children under age 5 who were not vaccinated died from influenza that year, and every one of these deaths was preventable. I would imagine that a far larger number actually got a serious case of the flu, and had to suffer the effects. (Obviously, for little kids and really old people, the flu is a dangerous illness.)

  200. Rich Rifkin

    Vincente,

    What you say makes a little teeny bit of sense. However, crimes against children over the last 40 years have closely paralleled the overall crime rate. They have not declined at a greater rate since all of this awareness about perverts came about. When crime rates peaked in the early-mid ’90s, crimes against children peaked, too. And since the crime rate has fallen (pretty steeply) since then, the crime rate against kids has likewise fallen (admittedly, it has fallen a bit more steeply than the overall crime rate).

    What needs to be emphasized, however, is how extraordinarily rare certain crimes are, yet get so much attention that they seem to most people to be a great possible hazard. For example, in our country of 300 million people, there are usually around 100 stranger abductions of children in the United States each year. But when these cases occur, each one (usually) gets a tremendous amount of press. So families in every community are constantly on guard against strangers who might be trying to abduct their kids, despite the fact that the odds of such a crime occuring to them are terribly remote.

    By contrast, little focus is given to the increasing number of morons who won’t vaccinate their children (due to misinformation by other idiots). Lack of flu vaccine, for example, is very very dangerous. I recall reading a few years ago that close to 200 American children under age 5 who were not vaccinated died from influenza that year, and every one of these deaths was preventable. I would imagine that a far larger number actually got a serious case of the flu, and had to suffer the effects. (Obviously, for little kids and really old people, the flu is a dangerous illness.)

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